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 A Vintage Recipe
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play dough
From The Collectors Newsletter #465 October 2006 (10-12-2006)

We did not get any responses to last week request, so here are some


If you have a variation of these recipes that you would like to share with our
readers, send them to us at recipes@tias.com
Be sure to also check out this weeks recipe request, below.
--
This is not a request, only a comment. Several requests have come from readers
looking for recipes that came from school cafeterias. Today kids gripe about school
food, and it seems to me that standardization has taken all the fun out of school
cooking! Barb Russel, Chesapeake VA
--


More Maple Syrup candy
My mother's family is from Vermont and New Hampshire by way of Quebec. The
maple syrup they made helped provide a few pennies here and there throught the
depression. Of course, Mom knows the maple snow candy recipe, and told me
the name they called in in French, which sounds something like La Tiere. Anyone
know the right word?


We used to make it when I was a kid, and I have made if for my own children, too.


To make it boil REAL maple syrup until reduced in volume by about half; this can
take a while. You don't have to stir, but do not leave the pot unattended.. I always
add a pat of butter to the pan to prevent boil-over; when they make syrup from sap,
they use cream for the same purpose. It also adds to the flavor.


While you are boiling the syrup, send the kids out to prepare the snow. They
should flatten it out and pack it lightly, not too hard. Or, they can fill a lasagna
pan with packed snow to bring in when the syrup is done. In any case, the snow
needs to be ready before the syrup!


Take the pot of VERY HOT syrup and pour it in little squiggles over the snow.
It will harden immediately. You can remove the hardened pieces to a chilled
plate to make room for more if you want.


Be careful with this candy if you have loose fillings or bridgework!
Soak the pot in hot soapy water to remove the remaining goo.


--Another Recipe--


I have a sugar cookie recipe that I get raves on each time I serve them. It is from
the Meta Given's Modern Encyclopedia of Cooking.


Basic Sugar Cookies


2-1/2 c flour 1-1/3 c sugar
1/2 tsp soda 1/2 tsp vanilla
1 tsp cream of tartar 1/2 tsp lemon extract
1/4 tsp salt 2 eggs
1/2 c soft butter 1 to 2 tbls milk
1/3 c shortening Raisins or nuts, if desired


Grease baking sheets lightly. Start oven 10 minutes before baking; set to 425
degrees. Sift flour, measure, resift 5 times with the next three ingredients.
Cream butter and shortening until shiny, then add sugar gradually and cream well.
Stir in flavorings, then beat in eggs until fluffy. Add flour in 2 or 3 portions, mixing
until smooth after each portion. Stir in milk. Cover bowl and place in refrigerator
to chill one hour. Remove 1/3 of the dough at a time (keep rest chilled) . Roll
out on a lightly floured pastry cloth with floured rolling pin to a thickness between
1/8 and 1/4 inch. Cut out as close together as possible. Place on prepared
baking sheet. Leave plain or sprinkle with sugar, or press a raisin or nut lightly
into the center of the cookies. Brush with egg white beaten slightly with 1 tsp
of water, if desired. Re-roll leftover dough. Bake 8 to 10 mnutes, then remove to
racks to cool. Makes 5 dozen 2-1/4 inch cookies. Connie F.
--
Did you know TIAS merchants have over 1000 vintage
cookbooks for sale online? They make great gifts. Take a
http://www.tias.com/cookbooks


Vintage Kitchen items are practical and collectible. We've
http://www.tias.com/kitchen

 


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