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(1822-89) Graduated in the celebrated West Point class of 1846. During the Mexican War he served as a lieutenant of dragoons and was captured and held prisoner for eight days while making a reconnaissance near Buena Vista. After the Mexican War he took part in a number of Indian campaigns out west. At the start of the Civil War he was in command at Fort Smith, Arkansas. Many of his officers defected to the Confederacy; however Sturgis refused to surrender and managed to march his troops with much of the government property to Fort Leavenworth. Taking part in the battle of Wilson's Creek, Mo., in August 1861; he succeeded to command of the Union forces after the death of General Nathaniel Lyon. Sturgis was promoted to brigadier general to rank from Aug. 10, 1861. Sent east, he was ordered to support General John Pope's Army of Virginia at the 2nd battle of Bull Run, and during the campaign he made the now famous quote, "I don't care for John Pope one pinch of owl dung!" He fought in the Antietam campaign where one of the brigades in his division carried Burnside's Bridge. During the battle of Fredericksburg, he commanded a division of the 9th Corps. In 1863, he went west with the 9th corps serving in Tennessee and Mississippi, and then served as chief of cavalry of the Department of the Ohio. In June 1864, he was routed by General Nathan Bedford Forrest at the battle of Brice's Cross Roads, Miss. He remained in the army after the Civil War, and on May 6, 1869, he became colonel of the celebrated 7th Cavalry, whose lieutenant colonel was George A. Custer.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform. Backmark: R.W. Addis, Photographer, McClees Gallery, 308 Penna. Avenue, Washington, D.C. Scarce.  


8 1/4 x 4 1/2, imprinted form, printed on brown necessity paper, filled out in ink. Confederate era freight bill, South Carolina Railroad, dated Nov. 17, 1864, Blackville Depot, shipping two bags of grain to Columbia Depot to be transferred to the Greenville & Charleston R.R., at a freight cost of $2.00. Shipped by Nancy E. James of Greenville, S.C., who had sons who fought in the Confederate Army. Light age toning and wear. Fine Confederate era railroad document.  Photographed here with a quarter for size comparison, this attractive hand engraved bracelet tests as 10K gold and sports a patriotic shield over a fine and barely visible script engraved <I>N.A.G.</I> monogram.  A rose appears on either side of this center design.  All in nice original condition with a pleasing period charm.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Our illustrations will do best to describe this attractive antique pottery ink bottle.  Photographed here with a quarter for size comparison, the slightly ink stained <B>E. S. CURTIS</B> label (see: Boston Civil War Directories) will set this item off nicely in any Civil War era writing instrument or personal item collection. Another one of those common to the period items of every day 19th century life that seldom survived to reach the modern day historian. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

CDV General Samuel D. Sturgis $150.00

 

1864 Confederate South Carolina Railroad $50.00

 

Civil War era 10k GOLD PATRIOTIC BRACELE $165.00

 

Civil War vintage POTTERY INK

Worth a close look if you are one of those collectors who is especially drawn to original period material that remains in fine nearly <I>as new</I> condition.  With the exception of a nice honest soft age patina to its classic unfinished birch wood body and that distinctive look that the old mercury backed mirrors offer, time has been most kind to this Civil War folding shaving mirror.  A wonderful companion piece if you have an especially nice razor or tin shaving cup. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I> All direct sales are backed by </I> <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased !</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item is being returned per these previsions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 Illustrated here with a quarter as size comparison, our photos should do best to describe this nice antique militia plate except to advise that  this specific piece emanated from the collection of Dr. Francis Lord and is published Vol. II p. 89 of his classic reference <I>Lord’s CIVIL WAR COLLECTORS ENCYCLOPEDIA</I>.   We acquired this piece several years ago when we were fortunate enough to purchase several groupings from the personal collection of our longtime friend, Dr. Francis Lord.  A pioneer Civil War collector from a day when nearly no one else paid much attention to the details of many now valued Civil War collectable categories, Francis authored the  widely known, multi volume, pioneer reference,  <I>Lord’s CIVIL WAR COLLECTORS ENCYCLOPEDIA</I>.  While a lot of detailed knowledge has been gained as the interest and <U>value</U> of Civil War collectables increased so dramatically over the years, Dr. Lord’s first and second volumes in particular and his <I>Civil War Sutlers & Their Wares</I> continue to offer valuable and reliable reference to Civil War collectors.  (Use <I>Lord</I> in our search feature to find other Lord collection items.) Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Maker marked <B>H. FILLEY & SONS / PHILADA</B> is made from a pewter-like alloy frequently referred to as <I>Britannia</I>.   In eye appealing condition with good evidence of age and period use yet remaining solid without objectionable issues that frequently accompany these soft alloy drinking cups.  Measuring roughly 3 inches high when extender for use the cup is approximately 2 ½ inches in diameter at the mouth.  A nice antique personal item without spending a lot of money.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  


Unused, patriotic envelope with comical spoof theme on Confederate President Jeff Davis. Hand colored vignette of figure representing Jeff Davis in uniform with the slogan above, Jeff Davis Going To War.  When you turn the cover upside down the illustration turns to the head of a jackass with the slogan above, Jeff Returning From War. 1861 imprint of E. Rogers, Pennsylvania.

Civil War vintage Antique Traveling Shav $155.00

 

Lord collection Maryland Militia SHAKO H $165.00

 

Civil War vintage - Philadelphia maker m $95.00

 

Patriotic Cover, Jeff Davis Going & Retu




<b>Anti Slavery and Abolitionist Newspaper!


Announcement of President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation!</b>


Our Country is the World, our Countrymen are all Mankind


William Lloyd Garrison, Editor


4 pages. Large slave related vignette above the banner. Has the mottos, Come To Break The Bonds Of The Oppressor, and Thou Shall Love Thy Neighbor As Thy Self.


PROCLAMATION OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN. Proclaim Liberty throughout all the land, to all the inhabitants thereof. The Hour of Deliverance. Freedom For The Slaves. The Two Proclamations. The Proclamation; How to Make it Efficient. Address of Wendell Holmes. The Policy of a Negro Army For The North. Desperate and Prolonged Conflicts at Murfreesboro and Vicksburg. Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Anti Slavery Society. Proclamation Day in Boston. One Honest Abolitionist. General Benjamin Butler's Farewell to the People of New Orleans. Farewell Address of General Butler to His Troops. Right of Secession. Slave Songs. John Brown's Avenger. Abraham Lincoln. Chronology of the War. The Late Rupture of the Cabinet. Conciliation in North Carolina, and more. Extremely desirable issue regarding President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation and the freeing of the slaves.  


Light age toning and wear, and a few edge chips and tears. Ink borders have been drawn to highlight the President Lincoln Proclamation story.   


<b>With locks of his hair and remnants of a Civil War flag</b>


Ninth plate tinype of a Civil War boy soldier in uniform wearing kepi. Several locks of his hair have been glued to the tintype across his chest. Comes in full leather covered case with brass hook and latch, purple velvet liner, brass mat, preserver and glass. Found inside of the case were red, white and blue remnants of a Civil War flag. The tintype has been trimmed. Subject lacks contrast with the background. A tent and flag on pole can be seen in the backdrop.   


 


<b>Rare pose!</b>


(1816-1870) Graduated in the West Point class of 1840. Brevetted for gallantry in the Mexican War. One of the ablest Union commanders during the Civil War, he saw action at Mill Springs, Shiloh, Corinth, Perryville, Stone's River, Franklin & Nashville. However, his finest moment probably came during the battle of Chickamauga. His heroic stand on Horseshoe Ridge earned him the sobriquet of "The Rock of Chickamauga."


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Excellent half view pose in uniform with rank of brigadier general. George Thomas, Comdg. 14th A.[rmy] C.[orps] is written in period ink on the front mount. No imprint. Light wear. Rare pose.  


A History of the Kentucky Lincolns. By Louis A. Warren. The Century Company, New York, 1926. Hardcover, burgundy cloth with gold gilt stamped front cover and spine. 392 pages, index, illustrated. Some wear to inner boards at the spine. The pages are tight and clean. Fine copy.

The Liberator, Boston, January 9, 1863 $125.00

 

Tintype of Civl War Boy Soldier

 

CDV General George H. Thomas

 

Lincoln's Parentage and Childhood $50.00




<b>Killed in action at the battle of Franklin, Tennessee


Extremely rare signature!</b>


(1831-64) Born in Copiah County, Mississippi, he was educated at Oakland College, in Rodney, Miss. He moved to Texas in the early 1850's establishing himself at Waco, studied the law, was admitted to the bar, and served as chief justice of McLennan County from 1856-58. He recruited the Waco Guards in 1861, and was elected major of the 7th Texas Infantry in October of that year. He was captured at Fort Donelson, Tenn., and after his exchange he was promoted to colonel of the 7th Texas Infantry. He served with his regiment in Mississippi with General Joseph E. Johnston's Army of Tennessee during the Vicksburg campaign, and then led them in the battles of Raymond and Jackson. Granbury fought in the battle of Chickamauga where he was wounded, and then participated in the siege of Chattanooga, and the battle of Missionary Ridge. When Brigadier General James Argyle Smith was wounded at Chattanooga, Granbury led the brigade in the retreat from Chattanooga. Division commander, Major General Patrick R. Cleburne, commended Colonel Granbury for his handling of the brigade, and on February 29, 1864, he was promoted to brigadier general. He then led the Texas brigade throughout the Atlanta campaign. His brigade was composed of eight under strength Texas regiments, including the 7th Texas. He fought with particular distinction at the battle of New Hope Church. At the battle of Franklin, Tenn., on November 30, 1864, General John Bell Hood ordered 18 brigades to make numerous, hopeless, frontal assaults against well fortified Union positions occupied by forces under the command of Major General John M. Schofield. Grandbury's brigade charged the center of the Federal breastworks and he was killed near the Union lines along with Major General Patrick R. Cleburne. 


<u>Signature</u>: 2 1/2 x 1, in ink, H.B. Granbury. Very fine. Extremely rare.  


(1828-79) He fought in the Mexican War as a member of the 3rd Indiana Infantry. In April 1861 he was a member of the garrison at Fort Sumter when the opening shots of the Civil War were fired. With rank of brigadier general, he commanded a division at the battle of Pea Ridge in March 1862, and at the siege of Corinth. On Sept. 29, 1862, he provoked a quarrel with his ex-commanding officer, General William Nelson, and shot him to death in the lobby of the Galt House in Louisville, Ky. Davis went on to distinguish himself as a division commander at Murfreesboro, Chickamauga and in the Atlanta campaign and as commander of the 14th Corps in Sherman's March to the Sea, and the Carolina campaign.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Period ink inscription on the front mount, Brig. Gen. Jeff C. Davis, Commanding 1st Division, 20th A.C., Army of the Cumberland, August 1863. Light age toning and wear. No imprint. Uncommon.  


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient</b>


(1831-1906) Graduated in the West Point class of 1853. At the start of the Civil War, he was major of the 1st Missouri Infantry, and chief of staff to Gen. Nathaniel Lyon at the battle of Wilson's Creek where he served gallantly later being awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions. On Nov. 21, 1861, he was appointed brigadier general of volunteers and charged with the command of all Union militia regiments in the state of Missouri. From Oct. 1862 to April 1863, he commanded the Army of the Frontier. He commanded a division of the 14th Corps in Tennessee from May 1863 until January 1864. He fought in the Atlanta campaign in command of the Army of the Ohio. He inflicted a bloody and crippling repulse on Gen. John Bell Hood at Franklin, and again virtually destroyed Hood at Nashville. He then participated with Gen. W.T. Sherman in the Carolina campaign which terminated with the surrender of Gen. J.E. Johnston.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: The Addis Gallery, Washington, D.C. Light age toning. Very fine.  


<b>Killed in action at Petersburg, Va. in 1865</b>


(1847-1865) A.P. Hill graduated in the West Point class of 1847, and served in the Mexican & Seminole Wars. He was Colonel of the 13th Virginia Infantry in 1861. Appointed brigadier general on February 26, 1862; Hill distinguished himself at Williamsburg, and in the Peninsular campaign; during the 7 Days battles his command was a tower of strength; he fought at Cedar Mountain; Sharpsburg; Fredericksburg; Chancellorsville; Gettysburg; the Wilderness; Petersburg; and Cold Harbor. He was killed on April 2, 1865, during the fall of Petersburg, Va. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Chest up view in Confederate uniform. No imprint. Light age toning. Very fine.

Autograph, General Hiram B. Granbury $1250.00

 

CDV General Jefferson C. Davis $125.00

 

CDV General John M. Schofield $125.00

 

CDV General Ambrose Powell Hill




Unused, 3 1/2 x 5 1/2 linen postcard, with full color illustration. Dress of Mary Todd Lincoln, U.S. National Museum, Smithsonian Institution. Excellent item related to the First Lady, Mrs. Abraham Lincoln.  


<b>Killed in the Atlanta campaign!</b>


(1828-64) Graduated #1 in the West Point class of 1853, a class which included Philip H. Sheridan and John Bell Hood. Eleven years after their graduation, now Confederate general Hood opposed McPherson before Atlanta, and Hood's battle order would result in the death of his old classmate. By the fall of 1862, McPherson had risen to rank of major general. He saw service at Forts Henry and Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth and Vicksburg. On March 26, 1864, he was given command of the Army of the Tennessee which he led in the subsequent campaign in northern Georgia. McPherson was killed before Atlanta on July 22, 1864. General William T. Sherman's tears rolled through his beard and down on the floor when he viewed the dead body of his friend laid upon a door torn from its hinges and improvised as a bier.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of major general. No imprint. Light age toning and wear. Sharp image. Very desirable pose.  

 


(1819-98) Graduated #5 in the West Point class of 1842. Known as "Old Rosy," he was promoted to rank of brigadier general in 1861. He commanded a brigade under McClellan in the western Virginia campaign at the battle of Rich Mountain. In May 1862, he directed the left wing of General Pope's Army of the Mississippi in the advance on Corinth. When Pope was ordered east, Rosecrans took over command of the army and fought at Corinth and Iuka. He later commanded the Army of the Cumberland at Murfreesboro, Chattanooga and Chickamauga. He was promoted to major general to rank from Mar. 21, 1862.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in his general's uniform coat. Period ink ID on the front mount, Genl. Rosecrans, Comdg. Department Cumb.[erland]. No imprint. This is a scarce pose of General Rosecrans. Excellent.  


By Dale Carnegie. D. Appleton-Century Co., Inc., New York, 1936. Hardcover, 305 pages, illustrated. The covers and spine show some light water stains. Some light water stains are also visible on the inside boards and the first few pages. Stamped on the fly leaf and inside cover, Dale Carnegie Institute, 50 East 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. The book is very tight, and clean, other than as described above. A very fine reading copy full of very interesting stories about Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States.

Dress of Mary Todd Lincoln $3.50

 

CDV General James B. McPherson

 

CDV General William S. Rosecrans

 

Lincoln The Unknown $6.00

<b>Supplies Have Been Transferred to in the District of the Etowah</b>


2 pages, 21 1/2 x 17, manuscript in ink. Huge handwritten document being a Monthly Report of Officers to Whom Public Money or Supplies have been transferred to during the month of February 1865 by Officers in the District of the Etowah. Numerous regiments are represented including the 15th Wisconsin, 68th and 44th Indiana, several U.S. Infantry regiments, and others. Signed, Sam. P. Bradford, Capt. 44th Ind. Vols., Q.M. Some small fold splits, overall very fine.


Samuel P. Bradford, was a resident of Lagrange, Indiana, when he enlisted as a private on November 22, 1861, and was mustered into Co. H, 44th Indiana Infantry. He was promoted to quartermaster, January 19, 1863; captain, January 11, 1865; and was mustered out of the service, September 14, 1865.


The 44th Indiana Infantry saw action in the capture of Fort Donelson, in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, and Chattanooga.  


<b>1862 Mathew Brady imprint</b>


(1818-1885) Graduated in the West Point class of 1838. From 1841 to 1845 he taught tactics at the U.S. Military Academy and many of the students he taught went on to become Confederate generals who haunted him on the battlefields of the Civil War. He was awarded the rank of brevet captain for gallantry at the battle of Buena Vista during the Mexican War. He was appointed brigadier general May 14, 1861. By July, political pressure demanded an advance by his half trained army on the Rebels under the command of General P.G.T. Beauregard at Manassas Junction, where the railroad from Richmond to Alexandria met the line from the Shenandoah Valley. The resulting Union disaster at the 1st battle of Bull Run stemmed as much from misfortune as ineptitude although on paper McDowell had a good plan, but wasn't able to inspire his officers or troops. He later commanded a corps of the Army of the Potomac which was detached to protect Washington, and in the 2nd battle of Bull Run he commanded the 3rd Corps. On July 1, 1864, he was assigned to command the Department of the Pacific.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of major general. 1862 M.B. Brady imprint on the front mount. Backmark: Brady, Washington. Very fine quality image.  


<b>1863 Philadelphia imprint</b>


(1826-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846 and fought in the Mexican War. Hailed at the beginning of the Civil War as the "Young Napoleon," he proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but an officer totally lacking in the essential qualities of successful command of large forces in battle. He saw action at Rich Mountain, W.V., in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and at the battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day in American history. He was defeated for the presidency in 1864 by Abraham Lincoln.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of major general. 1863 imprint on the front mount, F. Gutekunst, 704 & 706 Arch St., Philadelphia. Backmark: F. Gutekunst, Philadelphia, with 2 cents blue George Washington U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp. Very fine quality image.  


(1838-1916) Born in Scott County, Kentucky, at the start of the Civil War he enlisted as a private in the Lexington Rifles, in the company of his brother-in-law, the celebrated John Hunt Morgan. The unit soon became part of the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry and Duke was appointed lieutenant colonel and then colonel. Playing a gallant role in all the operations of General Morgan's command, Duke was captured during the celebrated raid into Ohio and Indiana and was a prisoner of war for more than a year. After his exchange he commanded in Eastern Kentucky and Western Virginia and was promoted brigadier general to rank from September 15, 1864. In the closing days of the war his brigade acted as an escort to President Jefferson Davis and the fugitive Confederate government.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 7/8 card. Mount is slightly trimmed. Bust view pose. No imprint. Light age toning and wear. Very fine. Images of Basil Duke are very difficult to find. Extremely desirable Confederate Kentuckian.

Monthly Report of Officers to Whom Publi $35.00

 

CDV General Irvin McDowell $75.00

 

CDV General George B. McClellan $75.00

 

CDV General Basil Duke

<b>Needs Transportation to Portsmouth, Va.</b>


5 x 8 1/4, written in ink, on imprinted form.


United States Military Telegraph

By Telegraph from Bermuda [Hundred, Va.]

Dated July 6, 1864


To Capt. P.P. Pitkin

A.Q.M.


Choate's Col'd Batty. is now here from the front. Shall need transportation for it to Portsmouth. Can you send me boats that will carry one hundred & forty (140) men, ninety (90) horses, sixteen (16) carriages. The Winnisimmet & another ferry boat will carry the whole if you can send them.


C.E. Fuller

Lt. Col. & Q.M.


Very fine. Scarce and desirable Civil War telegram regarding a U.S. Colored Artillery battery.


Charles E. Fuller, was the grandson of the man who preached to the Continental troops under the elm tree at Cambridge before they marched to Bunker Hill. Charles E. Fuller was commissioned captain in the U.S. Volunteers Quartermaster's Department, on August 3, 1861. He served on the staff of Generals' Hunter, Gillmore, Butler, and Sherman, and was promoted to lieutenant colonel and quartermaster on February 1, 1864. At the close of the war he was chief quartermaster of the Army of the James. After the war he became a well known Boston banker and was a member of the New York and Boston stock exchanges. A lifetime lover of outdoor sports, he was known as the "Father of the New England Skating Association," and also had a fishing fly named for him.


The troops needing transportation to Portsmouth as per this telegram were Captain Francis C. Choate's Battery B, 2nd Regiment Light Artillery, U.S. Colored Troops.  


<b>Medal of Honor recipient for gallantry at Gettysburg</b>


(1835-1911) Graduated in the West Point class of 1855. He fought against the Florida Seminoles after his graduation and returned to the Academy in 1856 as an instructor in mathematics. At the outbreak of the Civil War he took part in the defense of Fort Pickens and also served at 1st Bull Run and in the Peninsular campaign. During the Antietam campaign, Webb was chief of staff of General Fitz John Porter's 5th Corps. Just prior to the battle of Gettysburg, he was promoted to brigadier general, and took command of the 2nd Brigade, Gibbon's Division, of Hancock's 2nd Corps. On July 3, 1863, during the 3rd day's battle at Gettysburg, Webb's four Pennsylvania regiments were posted in the vicinity of the copse of trees which was the focal point of the famous Pickett's charge. His command lost 451 men killed and wounded in the encounter, Webb among the wounded, and was awarded the Medal of Honor for his gallantry! He was very seriously wounded at Spotsylvania, Va. in May 1864, and did not return to duty until January 1865, when he became chief of staff to General George G. Meade. Webb received the brevet of major general in both the regular and volunteer services. He again taught at the Military Academy after the war and was honorably discharged from the army in 1870. He then accepted the presidency of the College of the City of New York. General Webb is buried at West Point.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 1/2 card. Seated view in uniform, with rank of brigadier general, holding his kepi on his lap. Backmark: Brady's National Portrait Galleries, New York and Washington, D.C. Card is trimmed. Very desirable Gettysburg general. Scarce.  


<b>Union commander at the battle of Gettysburg</b>


(1815-1872) Graduated in the West Point class of 1835, and won a brevet in the Mexican War. He fought in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and the Seven Days battles being very severely wounded at Glendale. He recovered in time to see action at 2nd Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. Elevated to command of the Army of the Potomac, he defeated General Robert E. Lee at Gettysburg and went on to fight in all of their battles culminating in the surrender at Appomattox Court House.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative by Mathew Brady. Light age toning and wear.  


<b>Written by Clark S. Edwards, Colonel of the regiment


He commanded the 5th Maine during the battle of Gettysburg!


Promoted to Brevet Brigadier General


War Date Letter With Cover


"our communications were cut by the Rebs near Fairfax Station the night before...we are expecting to move at any time...two corps left on Friday to join Rosecrans’ Army at Chattanooga, the 11th & 12th, Howard & Slocum...I hear today that others are to follow soon, but do not know what ones are to leave...Capt. A.  I have not yet seen since the Gettysburg fight."</b>


(1824-1903) Edwards was 37 years old when the news of the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter reached the small town of Bethel, Maine.  He was high on a ladder shingling his roof and he immediately climbed down, obtained permission from the appropriate authorities to form a company of volunteers, and set out to gather recruits from Bethel and the surrounding towns.  This group of men became Company I, of the 5th Maine Volunteer Infantry, with Edwards commissioned as their captain on June 24, 1861.  He rose through the ranks and was appointed colonel of the regiment, on January 8, 1863, commanding the 5th Maine Infantry from that date forward. He was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on March 13, 1865, for his gallant and meritorious Civil War service record.


The 5th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was one of the first Maine regiments to be mustered into the Union Army.  They fought in many battles from 1st Bull Run to Petersburg.  During the battle of Rappahannock Station the regiment is credited with capturing 4 Confederate battleflags and 1,200 prisoners.  Known as one of Maine's best fighting regiments, it captured more prisoners than the entire number of men who served in the regiment, and three times the number of battle flags than any other Maine regiment.  After three long years of hard fought service only 193 men were mustered out of the regiment when their term of service expired.  Among their battle honors are written the names of 1st Bull Run, Gaines' Mill, 2nd Bull Run, Crampton's Gap, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Rapidan Crossing, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor and Petersburg.


4 pages, 7 1/2 x 9 3/4, in ink. Comes with the envelope addressed in the hand of Edwards to his wife, "Mrs. Clark S. Edwards, [thus his full signature] Bethel, Maine, Oxford Co.," C.D.S., Washington, D.C., Sep. 29, 1863, stamped Due 5. Docket at left edge, Sep. 27th/63.


<b><u>Head Quarters, 5th Me. Vol., Camp near Culpepper C.[ourt] H.[ouse], Va., Sept. 27, 1863</b></u>


Dear Wife,


I once more seat myself to write you, but have none to answer.  I sent away a letter night before last directed to you.  It contained a draft on N. York for three hundred dollars, also a three dollar bill on a Portland Bank of which I hope you have received before this.  I have a little misgiving about it yesterday as our communications were cut by the Rebs near Fairfax Station the night before.  I am still at the place I last wrote you from, but we are expecting to move at any time.  Two corps left on Friday to join Rosecrans’ Army at Chattanooga, the 11th & 12th, Howard & Slocum.  I hear today that others are to follow soon, but do not know what ones are to leave.  I have but little to write today as I write so often.  Melvin Freeman just left my tent.  He says his father & Howard are at Washington & that H. is going into a printing office there.  Capt. Robinson took dinner with me last Sunday.  I think I will call on him after dinner.  Capt. A  I have not yet seen since the Gettysburg fight.  Dan Stearns I hear nothing from, nor any of them that left at the time he did.  Littlehall is well, say to his father, and is as fat as a pig.  Quincy is still with me the same as ever.  Bryce is getting along well.  I will close this up after visiting Capt. Robinson.


(Sunday Morning) I have just received your letters of Sept. 23rd of which is always gladly rec.  You say you are in trouble again of which I am sorry as it can do no good.  I have almost come to the conclusion that we will not have any more fighting this fall, that is, with this army as it is in no condition to fight.  I am glad to hear that Mrs. Sawyer is so nice & lovely.  My regards to her.  Ask her what she thinks about Lee’s getting recruits.  I find the same in this in regard to Freeman as I write in the first part of this letter.  I am sorry to hear of David Brown’s troubles as he has been punished enough for his sins already.  I am sorry to hear that Del is getting along so slow.  I hope this will find you all in fine health.  If you see Del give my regards to him.  You say you have not got the money of Capt. H. yet.  I think you had better let it go till I see him.  Perhaps he has not got it at the present time.  You ask if Chas. is concerned with Morse in the 14th N. York.  I do not think he is, but you need not say that to any one for perhaps he wants it to go that he is.  Morse is now at Washington.  I did not call on Capt. R. this P.M. as I expected so cannot tell you of him.  Say to Mrs. Sawyer that Lee is well and is not much given to writing after the morning.  A.J. Bean is well, but gets no letters from his wife. I expect you will want to know what I think of the coming campaign.  I think we may stay here a few days more and then fall back to Washington or Alexandria.  Perhaps our corps will go into Maryland to guard on the Potomac, and I think perhaps one or two corps more will go west.  Perhaps ours, but I hope not, so do not worry about us.  I am still in fine condition, only my back a little lame, but it does not plague me much.  I think I could do family duty if at home.  I have sent you an order on Lt. G of which you will please pass to my credit, also the draft & money.  I have to pay very high for all I have here. It cost me seven dollars per week for board here, and I have got to buy me a lot of clothes for winter.  My top boots cost fifteen dollars.  The campaigning last gone through has been hard for clothes.  My coat & jacket is about worn out.  I have no overcoat for winter, neither have I any thick undershirts, but I think I can get along some way.  I will close this after tea.


(Sunday evening) I thought I must add a word more to this.  It is quite cool here at this time.  I have never known it cooler at this season of year or it is at least, it was much warmer for the past two years.  I am not much in mood of writing tonight or at least have nothing to write about.  I think if the Regt. goes back towards Washington I shall get a leave to go home, but if we go west I presume I will not be at home till my term of service is up, if I am lucky enough to see that time, but everything is uncertain in regard to this.  I will write you again soon, but where it will be from is more than I can tell.  My love to all the good folks of Bethel.  Write often & long.  Kiss the children for me.


Yrs,

Clark  


Light age toning and wear. Very fine letter.

U. S. Military Telegram, Choates Colored $75.00

 

CDV General Alexander S. Webb $350.00

 

CDV General George G. Meade

 

5th Maine Infantry Letter




Unused, 3 1/2 x 5 1/2 postcard, with black and white photograph. The large statue on top of the pedestal represents Liberty. There are four statues located at each corner near the base. They represent War, History, Peace and Plenty. The cornerstone of the monument was laid on July 4, 1865, and the monument was dedicated on July 1, 1869. It marks the spot near where President Abraham Lincoln delivered his immortal Gettysburg Address. Undivided back era postcard, circa 1901-07.  


(1824-1881) Graduated in the West Point class of 1847. Mexican War veteran. Serving on the western frontier, he was wounded in a skirmish with Apaches in 1849. He resigned his commission in 1853, invented a breech loading rifle, was appointed a Major General of the Rhode Island State Militia and was elected to Congress as a Democrat. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he organized the 1st Rhode Island Infantry, becoming their Colonel. He was in command of a brigade at 1st Bull Run. Having become a Lincoln favorite, he was given command of the expedition against the coast of North Carolina, fought at Antietam, and in December of 1862 commanded the Army of the Potomac during their bitter defeat at Fredericksburg. Burnside also saw action at Knoxville, the Overland Campaign, and Petersburg. In his post war career he was elected Governor of Rhode Island three times, and later a U. S. Senator.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Very fine view in uniform with rank of major general. No imprint. Light age toning and wear.  


(1820-86) Fought in the Mexican War as a colonel of Tennessee Volunteers. Later became major general of Tennessee state militia. He was appointed a Confederate brigadier general on July 9, 1861, and major general to rank from March 10, 1862. He distinguished himself as a brigade, division, and corps commander in every engagement of the Army of Tennessee from Shiloh to Atlanta. He also saw service in the Franklin and Nashville campaign. After the war he was superintendent of Tennessee state prisons, and postmaster of Nashville.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery, with 2 cents orange tax stamp on the reverse. Light age toning.  


<b>Army of the Cumberland imprint</b>


(1831-1903) The highest ranking of the fourteen "Fighting McCooks," who saw Civil War service. He graduated in the West Point class of 1852 and was later an instructor in tactics at the U.S. Military Academy until the outbreak of the Civil War. He was commissioned colonel of the 1st Ohio Infantry in April 1861 and led them at the 1st battle of Bull Run. He was appointed brigadier general of volunteers on September 3, 1861, and major general in July 1862. He saw action at the capture of Nashville, in the battle of Shiloh, the siege of Corinth, and the battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro, Tullahoma and Chickamauga.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: J.W. Campbell, Army Photographer, 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland. Scarce.

Soldiers' National Monument, Gettysburg $5.00

 

CDV General Ambrose E. Burnside $65.00

 

CDV General Benjamin F. Cheatham $250.00

 

CDV General Alexander M. McCook $125.00




(1814-1879) Graduated in the West Point class of 1837. He displayed a gallant record in the Mexican War. A solid combat officer, Hooker fought in the Peninsular campaign, the Seven Days battles, 2nd Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, where he commanded the Army of the Potomac, and the Atlanta campaign. His sobriquet was, "Fighting Joe" Hooker.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of major general. No imprint. Excellent image.  


<b>Severely wounded at the battle of Gettysburg</b>


(1831-79) Graduated in the West Point class of 1853. He resigned his U.S. Army commission on April 17, 1861, and thereafter distinguished himself on many Civil War battlefields as a regimental, brigade, division and army commander. The hard fighting Hood saw action in the Virginia peninsular campaign, 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, he was severely wounded at Gettysburg, lost a leg at Chickamauga, and later fought at Atlanta, Franklin and Nashville. He died of yellow fever at New Orleans, La., together with his wife and one of their children, on Aug. 30, 1879.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in Confederate uniform. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York. Excellent quality image.  


(1818-1898) Graduated in the celebrated West Point class of 1841 which contributed 20 general officers to the Civil War. He was seriously wounded in the Mexican War at the battle of Churubusco, and won the brevets of captain and major. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he was in San Francisco as adjutant of the Department of the Pacific. He was commissioned brigadier general, on May 17, 1861, and upon his arrival in Washington, he helped to train and organize the Army of the Potomac. Buell was selected to lead the Army of the Ohio from Kentucky into eastern Tennessee, but because of the lack of railroads he urged an alternate route via the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers towards Nashville. His plan may have been a contributuing factor to the victories of General U.S. Grant at Forts Henry and Donelson which enabled Buell to march unopposed into Nashville. He arrived at the battle of Shiloh in time to stem the Rebel assault of the first day and turn almost certain defeat into a Union victory. He served under General Henry W. Halleck in the Corinth campaign, and on March 22, 1862, was promoted to major general. In June he was detached with four divisions to advance on Chattanooga and to repair the Memphis & Charleston Railroad. In September, he moved into Kentucky to resist the invasion by Generals Braxton Bragg and E.K. Smith and occupied Louisville. On Oct. 8, 1862, he fought the bloody battle of Perryville, Kentucky.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bottom 2 corners of the mount are slightly trimmed. Half view, seated pose in uniform with rank of major general. No imprint. Very fine image.  


(1831-88) A prominent Civil War commander, he graduated in the West Point class of 1853. Appointed brigadier general of volunteers Sept. 13, 1862, and major general, Mar. 16, 1863. Fought in the battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, the Shenandoah Valley and Appomattox campaigns, to name but a few. Sheridan also saw action against the Plains Indians in the 1870's.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 7/8 card. Excellent quality half view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: Hoag & Quick's Art Palace, Cincinnati, Ohio. Bottom of the mount is very slightly trimmed. Very sharp image. Desirable pose!

CDV General Joseph Hooker $65.00

 

CDV General John Bell Hood

 

CDV General Don Carlos Buell $75.00

 

CDV General Philip H. Sheridan $125.00




<b>Wearing his 6th Corps badge</b>


(1820-99) Graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1841. Serving in the Corps of Engineers, his pre war service included the construction of Forts Taylor and Jefferson in Florida. His first Civil War service was an abortive attempt to destroy the Norfolk Navy Yard dry dock before its evacuation by the Federals; an action in which he was captured. He later saw action at 1st Bull Run, the Port Royal expedition, Secessionville, Gettysburg, the Mine Run campaign, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cedar Creek, Petersburg and the Appomattox campaign.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. Seated view in uniform with rank of major general and wearing his 6th corps badge. Backmark: John Goldin & Co., Washington, D.C. Card is trimmed. Sharp image. Desirable pose. Scarce.  The unique and rare item presented is a holy water dispenser or font designed to hang by a doorway.  It measures 5 inches long by 2 1/2 inches wide.  Condition is excellent - no chips or cracks.


The potter is not identified on the antique.  It could date anywhere from the early to late 19th century. Jean Wetherbee's book White Ironstone: a Collector's Guide, shows one quite similar to this in Fig. 17-23.  She attributes it to an American potter, so I will do the same. 


The embossed design of the crucified Jesus is clearly visible.  A wreath of laurels decorates the edge.  The early plate presented measures 9 inches wide.  This pattern is entitled "Asiatic Scenery," a name used by several potteries for different scenes.  This was made in the Thomas and John Carey pottery which operated from 1823 through 1842.  


The plate is quite lovely with an irregular scallop to the rim which is both dimensionally beaded and bordered in white.  There features enhance the effect of the skillfully designed and transferred pattern.  The back bears the pottery name, pattern name, and imprinted Carey anchor.


It is in excellent condition, free of chips and cracks with the exception of a little nibble to the foot ring on the underside as pictured.  Our photo illustrations will likely do best to describe this nice old two cavity bullet mold.  With good evidence of age  and period use, this neat old .44 caliber conical bullet and ball mold offers lots of its original blue.  With no maker markings this mold will lay in well with any Civil War vintage percussion revolver. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>

CDV General Horatio G. Wright

 

Rare White Ironstone Holy Water Font, Ho $125.00

 

Carey Black Transferware Plate, " As $150.00

 

Civil War era BULLET MOLD $155.00

Always a bit of an enigma to all but the  specialist, Civil War import socket, sword bayonets, offer a myriad of variations. As to this one. a look at Watts & White <I> The Bayonet Book</I> p. 361 fig. 728 will, though there are some dimensional variations, serve best to identify this example as companion to the British Pattern of 1841 Sappers and Miners Carbine.  Totally unmarked as to origin and a bit more crude in construction than the British made examples, this one is most likely to have been made in British colonial India between 1845 and 1860.   A pedigree that fits all  well with the conglomeration of obsolete small arms shipped to both Union and Confederate arms buyers who scoured European arsenal stores in response to the early Civil War clamor for small arms.   This 2nd pattern Sappers & Miners saber bayonet measures 26 inches in total length with a 21 11/16 inch spear point blade. (For additional dimensions see our drawing.)  A tough item to find!   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>



 A well-documented personal utility of the American Colonial and Revolutionary War period (see: Valley Forge Museum collection also the Robert Burns Museum ) seldom found in nice original and untouched condition as is this set.  Complete with classic 4 5/8 inch paper-mache pocket case, tiny blown glass inkwell and two quill pens this traveling set will lay in nicely with any 18th early 19th century personal grouping or will make a wonderful companion piece with a period ledger, journal or in any collection of antique writing instruments. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>   Not the most attractive thing to look at but a wonderfully pure old Civil War relic, is this neat old laurel root candle holder.  Standing just under 11 inches tall the candlestick was fashioned from a laurel root burl at the top footed by sections of root all held together with period iron <I>cut</I>nails.  The candlestick sports an old penned label in period brown ink : <B>ORANGE PLANK ROAD MAY 7, 1864</B>.  The date will be familiar to students of the Civil War, in particular the <B>Battle of the Wilderness</I>.  The <I>Orange Plank Road</I> too, will be recognized as a section of the Orange Turnpike built about the time of the War of 1812.   Running through the Wilderness connecting Fredericksburg with the Orange Court House the planked section in particular became  key to navigation of that part of the seventy square mile Wilderness thus left its mark in the history of the great battle there in May of 1864.  The laurel burl will remind the enthusiast of Civil War soldier personal items of the popularity of these laurel knots in the carving of tobacco pipe bowls.   Another <I>find</I> as we dig through the remnants of our forty plus years of gathering up such things, this old folk art candlestick came to us from among a small collection of GAR Civil War veteran hall keepsakes. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>   Illustrated here with a U. S. Quarter for size comparison, out photos will likely do best as a description for this classic old meerschaum except to advise that it has been lightly smoked but remains in nice original condition.  Hand carved and fitted with its original lacquered stem this piece will be of special interest to the vintage tobacco enthusiast as it offers that classic <I>Turk’s head</I> that became synonymous with 19th century tobacciana.  The pipe is unmarked as to maker as was most common with the period. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques

Civil War import SABER BAYONET $125.00

 

Revolutionary War era Traveling Inkwell $225.00

 

Civil War ‘Orange Plank Road’ LAUREL ROO $175.00

 

antique - handcrafted Meerschaum TURK’S $65.00

This nice antique cupping device measures approximately 2 ¼  inches in height and is about 2 inches in diameter at the mouth with a bulbous body swelling to over 2 ½ inches in diameter.  These glass medical devices were used in the widely utilized medical cure process of bleeding with this example dating in the 1800s with use through the Civil War period.  This <I> cupping </I> device or <I>bleeding cup<I/> would be a staple in any physician's bag or medical chest of the period.  A nice original example in excellent condition with no chips or flakes, this piece demonstrates all the characteristics glass collectors of the period appreciate.  We are fortunate to have a small number of these of varying size shape and construction (use our search feature to see item #2710 # 3297) and are offering them individually priced for the antique medical collector who would like one.  <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison is a wonderfully delicate antique dipping pen nestled in its original leather covered travel case. The pen sports a nicely turned shaft of ivory rather than the more usual bone or shell material and is fitted with a 14k gold nib.  The nib is marked <B>H. M. Smith & Co. - New York- 1</B> and remains in nice useable condition.  Horace M. Smith operated a pen shop on Nassau Street in Manhattan where he sold gold and steel dipping pens in the Civil War era. Later he handled newer design telescoping pens and mechanical pencils.  All in excellent condition for the writing instrument collector or Civil War era personal item enthusiast.  <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 Illustrated here with a quarter as size comparison, our photos should do best to describe this nice antique musician plate except to advise that this specific piece emanated from the collection of Dr. Francis Lord and is published Vol. II p. 89 of his classic reference <I>Lord’s CIVIL WAR COLLECTORS ENCYCLOPEDIA</I>.   We acquired this piece several years ago  when we were fortunate enough to purchase several groupings from the personal collection of our longtime friend, Dr. Francis Lord.  A pioneer Civil War collector from a day when nearly no one else paid much attention to the details of many now valued Civil War collectable categories, Francis authored the  widely known, multi volume, pioneer reference,  <I>Lord’s CIVIL WAR COLLECTORS ENCYCLOPEDIA</I>.  While a lot of detailed knowledge has been gained as the interest and <U>value</U> of Civil War collectibles increased so dramatically over the years, Dr. Lord’s first and second volumes in particular and his <I>Civil War Sutlers & Their Wares</I> continue to offer valuable and reliable reference to Civil War collectors.  (Use <I>Lord</I> in our search feature to find other Lord collection items.) Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  


<b>With inscription on the reverse: "I know you are sorry it isn't Old Abe."</b>


(1818-1893) A lawyer, he was elected to the Massachusetts house of Representatives in 1853, and to the State Senate in 1859. The following year Butler was a delegate to the Democratic Convention which met in Charleston, where he voted 57 consecutive times to nominate Jefferson Davis for President of the United States. As a Brigadier General of the Massachusetts Militia, Butler entered the war in dramatic fashion; five days after the bombardment of Fort Sumter he lifted the blockade of Washington with the 8th Massachusetts. He was the first volunteer general appointed by Lincoln. He was badly defeated at Big Bethel. Butler was the first to apply the term "contraband of war" to slaves. He commanded the successful attack on Hatteras Inlet and later became the vilified military governor of New Orleans. In 1863 he was given command of the Army of the James which he saw action with at Bermuda Hundred and the Petersburg campaign. Elected to Congress in 1866, he played a prominent role in the Andrew Johnson impeachment. He later became Governor of Massachusetts.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of brigadier general, wide stripe on his trousers, and holding his kepi towards the camera to show the U.S. hat wreath insignia. Maj. Gen'l B.F. Butler is imprinted on the front mount. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Period ink inscription on the reverse: "I know you are sorry it isn't Old Abe." Edges and top right corner of the mount are slightly trimmed. Sharp image. Desirable pose of "Beast" Butler.

c. late 1700s / early 1800s BLEEDING CUP $75.00

 

Cased Antique Victorian Dipping Pen 14k $135.00

 

Lord collection MUSICIAN’S SHAKO HAT DEV $125.00

 

CDV General Benjamin F. Butler $100.00




<b>Died in 1862</b>


(1821-62) A native of Salem, Mass., from a distinguished American pioneer family, he studied for a career in engineering and was engaged on the survey of the Northern Pacific route in 1853 and participated in five transcontinental surveys including the overland wagon road. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he was sent to Texas by the government on a secret mission to ascertain the extent of Union sentiment there. He later served under General George B. McClellan at the battles of Philippi and Rich Mountain and was commissioned brigadier general of volunteers to rank from May 17, 1861, taking commanding of a brigade of Stone's division. The day after the battle of Ball's Bluff, Va., he was severely wounded in the leg in a skirmish at nearby Edwards Ferry, which he was holding with a company of sharpshooters. He was soon promoted to divisional command and on January 5, 1862, successfully defended the town of Hancock, Md. against an assault by a superior Confederate force under the command of General Stonewall Jackson. His division then went into camp at Paw Paw, Va., on the upper Potomac, and on February 14, 1862, he led an attack on a rebel position in nearby Bloomery Gap. While preparing to move to the support of General N.P. Banks in the Shenandoah Valley, Lander was suddenly stricken with an attack of congestive chills and after more than 20 hours under morphine, died of pneumonia on March 2, 1862.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view in uniform with epaulettes and rank of brigadier general. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Excellent.  


(1807-82) Graduated in the West Point class of 1826. Distinguished himself during the Mexican War battles of Contreras, Churubusco, Molina del Rey, and Chapultepec, earning the brevets of major and lieutenant colonel for gallantry. Appointed a brigadier general of volunteers on Aug. 31, 1861. At the battle of Seven Pines, Va., in 1862, his division of the 4th Corps, bore the brunt of the Confederate attack by Gen. A.P. Hill's troops, and "Casey's Redoubt" was named for him. He later commanded a brigade in the Washington defenses and served as president of a board to examine candidates for officers of Negro Troops. General Casey also compiled and edited "Infantry Tactics," which was adopted by the government in 1862.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Extremely sharp image. Excellent.  


<b>Governor of Virginia


Signature as U.S. Secretary of War</b>


(1806-63) Graduated from South Carolina College in 1829. A lawyer by profession, he was elected to the Virginia house of delegates in 1847, and governor of the state in 1848. President Buchanan appointed him Secretary of War in 1857, a post which he occupied until his resignation on December 29, 1860. This was precipitated by the refusal of President Buchanan to order Major Robert Anderson back from Fort Sumter to Fort Moultrie. Floyd was subsequently bitterly criticized in the North for his alleged transfer of unwarranted numbers of arms from Northern to Southern arsenals. Commissioned a Confederate brigadier general on May 23, 1861, he served in the West Virginia campaign under General Robert E. Lee, and was then ordered to Fort Doneslson where he escaped with his own troops prior to the surrender of the fort. He was commissioned a major general of Virginia state troops, but his health soon gave out and he died near Abington, Va., August 26, 1863.


<u>Signature as Secretary of War</u>: 2 x 3/4, in ink, J.B. Floyd, Secry. of War. Mounted to 3 1/2 x 2, black bordered mourning card. Light age toning. Very fine.  

 


(1823-1903) Graduated #1 in the West Point class of 1843. He won a brevet for gallantry in the Mexican War at Buena Vista. As an engineer officer, he was in charge of the construction of the new Capitol dome in Washington, D.C. He commanded a brigade at the 1st Battle of Bull Run, and led a division, and subsequently the 6th Corps, with distinction in the Virginia Peninsular campaign. During the Maryland campaign, he commanded the forces which penetrated Crampton's Gap at South Mountain, and his led his corps at Antietam. At the battle of Fredericksburg, he commanded the "Left Grand Division." He later commanded the 19th Corps in the expedition to Sabine Pass and in the ill fated Red River campaign in which he was wounded.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Excellent quality seated view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery.

CDV General Frederick W. Lander $100.00

 

CDV General Silas Casey

 

Autograph, General John B. Floyd $150.00

 

CDV General William B. Franklin




<b>Endorsement Signed</b>


(?-1890) A native of Maryland, Edmund Howard Brooke served in the Paymaster's Department of the U.S. Army. He earned promotion to brevet lieutenant colonel on April 1, 1865, for faithful and meritorious service. He retired from the the U.S. Army on June 30, 1882.


<u>Document Endorsed</u>: 7 1/2 x 9 1/2, in ink.


Port Byron, Ills., Oct. 30, 1869


B.W. Brice

Pay Master Genl. U.S.


Washington, D.C.


Dear Sir,


We send herewith an affidavit as a basis upon which to issue to us a duplicate. If not sufficient or if further evidence is deemed necessary will you please inform. We are ignorant of your rules in such matters and you will do us a favor to inform us.


Respectfully, &c.,

Devon & Shepperd

Bankers

Port Byron, Ill.


Dockets on the reverse of the document include an endorsement signed by B.W. Brice, Pay Master Genl. {Brice's signature is stamped], and an endorsement signed in ink by E.H. Brooke. 


The docket explains that E.H. Brooke is trying to obtain a duplicate of check No. 1640, made out in the amount of $100, which was issued to John J. Griffin, of Co. C, 129th Ills. Vols., for his additional bounty.


Light age toning and wear.  


<b>Stamped First Day of Issue</b>


Used, 6 x 4 postcard, with full color illustration. View of The Confederate Memorial Carving. Descriptive text on the reverse: View Of The Confederate Memorial. Carving of the equestrian figures of Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. The figures carved from the solid granite of historic Stone Monument located just east of Atlanta are nearly 140 feet tall- equivalent to a 10 story building. The overall carving is set in a niche larger than a football field.  C.D.S., Stone Mountain, Ga., Sep. 19, 1970, with 6 cents Stone Mountain Memorial postage stamp. Stamp cancelled on top of Stone Mountain- transported via cablecar. Light wear at upper edge.  


Used, 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 postcard, with full color photograph showing interior view of the museum. Note the boy scout in full uniform being instructed by the woman guide. Descriptive text on the reverse: Warren Rifles Confederate Museum, Front Royal, Va. The Buck Niche in the east wall of the museum forms a background for several muskets, a bust of Col. John S. Mosby, General "Stonewall" Jackson's signal cannon and a handmade ornamental seashell memorial to General Jackson, made by his widow. C.D.S., Washington, Va., Aug. 25, 1962, with 3 cents Statue of Liberty postage stamp. Neat collectible from the Civil War Centennial in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia.  


<b>Civil War Congressman from New York


War Date Autograph Note Signed</b>


(1810-73) Born in Portland, Maine, he attended the Academy at Monmouth, Me., and was a school teacher in Lewiston by the age of 16. He graduated from Waterville College (now Colby College) in 1831, studied law, was the editor of the Portland Advertiser, and served as a member of the Maine State House of Representatives in 1835. Moving to New York City in 1836, he established the New York Daily Express and was the paper's editor for the rest of his life. He served in the New York State Assembly in 1847. He was a U.S. Congressman, from 1849-53, 1863-66, and 1867-73. A "Peace Democrat," he endorsed Stephen A. Douglas for president in 1860, and urged the Federal government to allow the South to "depart in peace" in early 1861. He was a member of the New York State constitutional convention in 1867, and was appointed as a Government director of the Union Pacific Railroad in October 1867. In 1873, he was censured by the House of Representatives for attempted bribery in connection with the Credit Mobilier scandal. 


<u>War Date Autograph Note Signed</u>: 4 x 4 1/8, in ink. Washington, Dec. 10/63. Dear Sir, Herewith is the autograph you desire. Yrs. Respy., James Brooks. The bottom right corner of the paper is missing. This just barely affects the bottom of the "s" in Brooks. Light age toning. Boldly written.

Autograph, Colonel Edmund H. Brooke $20.00

 

View of the Confederate Memorial, Stone $10.00

 

Warren Rifles Confederate Museum, Front $5.00

 

Autograph James Brooks $35.00




4 pages, 8 x 9 3/4, in ink.


Estimate of Quarter Master Stores required for the 1st Div., 4th A.C., For the Month of March 1864. Lengthy, itemized list of Q.M. stores including different types of paper and envelopes, blotting sheets, sealing wax, bottles of mucilage, red & black ink, steel pens, pen holders, ink stands, Q.M. blanks, paper folders, erasers, soap, wagon whips, curry combs, horse brushes, wagon covers, harness, army wagons, water buckets, halter straps, horse collars, mule collars, saddles, horse shoes, horse shoe nails, wagon grease, tools, ambulance and much more.


Docket on the reverse: Estimate Quartermaster Stores required for the month of March 1864 By Geo. F. Laubach, 1 Lt., 77 P.V. & A.A.Q.M., 1 Div., 4 A.C.


Hd. Qrs. Dept. Cumb.[erland] Office Chf. Qr. Mr., Chattanooga, Mch. 8/64. Capt. H.M. Smith, A.Q.M., will furnish the within named stores as soon as practicable. L.C. Easton, Lt. Col. & Chf. Q.M.


Langdon C. Easton, was an 1838 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, and he  served in the Seminole War and the Mexican War. During the Civil War he served as Chief Quartermaster of the Army of the Cumberland, and was promoted to brevet brigadier general on March 3, 1865.      


<b>1861 Boston imprint</b>


(1786-1866) A year older than the Constitution, the venerable Scott, hero of the War of 1812 and the Mexican War, became General in chief of the U. S. Army in 1841, a position he still held at the start of the Civil War. A true professional soldier, he was one of the very few men in the country who saw the need to prepare for a major military effort. His Anacondona Plan proved to be very sound. Succeeded by General George B. McClellan in Nov. 1861, he retired to write his memoirs, and died at West Point in 1866 where he is buried. A Virginian, he was the only non-West Pointer of Southern origin in the Regular Army to remain loyal to the Union.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 1/4 card. Bust view in uniform with epaulettes. 1861 J.H. Bufford, Boston, Mass. imprint on the front mount. Backmark: J.H. Bufford, 313 Washington St., Boston. Very fine.  


4 3/4 x 7 3/4, in ink, on imprinted letter sheet.


Winthrop St. Parsonage

35 Dale St., Boston


Feb. 13/93


Mr. Edward A. Hammond

Com. Gettysburg Post G.A.R.


Dear Sir,


If your Post is not already invited elsewhere Memorial Sunday, May 28, I should be pleased to see them at Winthrop at church at the morning service. It would give me pleasure to address them at that time.


Hoping to hear from you through the proper officer,


I am,

Very truly yours,

C.L. Goodree


Light age toning and wear.

 


2 pages, 6 1/4 x 8, in ink.


Camp Graham, March 1, 1862. Lieut. John E. Brown, To the Confederate States. Dr. Itemized list that includes molasses, soap, candles, sugar, fresh beef, flour, salt pork, hard bread, bacon, rice, vinegar, potatoes, etc. Signed John E. Brown, 1st Lt. & Adjt., 7 Reg. N.C.T. Light age toning and wear. Very fine.

1864 Quarter Master Stores Invoice, 1st $45.00

 

CDV General Winfield Scott $35.00

 

Gettysburg Post 191 is Invited to Memori $15.00

 

List of Articles Purchased by Officer, 7




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