View Orders Back to AntiqueArts Home Page Come and view all that's new! Come and view all that's new! More than 135 upscale Antiques shops Would you like to sell your antiques here? A guide to more than 40,000 antique shops nationwide Have a question or suggestion? A comprehensive guide to antiques resources on the World Wide Web
Antique Arts Showcase
What's New in the Collector's Showcase?
The Most Recent Additions to This Category are First!


 Architectural Antiques
 Art
 Art Deco
 Autographs
 Bed Bath & Vanity
 Books
 China & Dinnerware
 Clocks & Watches
 Coins & Currency
 Cultures & Ethnicities
 Furniture & Accessories
 Glass
 Jewelry
 Lamps & Lighting
 Memorabilia
 Metalware
 Militaria
 Miscellaneous
 Music Related
 Paper & Ephemera
 Photographica
 Political
 Porcelain & Pottery
 Silver
 Textiles




Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1995. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 168 pages, illustrated, index. New condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who personally experienced the Second Manassas campaign. Through their words and images you can relieve the emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the human comedy- of one of the Civil War's major engagements. Thus, you hold in your hands an album of personal recollections from letters, diaries, photographs, sketches, and artifacts. 


To compile this special volume, we combed hundreds of sources, both published and unpublished.  We had invaluable help from an extensive network of consultants. Using our own diverse resources and historical materials in libraries and archives around the United States, we were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives: manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories and privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of these writers to accompany their personal accounts.


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail systems set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. Mail packets were even exchanged across enemy lines. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. Andrew Coats of the 5th New York Infantry recorded, "War has been designated as Hell, and I can assure you that where the Regiment stood that day was the very vortex of Hell. Not only were men wounded, or killed, but they were riddled." 


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the Union armies to depict events for readers. These correspondents, or "specials" drew virtually everything of possible interest: pitched battles, lounging soldiers, the odd piece of military equipment. Sketches dashed off in a few moments during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication, where they were transformed into woodblock engravings suitable for printing. 


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the fledgling craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and equipment and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are well chronicled, thanks to the efforts of men, who endured great hardship. Travel was tedious, with cumbersome equipment and portable darkrooms mounted on wagon beds. But photographers like Mathew Brady and his assistants spent months following the army, etching with light the brave faces of the soldiers, as well as the bodies stiffened on the field. When Brady's stark photographs of the dead were first exhibited in New York City in 1862, the public thought, albeit briefly, that such horrific images could actually bring the war to an end. 


So you hold in your hands living testimony from the battlefield at Manassas. As you look into the eyes of these soldiers and civilians dazed by the violence around them or the grief that follows the fighting, perhaps it will be possible to perceive more clearly the experience that was the shattering experience that was Second Manassas.


Cover Photograph: A Federal train lies burned to the wheels by Confederate forces near Manassas Junction.  


<b>Endorsement Signed</b>


Appointed Paymaster, United States Volunteers, on February 19, 1863; promoted to brevet lieutenant colonel, on March 13, 1865, for faithful and meritorious Civil War service. Remained in the U.S. Army until his retirement in 1875.


<u>Endorsement Signed</u>: 3 1/2 x 7 3/4, in ink. Respectfully referred to the Adjutant General with order enclosed. Can this order be looked on as sufficient authority to keep the officer in the Service of the U.S. after the m/o [muster out] of his Regt.? Was his m/o because his services were no longer required? J.W. Nicholls, P.M.U.S.A. [Pay Master U.S. Army]. July 14/66. Circular stamp in black with Jul. 17, 1866 date. Light age toning and wear.


This endorsement is referring to a Civil War soldier named George Sanderson who served in the 8th Illinois Infantry during the war. This information was acquired from the reverse of the endorsement.


George Sanderson was a resident of Cairo, Illinois when he enlisted on July 25, 1861, as a sergeant, and was mustered into Co. G, 8th Illinois Infantry. He re-enlisted in the regiment on February 1, 1864, as a veteran volunteer, and was promoted to 1st lieutenant on November 14, 1864.     Some years ago we acquired a small number of earlier 1800s through Civil War era <B>straight shank</B> (eyeless) fish hooks with original <B>hand tied cotton cord leader</B> and are offering them here <U>individually</U> priced for the antique fishing gear enthusiast or Civil War collector who would enjoy having an example.   Remaining in original to the period, unused condition after decades of storage, this example of a once so common piece of basic fishing equipment will lay well in any period fishing grouping.  A handy item in the haversack or <I>ditty</I>bag of any well prepared Civil War troop.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  We have a small number of these 19th century glass dice and are offering them here <U>priced by the pair</U> for the collector who would like a set.  Classic period hand crafting of each individual piece is made obvious by the irregularity of dot placement and <I>out of square</I> shape of each game piece as it was hand sheared  from hot, square drawn, glass stock.  Difficult to find and nice companion item for any earlier to Civil War era personal, or gaming grouping.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!

Voices of the Civil War, Second Manassas $35.00

 

Autograph, Lieutenant Colonel James W. N $8.00

 

Original Civil War era FISH HOOK with ha $30.00

 

earlier to mid 1800s – hand cut white gl $35.00

Not a big deal but a nice honest utility to display with Civil War vintage personal items without spending a lot of money.  A <I>must have</I> in the days before plastic bags and cellophane wrapped snacks, the days when a hand full of black walnuts or pecans served as a welcome treat, a <I>nut pick</I> (also a handy tool to loosen a knot) was a common utility carried in pocket or haversack. This antique bone mounted iron pick remains in pleasing condition with a telltale age <I>shrinkage</I> crack in the bone as good evidence of age and originality.  Solid and ready for use!   please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  Crisp in focus and contrast, this photograph measures approximately 4 ¼ X 4 ½ inches on its original mount. Back marked by period Dansville, New York photographer E. J. Betts, this image is one of the less common photos of Clara Barton and will set well in any quality collection, historic photography, Civil War, medical, humanitarian  and more. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 Boldly marked on one side for vertical display this colorful U. . V. banner measures 12 inches wide at the top and is 22 inches in total length.   Stencil printed on cotton in the fashion common to the turn of the century the banner remains solid with some tattering yet bright in color and appears never to have been exposed to the weather or bright sun while offering good evidence of age and originality. Just rediscovered three of these (use our search see # 5656 & 5657) as we rummage through our long ago tucked away <I>stuff</I>, this old banner was recovered as part of a small grouping from, of all places, the attic remains of a long ago defunct <I>Yankee</I> G. A. R. hall. (Those were the days!) How the banner came to Maine Civil War veteran hall storage can only be left to the imagination though it seems more than likely that the piece was a souvenir of a trip South for one of the joint G. A. R. – U. C. V. reunions common in the waning years of first generation Civil War veterans.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Measuring 24 1/8 x30 ¾ inches on its original stretcher, this oil on canvas beardless Lincoln portrait is signed (<I>A. Aloisi</I>) and offers good evidence of age and originality while remaining in pleasing condition save an easily restorable  small tear just above the ear and some natural age thin spots that are likewise easily restorable. (All easily seen in our illustrations, we have chosen to leave the painting as found to preserve originality.) The painting is taken from a photograph by Alexander Heslet during a June 3,1860 sitting while Lincoln was campaigning for the presidency.  A popular image of the <I>Rail Splitter</I> in the early campaign, Heslet’s Lincoln and images taken from his work, became well known in the period and are especially sought by todays collectors.  Lincoln’s law partner, William Herndon, commented that the image was <I> so essentially Lincolnian; no other artist has ever caught it.</I>  Nicely done yet offering a crudeness not seen in the work of a trained artist, the special charm of this old piece will place it in the <I>folk art</I> category to most.  An exceptional piece of Americana, this early presidential campaign rendering from the Springfield, Illinois photographer’s  a beardless Abraham Lincoln photograph will show off well.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

19th century bone mounted Nut Pick $30.00

 

period albumin - Civil War Nurse & Foun $175.00

 

Late 1880s / early 1900s UNITED CONFEDER $125.00

 

c. 1860 Abraham Lincoln - FOLK ART OIL P $525.00




<b>United States Senator From Massachusetts


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1811-74) After graduating from Harvard, he became a lawyer. A staunch abolitionist, he was violently opposed to the extension of slave territory, and was elected Senator in 1851 on this ticket. In 1856 he delivered an invective laden speech called "The Crime Against Kansas" in which he insulted a South Carolina senator who was not present. Two days later, Representative Preston Brooks, of S.C., a relative of the reviled man, attacked Sumner viciously with a cane. Sumner did not recover for three years, although he continued to hold his Senate seat. After secession he refused to let the Senate consider a compromise between the sections and constantly urged emancipation and equal rights for negroes. He was one of the people in the room when President Lincoln died. Although he had supported Lincoln, he was one of the most important leaders in the impeachment proceedings against President Andrew Johnson.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 3/4, in ink, Charles Sumner, Mass. An important autograph for any U.S. political collection! 

 This set of 6 earlier to mid 1800s shirt or blouse buttons (illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison) were fashioned from natural <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and will make an attractive addition to any period garment restoration project or simply to display with period sewing or personal things.  They will go especially well with Civil War period material.  We have acquired a limited few sets of antique buttons of <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and have scattered them through the site. (Enter <B>buttons</B> in our search to see all.)  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 This set of 6 earlier to mid 1800s shirt or blouse buttons (illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison) were fashioned from natural <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and will make an attractive addition to any period garment restoration project or simply to display with period sewing or personal things.  They will go especially well with Civil War period material.  We have acquired a limited few sets of antique buttons of <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and have scattered them through the site. (Enter <B>buttons</B> in our search to see all.)  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  This set of 11 antique  vegetable ivory buttons will be distinctive to the vintage clothing enthusiast as they were fashioned in the classic 18th early 19th century design with <U>two holes on the back and a single hole on the front.</U>  All are matching and remain in excellent condition and are of a nice size comparable to those used with the period frock or coat.  This set will make an attractive addition to any period garment restoration project or simply to display with period sewing or personal things.  We have acquired a limited few sets of antique buttons of <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and have scattered them through the site. (Enter <B>buttons</B> in our search to see all.) Ideal for restoration of vintage clothing of all design, these buttons will go especially well on southern made garments.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

Autograph, Charles Sumner $65.00

 

antique natural VEGETABLE IVORY BUTTON s $32.00

 

antique natural VEGETABLE IVORY BUTTON s $30.00

 

1700s early 1800s VEGETABLE IVORY BUTTO $35.00

This set of 7 earlier to mid 1800s shirt or blouse buttons (illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison) were fashioned from natural <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and will make an attractive addition to any period garment restoration project or simply to display with period sewing or personal things.  They will go especially well with Civil War period material.  We have acquired a limited few sets of antique buttons of <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and have scattered them through the site. (Enter <B>buttons</B> in our search to see all.)  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  This set of 7 earlier to mid 1800s shirt or blouse buttons (illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison) were fashioned from natural <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and will make an attractive addition to any period garment restoration project or simply to display with period sewing or personal things.  They will go especially well with Civil War period material.  We have acquired a limited few sets of antique buttons of <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and have scattered them through the site. (Enter <B>buttons</B> in our search to see all.)  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  This set of 9 antique  burl walnut buttons will be distinctive to the vintage clothing enthusiast as they were fashioned in the classic 18th early 19th century design with <U> two holes on the back and a single hole on the front.</U>  All are matching and remain in excellent condition with the exception of one which has a period chip.  A nice size comparable to those used with the period military frock or waist coat, these buttons would go especially well on a Southern style garment.  We have acquired a limited few sets of antique buttons of <I>butternut </I>vegetable ivory and have scattered them through the site. (Enter <B>buttons</B> in our search to see all.) Ideal for restoration of vintage clothing of all design, these buttons will go especially well on southern made garments.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 We have acquired a nice lot of original antique black iron <I>roller buckles</I> and are offering them here individually priced for the collector / historian who would like an example for use or display.  Originally emanating from the clean out of 19th century harness and leather work shop where the harness maker cut the buckles from used leather and threw them into a large wood box for reuse.   From this mix we have separated a number of classic <I>roller buckles</I> and are offering them here in <U>two sizes</U> all remaining in pleasing <I>as found</I> and usable condition many even retaining remnants period black paint finish.  We have buckles sized to accept 1 3/8 and 1 ¼ inch wide straps so <U>be sure and note the size you need</U> when ordering.  Wider waist belts were frequently cut down on the leading end to accept the standard 1 3/8 inch buckle.  (<I>see illustration</I>)   A classic design of the Civil War era we have seen these heavy black-iron roller buckles in use back to the Mexican War vintage <I>Grimsley</> U. S. Dragoon saddles.   Wide Civil War military use on all manner of leather accoutrements, horse equipment, waist belts and more has been well documented. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

antique natural VEGETABLE IVORY BUTTON s $35.00

 

antique natural VEGETABLE IVORY BUTTON s $25.00

 

late 1700s early 1800s hand-cut BURL WA $35.00

 

Original! Antique! ROLLER BUCKLES $32.00

Lots of folks may file this offering under <I>who cares</I> but for the serious mess gear collectors offering will be meaningful.  A nice all original and period example of F. Grosgean’s <B>Patent January 28, 1862</B> two piece mess spoon.  Fashioned from light, tinned sheet iron, die struck with overlapping sections of the handle and bowl soldered together to form the finished spoon.  Grosgean’s design claimed a stronger yet lighter eating utensil.  This rarely surviving example remains in pleasing all original condition yet with good evidence of age and period originality.  (<U> We currently have a number of collectable Civil War era mess spoon variations from an old collection.  Use <I>spoon</I> in our search box to see them all.</U>    <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  An unusual and desirable item for the Civil War era mess equipment and personal item enthusiast is this <B>J. Fallows Patent 1865</B> mess spoon was constructed of die-struck tined sheet iron in accordance with the direction offered by the Fallows patent (see illustration).  The spoon handle is formed from two thin iron sheets with the top sheet crimped over the lower with the two piece handle crimped and soldered to the bowl.   (Patent markings are barely discernable on the spoon handle.)  The design resulted in a stronger spoon while utilizing lighter material.  This rarely surviving example remains in excellent original condition yet with good evidence of period originality.  An especially nice personal item, this piece will lay in well with any quality Civil War grouping.   (<U> We currently have a number of collectable Civil War era mess spoon variations from an old collection.  Use <I>spoon</I> in our search box to see them all.</U>    <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 

 An unusual and desirable item for the Civil War era mess equipment and personal item enthusiast is this <B>J. Fallows Patent 1865</B> mess spoon was constructed of die-struck tined sheet iron in accordance with the direction offered by the Fallows patent (see illustration).  The spoon handle is formed from two thin iron sheets with the top sheet crimped over the lower with the two piece handle crimped and soldered to the bowl.   (Patent markings are barely discernable on the spoon handle.)  The design resulted in a stronger spoon while utilizing lighter material.  This rarely surviving example remains in excellent original condition yet with good evidence of period originality.  An especially nice personal item, this piece will lay in well with any quality Civil War grouping.     (<U> We currently have a number of collectable Civil War era mess spoon variations from an old collection.  Use <I>spoon</I> in our search box to see them all.</U>   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 

 


<b>Autograph Document Signed</b>


(1809-73) A planter and lawyer in Clarke County, Va., Underwood was a Free-Soiler in politics and was virtually driven from Virginia for his attacks on slavery during the presidential campaign of 1856. A Republican office holder during the Civil War, he became a U.S. district court judge in Virginia, in 1864. In this capacity he asserted the right of the United States to confiscate property of persons in rebellion and treated Confederate President Jefferson Davis with great harshness during and after Davis' indictment for treason in 1866. He presided over the Virginia constitutional convention which met at Richmond in December 1867.


<u>Autograph Document Signed</u>: 8 x 2 3/4, manuscript in ink. Received of Mrs. E.E. Jackson one hundred eighteen Dollars & seventy five cents it being a portion of four hundred & seventy five Dollars recently received by her from the estate of Col. George Jackson for the benefit of her children. John C. Underwood for Maria G. Underwood. 


Light age toning and wear.


E.E. Jackson and Col. George Jackson were kinfolk of Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson. This document came out of a Jackson family collection I had many years ago. 


Comes with an original newspaper clipping titled, "The Funeral of Judge Underwood," that is dated Washington, Dec. 14, 1873.

F. Grosgean’s Patent 1862 – two piece t $85.00

 

Scarce J. FALLOWS PAT. 1865 – table spoo $65.00

 

Scarce J. FALLOWS PAT. 1865 - MESS SPOON $85.00

 

Autograph, John C. Underwood $75.00




3 pages, 5 3/8 x 8 3/4, imprint.


House.....No. 8


Commonwealth of Massachusetts


Office of Pension Agent, 29 Pemberton Square

Boston, January 1, 1894


To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court assembled:


I have the honor to submit my sixth annual report for the year ending December 31, 1893.


The business of this office, since the change of administration, is much more perplexing than it has been in previous years. One reason is from the fact that many claims which had been prosecuted, claimants examined, and the testimony necessary to establish the claim under the Act of June 27, 1890, had been forwarded to the Department and placed upon the completed files ready for the certificates to be issued, the rulings of the new Commissioner, in which a different construction was placed upon the Act of June 27, 1890, made it necessary for these claimants to again furnish the testimony with some additions to comply with the new ruling of the Commissioner.


Much more content including a detailed statement of the business of the office during the year. Signed in print by J.B. PARSONS, State Pension Agent. Click on the enlargements to see the complete content of the document.


Light wear. There is a small chip out of the paper at the upper corner of the last page which does not affect any of the content. Interesting Massachusetts pension document concerning Civil War soldiers and their families.  Whether you prefer to consider them <I>child’s</I> or, in consideration of their adult style and apparently unworn condition, as <I>sales samples</I>,this exceptionally nice pair of Civil War vintage boots measure 6 3/8 inches heel to toe and stand 9 ½  inches high.  With classic Civil War period design and construction that will be familiar to collectors of period military ware, these boots will serve well as a demonstration of the larger examples worn into the Civil War.  Remaining in exceptional original condition, with no evidence of wear, these boots sport the <B>Pat. Nov. 29, 1853 </B> marked brass toe caps as found in so many Civil War site excavations. (see: <I>Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War</I> by Phillips)   While there are no maker markings, the classic style with the toe caps and set in patent leather panels with <I> Warranted</I> embossing, are most consistent with the work from the John Batchelder Holliston, Mass. <I>’ten by ten’*</I> cobbler shop.  (So called by 1850s and first half 1860s locals of Holliston, Mass. where nearly one half of the working population labored in a number of small 10 X 10 foot cobbler shops that dotted the countryside.)   Typically as many as a half dozen artisans plied their trade in each <I>ten X ten</I> making boots and shoes under the direction of the owner who marketed the footwear.  In excellent original condition with no <I>issues</I>, this classily styled pair of Civil War era boots are sure to please!  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  


<b>Member of the Iowa Territorial House of Representatives


Governor of Iowa


Member of the 1861 Peace Convention


United States Senator from Iowa


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1816-72) Born in Deering, N.H., he graduated from Hampton Academy, attended Dartmouth College, studied law, moved west and commenced practice in the "Black Hawk Purchase," Wisconsin Territory. Member of the Iowa Territorial House of Representatives, 1838-39, and 1843-44. Governor of Iowa, 1854-58. He was a member of the 1861 peace convention held in Washington, D.C. which attempted to prevent the Civil War. Served as U.S. Senator from Iowa, 1859-69, including the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. Was the chairman of the Committee on the District of Columbia, and also served on the Committee on Naval Affairs.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 3 1/4, in ink, J.W. Grimes, Iowa.  


6 x 2, imprint. Lottery of the State of Kentucky. Covington, Ky. June 27, 1863. The winning numbers on this ticket were 7, 18 and 73. Uncommon.

Report of the State Pension Agent of Mas $10.00

 

outstanding! Civil War era ‘Quarter Size $295.00

 

Autograph, James W. Grimes $25.00

 

1863 State of Kentucky Lottery Ticket $25.00




<b>Governor of Rhode Island


United States Senator from Rhode Island


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1815-84) Born in Coventry, R.I., he graduated from Brown University in 1833. Was editor of the Providence Journal in 1838, and afterwards became one of its owners. Served as Governor of Rhode Island, 1849-50. Served as U.S. Senator, from 1859-84, including the President Andrew Johnson impeachment congress. He was President pro tempore of the Senate (41st to 43rd Congresses) was chairman of the Republican Conference (37th to 49th Congresses) and served on the Committee on Revolutionary Claims.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 3/8, in ink, H.B. Anthony, R.I.  


Bust of General George B. McClellan in uniform on the obverse with his name above and the year 1863 below, with Army & Navy within wreath on the reverse and crossed sabers at the bottom. Fine.  


<b>The Companion Volume to the Celebrated PBS Television Series by Ken Burns</b>


By Geoffrey C. Ward, With Ric Burns and Ken Burns. Published by Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1991. Large 9 1/2 x 11 1/4, hardcover edition with dust jacket. 425 pages, illustrated, index. New condition. If you enjoyed the monumental Ken Burns documentary, "The Civil War," you will love adding this companion book to your collection! 


With more than 500 illustrations; rare Civil War photographs, many never before published, as well as paintings, lithographs, and maps reproduced in full color.


It was the greatest war in American history. It was waged in 10,000 places- from Valverde, New Mexico, and Tullahoma, Tennessee, to St. Albans, Vermont, and Fernandina on the Florida coast. More than three million Americans fought in it and more than 600,000 men died in it. Not only the immensity of the cataclysm but the new weapons, the new standards of generalship, and the new strategies of destruction- together with the birth of photography- were to make the Civil War an event present ever since in the American consciousness. Thousands of books have been written about it. Yet there has never been a history of the Civil War quite like this one.


A wealth of documentary illustrations and a narrative alive with original and energetic scholarship combine to present both the grand sweep of events and the minutest of human details. Here are the crucial events of the war; the firing of the first shots at Fort Sumter; the battles of Shiloh, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg; the siege of Vicksburg; Sherman's dramatic march to the sea; the surrender at Appomattox. Here are superb portraits of the key figures: Abraham Lincoln, claiming for the Presidency almost autocratic power in order to preserve the Union; the austere Jefferson Davis, whose government disappeared almost before it could be formed; Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant, seasoned generals of fierce brilliance and reckless determination. Here is the America in which the war was fought: The Civil War is not simply the story of great battles and great generals, it is also an elaborate portrait of the American people- individuals and families, northerners and southerners, soldiers and civilians, slaves and slaveowners, rich and poor, urban and rural- caught up in the turbulence of the times.


An additional resonance is provided by four essays, the work of prominent Civil War historians. Don E. Fehrenbacher discusses the causes of the war; Barbara J. Fields writes about emancipation; James M. McPherson looks at the politics of the 1864 election; C. Vann Woodward speculates on how the war has affected the American identity. And Shelby Foote talks to filmmaker Ken Burns about wartime life on the battlefield and at home.


A magnificent book. In its visual power, its meticulous research, its textual brilliance, and the humanity of its narrative, The Civil War will stand among the most illuminating and memorable portrayals of the American past.


Jacket photograph: The 5th Vermont at Camp Griffin, Virginia, at the beginning of the war. Its men would see action at Yorktown, Savage's Station, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, in the Shenandoah, and at Petersburg- and 338 of them would not return when the fighting ended.   


<b>United States Congressman from Massachusetts


Governor of Massachusetts</b>


(1784-1864) Born in East Freetown, Mass., he graduated from Brown University in 1804. He studied law at Tapping Reeve's law school in Litchfield, Connecticut where he was a schoolmate of John C. Calhoun, who served as a mentor and friend for many years. He was admitted to the Norfolk County bar in 1807, and opened a practice in Taunton, Mass. Was clerk of the Massachusetts State Senate in 1811. He served as a U.S. Congressman from 1817-21. He was Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts, 1824-25; and Acting Governor of Massachusetts, 1825; Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, 1825-40; Governor of Massachusetts, 1840-41, and 1843-44. In 1845, President James K. Polk appointed Morton collector of the port of Boston, and served from 1845-49. He was a delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1853 and was a member of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives in 1858.


Antique portrait engraving with his name and state printed below his likeness, "Marcus Morton of Massachusetts." Engraved by J & H.G. Langley, New York. 4 1/8 x 7. Tipped to 6 x 9 1/4 album page with black ink border around the engraving. Circa mid 1800's.

Autograph, Henry B. Anthony $25.00

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, General $75.00

 

The Civil War; An Illustrated History $45.00

 

Marcus Morton $10.00




<b>Civil War Governor of Illinois


United States Senator from Illinois


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1818-73) Graduated from Illinois College, Jacksonville, Illinois, in 1835, studied law at Transylvania University, Lexington, Ky., was admitted to the bar in 1837, and commenced practice in Jacksonville, Ill. He served in the Illinois State House of Representatives, 1842-45, and 1848-49. Served in the U.S. Congress, 1851-55, as a Whig, before joining the new Republican party. He was elected governor of Illinois in 1860, serving in that position throughout the Civil War. He was very active in raising troops for the Union war effort and in suppressing the activities of Southern sympathizers in his state. He later served in the U.S. Senate, 1865-71, including the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress, and was the chairman of the Committee on Revolutionary Claims. 


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 2, in ink, Richd. Yates, Ills.  


<b>United States Civil War Senator from Michigan


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1805-71) Graduated from Williams College, Williamstown, Mass., in 1830; studied law; moved to Detroit in 1832; admitted to the bar in 1833 and commenced practice in Detroit. He was the city attorney of Detroit in 1834; was a member of the Michigan State House of Representatives in 1838; and served as a U.S. Congressman, 1841-43. He helped draw up the platform of the first Republican convention in 1854. Was attorney general of Michigan, 1855-61. Served as U.S. Senator 1862-71. He was the chairman of the Committee on Pacific Railroads.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 3, in ink, J.M. Howard, Mich.  


<b>United States Senator & Congressman from Pennsylvania


United States Secretary of the Treasury</b>


(1761-1849) Born in Geneva, in what is now present day Switzerland, he immigrated to America in the 1780's. He was naturalized in Morgantown, Va., and ultimately settled in Pennsylvania. He served as U.S. Senator 1793-94; U.S. Congressman, 1795-1801; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1801-14; U.S. Minister to France, 1816-23; and U.S. Minister to the United Kingdom, 1826-27. Gallatin then settled in New York City, where he helped found New York University in 1831 to offer university education to the working and merchant classes as well as the wealthy. He became president of the National Bank in New York City from 1831 to 1839. His last great endeavor was founding the American Ethnological Society in 1842, and serving as its president until 1848. With his studies of the languages of Native Americans, he has been called "the father of American ethnology." At his death in 1849, Gallatin was the last surviving member of President Thomas Jefferson's Cabinet and the last surviving senator from the 18th century.


Antique, portrait engraving. Seated view of Gallatin holding his top hat and cane. Overall size is 5 7/8 x 9. Circa mid 1860's.    A scarce <U>first patent example</U> of the much more frequently encountered later Pat. 1861 / 1864 variation with pen holder, this earlier <B>Patent June 4, 1861</B> inkwell remains in excellent all original and as found condition after decades of attic storage.  The spun brass base measures approximately 5 inches in diameter with a glass ink reservoir set in with a patent dated hinged pewter top.  With pleasing evidence of period use and the charm of the period addition of a political cartoon of <B><I>CONFEDERATE  CAT  Jeff Davis</I></B> likely trimmed from a <I>Harper’s</I> or <I>Leslie’s</I> and pasted over the plaster base surface, this will be neat piece for the Civil War personal item or antique writing instrument collector. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

Autograph, Richard Yates

 

Autograph, Jacob M. Howard $20.00

 

Albert Gallatin $10.00

 

Civil War era Pat. 1861 – INKWELL $195.00

Emanating from the neighboring coastal Maine location of the <I>Portsmouth Navy Yard</I> in Kittery, Maine, this <B>NAVY STORE - INSIDE KEY -  TO IRON ROOM</B> key would have secured the iron component storage area at the Navy Shipyard there.   The Federal Government established the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in 1800 and the <I>Kittery Yard</I> (to locals) launched its first product, the 74-gun warship USS Washington, in 1814.  An additional ten war ships were commissioned to the outbreak of the Civil War when a surge in activity at the old yard produced sixteen ships for the Union Navy.  The shipyard remains active today constructing and overhauling some of the most sophisticated war ships of our modern Navy.  Of interest to is that the location of the historic old shipyard fostered a vigorous boundary dispute between Maine and neighboring New Hampshire that was not settled until the U.S. Supreme Court dismissed the case in 2001. Measuring just over 8 ½ inches in length, this heavy iron antique key with its deeply patinated copper identification tag is an exceptional piece of historic Americana.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>

 A classic piece of original Americana, this 1842 dated silk temperance ribbon measures approximately 6 5/8 inches long by 2 1/16 wide.  Pleasing to the eye. natural age patina and some tattering at the ends only add charm and good evidence of originality. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Measuring approximately 6 1/4 inches from the back to the cutting edge, this eye appealing belt axe  would have offered a stout cutting tool or formidable personal weapon in hands of a willing frontiersman.   In pleasing condition while displaying good evidence of age and originality, this attractive 18th earlier 19th century hand forged axe head will go well in any American colonial, Revolutionary War grouping.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


<b>Killed at Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia in 1864


U.S. Army Document Signed</b> 


(1835-64) Graduated in the West Point class of 1858. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Harker was engaged in drilling Ohio troops and became colonel of the 65th Ohio Infantry. He fought with General Don Carlos Buell's Army of the Ohio at the battle of Shiloh. By the time of the battle of Perryville he was a brigade commander and helped chase Confederate General Braxton Bragg out of Kentucky. At the battle of Murfreesboro, his conduct was so distinguished that he was promoted to brigadier general. At Chickamauga, Harker conducted the famous defense of the hill on which the Snodgrass home stood, which helped earn the nickname of the "Rock of Chickamauga" for his superior General George H. Thomas. In the Atlanta campaign he commanded a brigade in General O.O. Howard's IV Corps. Undaunted by the fact that he had four horses shot out from under him in battle, Harker went into the battle of Kennesaw Mountain on horseback. Becoming a conspicuous target for Rebel sharpshooters, he was mortally wounded during the attack and died a few hours later. 


<u>Document Signed</u>: 15 x 9 3/4, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


This is the Monthly Summary Statement of Lieutenant Charles G. Harker, when he served in the 9th U.S. Infantry. It is dated November 30, 1859. 


I certify that the above is a true statement of all the moneys which have come into my hands, on account of the Quartermaster's Department, during the month of November 1859, and that the disbursements have been faithfully made. The balance due the United States is deposited in the Sub Treasury, San Francisco, Cal. C.G. Harker, 2nd Lt. 9th Inf., A.A. Quartermaster, U.S.A. Very fine. Desirable autograph.

Original! early 19th century (Kittery, M $345.00

 

original c. 1842 COLD WATER ARMY – Temper $65.00

 

1700s earlier 1800s hand forged - BELT A $165.00

 

Autograph, General Charles G. Harker $250.00




(1836-96) Born at Spartanburg, South Carolina, he moved with his parents at a very young age to Bartow County, Georgia. His early education was obtained at the Georgia Military Institute, and he was later admitted to the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1857, but resigned upon the secession of Georgia only a few months before he would have graduated. He was commissioned 2nd lieutenant of artillery in the Regular Confederate Army, on March 16, 1861. He rose rapidly to lieutenant colonel of Cobb's Georgia Legion and was appointed commander of its cavalry. He was attached to General Wade Hampton's brigade of General J.E.B. Stuart's Cavalry Corps, and greatly distinguished himself in the Maryland campaign of 1862. He was promoted to colonel, November 1, 1862, and brigadier general September 28, 1863. During part of 1864 he commanded General Hampton's old division, and in November he was sent to Augusta, Georgia, to collect troops and to aid in the defense of the city then being threatened by Yankee General William T. Sherman. He was subsequently promoted to major general and under the command of Hampton resisted Sherman's advance through the Carolinas. After the war General Young became a prominent politician serving five terms in the U.S. Congress, from 1868 to 1875. He served as a delegate to the Democratic National Conventions of 1872, 1876 and 1880, and also held several consular and diplomatic posts.


Antique silver print photograph in Confederate uniform. This pose dates to the 1863-64 period. No imprint. 2 1/2 x 3 1/2. Circa early 1900's.  


5 x 7 3/4, imprint.


Headquarters Department of the Gulf

New Orleans, Sept. 6, 1862


General Orders No. 67


All commanders of Regiments, Batteries and detached Companies, in this Department, having discharged soldiers or men entitled to go home, will repor[t] the same to the Quartermaster immediately, so that they may be sent by the first transport.


By command of

MAJOR GENERAL BUTLER


R.S. DAVIS, Capt. & A.A.A.G.


Scarce Department of the Gulf imprint. Excellent.  


<b>45th Pennsylvania Infantry


Twice Wounded; at the battle of Jackson, Mississippi, in 1863, and at the battle of the Wilderness, Virginia, in 1864</b>


7 1/2 x 6 1/4, manuscript in ink.


Seminary U.S.A. Hospital

Georgetown, D.C.

June 3, 1864


Major,


Will you please pay the Bearer Chas. H. Coombs, Hospl. Steward, the pay due me on the Company rolls for the Months of March & April as I am in want of it and am unable to leave my room on account of wounds.


Very respectfully,

William Chase

Capt. Co. I, 45 Pa. Vol.


Light age toning. Very fine.


William Chase, was a resident of Tioga County, Pa., when he enlisted as a sergeant, on September 21, 1861, and was mustered into Co. I, of the 45th Pennsylvania Infantry. He was promoted to 2nd lieutenant, September 14, 1862; and captain, April 1, 1863. He was wounded in action on July 11, 1863, at Jackson, Miss.; and wounded again on May 6, 1864, in the battle of the Wilderness, Va. He was discharged on January 18, 1865.


The 45th Pennsylvania Infantry saw action on James Island, S.C., South Mountain and Antietam, Md., Jackson, Miss., Blue Springs, and Knoxville, Tenn., the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and Poplar Springs Church, Va., to name a few of the battles they participated in.     


<b>The first Governor of West Virginia 


Elected during the War Between The States in 1863!


Later served as United States Senator from West Virginia</b>


(1823-96) Studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1843, and commenced a practice in Parkersburg, Va. He served as a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, 1855-61, and presided over the convention of Union supporters from the counties of northwestern Virginia, held at Wheeling, on June 19, 1861, to form the new state of West Virginia. Elected judge of the circuit court of the 19th circuit of Virginia, serving 1861-63. Served as the first Governor of West Virginia, from 1863-69, when he resigned to accept the nomination as U.S. Senator, serving 1869-75.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 3/8 x 2 3/4, in ink, Arthur I. Boreman, West Virginia. Very desirable autograph.

Photograph, General Pierce M. B. Young $10.00

 

1862 Orders Issued by General Benjamin F $15.00

 

1864 Hospital Letter From Wounded Yankee $50.00

 

Autograph, Arthur I. Boreman




Thomas Porter slave button. 3/4 inches in diameter with "T.Porter" on the face. Excavated example with shank. This button dates from the early 1800's and is a relic from the slavery trade era. It was manufactured for the slave trader Thomas Porter who sold slaves in the Caribbean area during the turn of the 19th Century. This button originated in Antigua, British West Indies and was produced in London. The name Porter may have been an Anglo version of Porteous as there was a French family who ran slave ships during that era. These buttons were reportedly found off the Georgia coast and were worn by his slaves for advertising purposes when sold at auction.

 


Antique 19th century fleam which was a bloodletting medical device. The brass case contains three foldable hinged steel blades. When closed the brass case or handle measures 3 1/2 inches in length. When the blades are fully opened the device measures about 6 1/2 inches in length. All three blades are stamped with the makers name which I can't make out. Very fine.    


<b>The Cradle of Liberty</b>


In 1740, at a meeting held in Boston, merchant Peter Faneuil offered to build a public market house at his own expense and donate it as a gift to the city. His offer was accepted and the building which was partly funded by profits from slave trading was begun in Dock Square in September 1740, and completed in 1742. Built in the style of an English country market by artist John Smibert, the ground floor served as a market house with an assembly room above. Faneuil Hall was the site of several important speeches by Sam Adams, James Otis and other patriots encouraging independence from England thus earning the nickname, "the Cradle of Liberty." Through its illustrious 275 year history many other famous orators have spoken here among them Daniel Webster, Edward Everett, Wendell Phillips, Charles Francis Adams, and Oliver Wendell Holmes. In 1806, the hall was expanded by Charles Bulfinch which included the addition of a third floor.  


Antique steel engraving of the famous market house and meeting hall in Boston. Executed by W.H. Bartlett & H. Griffiths. Overall size is 9 1/4 x 6. Circa mid 1800's. Excellent.  


7 1/2 x 3, imprinted form, filled out in ink. $19.00. Received of R.H. Whittaker, Estate. Nineteen Dollars and __ cents Tax for the year 1841. His taxable property consisted of 275 acres of land, valued at $1100; and 9 slaves. Signed by the Warren County Tax Collector. Very fine.

Thomas Porter Slave Merchant Button $45.00

 

Civil War Era Brass Medical Bleeder $150.00

 

Faneuil Hall, Boston, Massachusetts $10.00

 

1841 Mississippi Tax Receipt Listing Sla $75.00




<b>Colonel of the 7th New Hampshire Infantry during the Civil War


United States Senator from North Carolina


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1825-81) Born in Concord, New Hampshire, he graduated from Phillips Academy in 1846 and was a lawyer, businessman, and newspaper editor. He served as Adjutant General of New Hampshire, 1856-61. He began his Civil War career on December 13, 1861, when he was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 7th New Hampshire Infantry. Promoted to colonel on November 17, 1863, he commanded the 2nd Brigade, 24th Corps. He later commanded Abbott's Brigade, Terry's Provisional District, and the 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 10th Army Corps. Abbott was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on January 15, 1865, for gallantry in the capture of Fort Fisher, N.C., and for a time was the commandant of the city. He was a delegate to the North Carolina State constitutional convention in 1868, and upon the readmission of the State of North Carolina to the Union was elected U.S. Senator serving from 1868-71. He served as collector of the port of Wilmington under President Ulysses S. Grant, and was inspector of posts along the eastern line of the southern coast under President Rutherford B. Hayes. He established the town of Abbottsville, in Bladen County, N.C. He was employed as a special agent in the United States Treasury Department. Served as the editor of the Wilmington Post newspaper. 


<u>Signature With States</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 3/4, in ink, Joseph C. Abbott, N.C.  


<b>United States Congressman & Senator from Vermont


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1810-98) Born in Strafford, Vermont. Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, 1854, as an antislavery Whig, he began an unbroken service of 12 years in the House and almost 32 years in the U.S. Senate, to which he was first elected in 1866. In the House he became an important member of the Ways and Means Committee of which he served as chairman, 1865-67; in the Senate he served as a member of the Committee on Finance, of which he was chairman, 1877-79, 1881-93, and 1895-98. He also served on the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds. A conscientious and fair minded protectionist and an authority on finance, he was very influential throughout his congressional career in tariff legislation, especially in the acts of 1861 and 1883; he consistently opposed inconvertible money and financial inflation. He made his greatest contribution in the Morrill Act, for the creation of land grant colleges, first introduced in 1857 and vetoed by President Buchanan, but signed in a similar form by President Abraham Lincoln, in 1862. He served as regent of the Smithsonian Institute, 1883-98, and was a trustee of the University of Vermont, 1865-98.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 3/4, in ink, J.S. Morrill, Vt.  Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison, this natural horn ladies comb sports a period <I>LADY LIBERTY</I> embellishment that we’d guess was added in the patriotic furor of the period.  (Upon close examination the red and blue, two color printing, period typically poor indexing of the colors, one running over the other, and the figure its self is clearly reminiscent of the work seen on Civil War patriotic mailing envelopes so popular all during the war.)  All in wonderful as found condition, this piece offers good evidence of age and originality by virtue of its period construction methods, material used and eye appealing natural gage patina.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!



 This neat little traveling <I>field</I>microscope is entirely complete and functional while at the same time offering good evidence of age and period use.  This offering will set in well with any period scientific or medical grouping.  please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!

Autograph, General Joseph C. Abbott $35.00

 

Autograph, Justin S. Morrill $20.00

 

Civil War vintage ladies - PATRIOTIC HOR $95.00

 

turn of the century antique Pocket or Fi $65.00

Measuring approximately 9 ½ inches in length, this slender hand forged curling iron remains in eye pleasing original condition and will set in nicely in any quality colonial Americana or Revolutionary War personal grouping.   <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  


Large two piece iron backed coat size Confederate artillery uniform button with shank. No back mark. Good sharp face with large "A" and no indentations.  A 800 yard unopened, original label, turn of the century, spool of 8oz. <I>CARPET WARP FOR WEAVING</I> from the January & Woods Inc. <I> Maysville Cotton Mills </I> in Kentucky.  A bit apart from our usual fare but when we had an opportunity to acquire a few spools of this wonderful old cord from turn of the century American grown and milled cotton we could not resist.  Besides those textile collector / historians who would enjoy an early unopened display spool from the historic old Maysville, Kentucky cotton mill, there are other <I>Antiquers</I> who will recognize the practical use potential of 800 yards of turn of the century Kentucky milled, 8oz cotton warp. (Easily distinguishable from <I>modern</I> spun cotton twine, this material will do well in any number of antique applications.)  

      Prior to its recent demolition the historic old Maysville Cotton Mill had been a leading producer of carpet warp, rug yarns, cotton twine, twisted cord and tent rope.  It had been in continuous operation since the first building was erected about 1834 with the exception of several months during the Civil War, when due to the inability to secure cotton, the mill closed from November, 1861 to March, 1862. J&W was one of only a few cotton mills in the country that continued operations throughout the Civil War.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

 A 800 yard unopened, original label, turn of the century, spool of 8oz. <I>CARPET WARP FOR WEAVING</I> from the <I> LILY MILLS - SHELBY, N. Carolina</I> cotton mill.  A bit apart from our usual fare but when we had an opportunity to acquire a few spools of this wonderful old cord from early 1900s North Carolina grown and milled cotton we could not resist.  Besides those textile collector / historians who would enjoy an early unopened display spool from the old Shelby, North Carolina cotton mill, there are other <I>Antiquers</I> who will recognize the practical use potential of 800 yards of turn of the century Southern milled, 8oz cotton warp. (Easily distinguishable from <I>modern</I> spun cotton twine, this material will do well in any number of antique applications.)  Lily Mills located in Shelby, on the edge of cotton country in North Carolina was founded in 1903 as part of growing industry in the post- Civil War, Reconstruction South. It was one of several mills which began to flourish in the region as they processed locally grown cotton in local mills.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

1700s early 1800s CURLING IRON $65.00

 

Confederate Artillery Uniform Button $195.00

 

vintage -Maysville, Kentucky – Cotton Mi $20.00

 

vintage LILY MILLS - Shelby, N. Carolina $20.00




Very rare historical display which includes strands of President Abraham Lincoln's hair, wood from the gallows where the Lincoln conspirators were hung, a piece of the cloth that bound the arms of Mrs. Mary Surratt during her execution and a strand of Mrs. Surratt's hair. 


On July 7, 1865, Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, David Herold and George Atzerodt were hanged from a wooden scaffold in the yard of the Old Arsenal Penitentiary in Washington, D.C. They had been tried and found guilty as conspirators in the plot to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln, and U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward, on April 14, 1865. 


14 x 11, with burgundy suede outer mat and a gold Florentine inner mat, with four separate windows displaying the artifacts. The photographs in the display are high quality modern copies of original Civil War period images. Please note that the illustration of the display on my website is cropped as it is larger than my scanner.


This very rare historical display highlights Mary Surratt who was one of the four conspirators executed on July 7, 1865. The strand of Lincoln's hair originated from a well documented lock given to Mrs. Caroline Wright, the wife of the Governor of Indiana by Mary Lincoln. The documented wood fragments originated from relics obtained by a soldier stationed as a guard in the prison yard. Mary Surratt's hair was included in the effects of Samuel Curtis another guard at the prison and found in his 1865 diary. The remnant of cloth was included with a period note attesting that the wood came from the gallows and the cloth originated from the bindings that held her arms during the execution. These bindings had been made from material from a shelter tent at the same time the executioner, Christian Rath, made hoods from the same material. The latter is an incredibly rare relic of that faithful 1865 summer day, an extremely important day in American history! Mrs. Mary Surratt was the first woman ever executed by the United States Government! Provenance papers on all artifacts are included with the display.        


<b>United States Congressman from Pennsylvania


Civil War Governor of Minnesota


United States Senator from Minnesota


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress


United States Secretary of War</b>


(1815-1903) Born near Harrisburg, Pa., he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1839, and began practice in Harrisburg. Served as U.S. Congressman from Pennsylvania, 1843-47, and as the first Territorial Governor of Minnesota, 1849-53. He was elected as the second Governor of Minnesota after statehood and served from January 2, 1860 to July 10, 1863. Ramsey is credited with being the first Union governor to commit troops to the war effort during the Civil War. He resigned the governorship to become a U.S. Senator, having been elected to that post in 1863, and served until 1875. He served as Chairman of the Committee on Post Office and Post Roads. Was Secretary of War from 1879 to 1881, under President Rutherford B. Hayes. He was the Chairman of the Edmunds Committee dealing with the question of Mormonism and polygamy in Utah, 1882-86. He was a delegate to the centennial celebration of the adoption of the Federal Constitution in 1887. 


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 3 1/8, in ink, Alex. Ramsey, Minn.


       Dated May 1867 this check is drawn on the account of the state of Wisconsin in the amount of $100.00 and is signed by then Wisconsin Secretary of State <B>Bvt. Brig. General Thomas S. Allen</B> who served in the <B>2nd Wisconsin Infantry</B> then as Colonel in command of the <B>5th Wisconsin Infantry</B>.  The check is made to Allen’s clerk <I>Richard Lester</I> who served as <U>1st Sgt.- 2nd Wis.</U> (Sgt. Lester was wounded at Bull Run, Virginia)      

      Though Thomas S. Allen entered the Civil War in April 1861 as a private in the Governor’s Guards (Co. K, 1st Wis. Inf.)  by the end of June he was serving as Captain of Co. I, 2nd Wisconsin which he had raised at the request of the Governor.  A month later Allen led his troops at the <B>Battle of Bull Run</B>, then over the next several months was promoted through the ranks to Lt. Colonel.  Allen led his troops into the <B>Battle of Gainesville</B>, where he was <U>wounded in the neck and the wrist</U>, but refused to leave the field. He was again wounded at the <B>Battle of South Mountain</B>.  In January 1863 Allen was promoted to colonel of the <B>5th Infantry</B>. On May 3, he commanded the regiment at the bloody attack on <B>Marye's Heights</B>, during the <B>2nd Battle of Fredericksburg</B>. On November 7 he was <U>wounded</U> again, during the <B>Battle of Rappahannock Station</B>. When the 5th Infantry’s term of service was up in the summer of 1864, Allen volunteered to reorganize it with new recruits, and served through the end of the war.  He was brevetted <B>Brig. Gen. U.S. Volunteers</B>. In the post-Civil War years Gen. Allen served as Wisconsin’s Secretary of State, was a driving force in the organizing of the <B>Grand Army of the Republic</B> in Wisconsin, and <U>served as its commander, 1869-1870</U>.   A nice item for the autograph enthusiast or Wisconsin in the Civil War items. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 This outstanding Civil War era advertising game board was put out by <B> SNOW & BROWN, 29 Dauphin Street, Mobile, Alabama</B>.  The board measures 12 inches square when open and remains in excellent condition, strong at the hinge with a game surface that remains bright and nearly as new.  The back which is exposed when closed, remains in pleasing condition while offering wear as good evidence of age, originality and period use and carrying.  While we have not been able to date the establishment of the partnership of Snow & Brown at 29 Dauphin, Street, we found that Snow (J. H. Snow) commenced business at that address in 1855 and that the partnership business of Snow & Brown at the same location burned in 1874.   One period description advised that the Dauphin Street establishment <I>’was an elegantly arranged and handsomely fitted up temple of music filled with pianos, organs, and musical instruments’</I>.  Equally well known in Mobile as a music teacher, Snow was a prolific publisher of popular Confederate sheet music from this same address on Deuphin, Street.  (see: <I>CONFEDERATE SHEET MUSIC</I> by E. Lawrence Able)   Among the several such was the <B>JEFFERSON DAVIS GRAND MARCH</B> published in 1861.  An exceptionally nice item to set in with any Civil War era gaming or personal grouping, this neat old advertising game board will be of special interest to the collector of period Southern items.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

The Execution of Lincoln Conspirator Mar $595.00

 

Autograph, Alexander Ramsey $35.00

 

Gen. Thomas S. Allen 2nd & 5th Wisconsin $65.00

 

mid 1800s advertising checkerboard – SNO $295.00




Thomas Porter slave button. 3/4 inches in diameter with the initials "T.P." on the face. Excavated example. This button dates from the early 1800's and is a relic from the slavery trade era. It was manufactured for the slave trader Thomas Porter who sold slaves in the Caribbean area during the turn of the 19th Century. This button originated in Antigua, British West Indies and was produced in London. The name Porter may have been an Anglo version of Porteous as there was a French family who ran slave ships during that era. These buttons were reportedly found off the Georgia coast and were worn by his slaves for advertising purposes when sold at auction.

 


6 x 1 3/4, red and black imprint. Lottery of the State of Kentucky. Covington, Ky. May 19, 1863. The winning numbers on this ticket were 14, 48 and 74. Choice condition. Uncommon.   


<b>United States Senator from Missouri


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1811-92) Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, he attended St. Joseph's College, Bardstown, Ky., in 1823-24, and Patridge's Military Academy, Middletown, Conn., 1824-25, and was appointed a midshipman in the U.S. Navy, in 1825 and served four years. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in Cincinnati in 1833, moved to St. Louis, Mo., in 1834, where he continued the practice of law. Served in the Missouri State House of Representatives, 1859-60. Was a member of the State constitutional convention in 1865. He served as U.S. Senator from Missouri from 1867-70, which included the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. He was the chairman of the Committee on Education. Appointed Chief Justice of the Court of Claims, serving 1870-75.


<u>Signature With Title and State</u>: 5 3/8 x 2, in ink, C.D. Drake, U.[nited] S.[tates] S.[enate] Mo. [Missouri].    


Silver coin with the Roman numeral III with stars around the edges and an olive branch above and a bundle of 3 arrows beneath is on one side, and on the opposite side is a six pointed star with an American shield inside of it and United States of America around the edges. The year, which is at the bottom center, has faded. It looks to me like it might be 1857. Very good.

 

Footnote: This was the smallest of United States silver coins, called the "trime" by the Treasury Department, and it was authorized by Congress, on March 3, 1851.

Slave Merchant Button $50.00

 

1863 State of Kentucky Lottery Ticket $25.00

 

Autograph, Charles D. Drake

 

United States 3 Cents Piece $20.00




< prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 next >

AntiqueArts.com home page! How to use this page! How to advertise here How we manage your personal information Terms of use TIAS home page