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<b>8th Mississippi Regiment


Also includes doctor's letter</b>


8 1/2 x 14, two sided imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Form No. 3. Application for Indigent Blind Widow of Soldier or Sailor of the late Confederacy, Under Chapter 102, Code of 1906, for $75.00. This is for the widow of James A. Bishop who enlisted in the service of the Confederate States in Jasper County, Mississippi in February 1862, and served in Company A, Eighth Mississippi. States that he was discharged April 1, 1864, at Enterprise, Mississippi. The document has been signed and witnessed and is dated August 6, 1914. Included with this form is a doctor's letter, 5 1/2 x 9, written in ink: Jasper Co., Miss., Aug. 3rd, 1914. To whom it may concern, This is to certify Mrs. Melissa Bishop on account of age and being affected with Rheumatism is unable to earn a living. Respectfully, W.C. Lamb, M.D. Light age toning and wear.    


 Victorian heavily carved dining table with winged griffins on plinth, resting on massive claw feet. Beautiful quarter sawn oak top and substantial apron.


Dimensions:  30" H x 66" W x 66" D  A complete American Renaissance Revival carved oak dining room suite, late 19th C., American, comprised of an extension dining table, sideboard, server, china cabinet and eight side chairs. The circular table with molded edge and scalloped carving, figural supports below the skirt, massive anthemion carved pedestal opening to receive two leaves, on an incurvate plinth ending in massive paw feet; the sideboard with broken arch putti crest, griffin support shelf, massive base with extensive decoration of fruit clusters, figural supports and carved moldings, rounded sides, acanthus molded base, ball feet, conforming server with shelf, the 8 chairs (6 sides and 2 arms) with putti crests, barley twist stiles, trapezoidal seats and barley twist legs connected by incurvate stretcher. This suite is $55,000 as is.  Price restored for entire suite, including the addition of fully skirted leaves, and COM upholstery $75,000. 


Table: 30"H x 62" Diameter, opens to 96" wide (with four 18" leaves)

China Cabinet: 94"H x 21"D x 56"W

Sideboard: 87"H x 92"W x 30"D

Server: 54"H x 57.5"W x 22"D

Chair: 50"H 


Note: The strapwork crests with cabochons and flanked by cherubs on the sideboard, server, and chairs are similar to those on a carved oak sideboard, server and chairs in a suite descended in a New Orleans family and attributed to R.J. Horner of New York.  Grandly scaled incredibly carved Rococo "Throne Chair" executed in walnut. This massive chair is a statement piece.

Application of Widow of Deceased Confede

 

7247 19th C. Oak Carved Winged Griffin D $12500.00

 

7157 RJ Horner 12-Piece Renaissance Revi $55000.00

 

7711 Massive Over The Top French Rococo $25000.00

The antique sauce boat presented measures 8 1/2 inches wide by 5 inches tall.  The floral design involves groups of three hanging flowers on a vine that winds its way around the sides of the vessel.  Under the handle are nicely embossed foliates.  It once belonged to a large dinnerware set, each item of which would have a variation of this pretty design.


Two potteries made this shape, W Baker and W.E Corn.  The latter called this design Lily Shape.  Since not backstamp appears on the underside of this gravy tureen, I cannot tell you which pottery produced it.


It's in fine shape, free of chips and cracks with the exception of a tiny chiplet on the underside of the base.  <b>The Aftermath of a Battle</b>


By Gregory A. Coco. 1995, Thomas Publications, Gettysburg, Pa. Soft cover, 433 pages, index, illustrations, maps. This outstanding book traces the cleanup and restoration of the battlefield from the initial stages of removing the wounded and burying the dead, to the development of hospitals, gathering of prisoners, and memorializing the fields. Using numerous first hand accounts, written by people who were present to witness these scenes, the descriptions herein illustrate in a very powerful way the grim realities of warfare. Brand new. 


 Magnificent French rosewood bureau plat desk with fancy bronze ormulu mounts and a black, gold-tooled leather top circa 1890.  


<b>For Corporal of the Jeff Davis Light Artillery</b>


8 1/2 x 14, two sided imprinted form, filled out in type and ink.


APPLICATION FOR PENSION

Form 4- Widows


Application of Widow of Soldier or Sailor of the Late Confederacy. For Mrs. P. Blankinship, the widow of Corporal Joseph Blankinship, of Akenville, Wilcox Country, Alabama, who enlisted in 1861, and served as a corporal and gunman under Capt. Bondurant. Further states that he was with Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House. Dated June 19, 1924, and signed multiple times by the pensioner, P. Blankinship, and T.Q. Brame, the Chancery Clerk. Also signed by E.A. White, President of the Board of Inquiry of Jasper County, Mississippi, and other members of the board, and witnesses. The document has an embossed Jasper County, Miss. seal. 


Also included is a typed letter signed, 8 1/2 x 14. 


State of Mississippi

Jasper County


I, Mrs. P. Blankinship, do hereby certify that I was married to Joseph Blankinship, a Confederate Veteran, at Lake Como, Mississippi, on 22 day of Oct. 1865. 


I further certify that I have no income whatever of any kind of description.


This April 11, 1928.


Mrs. P. Blankinship


Sworn to and subscribed before me this the 11th day of April, A.D., 1928.


T.Q. Brame

Clerk of Chancery Court

Jasper County, Miss.


Light age toning and wear. Confederate pension documents are scarce to find, this application filed by the State of Mississippi. 


Joseph Blankinship served as a corporal in the Jeff Davis Light Artillery Battery of Alabama during the War Between The States.


The Jeff Davis battery, organized at Selma, Ala., in May, 1861, was soon sent to Virginia, where it fought in Early's brigade at Manassas and at the battle of Seven Pines, losing 3 men at the latter place.


In Hill's division, during the Seven Days' battles, it lost 3 killed and 14 wounded; at Cold Harbor, 3 killed and 10 wounded; at Gaines' Mill, 3 killed and 14 wounded.


It also fought at Mechanicsville and many other points in Virginia, and was at South Mountain, Fredericksburg and Orange Court House.  It took part in the terrible battle of Gettysburg.


Serving, consecutively, in Long's and Page's brigades, it was in northern Virginia during the spring and summer of 1864, at Cedar Creek in October, 1864, and at Fort Clifton in March, 

1865.  It was almost continuously engaged.


Its first captain was J.T. Montgomery, who was succeeded by J.W. Bondurant, and later it was commanded by W.J. Reese. The latter was in command during and after the battle of Gettysburg.  These officers were all distinguished for their skill and gallantry.


Source:  Confederate Military History, Vol. VIII

White Ironstsone Sauce Boat, Bordered Hy $55.00

 

A Strange and Blighted Land, Gettysburg

 

7718 Antique French Rosewood Bureau Plat $15000.00

 

Application of Widow of Deceased Confede $25.00




<b>Bicentennial Edition</b>


By Alphaeus H. Albert. Boyertown Publishing Company, 1976. Blue cloth, hard cover, with gold embossed lettering on the front cover and spine, 511 pages, profusely illustrated. Bicentennial Edition. Very fine. This famous reference work is considered the "bible" or standard reference work on the subject of buttons from 1775 onward.


A definitive listing of the buttons depicting the insignia of the armed forces and famous regiments, governmental, service and veteran organizations, educational and military training institutions, the State seals, the Republic of Texas, the Confederate armed forces, the caricatures and slogans of political campaigns, including those of Washington's Inauguration, with illustrations and relative value.  


Elizabeth Brown Pryor. Published by Viking Penguin Group, N.Y., 2007. Hard cover with dust jacket, 658 pages, index, illustrations, brand new. 


A legendary but elusive hero; a wonderful trove of overlooked family letters; and one of America's most dramatic sagas all come together in this new study of Robert E. Lee.


Over the past several years historian Elizabeth Brown Pryor has uncovered important documents in both private and public collections that give a stunning personal account of Lee's military ability, his beliefs, and his time. "Reading the Man" presents dozens of these previously unpublished letters in their entirety, using them as departure points for a series of surprising "historical excursions" that shed new light on every aspect of Lee, telling his life story with an innovative blend of analysis, historiography, and rich period detail. Through them we are able to look across time at Lee's troubled childhood, the hardening of his anti-abolitionist views, his celebrated but controversial battlefield performance, and his final wrenching years.


Part of the intrigue of "Reading the Man" is that it delves into lesser-known aspects of Lee's character, such as his pioneering role in engineering science, the fluctuation in his religious beliefs, and the way he shaped his leadership style. The relationships that influenced Lee's decisions are also examined, including the deep love he held for his seven children and the often tense interactions he had with his fellow generals and the Confederate government. And for the first time his actions are explained in the context of the tumultous societal developments taking place in the young United States, which changed the expectations of men like Lee, making them leading actors in the formation of the nation, frequently at the cost of their private happiness. 


As Pryor's exhaustive research shows, Robert E. Lee had no premonition of fame. He never saw himself as a tragic, heroic figure, and as a result his letters are remarkably open. Lee's guileless pen reveals a person who is frequently as confused, passive, and vulnerable as he is conscientious and brave; a witty storyteller and merry companion who suffers from loneliness and deep depressions; and an intrepid commander whose very boldness may have lost him the war. The Robert E. Lee who emerges is more complex and contradictory and far more fascinating than the familiar stone icon. "Reading the Man" gives a tantalizing glimpse of a guarded soul while it prods us to question our own assumptions about the meaning of loyalty and patriotism.  


<b>United States Congressman from Missouri</b>


(1823-93) He established the first omnibus line in St. Louis, Missouri and subsequently inaugurated the first street railroad company.  He served as a member of the Board of Alderman of St. Louis, 1853-67.  Was President of the Missouri Railroad Company, 1859-83.  Served as United States Congressman, 1869-77 and 1879-81. 

 

<u>Signature with Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 3/8, in ink, Erastus Wells, St. Louis, Mo.  


<b>The famous 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry</b>


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of Colonel DeWitt Clinton Baxter, commander of the 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry, "Baxter's Zouaves." Imprint at top center, Head-Quarters Baxter's Fire Zouaves, Third Regiment, Baxter's Brigade. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8.


The 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Baxter's Fire Zouaves, were organized in Philadelphia, Pa., on August 10, 1861, and were commanded by Colonel DeWitt Clinton Baxter, who was wounded in action on July 3, 1863, at the battle of Gettysburg. The monument with statue of a Zouave with clubbed musket marks the area near the famous stonewall and copse of trees where the regiment was in action during Pickett's Charge on July 3rd. It was here that the brave Pennsylvanians were deadlocked in heroic hand to hand combat with their Rebel rivals. The regiment went into the fight 485 strong and when the smoke cleared only 266 were left.


WBTS Trivia: The hard fighting 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry lost 11 officers and 182 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, and 2 officers and 69 enlisted men who died from disease during the Civil War for a total of 264 men lost.


***Please read the history about these Union patriotic imprints recently discovered in their individual category section on the website. CIVIL WAR MEMORABILIA/Patriotic Imprints.

Record of American Uniform and Historica $45.00

 

Reading The Man; A Portrait of Robert E.

 

Autographm Erastus Wells

 

Head Quarters Baxter's Fire Zouaves




<b>Written by Clark S. Edwards, Colonel of the regiment


He commanded the 5th Maine during the battle of Gettysburg!


Promoted to Brevet Brigadier General


War Date Letter With Cover that has been franked by Edwards as Major of the 5th Maine Infantry


"We are still here in camp but have orders to move...report says to Harpers Ferry or across into Va...I presume we shall have another fight within a day or two as everything is looking that way."</b>


(1824-1903) Edwards was 37 years old when the news of the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter reached the small town of Bethel, Maine.  He was high on a ladder shingling his roof and he immediately climbed down, obtained permission from the appropriate authorities to form a company of volunteers, and set out to gather recruits from Bethel and the surrounding towns.  This group of men became Company I, of the 5th Maine Volunteer Infantry, with Edwards commissioned as their captain on June 24, 1861.  He rose through the ranks and was appointed colonel of the regiment, on January 8, 1863, commanding the 5th Maine Infantry from that date forward. He was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on March 13, 1865, for his gallant and meritorious Civil War service record.


The 5th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was one of the first Maine regiments to be mustered into the Union Army.  They fought in many battles from 1st Bull Run to Petersburg.  During the battle of Rappahannock Station the regiment is credited with capturing 4 Confederate battle flags and 1,200 prisoners.  Known as one of Maine's best fighting regiments, it captured more prisoners than the entire number of men who served in the regiment, and three times the number of battle flags than any other Maine regiment.  After three long years of hard fought service only 193 men were mustered out of the regiment when their term of service expired.  Among their battle honors are written the names of 1st Bull Run, Gaines' Mill, 2nd Bull Run, Crampton's Gap, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Rapidan Crossing, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor and Petersburg.


4 pages, 5 x 7 3/4, in ink. Comes with envelope addressed in the hand of Edwards to his wife, Mrs. C.S. Edwards, [thus his full signature] Bethel, Maine, C.D.S., Washington, D.C., Nov. 4, 1862, stamped Due 3. Franked (signed) at the top right, Soldier's Letter, Maj. C.S. Edwards, 5th Me. Vol.  


<b><u>Tuesday Afternoon, In camp near Bakersville, Md., Oct. 28th/62</b></u>


My Dear wife,


We are still here in camp but have orders to move or be ready to move at once, but I hardly know which way we go, but report says to Harpers Ferry or across into Va.  I presume we shall have another fight within a day or two as everything is looking that way.  I have not received any letters from you since I wrote my last as we only get one mail a week.  The health of the Regt. is good at the present time.  Bryce* is quite smart again.  David is well.  All the Bethel boys are well that is with us.  The clever fella is still in the Hospital but I hear he is quite smart.  Dan Stearns** is the same as ever.  I am as fat as a hog.  I weigh 160 lbs. that is ten lbs. more than I weighed last winter.  If I keep on I will be obliged to go home.  When I sit down I have to unbutton my pants and find by my clothes are all too small for me.  I never was near as plucky as now.  A clear conscience is everything to make a man pluck up.  I get along quite easy now, have but very little to do as we have good horses to ride, or at least I have.  I have been out to a little vill.[age] or three of them.  One is Bakersville, one Fair Play and the other is Tillman Town.  There is one store in each place but few goods in them at the present time.  My horse is a beautiful one to ride and I like riding very much.  I think you & Kate will not laugh when you see me ride now as they call me a very good rider, but I think it is in having a good horse.  You write me that Lee is still at Augustine.  If he had been here a few days ago I could [have] got him a good place in the Comm. Department, but the place is now taken up.  I hope his wife is feeling better than she was a while ago.  Give my regards to her and tell her I will call & see her when I go home.  I shall write the boys as soon as I find out about the matters that is the sutler’s.  I think they could do well here in it and well could make more money in one month here than he can in a year at the North.  I know of some of the privates making a hundred dollars per month in selling little things they buy outside the Regt.  I have no doubt but he could make money in buying pelts here as the farmers are selling nice pelts from twenty to forty cts. a piece (20 to 40 cts.) and he could send them to N. York or Boston & make a profit.  I think if I should resign I would go with something of the kind here and in western Va. & Penna.  I must now go on dress parade so good bye.  


There is no formal signature, but the letter is definitely complete, and has two of his signatures on the envelope, in the address line and the free frank at top.


Light age toning and wear. Very fine.


* Bryce M. Edwards, was a 41 year old private, of Co. I, 5th Maine Infantry, who hailed from Otisfield, Me.


** Daniel M. Stearns, was a 22 year old private, of Co. I, 5th Maine Infantry, and a resident of Bethel, Me. He was wounded in action on May 3, 1863 at the battle of Chancellorsville, Va.  A white ironstone oval platter in the Eagle or Diamond Thumbprint shape. Unusual and HTF shape. Potted by Gelson + Bros. Ca. 1868-75. it is 10 1/2 x 15 inches. Mint condition with no chips or hairlines. Excellent color and crisp detail. There is a stress line that occurred during the firing(pictured).  


2 pages, 4 1/8 x 6 1/2, written in ink by Charles V. Bogart, to his mother.


<b><u>Nashville, Tennessee, Hospital No. 1, July 21, 1863</b></u>


Dear Mother,


I will once more sit down to write a few lines to let you know that I am not dead nor a going to be. I have...written several letters but can't get any since. I just received a letter from Charley. Charley is the only one I can get any letters from any more. I have written to all the rest of you two or 3 times a piece and I have not heard a word from any of you since I came here. Have you wrote or not. I should like very well to know how you all are getting along. I think I am pretty near well. I am going to the Regiment before long, I expect in a few days. I should like to hear how you are before I go, and write. No more at present so good by. My love to you all.

 

C.V. Bogart


Light age toning and wear. The ink is faded in some places.


Charles V. Bogart served in Co. G, 18th U.S. Infantry during the Civil War. After the war he was a member of G.A.R. Post #780, General Willich Post, in Des Plaines, Illinois. He died on November 26, 1909.


The 18th U.S. Infantry fought in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and in the Atlanta campaign.   


2 pages, 4 7/8 x 8, written in ink by Charles V. Bogart, to his mother.


<b><u>General Field Hospital, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, June the 3, 1863</b></u>


Dear Mother,


I have just written you a letter enclosed in a letter I sent to Hud Swick and put it in the office and got back to the tent and Tune was here. Had a letter wrote to send he had wrote the eve you sent to me, and so I thought I would write a few lines and send with his. I have not got much to write at present for I am wrote almost out. I have written 4 letters today and this makes 5. I believe that is all at present so good by. O yes, I forgot to ask [how] you get along this spring work and who do you have to help you. Things look nice down here. We have just had some rain and it makes things look green. No more. Write soon.

  

C.V. Bogart


Light age toning and fold wear. 


Charles V. Bogart served in Co. G, 18th U.S. Infantry during the Civil War. After the war he was a member of G.A.R. Post #780, General Willich Post, in Des Plaines, Illinois. He died on November 26, 1909.


The 18th U.S. Infantry fought in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and in the Atlanta campaign.

5th Maine Infantry Letter $125.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE PLATTER, EAGLE $135.00

 

18th U. S. Infantry Letter, Nashville, Te $25.00

 

18th U. S. Infantry Letter, Murfreesboro, $35.00




By Harry W. Pfanz. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, N.C., 1993. Hard cover with dust jacket, 507 pages, index, maps and illustrations. Brand new condition.


In this companion to his celebrated earlier book, "Gettysburg; The Second Day" Harry Pfanz provides the first definitive account of the fighting between the Army of the Potomac and Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia at Cemetery Hill and Culp's Hill, two of the most critical engagements at Gettysburg on 2 and 3 July 1863. Cemetery Hill, located at the northeast end of the battlefield, was the curve of the hook shaped Union position, while Culp's Hill formed the barb of the hook on the right of the main Union line. 


Pfanz provides detailed tactical accounts of each stage of the fighting and explores the interactions between and decisions made by generals on both sides. He begins by introducing two of the principal protagonists, Confederate Lieutenant General Richard S. Ewell and Union Major General Oliver O. Howard, reviewing the operations that brought them and their armies to Gettysburg; Ewell's sweeping raid into Pennsylvania and Howard's selection of Cemetery Hill as the keystone of the Union position at Gettysburg.


On 1 July the outnumbered Union forces that retreated from the fields west and north of town rallied on Cemetery Hill and extended their line right to Culp's Hill and left down Cemetery Ridge. Pfanz illuminates Ewell's controversial decision not to attack Cemetery Hill that day. He also discusses General Lee' plan for Ewell to attack both hills on 2 July, as General Longstreet assaulted the Union left, and Culp's Hill on 3 July at the time Longstreet attacked the Union center. Pfanz suggests that Union blunders nearly resulted in a victory for Ewell on 2 July, although defeat came the next morning at the hands of Union troops fighting from behind breastworks at Culp's Hill.


Pfanz explores other salient features of the fighting as well, including the Confederate occupation of the town of Gettysburg, the skirmishing in the south end of town and in front of the hills, and the small but decisive fight between Union cavalry and the Stonewall Brigade.  


By Harry W. Pfanz. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, N.C., 1987. Hard cover with dust jacket, 601 pages, index, maps, illustrations. Brand new.


The second day's fighting at Gettysburg, the assault of the Army of Northern Virginia against the Army of the Potomac on 2 July 1863, was probably the critical engagement of that decisive battle and, therefore, among the most significant actions of the Civil War.


Harry Pfanz, a former historian at Gettysburg National Military Park, has written a definitive account of the second day's brutal combat. He begins by introducing the men and units that were to do battle, analyzing the strategic intentions of Lee and Meade as commanders of the opposing armies, and describing the concentration of forces in the area around Gettysburg. He then examines the development of tactical plans and the deployment of troops for the approaching battle. But the emphasis is on the fighting itself. Pfanz provides a thorough account of the Confederates smashing assualts at Devil's Den and Little Round Top, through the Wheatfield and the Peach Orchard, and against the Union center at Cemetery Ridge. He also details the Union defense that eventually succeeded in beating back these assaults, depriving Lee's gallant army of victory.


Pfanz analyzes decisions and events that have sparked debate for more than a century. In particular he discusses factors underlying the Meade-Sickles controversy and the questions about Longstreet's delay in attacking the Union left. The narrative is also enhanced by thirteen superb maps, more than eighty illustrations, brief portraits of the leading commanders, and observations on artillery, weapons, and tactics that will be of help even to knowledgeable readers.


"Gettysburg; The Second Day" is certain to become a Civil War classic. What makes the work so authoritative is Pfanz's mastery of the Gettysburg literature and his unparalleled knowledge of the ground on which the fighting occurred. His sources include the Official Records, regimental histories and personal reminiscences from soldiers North and South, personal papers and diaries, newspaper files, and last but assuredly not least, the Gettysburg battlefield.


Pfanz's career in the National Park Service included a ten year assignment as a park historian at Gettysburg. Without doubt, he knows the terrain of the battle as well as he knows the battle itself.



"For Civil War readers not familiar with Harry Pfanz, be advised that he is today the greatest living authority on Gettysburg. What he has done here is to produce the most complete acount of the main fighting on July 2 that will ever be written; both a fast paced narrative and an all inclusive encyclopedia." James I. Robertson    


By Harry W. Pfanz. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, N.C., 2001. Hardcover with dust jacket. 472 pages, index, maps, illustrated. Brand new condition.


Though a great deal has been written about the battle of Gettysburg, much of it has focused on the events of the second and third days. With this book, the first day's fighting finally receives its due. Harry Pfanz, a former historian at Gettysburg National Military Park and author of two previous books on the battle, presents a definitive account of the events of July 1, 1863.


Pfanz begins by sketching the background of the Gettysburg campaign and recounting the events leading up to the opening of the battle. After depicting the advances the earliest skirmishes just west of Gettysburg, he details the fighting that took place west and north of the town, the retreat of the Union forces through Gettysburg, and the Federal rally on Cemetery Hill. Highlights of Pfanz's narrative include his descriptions of the decimation of Iverson's North Carolina brigade, the smashing of the Eleventh Corps at Blocher's Knoll, the decisive morning and afternoon fighting at the railroad cuts, the bloody battles at McPherson's Woods, and the final Union stand at the seminary.


Throughout the book, Pfanz challenges some of the most common assumptions about the battle as a whole, most notably that Union cavalry only delayed the Confederate forces by skirmishing, rather than held them off by hard fighting on the first day, and that Richard Ewell's late day failure to press an attack against Union troops at Cemetery Hill ultimately cost the Confederacy the battle. 


Deeply researched and engagingly written, this book will ensure that the importance of the first day's battle at Gettysburg will be remembered in the ongoing exploration of the events that followed.



"With this installment, Harry Pfanz completes a three volume work that every serious student of the battle of Gettysburg must consult. Here is military history at its best." James I. Robertson


"Gettysburg; The First Day" continues Harry Pfanz's superbly researched, beautifully written, and exquisitely detailed study of the battle. The three volumes comprise a great classic, and the best Gettysburg material ever published." Robert K. Krick


"No one knows and understands the battle of Gettysburg better than Harry W. Pfanz. Since he joined the National Park Service as a historian in 1956, he has never been far from what for the public is America's best known and most controversial battle. His credentials as a researcher, raconteur, and historian par excellence are attested to by his applauded books on the battle's second and third days..."Gettysburg; The First Day" fills a void and completes in masterful fashion a trilogy long needed and guaranteed to stand the test of time." Edwin C. Bearss   


5 1/4 x 4, imprinted form, filled out in ink. 


No. 89. Treasurer of Amite County, $2.


Pay on the 1st day of May, A.D., 1862 to the order of H. McKnight, F.H. Sleeper, E.L. Tarvis, Wm. Jenkins and Thos. Garner Commissioners of the Military Fund of Amite County, the sum of Two Dollars, the same being the amount appropriated to J.M. Dye on the 23d day of January A.D., 1862, with interest at 8 per cent per annum from that date until paid.


Witness my hand and Official Seal this 5 day of February A.D., 1862, A.J. Whittington, Clerk, Moses Jackson, Pres't Board Police.


Written in ink on the reverse is T.H. Sleeper for Military Board. Filed & cancelled, May 19, 1862, A.J. Whittington. 


Embossed seal at lower left of the document. Light age toning and wear.

Gettysburg; Culp's Hill & Cemetery Hill

 

Gettysburg; The Second Day $25.00

 

Gettysburg; The First Day

 

1862 Receipt Military Relief Fund Amite $35.00




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"We stopped on Rich Mountain where the first battle was fought and where our men whipped the Rebels.  It is a very rough and strong place and we could see where the balls had struck the trees in the woods.  "</b>


2 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Beverly, Nov. 12th/62</b></u> 


My Dear wife,


After my love to you and the children and my best wishes for your health, I will inform you that I am still in the enjoyment of good health.  We left Buckhannon on Sunday morning for this place where we arrived on Monday evening.  We came through the roughest country that I have ever seen.  It was first round one mountain and then over another all the way.  We stopped on Rich Mountain where the first battle was fought and where our men whipped the Rebels.  It is a very rough and strong place and we could see where the balls had struck the trees in the woods.  We got here in the evening and encamped on the banks of Taggert Valley River close to town.  There is not many troops here at this time.  There is part of three regiments and part of one battery.  We left 4 of our men sick at Buckhannon amongst the rest M.W. Maris, but we are looking for them in a few days.  I wrote to you on Saturday night before we left Buckhannon stating that I thought I would get leave of absence to come home from here, but General Milroy was not here, but we are looking for him every day and I think when he comes I will get to come home.  There is talk that we will be paid off about the 20th of this month.  If that is the case I would rather wait till I get some money to bring home to you for I don’t know how you can get along this winter without money.  Well good by dear.  May God bless you and keep you till I get home.  

  

From your loving Husband,


L. Lupton


Beverly, Randolph Co., Va., Co. C, 116th

 

Light age toning and wear. Fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.        This outstanding pair of horn mounted, hollow ground, straight razors are the early work of Sheffield’s <B>William Greaves</B>.  One  simply marked <I>W. Greaves</I> and the other <I>Warranted Steel,</I> the pair would have been made prior to 1816 when a son joined the firm resulting in the name change to <I>W. Greaves & Son</I>.  All in wonderful condition, untouched with pleasing evidence of age and originality, the slabbed horn grip of one bears the faintly scratch engraved date <I>1812</I>.  Both razors bear a similarly inscribed letter <I>B</I>on one side of its grip.  One razor has been squared off at the butt of the grip.  A common practice accomplished by the user when razors are in pairs.  (Afforded quick identification of razors one from another thus keeping track of which had been used and which had been freshly stropped.)   The razors are housed in their original pine case the body being chiseled from a single piece of wood with a swing away cover.   With minimal wear at the edges from period use and carrying the case retains its period dark green <I>milk-paint</I> finish.  A nice item for the vintage straight razor enthusiast or personal item collector that appreciates items from the War of1812 era with use through the Mexican War into the Civil War period.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


     

 Utilized in the period as textile binding braid or tape, this original 5 yard packet of early ¾ inch D. Goff & Son Worsted remains in unopened <I>as new</I>condition and will serve well in any appropriate textile restoration effort or simply as a display piece with 19th century textile or sewing antiques.

Darius Goff set up his textile machinery in 1861 in what was known as <I>the old stone mill</I>on the east side of the river in Pawtucket, Rhode Island.  The little weaving operation was the first worsted mill in the country when the younger Goff joined his father to form D. Goff & Son in 1862.  A neat old attic find.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

 <b>State of Mississippi</b> 


7 3/4 x 9 3/4, imprint filled out in ink.


The State of Mississippi


To R.L. Meredith, Dr.


1861, Sept. 14. Services of self & team of 2 horses, hauling for 1 month from Aug. 14 to Sept. 14, 1861. $50.00. Received at Iuka, [Miss.], Sept. 14, 1861 of A.B. Dillworth, Assistant Quarter-Master General, Army of Mississippi, Fifty Dollars, in full of the above account. R.L. Meredith. Light age toning and wear. Very fine early war Mississippi imprinted document.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

outstanding pre 1812 W. Greaves travelin $225.00

 

Civil War era - D. Goff & Son Worsted B $75.00

 

1861 Receipt For Services Provided to Q. $75.00




4 3/4 x 8, manuscript in ink.


Chief Q.M. Office, 

Meridian, [Miss.], Aug. 9th/64


Capt.,


You will please report at this office with as little delay as possible prepared to make a trip to Montgomery, Ala. I have some business in Montgomery I wish to have attended to at once.


Very Respy.,

Jno W. [?]

Maj. & Chief Q.M.


[to] Capt. J.C. Noble

Lauderdale Springs, [Miss.]


Light age toning and wear. Very fine.


WBTS Trivia: Lauderdale Springs, Mississippi was the site of Lauderdale Springs Confederate Hospital and Cemetery.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"Dear I want you to pray to your heavenly Father to heal your bodily infirmities and don’t forget to pray for your poor sinful Father for he has need of your prayers. "</b>


2 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his children.


<b><u>Buckhannon, Nov. 8th, 1862</b></u> 


My Dear Children,


I thought I would send you a few lines wishing they might find you in good health.  Margy it makes me feel very bad to think that you have such a hard time of it and have no one but Mother to do anything for you for it makes it so hard on her when you are all sick.  I have wished many, very many times that I was there to help take care of you.  Dear I want you to pray to your heavenly Father to heal your bodily infirmities and don’t forget to pray for your poor sinful Father for he has need of your prayers.  Laura I am glad that you keep up this fall.  I hope you can help your Mother in her trials and troubles for she has much need of help at this time.  I hope you will be a good girl and do all you can for the rest of the children.  Well Willey, Pap is glad that you have got well and he hopes that you will be a good boy and do all you can for your Mother and sisters and not quarrel with them and do not be saucy to Mother or anybody else.  I want you to carry all the stove wood and the coal for Mother and feed the pigs and cow for her and do not run away nor stay out at night but always mind Mother and the good Lord will bless you and keep you safe, so good by my Dear children and may it please the Lord to keep you safe.

  

From your Loving Father,


Levi Lupton


Write to Pap and direct to Beverly, Va.

 

Light age toning and wear. Fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


5 x 8, imprint.


WAR DEPARTMENT

Adjutant General's Office,

Washington, May 29, 1865


Memorandum:


Where deserters have been arrested during the continuance of the President's [Lincoln] Proclamation, of March 11, 1865, they are entitled to its benefits.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:


L.H. PELOUZE

Assistant Adjutant Genetal


Light age toning and wear. There are two very tiny punch holes at the left edge which do not affect any of the content.  


<b>Signed by the commanding officer of the regiment who was wounded and captured at Gettysburg!</b>


8 1/2 x 10 3/4, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Invoice of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores, turned over by Capt. John Irvin, Comdg. 149th P.V., to Comdg. officer Co. C, 149th P.[ennysylvania] V.[olunteers] at Culpepper, Va., on the 6th day of February, 1864. The invoice lists an Enfield rifled musket, Cal. .577, bayonet scabbard, cap pouches, cartridge box, cartridge box plates, cartridge box belts, gun sling and non-commissioned officer's waist belts. I certify, That the above is a correct Invoice of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores turned over by me this 6th day of February, 1864, to Comdg. officer Co. C, 149th P.V. John Irvin, Capt. Comdg., 149th P.V. Excellent document. Very desirable regiment!


John Irvin, was a 26 year old resident of Clearfield County, Pa., when he enlisted on August 26, 1862, and was commissioned captain, in the 149th Pennsylvania Infantry. He was wounded and captured on July 1, 1863, at the battle of Gettysburg. He was promoted to major, February 10, 1864; lieutenant colonel, April 22, 1864; colonel, February 21, 1865; and was mustered out of service on June 24, 1865, at Elmira, New York.


<u>149th Pennsylvania Infantry</u>


This regiment (Bucktail) was recruited in the late summer of 1862 from the counties of Potter, Tioga, Lycoming, Clearfield, Clarion, Lebanon, Allegheny, Luzerne, Mifflin and Huntingdon, and was mustered into the U.S. service at the general camp of rendezvous in the month of August for a three years' term. Such had been the efficient service rendered during the first year of the war by the original Bucktails, the 42nd of the line, a strong demand arose for a Bucktail brigade from the state. Major Stone of the 42nd accordingly authorized by the Secretary of War in July, 1862, to proceed to the state and raise such a brigade. Within 20 days twenty companies were organized, which formed the 149th and 150th regiments, and there was a good prospect of raising a third and even a fourth regiment, when the Confederate army suddenly invaded Maryland and the two regiments already organized were immediately ordered to Washington. The men of the 149th were of fine physique, accustomed to the rifle, and wore the "bucktail" as did the original regiment of that name. It remained on duty in the vicinity of Washington until the middle of Feb., 1863, when it joined the Army of the Potomac at Belle Plain, Va., and was there assigned to Stone's (2nd) brigade, Doubleday's (3d) division, Reynolds' (1st) corps. It was in position on the right of the line at Chancellorsville, but was only lightly engaged and suffered no loss. It arrived on the field of Gettysburg at 11 o'clock a. m. on the first day of the battle and at once went into position on the ridge in front of the seminary, near the Chambersburg Pike. It maintained its position with great heroism throughout the first day until the whole line retreated through the town. Its heaviest losses were sustained in the fierce fighting of this day, though it was fearfully exposed during the great artillery duel of the third day. It lost 53 killed, 172 wounded and 111 captured or missing, a total of 336.  Among the severely wounded were Colonel Stone, commanding the brigade, and Lieutenant Colonel Dwight, the regiment. While in winter quarters near Culpeper, it received a large number of recruits mostly conscripts. On May 4, 1864, it moved on the Wilderness campaign and fought at the battles of the Wilderness, Laurel Hill, the North Anna, Totopotomy, Cold Harbor and the first assaults on Petersburg. Its losses were enormous from the beginning of the campaign up to the end of July, amounting to 34 killed, 249 wounded and 121 missing, a total of 404. It was active in the work of the siege until the middle of August, when it was engaged with its corps on the Weldon Railroad, suffering some loss. Three weeks were then spent in fortifying, when it was relieved and held in reserve until Oct.1. It fought at Hatcher's run in October; shared in the raid on the Weldon Railroad in December; and fought its last engagement at Dabney's Mill in Feb., 1865, after which it was ordered north and was engaged in guarding the prison camp at Elmira, N.Y., until the close of its term of service. It was mustered out at Elmira on June 24, 1865, and proceeded to Harrisburg, Pa., where the men were paid and finally discharged. 


Source: The Union Army, Vol. 1

Order From Chief Q. M. , Meridian, Mississ $45.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

War Department Memorandum Concerning Des $10.00

 

Ordnance Invoice, 149th Pennsylvania Inf $125.00




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"We have orders to march to Beverly distant about thirty miles from here, but no farther from home, and I think if we get there I can get a furlough to come, at least the Colonel told me that he thought General Milroy would give me leave to come home. "</b>


2 pages, 7 3/4 x 9 1/2, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Buckhannon, Nov. 8th, 1862, Saturday Night</b></u> 


My Dear wife,


After my love to you and the children I can inform you that I am well at the present time and have been so all the time since I left home.  The weather is quite blustery.  We had a right smart snow last night and it laid on the ground all day, but we have very comfortable quarters, but we have to pull up stakes tomorrow morning.  We have orders to march to Beverly distant about thirty miles from here, but no farther from home, and I think if we get there I can get a furlough to come, at least the Colonel told me that he thought General Milroy would give me leave to come home.  He thinks that we will go into winter quarters pretty soon, and then there will be a good chance to get home.  Well Dear, I recd. your letter of the 6th and was glad to hear that Irena was a little better for I have been very uneasy about her for I thought I might never get to see her again, but I do hope that it will please our heavenly Father to grant me the privilege of once more seeing my dear little family again.  I feel very bad about Margy.  I was so in hopes that she would be able to help you.  If the Doctor thinks he can help her I think you had better let her go and let him try what he can do for her for I feel very anxious about her, and I am in hopes that he can help her.  Well Dear, in regards to Jerry if you cannot get seventy dollars for him try and get Jeha to take him and keep him for me until I come home, and I will try what I can do for him.  I think he ought to bring seventy five dollars for he is well worth it, but I will take a little less considering the circumstances.  As to my other matters with Jim I will try and settle the business when I come home.  I expected that he would do the right thing, but if he has not I will straighten him out.  Just keep a sharp look out and if he trys to take the advantage he may have cause to repent it.  I feel very sorry that people have so little principle as some seem to show.  When we were starting away they would do everything for anybody, and when they are gone they would take everything, but there will be a final settlement after a while.  I don’t want you to let anybody see or read this for I don’t want it to be known for it might be that matters will be all right.  Well Dear, I must conclude as it is getting late, so no more at this time.  May the Lord bless you and sustain you amidst your trials and troubles. Good by Dear.


From your loving husband,


Levi Lupton


Direct to Beverly, Va., Co. C, 116th Reg.

 

Light age toning and wear. Fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  Intricately detailed Renaissance Revival rosewood and walnut inlaid table circa 1865. This antique American Renaissance Revival inlaid table features gilt and ebonized incising, carved details and bronze mounts. Apron has inset gilt incised burl panels, and detailed stretcher joins ebonized acanthus leaf detailed base with stylized gilt incising.  


<b>War date document signed</b>


(1822-98) Born in Fredericksburg, Indiana, he attended what is now DePauw University, and then taught school in Independence, Mo. Shortly after, he studied medicine under his wife's brother, serving in this profession until being called into action as a captain of the 2nd Indiana Volunteers during the Mexican War. After the war he returned to Indiana where he practiced medicine at Loogootee. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Kimball was commissioned colonel of the 14th Indiana Infantry and saw action at Cheat Mountain, in western Virginia in the fall of 1861. In March 1862 Kimball was commanding one of General James Shields' division at the battle of Kernstown, Va., where he inflicted a defeat on the celebrated Confederate General Stonewall Jackson, one of the few defeats suffered by Jackson during his military career. Kimball was promoted to brigadier general, on April 16, 1862, and led the 1st Brigade of General William H. French's division of the 2nd Corps in the bitter fighting at Antietam, where he lost 600 men killed and wounded. During the battle of Fredericksburg, Va., on December 13, 1862, he was severely wounded. By the summer of 1863, he was commanding a division of the 16th Corps during the Vicksburg campaign. In 1864, during the Atlanta campaign, he held brigade command, and then after the battle of Peach Tree Creek, he commanded a division of the 4th Corps. He was active in suppressing the activities of the disloyal Knights of the Golden Circle in southern Indiana, and then moved on to join in the fighting at the battles of Franklin and Nashville, Tennessee. After the war he became Indiana State Commander of the Grand Army of the Republic; served two terms as State Treasurer; and one term in the State Legislature. President U.S. Grant appointed him Surveyor General of the Utah Territory in 1873, where he thereafter made his home. President Hayes later appointed him Postmaster of Ogden, Utah, an office he held until his death.


<u>War Date Document Signed</u>: 7 1/2 x 8, imprinted form, filled out in ink. Requisition for Forage For One Private Horse in the service of Brig. Genl. Nathan Kimball, Comdg. 1st Div., 4th A.[rmy] C.[orps], U.S. Army at Huntsville, Ala., for twenty eight days, commencing the 1st of February 1865, and ending on the 28th of February 1865. Beautiful large signature at bottom right,  Nathan Kimball, Brig. Genl. Comdg., 1st Div., 4 A.C. The document has been trimmed otherwise it is in excellent condition.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"the order came to strike tents and prepare for a march to Parkersburgh distant by land 62 miles.  We started off in high spirits but our boys soon found that there was not much fun in marching and carrying 40 rounds of ammunition and a knapsack full of clothes."</b>


2 pages, 7 3/4 x 12 1/4, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to William K. Tipton.


<b><u>Buckhannon, Nov. 2nd, 1862</b></u> 


Mr. William K. Tipton,


Dear Sir,


After my best respects to you and your family I will inform you that I am in reasonable good health at present and have been with the exception of a bad cold and a slight touch of neuralgia in my face and head which I cured with your medicine in a short time.  Well we have been moving about some little since you seen me in Jerusalem.  We staid at Gallipolis after my return to camp until the 16th of October when the order came to strike tents and prepare for a march to Parkersburgh distant by land 62 miles.  We started off in high spirits but our boys soon found that there was not much fun in marching and carrying 40 rounds of ammunition and a knapsack full of clothes.  We made about 15 miles and encamped for the night hungry, weary and foot sore.  The next morning our boys hired a team to haul their knapsacks which helped them considerable well.  We arrived opposite Parkersburgh on Sunday the 19th where we encamped and remained there until Wednesday the 23rd when we again struck our tents and crossed the river.  We got on the cars just at dark and started for Clarksburgh distant 78 miles.  We were all night on the cars and of all the nights since I have been out it was the most disagreeable that I have seen.  We were both cold and hungry.  Some of the men built fires in the cars on the seats which were constructed out of pine boards.  We built a fire on a board about a foot square which was a great comfort to us for we could warm our feet and hands by taking turns but sleep was almost out of the question.  Well we arrived safe and were glad when we landed where we could get something to eat.  Well we staid at Clarksburgh which by the way is rather an antiquated looking place until Saturday when just as we had got things fixed comfortably we were ordered to this place distant 28 miles.  We made 6 miles on Saturday.  On Sunday it commenced raining, but we had to start and a very disappointed day we had.  It rained all day and all night or rather it snowed the latter part of the night, but we had a pretty comfortable night of it considering everything.  We started again on Monday.  I was ordered to take 50 men of Com.[pany] C and go before as an advance guard.  We had two bridges to build but we built them in a short time.  We made them of poles and rails but they answered every purpose.  Well we arrived here about 4 o’clock.  Buckhannon is situated in a very nice valley on a river of the same name.  It is surrounded with high hills or small mountains.  From a hill above our camp we can see Rich Mountain, Cheat Mt., the Blue Ridge and some others.  The land here seems good and is very well timbered.  It is a fine country for grazing.  Well I must conclude.  Well in regard to religion, I am trying to live with a conscience void of offence towards God and in peace with my fellow men, although it is a hard task at times, but I hope you and all our friends will not forget to pray for us for we have need of your prayers.  I make it a daily business for myself.  It is all that upholds me.  Good night William.


Levi Lupton


Direct to Buckhannon, Upshur Co., Va., 116th Reg. O.[hio] V.[olunteer] I.[nfantry] 


Light age toning and wear. Very fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

6077 Renaissance Revival Rosewood Inlaid $13500.00

 

Autograph, General Nathan Kimball $125.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"oh the troubles and trials that this accursed rebellion has caused the people of this land. It is astonishing to see the destruction that it made in this part of the country.  Some farms are almost entirely destitute of buildings and fences.  Last summer, Jenkins, the Rebel General, came into this place and destroyed a great amount of property."</b>


2 pages, 7 3/4 x 9 1/2, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Buckhannon, Nov. 7th, 1862</b></u> 


My Dear and much beloved wife,


I recd. your letter of the 24th inst. and it made me sick at heart to think of the troubles that you have to endure and me so far from home and unable to do anything for you, and O how can I bear to think that I shall never see my dear little Irena again, but I do hope that it may please the Almighty ruler of [the] universe to spare her life for your sake, and that I may be permitted again to see my little family in health when this sad business shall be over, for oh the troubles and trials that this accursed rebellion has caused the people of this land.  It is astonishing to see the destruction that it made in this part of the country.  Some farms are almost entirely destitute of buildings and fences.  Last summer, Jenkins, the Rebel General, came into this place and destroyed a great amount of property and there has been so many soldiers stationed here and sometimes they do not get their provisions in time and then they will take cattle, sheep, hogs, poultry or anything that they can get so you see it is very hard on the people here for they dare not complain much about it, but must bear it the best they can.  There is some people in this section that I should not pity if the soldiers were to take all they had for I think they are in favor of the South, and besides that they bring things to camp to sell and then they must have an unreasonable price for everything they have to sell.  Sometimes they over reach the mark and then the soldiers take their stuff and give them what they think is right.  Well dear, we have tolerable cold weather here now, but we keep very comfortable.  We have a stove in our tent and we can make it as warm as we want, but dear, I think of you every night and morning.  It makes me feel very bad to think of your troubles and no one to help you, not even to make fires.  Dear, I think that if you cannot get Amanda Lawrence to live with you or some other girl to board with you and go to school you had better try and get a boy somewhere to board there and go to school and tend to the feeding and making fires.  I do want you to get somebody to help you no odds what it costs for it is too hard for you the way you have to do, and do hire somebody to help you until the children get well.  Well dear, I must conclude as I can hardly write I feel so bad, so good by my dear and loving wife.


From your loving husband,


Levi Lupton 


Light age toning and wear. Very fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of President Abraham Lincoln in oval surrounded by American flags, cannon balls and drum. Published by J.R. Hawley, Cincinnati. Staining at the corners and repair at right.   This finely crafted white ironstone sauce tureen has the ogee shapes of the many Sydenham-like shapes, this being one of them - President Shape.  Note the large gourd finial, ruffled rim, and ogees on both the domed lid and base.It measures 7 inches wide by 7 inches tall.


This is an early shape, first registered in 1855. Condition is excellent. Embossing is very sharp - what a beauty!  The pretty punch cup presented measures 2 3/4 across the top excluding the handle by 3 1/2 inches tall.  It's very shiny and perky - great undamaged condition.


This cup is larger than most posset, punch, or syllabub cups.  It could actually be used for a cup of tea.  Love the shape and the pedestalled design.  By its plain characteristics, we would date it to the 1870s.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

President Abraham Lincoln

 

J Edwards White Ironstone Sauce Tureen, $150.00

 

White Ironstone Punch Cup $22.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of Colonel David B. Birney in uniform with imprint above in riband, Col. Birney, and  at upper center, Col. D.B. Birney's Zouaves, Head-Quarters Twenty-Third Regiment P.[ennsylvania] V.[olunteers]. Light staining. 5 3/8 x 3 1/4.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of General George B. McClellan on horseback surrounded by frame with stars and a spread winged eagle and shield at the top. 5 1/4 x 3 1/8.   


<b>Written by Clark S. Edwards, Colonel of the regiment


He commanded the 5th Maine during the battle of Gettysburg!


Promoted to Brevet Brigadier General


War Date Letter With Cover 


"There was a little fight here on Sunday last but our folks drove the Rebels back to the Gap....I cannot tell you but little of the war news here as we get nothing correct from the front....One thing is certain, we hear the booming of cannon ahead the most of the time both night and day."</b>


(1824-1903) Edwards was 37 years old when the news of the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter reached the small town of Bethel, Maine.  He was high on a ladder shingling his roof and he immediately climbed down, obtained permission from the appropriate authorities to form a company of volunteers, and set out to gather recruits from Bethel and the surrounding towns.  This group of men became Company I, of the 5th Maine Volunteer Infantry, with Edwards commissioned as their captain on June 24, 1861.  He rose through the ranks and was appointed colonel of the regiment, on January 8, 1863, commanding the 5th Maine Infantry from that date forward. He was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on March 13, 1865, for his gallant and meritorious Civil War service record.


The 5th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was one of the first Maine regiments to be mustered into the Union Army.  They fought in many battles from 1st Bull Run to Petersburg.  During the battle of Rappahannock Station the regiment is credited with capturing 4 Confederate battleflags and 1,200 prisoners.  Known as one of Maine's best fighting regiments, it captured more prisoners than the entire number of men who served in the regiment, and three times the number of battle flags than any other Maine regiment.  After three long years of hard fought service only 193 men were mustered out of the regiment when their term of service expired.  Among their battle honors are written the names of 1st Bull Run, Gaines' Mill, 2nd Bull Run, Crampton's Gap, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Rapidan Crossing, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor and Petersburg.


3 pages, 7 5/8 x 9 1/2, in ink. Comes with envelope addressed in the hand of Edwards to his wife, Mrs. C.S. Edwards, [thus his full signature], Bethel, Maine, C.D.S., Washington, D.C., Nov. 12, and Bethel, Me., Nov. 17, stamped Due 6, and Missent. Franked at the top right, Soldier's Letter.

 

<b><u>Camp in the Woods, About three miles So.[outh] of Snickersville, [Va.], Nov. 5th, 1862</b></u>


My Dear wife,


As we are laying idle here today I thought I would commence a letter to you and will close it if we do not move.  I will start from Sunday or since we came into Va.  We crossed the Potomac at Berlin on a pontoon bridge, the wooden bridge being burnt by the Rebels more than a year ago.  The river at this place I should judge to be a quarter of a mile wide, but the water is very low.  The river can be forded at this place.  We came on Sunday through a little vill[age] by the name of Lovettville, and then another by the name of Burlington and went into camp.  We struck tents on Monday morn at five o’clock and came on through a little vill[age] by the name of Wheatland and went into camp.  Our march of Monday was about eight miles.  Tuesday morning we struck tents at nine o’clock and came on about eight miles through a beautiful country.  We passed a little vill[age] called Union.  There was a little fight here on Sunday last but our folks drove the Rebels back to the Gap.  It is now about noon and I think we will move on in a very short time as orders just came into camp to be ready to move at once.  We have not had any mail of late so I have no letters to answer.  I cannot tell you but little of the war news here as we get nothing correct from the front.  One thing is certain, we hear the booming of cannon ahead the most of the time both night and day, but no general engagement has come off as yet.  Last night as we arrived here we found the 16th Me. & the 5th Me. Battery.  I saw Lieut. A.B. Twitchell.  He is looking finely.  He was at my tent last night.  Say to his folks that he is well and is looking well, and I think will be Capt. of the 5th Me. Battery soon.  I now go to dinner and will close this tonight if I have time.


Friday morning, 7th


As I did not have time to write you this in full on Tuesday, I have delayed till this morning.  We left camp near Snickersville at one o’clock and came on to a place without a name & camped for the night, but it was on the spot that [General Alfred] Pleasanton had a fight a day or two before.  We left camp at sunrise and came on to this place which is called White Plains, a fine little place.  It is on the Manassas Gap R. Road.  Last night after we got here the train came in with supplies.  The boys were much pleased with seeing them once more.  It is now nine o’clock and no orders of [a] move as yet.  It is as cold as I ever saw it in Maine at this season of the year.  It snows a little and the water frozen quite hard.  I am now a writing in the cold with my fingers almost froze.

  

Saturday morning


It has cleared off and it is [a] fine morning.  We are still at White Plains. The P.[ost] M.[aster] is now waiting.


The letter ends here with no formal signature as he was obviously rushed to get this is the mail by virtue of his last comment. The back page is blank further indicating this letter is complete as he had plenty more space to write if he wanted to. This came out of a large group of Clark S. Edwards correspondence and is fully guaranteed to have been written by him. Plus the envelope corroborates the ID.    


Light age toning and wear and some slight paper loss at the top edge which does not affect any of the content. Well written. Very fine content.     

 


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of an American flag with eagle in the canton overlooking harbor with ships, a lone sentry standing at attention with musket and fixed bayonet on the parapet with cannon. 5 3/8 x 3. Titled, "Our Banner In The Sky," it was published by Jas. Gates, Cincinnati. Light staining.


***Please read the history about these Union patriotic imprints recently discovered in their individual category section on the website. CIVIL WAR MEMORABILIA/Patriotic Imprints.

Colonel David B. Birney's Zouaves

 

General George B. McClellan on Horseback

 

5th Maine Infantry Letter $125.00

 

Our Banner In The Sky




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of an American flag with eagle in the foreground with the dates 1776-1861 on the rock below and waves and sunburst in the background. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8.  


<b>Signed by his commanding officer who was seriously wounded in the battle of Chickamauga, Ga.</b>


15 x 9 3/4, imprint on vellum with vignette of a spread winged eagle and American shield, filled out in ink. The Commanding Officer Of The Nineteenth Regiment Of Indiana Artillery. To all who shall see these presents greeting: Know Ye, That reposing special trust and confidence in the patriotism, valor, fidelity and abilities of Clinton Keelor, I do hereby appoint him Sergeant of the Nineteenth Regiment of Indiana Battery in the service of the United States, to rank as such from the First day of September, one thousand eight hundred and Sixty two. Given at Louisville, Ky., on September 1, 1862. Signed by S.J. Harris, Capt. Commanding the Battery. Light age toning and wear. Very fine.


Samuel J. Harris, a veteran of the Mexican War, was a resident of Columbus, Indiana, when he was commissioned captain of the 7th Indiana Light Artillery, on October 4, 1861. He was commissioned captain of the 19th Indiana Light Artillery on August 20, 1862, and was wounded in action on September 19, 1863, at the battle of Chickamauga, Georgia. He was discharged as a result of his wounds on June 3, 1864. 


Clinton Keelor, also spelled Keeler, was a resident of Hagerstown, Indiana, when he enlisted in the Union Army, and was mustered in as sergeant of the 19th Indiana Light Artillery. He was promoted to 2nd lieutenant on December 8, 1863, and was mustered out on June 10, 1865.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of mounted cavalrymen clashing with their sabers. Imprint of Mumford & Co., Cinn. 5 1/2 x 3 1/4. Light staining.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of Liberty riding on the back of an eagle who is holding a riband in its mouth with the slogan Onward to Victory. Liberty is holding an American flag in both hands. UNION in large stars and stripes letters at the bottom. 5 1/2 x 2 7/8. Light staining and wear.


***Please read the history about these Union patriotic imprints recently discovered in their individual category section on the website. CIVIL WAR MEMORABILIA/Patriotic Imprints.

American Flag and Eagle, 1776-1861

 

Apppointment For Sergeant, 19th Indiana $95.00

 

Cavalrymen Clash With Sabers

 

Union, Onward to Victory

Delicate though they must have been with the period glass mirror and thin embossed sheet zinc housing, the popular use of such traveling mirrors as this one has been well documented by Civil War site <I>digger</I> historians and personal item collectors. (see: <I>Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War</I> by Phillips) Illustrated here with a US quarter for size comparison, this example shows good evidence of age and period use while remaining in pleasing condition ready to set into any period grouping for display.

A common to the period item of everyday life that seldom survived to reach the modern day historian. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>

 Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison, our photographs will likely do best to describe this group of 6 matching antique POLICE frock buttons.  Maker marked <B>SCOVILL MF’G CO. WATERBURY</B>, these buttons are dated c. 1860 1870 in McGuinn & Bazelons <I>AMERICAN MILITARY BUTTON MAKERS AND DEALERS; THEIR BACKMARKS & DATES</I> p.88 top ctr.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <U>key word</U> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  A nice pair of antique private purchase spurs, this attractive matched pair each bear a number <I>8</I> size designation with iron rowels, and smooth period wear with an untouched natural age patina.  A well-documented period design found in the most reliable Civil War collector references, these all original spurs will go nicely in any quality collection. ( Illustrated here with a Civil War vintage quarter for size comparison. )  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

 

 Illustrated here with a U.S. quarter for size comparison, this neat little period turned bone whistle remains in excellent condition with no cracks, flaws or repairs and will lay in well in any period personal grouping.  Difficult to find in bone, Civil War site <I>digger</I>/historians have well documented pewter examples of the period style. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

Civil War era traveling SHAVING MIRROR $95.00

 

lot of 6 – c. 1860 / 1870 POLICE BUTTONS $75.00

 

Civil War era Private Purchase Spurs $225.00

 

19th century Turned Bone Whistle $95.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of President Lincoln holding the Constitution. General McClellan is at the president's side on horseback, while General Scott stands resting his arm on the wheel of a cannon. Tent with an American flag is in the background. The somewhat faded imprint below reads The Constitution and Government must be sustained. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of Colonel John M. Gosline with imprint at upper center, Head-Quarters Gosline's Zouaves. 5 1/2 x 3 1/4. 


John M. Gosline was Colonel of the 95th Pennsylvania Infantry, also known as Gosline's Zouaves. He was mortally wounded in action at the battle of Gaines' Mill, Va., on June 27, 1862. He died two days later on June 29, 1862.  The fourteen-sided ironstone plate presented bears the Domestic pattern, a design that features a rural thatched cottage.  A couple appears before it along with a well.  Mountains rise in the background.


It was made in the James Edwards pottery, c. 1843 - 1851. Condition is excellent - no chips, cracks, stains, or restoration,


This design is atypical of its period.  Usually, designs featured fanciful and exotic images of far-away places.  This, in contrast, celebrates the rural life of the times.  Please note that we also have a cup plate of this design  It is on a round ironstone plate.  The large soup tureen presented measures 15 inches wide by 13 inches wide.  The second picture shows it with a vegetable tureen of the same shape and a sauce tureen  These pictures are included to give the viewer a sense of its size.  It would be lovely as a table centerpiece because of its lovely curves and embellishments.


This gorgeous design is Ring O' Hearts shape. The curved thumb print-like indentations create the hearts both on the base the the lid. The handles are scroll shapes; the finial is a closed bud with foliates below. 


It was made in the Livesley, Powell & Co. pottery and dates to 1853. The English registry mark appears under the base along with the name of the potter.


It is in fine shape, free of chips and cracks.  On close inspection, one can find a few glaze rubs on the high points, some tiny underglaze dark flecks from the potting, and on the underside of the domed lid a clay irregularity underglaze at the top, not damage. These details are mentioned for full disclosure.  It is a grand piece, worthy of prominent display. 


Included also is a picture of it with a cracker tray which is offered separately and is not a pattern match.  It is quite plain.

President Lincoln, General McClellan & G

 

Colonel Gosline, Head Quarters Gosline's

 

Staffordshire Black Transferware 14-Side $55.00

 

Livesley & Powell White Ironstone Soup T $325.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of Major General John C. Fremont with camp scene in the background. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8.  


5 x 8, imprint.


War Department,

Adjutant General's Office.

Washington, June 17, 1865


Memorandum


The Secretary of War directs that hereafter the monthly allowance for clothing for enlisted men, on duty in the Bureau of the War Department, will be the same as that provided by General Orders No. 55, current series, from this Office, for officers' servants.


Official:


Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning and edge wear. Light staining at bottom edge. Two small holes at left edge not affecting any of the content.  


This is the upper left hand corner from an original war period Confederate patriotic cover, with full color illustration of the "Stars and Bars," the First National Confederate flag. Affixed to a 5 1/2 x 3 1/8 piece from an original period album page.  


<b>Montgomery, Alabama issue</b>


Criswell #8. Montgomery, May 1, 1861. Arabic "1000" in ornate green scroll at center. With 12 coupons attached. Very fine.


Please note that the bond is larger than our scanner so we have illustrated it here in sections.

Major General John C. Fremont

 

1865 Memorandum From the War Department $6.00

 

The Stars and Bars, Confederate First Na $25.00

 

1861 Confederate $1, 000 Bond $125.00




<b>Rare With Tanner & Vanness, Lynchburg, Virginia imprint!


United States Senator from Georgia


Governor of Georgia</b>


(1832-1904) Born in Upson County, Ga., he had one of the most spectacular Civil War and postbellum careers of any civilian who fought for the Confederacy. His army service began shortly after the bombardment of Fort Sumter when he raised a company of mountain men from northwest Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee called the "Raccoon Roughs," of which he was unanimously elected major, and ended at Appomattox Court House as a corps commander. Six foot tall, narrow of frame, and possessing perfect posture, Gordon could inspire confidence in his troops with his image alone. General Lee gave him the distinct honor of leading the Army of Northern Virginia at the formal surrender ceremony. In between he fought magnificently on every battlefield in which the Army of Northern Virginia participated, except when he was absent from wounds. During the battle of Sharpsburg he was wounded five times, once severely in the head, and only a bullet hole in his cap prevented him from drowning in his own blood as he lay unconscious face down on the ground! He was promoted to brigadier general on November 1, 1862. He compiled a brilliant record in the Wilderness campaign, and in the Shenandoah Valley under General Jubal A. Early. His promotion to major general dated to rank from May 14, 1864. On the retreat from Petersburg, he was in command of one half of General R.E. Lee's army. General Lee considered him one of his most trusted subordinates and selected him to oversee the army's final offensive movement, the attack on Fort Stedman on March 25, 1865. After the war Gordon returned to Georgia where he became the idol of the people of his native state. He was elected to the U.S. Senate three times and was Governor of Georgia from 1886-90. A prime organizer of the United Confederate Veterans, he was elected its first commander-in-chief and served in that position from 1890 until his death. He is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. Lightly and very tastefully hand tinted. Backmark: Tanner & Vanness, Photographers, 124 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. Rare! This is the first General John B. Gordon cdv that I've had in many years!


<u>Quotes about General John B. Gordon</u>: 


One of the soldiers in his command said that Gordon, "had a way of putting things to the men that was irresistible, and he showed them at all times that he shrank from nothing in battle."


In the words of General Robert E. Rodes, Gordon fought in a "manner I have never heard or seen equalled during the war." 


General D.H. Hill said, "Gordon excelled his former deeds at Seven Pines and in the battles around Richmond. Our language is not capable of expressing a higher compliment."


Henry Kyd Douglas, of General Stonewall Jackson's staff thought Gordon was "a picture for the sculptor."


Jedediah Hotchkiss, Stonewall Jackson's famous map maker, believed Gordon to be "the very personification of a hero."


A Confederate officer seeing General Gordon riding his black stallion at Gettysburg called the sight, "the most glorious and inspiring thing...standing in his stirrups bareheaded, hat in hand, arms extended, and, in a voice like a trumpet, exhorting his men. It was superb, absolutely thrilling." 


The death of one of General Gordon's colonels in the battle at the Monocacy River on July 9, 1864, devastated him, and he exclaimed, "Oh Lord why am I spared & so many & so good  men are taken around me."


Sources: The Confederate General. Encyclopedia of the Confederacy.


 







 This early hand-painted toleware tray measures 28 1/2 by 22 inches.  Of all my trays, this is the one I love the most because of its beautiful design and graceful shape It shows the kind of wear one might expect from a tin object that is over 100 years old.  


The floral elements are done in dark red and green.  The foliates and other designs are gold.  The backside has little felt "feet" stuck to it.  I have not tried to remove them.  This round toleware tray has the appearance of an antique but probably is not.  It is a large one, 19 1/2 inches round.  The floral image in tones of red, and the grape and foliate images in gold look quite good, but there are white blemishes and a little paint loss along the rim.  The antique toleware tray presented measures 22 1/2 by 16 inches  There are no dents and very few blemishes to this tray. The flash has caused white spots which are not actually on the tray.


 Note the skillfully painted floral elements and super gold work on the surround.

CDV General John B. Gordon

 

Large Antique Toleware Tray $250.00

 

Mid Century Circular Toleware Tray $35.00

 

Antique Toleware Tray $75.00




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