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H 40in. x D 21in.

CIRCA 1920...REWIRED AND READY TO GO  H 9in. x W 10in. D 6in.

PRICE PER PAIRE....ORIGINAL PATINA...CIRCA 1910

 H 34in. x D 24in.

GREAT OLD ORIGINAL FINISH...REWIRED TO CODE

 H 21in. x D 12in.

GREAT QUALITY AND READY TO HANG

CAST METAL FRAME WITH STAINED GLASS PANELS

VINTAGE HAND FORGED IRON LIGHT $1200.00

 

CASRT BRONZE WALL LIGHTS $850.00

 

HEAVY BRONZE HANGING LIGHT $4500.00

 

VINTAGE HALL PANEL LIGHT $1450.00

H 50in. x D 11in.

6 AVAILABLE....HIGH GRADE COPPER FRAME WITH STAINED GLASS...ALL ORIGINAL

REWIRED AND READY TO INSTALL

CIRCA 1920

Price per unit  H 29in. x D 19in.

MATCHING 3 BULB FIXTURE IS AVAILABLE  H 26in. x D 14in.

REWIRED AND READY TO HANG....ALL ORIGINAL

MATCHING DINING ROOM LIGHT AVAILABLE.

 H 14in. x W 10in. x D 6in

BRASS WITH ORIGINAL FINISH

PRICE PER PAIR

VINTAGE CHURCH LIGHTS $2400.00

 

PENDANT LIGHT CIRCA 1940 $1250.00

 

HALL LIGHT CIRCA 1940 $750.00

 

PERIOD WALL LIGHTS $750.00

H 12in. x D 14in.

 H 5in. x D 10in

A REAL JEM OF A FIXTURE.

 


Eighth plate ambrotype of a full standing Union private wearing a 4 button sack coat, military vest and holding his slouch hat while posing with the other hand resting on the back of a wooden studio chair. Comes in half case with brass mat, keeper and glass. Comes with an old piece of paper that was found in the case behind the image with ink ID: Joseph McCuskey, Carl & Berl's Father, sometime in 1860's. Nice image in a rare size. 


Joseph McCuskey, was 18 years old when he enlisted as a private on February 18, 1864, and was mustered into Co. K, 62nd Ohio Infantry. He served with this regiment until September 1, 1865, when he was transferred into the 67th Ohio Infantry, and was mustered out of the Union army on December 7, 1865, at City Point, Va.   


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"We had a terrible accident happened today in our Company.  Our men had just come in off of picket and in putting away their guns one of them was discharged, the ball struck Amos S. Byers just behind the right ear making a terrible wound and killing him instantly.  His brother is going to start home with his corpse tomorrow morning."</b>


3 3/4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Romney, Va., Feb. 17th, 1863</b></u> 


My ever Dear and loving wife,


With my love to you and the children, I will inform you that I am well and hearty and hope these few lines may fine you enjoying the same blessing.  I wrote one letter to you today and sent it by mail, but as Gib Carlton [1] is going to start for home in the morning I thought I would write another one and send it by him.  Well Dear, I often see you in dreams and night before last I dreamed of seeing my dear little Irena and oh how bad I felt when I woke up and found it was a dream.  I do wish that things would turn out so that I could get home again, but I don’t know when that will be.  We had a terrible accident happened today in our Company.  Our men had just come in off of picket and in putting away their guns one of them was discharged, the ball struck Amos S. Byers [2] just behind the right ear making a terrible wound and killing him instantly.  His brother is going to start home with his corpse tomorrow morning.  It has cast a gloom over our company.  We met with quite a loss yesterday.  There was about 28 wagons went out after forage.  About 48 men out of Comp.[any] F, Capt. Brown and Lieut. Martin went along as guards.  They had got their hay load and started back when they were over taken by the rebels variously estimated at from 30 to 200 men, and were all taken prisoners.  They were so completely surprised that they did not pretend to fight, but surrendered at once.  They took about 100 men, wagoner’s and all.  They burned all but 7 wagons and took all the horses.  It was a complete surprise.  There is great blame attached to Capt. Brown for the way the matter terminated.  Well Dear, by the bearer I send you three rings, one for you, one for each of the girls.  M.W. Maris [3] made the one for you and Jimmy Preshaw [4] made those for the girls, and also a little bible that Sam Stonebraker [5] made for Willey.  They are all made of laurel.  Well dear, I have not much more to say, only if Gib can bring me some paper and envelopes I would like for you to send them, so hoping to hear from you soon, I remain your ever loving husband and Father, and may the Lord bless you.


Farewell,

Lieut. L. Lupton


18th: Good morning Dear, I thought I would tell you that I was well.  This morning we had a little disturbance in camp.  Last night we thought that the enemy were shooting at our pickets, but it turned out to be nothing but horses kicking in the stables so we had no fight at all.  So good by my Dear.


From your loving,

L.L.


Light age toning and wear. The last few lines of his postscript are written in pencil. 


[1] Abner Gibson Carlton, was 24 years old, when he enlisted as a private, on August 16, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was wounded in action at Petersburg, Va., on March 31, 1865, and was mustered out of the service on June 2, 1865, at Fort Monroe, Va.


[2] Amos S. Byers, was 27 years old, when he enlisted as a private, on August 15, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was accidentally killed on February 17, 1863, at Romney, Va. His corpse never made it home as Lieutenant Lupton thought it would.  Instead Private Byers was buried in the Winchester National Cemetery, Winchester, Va.


[3] Matthew W. Maris, was 27 years old, when he enlisted as a corporal, on August 8, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to sergeant on June 15, 1863, and was wounded in action at Piedmont, Va., on June 5, 1864, and was discharged for disability at Camp Dennison, Ohio, on June 2, 1865.


[4] James H. Preshaw, was 18 years old, when he enlisted as a private, on August 16, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was captured at Winchester, Va., on June 15, 1865, and was exchanged on November 2, 1863. He was captured a second time, and wounded, on June 5, 1864, at Piedmont, Va., and was confined at the notorious Confederate prison, Andersonville, in Georgia, where he died on November 3, 1864. He is buried in the Andersonville National Cemetery, in grave site #11779.


[5] Samuel M. Stonebraker, was 24 years old, when he enlisted as a private on August 15, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was captured on June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He was transferred into the 118th Co., Veteran Reserve Corps, 2nd Battalion, on January 1, 1865, and was mustered out of the service on September 18, 1865, at Baltimore, Md.


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.

FLUSH PRISM LIGHT $1800.00

 

VINTAGE JEWELLED LIGHT $600.00

 

Ambrotype, Private Joseph McCuskey, 62nd $250.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

Beautiful and in Original Condition Eastlake Dining Chairs, executed in walnut and currently upholstered in Purple velvet upholstery.  6 side chairs and 2 armchairs complete this highly detailed set.


Dimensions

Arm Chairs (2): 38.5"H x 22.5"W x 24"D

Side Chairs (8): 36"H x 16.5"W x 21"D  Colonel Jeremiah Palmer,an  Oriskany New York native organized the 2nd New York Artillery in 1861 which fought as Infantry much of the War, seeing heavy combat at  2nd Bull Run,  Knoxville, Tennessee, Petersburg, Farmville & High Bridge, Virginia, 1865. Colonel Palmer was severely wounded by shrapnel during the June 19, 1864 attack at Petersburg. An original Civil War CDV photo of a Colonel Palmer wearing oak leaf rank straps denoting his previous lt colonel rank. A pleasing  chestview with photographer imprints, front & back, by WJ Baker's Studio, Utica, New York. Small crease on reverse and age spots on margins. Image Excellent. Comes with service info. Thanks for visiting Mike Brackin Civil War Antiques.  


By George N. Barnard. Published by Dover Publications, Inc., New York. Soft cover, large 9 x 12 format featuring 61 full page photographs taken by Barnard of Sherman's campaign, plus 7 additional photographs by Barnard. Brand new condition.


George N. Barnard was a veteran photographer when he joined General Sherman on his decisive campaign through Georgia and the Carolinas during the Civil War. Barnard, a master of the daguerreotype, had worked for Mathew Brady earlier in the war, and Barnard and his assistants were as far as we know the only photographers to accompany General Sherman as he carried out one of the most brilliant and devastating military operations in history. This volume reproduces Barnard's complete portfolio of 61 photographs relating to Sherman's campaign, showing key battle sites and landmarks, with identifying captions, a corresponding map and Barnard's original commentary.


Tracing Sherman's movements eastward to the sea, the photographs record views of Sherman and his generals; the Capitol at Nashville, then under construction; Orchard Knob and Missionary Ridge; Chattanooga Valley from Lookout Mountain; the battleground of Resaca, Ga.; Etawah Bridge and Allatoona; the battlefield of Peachtree Creek, Ga.; the scene of General McPherson's death; the battlefield of Atlanta and the rebel works in front of Atlanta; the destruction left from Hood's Ordnance Train; the ruins in Columbia, S.C.; interior and exterior views of Fort Sumter; ruins of the Pinckney mansion, Charleston; and several others.


These pictures provide us with the most detailed visual source we have on the actual settings and terrain of Sherman's campaign, in many cases recording the bridges and battlements and the extent of the destruction as seen soon after the fighting. Several of the pictures are also quite remarkable as photographic art. The photographs of Savannah, which Sherman left intact, show us how this splendid port city once looked; the neo-classical ruins seen in several pictures suggest an ironic commentary on the South's fate during and after the war.


Barnard's photographs were originally published in a very small collectors edition now exceedingly rare, and have not been otherwise available before the present republication. Beaumont Newhall, the leading contemporary historian of photography, has written the Preface to the Dover edition, to which has been added seven other photographs by George Barnard. This is a book of extreme value and importance to Civil War buffs, military historians and to those interested in the early history of photography.


   Not like the usual find of a very delicate condition lady's fan of the period, this example was clearly intended for practical everyday use as opposed to a fashion statement.  It remains in fine durable condition and is, after decades of attic storage, ready for display with other period lady's finery or even for use and carrying should the lady desire.  Sturdily and yet attractively and delicately made of stained hardwood slats and that classic brown polished cotton that connoisseurs of period textile will recognize, this fan remains in fine original condition in every respect. No splits tears or repairs!   The piece measures just under 11 inches in length when folded (not counting the finger loop).  A common fashion statement and practical ladies utility of the Civil War period.  A fine all original accessory.

As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

7226 Set of 8 Antique Eastlake Walnut Di $4000.00

 

COLONEL JEREMIAH PALMER UTICA NEW NEW Y $225.00

 

Photographic Views of Sherman's March

 

Civil War era LADY'S FAN $95.00

     Identified to a <B>2nd Maine Infantry</B>  transferee to the hard fought <B>20th Maine Infantry</B> troop, this well worn soldier’s music book is none the less complete with no torn pages and is solid with the exception of the back cover which is there but separated.  This rarely seen original 1863 publication of <I>The Bugle Call</I> by Root & Candy of Chicago measures approximately 9 ½ X 6 ½ inches with 60 pages of <I>war songs</I> and patriotic music with lyrics.  (An interesting variation to the American music collector is the oddity of having a section of the book, pages 15 through 30, bound in upside down.) The book’s patriotic offerings include: <I>The bugle-call -- Stand up for Uncle Sam, my boys -- The harp of the Union band -- The Union League -- America -- Clear the way -- God save the nation -- The skedaddle rangers -- The ship of Union -- Gone to the war -- Flag of the fearless free -- Call 'em names Jeff -- Stand by the president -- The battle-cry of freedom -- O, wrap the flag around me, boys -- Our soldiers stand upon the field -- Hail, Columbia -- The star-spangled banner</I> (lyrics only) --<I> What's the cause of this commotion -- After the battle -- Uncle Sam's funeral -- Ho! for the gun-boats -- The battle-call -- Brave boys are they -- Jefferson D., Sir -- Come rouse up! brave boys -- Grafted into the army -- English neutrality -- Fine old Union gentleman</I> (lyrics only) --<I> Freedom and Union</I> (lyrics only) and more.

     A period pencil identification on the front cover offers <I>G. S. Gould – Maine</I> while on the first page in the top margin we see: <I>Bangor Me. – Gilman S. Gould – Maine</I> in period script.

     <B>Gilman S. Gould</B> gave his residence as Muscle Rig Place, when he enlisted as a 24 year old <I>Down East</I>Mainer and mustered in on October 17, 1862 as a Private of Co. G <B>2nd Maine Infantry</B> A list of the important battles in which the 2nd Maine participated during Gould’s tenure with the regiment would include,  Yorktown, Hanover Court House, Gaines' Mill, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville.  On May 20, 1863 the hardened veteran transferred to Co. H of the <B>20th Maine Infantry</B>.  Here the record becomes a bit foggy as while the Maine Adjutant Report lists a Gilman S. Gold as a transfer from the 2nd Maine to the 20th Maine, the early reference <I><B>Maine at Gettysburg</I></B> lists only a single <I>Gould</I> in the regiment, <I>William F. Gould</I> (a transferee from the 2nd Maine) serving as a <B>musician</B> in Capt. Walter Morrill’s Co. B of the 20th Maine. Some further research will likely unravel this all too common records puzzle.  The Maine Adjutant Report has our man transferring to the <B>Veteran Reserve Corps</B> on March 15 1865 with no method or date of discharge given?  As we have advised, this piece is offered as found with some folds at the corners and lots of evidence of period use but as we say, complete with no major page tears, stains or other issues save separation of the back cover.  A scarce Civil War collectable with a desirable <B>2nd Maine Infantry</B> and <B>20th Maine Volunteers</B> connection. 

     <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  




 


Wreath design at center of the cross with Deo Vindice 1861-1865 within and Southern Cross Of Honor around the edges. The opposite side has a wreath design at center with a Confederate battle flag within and United Daughters Confederacy To The U.C.V. around the edges. Has the hook on top but is missing the hanger bar. An excellent example as it is.


WBTS Trivia: The idea of a Southern Cross of Honor was conceived in 1898 by Mrs. Alexander S. Erwin, the daughter of Confederate General Howell Cobb, and it was to be bestowed upon Confederate Veterans for the valor and patriotism they exhibited during the War Between the States. The resolution adopted by the Laura Rutherford Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy in Athens, Ga., read in part, "every veteran...in times that tried men's souls, gave an exhibition of dauntless and unyielding courage in the face of overwhelming odds, such as has never been known in the history of the world."    


<b>12th Battalion Georgia Light Artillery</b>


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Oval view in civilian attire displayed within an ornate medallion frame on card. No imprint. Comes with original Confederate Veteran Magazine, Vol. XVI, June 1908, (missing front cover), with biographical articles about Lieutenant Colonel Henry D. Capers, one which includes a photograph of him with his granddaughter. Capers began his distinguished service with the Confederacy as Chief Clerk and Disbursing Agent in the Department of the Treasury, serving under Secretary C.G. Memminger. But in 1862, the gallant Capers left the comfort of civil service and joined the Confederate army, raising the 12th Battalion Georgia Light Artillery, becoming its lieutenant colonel, and being severely wounded in battle.


One of the articles reads in part:


<u>Tribute From Secretary Memminger</u>


"I am in receipt of your resignation as chief clerk and disbursing officer, an office you have filled from the initial day of the Confederate government. In season and out of season the faithful manner in which you have discharged the laborious and responsible duties incumbent upon you have not escaped my notice, and have greatly aided me. While I and the government lose the services of an efficient officer, I cannot but commend the spirit which prompts you to enter the army of our struggling country. My well wishes go with you."


The military career of Colonel Capers is well known to his living comrades. Leaving the security of a high office in the civil service, he was appointed by President Davis a captain in the regular army of the Confederacy, and in March, 1862, was assigned to the staff of General Magruder, then at Yorktown, Va. At the request of General Magruder, Captain Capers was promoted to the rank of major by the Secretary of War and ordered to organize a battalion of light artillery for service on the Peninsula of Virginia. This battalion he organized at Augusta, Ga., from four companies of the 1st Georgia Regiment of Infantry, whose term of enlistment had expired as twelve months troops- the first enlistment called for by the Confederate government. No command in the Confederate armies was more distinguished for its gallant, soldierly bearing on the march, in the camp, or on the field of battle than this, the 12th Georgia Battalion of Artillery.


In the Western Army, under the immediate command of General E. Kirby Smith; at Charleston, S.C., in the defense of Forts Sumter and Wagner; later in the ever memorable campaign of General Lee in 1864, and to the end at Appomattox; the 12th Georgia Battalion was noted for all that made the Confederate soldier the pride of Southern men and women.


In October, 1862, Major Capers, on the recommendation of General E. Kirby Smith and approved by General Bragg, was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel of artillery for "gallant and meritorious service."


In the battle of Cold Harbor, Virginia, June 2, 1864, Colonel Capers was severely wounded. Incapacitated for field service, he was assigned to duty by the Secretary of War with General J.A. Gorgas in the ordnance department and placed in charge of the bureau of field artillery. He held this official position until the end of the war. 


Returning to his home, in Georgia, Colonel Capers has devoted his remarkable energies in the most unselfish manner to advance the best interest of his people. With the last farewell order of General Lee to his immortal veterans as his guide, the Colonel has been untiring in his efforts to restore the peace and prosperity of his loved Southland. Well advanced in age, he is still in the vigor of manly strength. No one is better known and none more beloved by those who know him best. As an author his "Life and Times of C.G. Memminger, Secretary of the Confederate Treasury," is regarded as a standard work of reference, and has been so reported on by the American Historical Society.


It is really delightful to converse with this accomplished gentleman. He lives in Atlanta, and is actively engaged in the practice of law.


Since the death of Mr. Davis and Mr. Memminger, Colonel Capers by date of commission is the oldest Confederate official living. Source: Confederate Veteran, June, 1908       


<b>Memoirs of an African American Seamstress</b>


By Elizabeth Keckley. Dover Publications, Mineola, New York, 2006. Soft cover, 156 pages, illustrated front piece of Elizabeth Keckley. Brand new condition.


Born a slave in Virginia, Elizabeth Keckley (1824-1907) went on to become a talented dressmaker and designer, with some twenty employees of her own. Catering to the wives, daughters, and sisters of Washington's political elite, she included among her clientele Mary Todd Lincoln, who became her close friend and confidante.


Keckley's behind the scenes view of wartime Washington not only provides fascinating glimpses of nineteenth century America, but also offers candid observations on interracial relationships and the free black middle class. Here also are absorbing details of life in the Lincoln White House, as well as an insider's perspective on the men who made Civil War politics and the women who influenced them. A touching and revelatory work, filled with incisive social commentary, this inspiring narrative will be an important addition to the library of anyone interested in African-American and Civil War history.

2nd & 20th Maine - identified - Bugle Ca $275.00

 

Southern Cross of Honor

 

CDV, Lieutenant Colonel Henry D. Capers $150.00

 

Behind The Scenes in The Lincoln White H

An original CDV photo of Lt Allen Hoar, Warren Rhode Island officer in the 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery. The chestview shows Lt Hoar wearing his rank bars, reverse is pencil inscribed "Lt Allen Hoar 1st RI Art". Reverse w photo imprint by J Trott, Bristol, RI. Age stain on lower mat, overall Very Good. Comes with service info 1861-1865 incl wounded 1862. Thanks for visiting Mike Brackin Civil War Antiques.  An original Civil War photo bustview of a soldier,  ink inscr on front mat "Yours, JMR Story"  with the reverse ink inscribed "Hyde Park, Mass", w photographer  imprint by NS Bennett, 69 King St, Alexandria, Va" . (The Gilder  Lehrman Collection, NYC has a full view image of Russell w bio info).  Corners clipped, image Very Good overall. Comes with service info. Please visit us again at Mike Brackin Civil War  


1824-90) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846. His record in the Mexican War was most gallant, and he received the brevet of 1st lieutenant at Chapultepec. He published "Rifles and Rifle Practice" in 1859. On June 8, 1861, he resigned from the U.S. Army, and fought at 1st Manassas as colonel of the 9th Alabama Infantry. He was promoted to brigadier general on Oct. 21, 1861. From then until the surrender at Appomattox, Wilcox was present with the Army of Northern Virginia in virtually all of its major battles. He was promoted to rank of major general after the Gettysburg campaign, and assumed command of Dorsey Pender's old division. Always reliable and dependable, his last ditch effort in defense of Fort Gregg on the Petersburg lines, on April 2, 1865, was one of his most noteworthy contributions.


Authentic, portrait engraving, in Confederate uniform, with printed facsimile autograph below. Etched by Charles B. Hall, New York. 12 x 16. Comes with printed biographical record outlining the military career of General Wilcox. Scarce.  Antique 19th C. Oak Victorian writing table with brown leather top.

Country of Origin: USA

Style: Victorian

Condition: Restored

RHODE ISLAND CIVIL WAR SOLDIER IDENTIFI $125.00

 

CIVIL WAR HOSPITAL STEWARD CDV IDD JMR R $135.00

 

Confederate General Cadmus M. Wilcox

 

Antique 19th C. Oak Writing Table w / Brow $4000.00




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"I think if the weather would clear up and we could get out and drill or do something in the scouting line it would help to pass the time away, but the weather is so cold and there is so much snow on the ground that we cannot do anything in that line.  We had a very heavy sleet here last night.  It was very bad on the boys who had to stand guard, in fact it is a very hard time on the poor privates they have so much guarding to do."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Romney, Va., Feb. 6th, 1863</b></u> 


My ever Dear and Loving wife,


After my love to you I will inform you that I am still in the enjoyment of good health and hope these few lines may find you enjoying the same blessing.  Well Dear, I have not much to write this afternoon, but I felt so lonesome that I thought I would talk to you a little on this paper.  The Captain is going to see a horse race and Lieut. Mann [1] is officer of the guard and so I am left alone, but it makes but little difference to me for with all the company that surrounds me I still feel that loneliness, that aching void which nothing but the presence of my little family can ever full, and the longer I remain away from home the more lonesome and miserable I feel.  I think if the weather would clear up and we could get out and drill or do something in the scouting line it would help to pass the time away, but the weather is so cold and there is so much snow on the ground that we cannot do anything in that line.  We had a very heavy sleet here last night.  It was very bad on the boys who had to stand guard, in fact it is a very [hard] time on the poor privates they have so much guarding to do.  We have to send some wagons out every day for hay or corn and we always have to send a guard along with them of from 24 to 30 men, and they have to go from 8 to 14 miles after hay which makes a pretty hard day’s march of it, and it takes about three men every day to go to the woods to cut wood for our Company, and it takes John Sill [2] about one half of his time to haul the wood.  We have to bring it about two miles and a bad road at that.  Well dear, I got that money and the shirt all safe.  I could have got along very well without the money, but still I am very thankful for it, and will not use it without I have need to do so.  Tell Margy I thank her for that little song she sent me for it does me good for my little to write to me, and I wish that Mag and Laura would write to me often, and you my dear whenever you can for it makes my heart glad to get a letter from home.  I have been up to the hospital today to see John Walters [3] and B. Coffield. [4]  They have both been in there about 7 weeks.  Walters has had the typhoid fever.  He has been very low, but is mending pretty fast now, but is still very weak.  Coffield got his back strained and I don’t think he will be fit for duty for some time, yet the rest of our boys are generally well.  I think if T.L. Tipton [5] is as well as I understand he is, he ought to come and join the Regiment as soon as possible as I think he has as good a right to be here as the rest of us.  Well dear this is the third letter I have written to you this week and I thought I had not much to say today and I don’t know whether you will have patience to read all this or not as it is not very interesting, but I will quit any how so good by my Dear and loving wife, and may the Lord bless you all and hasten the time when I shall get home again.  Kiss little Seigel for me.


From your ever loving and true husband,


Lieut. L. Lupton


To E.H. Lupton


[1] James P. Mann, was 23 years old, when he enlisted as a 1st lieutenant, on August 16, 1862, and was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was mustered out of the service on June 13, 1865, at Richmond, Va.


[2] John Sill, was 36 years old, when he enlisted as a wagoner, on July 31, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was mustered out of service on June 14, 1865, at Richmond, Va.


[3] John Walters, was 30 years old, when he enlisted as a private, on August 13, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was captured at High Bridge, Va., on April 6, 1865, and mustered out of service at Camp Chase, on June 13, 1865.


[4] Benjamin Coffield, was 19 years old, when he enlisted as a private, on August 12, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was captured at High Bridge, Va., on April 6, 1865, and mustered out of service at Camp Chase on June 10, 1865.


[5] Thomas L. Tipton, was 18 years old, when he enlisted as a private on August 11, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was discharged for disability at Cumberland, Md., on February 23, 1863.


Light staining and wear. Very fine letter.


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a Zouave holding an American flag and pointing ahead. A sign post in the ground reads, "To Washington Through Baltimore." Verse below: "Jeff Davis boasts that "cotton's king," Upon his throne so rotten- But he'll soon find, amid his swing, That HEMP is king of cotton." 5 1/2 x 3.    


(1829-1902) Born in Lincolnton, North Carolina, he was educated at the United States Military Academy and graduated in the class of 1852. When the War Between the States broke out Forney was living in Alabama where he enlisted in the Confederate army and was commissioned colonel of the 10th Alabama Infantry. He was promoted to brigadier general on March 10, 1862, and major general on October 27th of that same year. He saw action in the battle of 1st Manassas, and was wounded in action at the battle of Dranesville in December 1861. He held departmental command in Alabama and Florida and directed a division of General John Pemberton's army at Vicksburg where he was captured. His subsequent service was in the Trans-Mississippi Department, where he succeeded to the command of John G. Walker's division. Source: Generals in Gray


Authentic, portrait engraving, in Confederate uniform, with printed facsimile autograph below. 12 x 16. Scarce.  


Eighth plate tintype of a standing Federal cavalryman posing in front of a camp scene backdrop with numerous tents. He is wearing a slouch hat, 9 button shell jacket, and gauntlets and is holding a saber at his front. An object can be seen pinned to his coat which might be a corps badge or ID disc. Mat and image only. This photograph was sent home in the mail as it shows the typical bent corners where the brass mat was folded over [not trimmed] the image to keep the tintype in place. This was a method used by soldiers to send their images home and not have the problems caused by the thickness of a full case and glass which would oftentimes get broken and damage the image. The eighth plate is also a rare size. The image shows light wear and some dark spots.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

To Washington Through Baltimore $15.00

 

Confederate General John H. Forney $25.00

 

Tintype, Union Soldier Holding Saber




12 x 17, imprint. 1861-1864. Co. G, 17th Mo. Vol. Inf., or Western Turner Rifle Regiment. Mustered Sept. 25, 1861, Discharged Sept. 27, 1864. Lists Franz Wilhelme as Captain, Edward Schueller as 1st Lieutenant, and August Spinner as 2nd Lieutenant, and also includes the names of all the Non-Commissioned Officers and Privates of Co. G, 17th Mo. Vol. Inf. by rank. Below that it lists 23 battles in which Co. G participated in including the dates of each battle. Among them are Pea Ridge, Ark.; Chickasaw Bayou, Miss.; Arkansas Post, Ark.; Vicksburg, Miss.; Lookout Mountain, Tenn.; Missionary Ridge, Ga.; Ringgold, Ga.; Resaca, Ga.; Dallas, Ga.; Big Shanty, Ga.; Kennesaw Mountain, Ga.; Chattahoochie River, Ga.; Atlanta, Ga.; Jonesboro, Ga.; and Lovejoy Station, Ga. Below the battle honors is a section titled "Statistics" which breaks down the number of men killed, wounded, taken prisoner, etc., and at the bottom is a section titled, "Following are the Names and Condition of Co. G when Mustered Out of U.S. Service at St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 27th, 1864." Publisher and publication date are unknown.

 

Light wear and age toning. There are a few very tiny holes, and some small archival tape repairs on the folds on the reverse. Very fine. Rare Missouri broadside for the "Western Turner Rifle Regiment."       


Compiled and edited by Harold Holzer. Published by Addison-Wesley Publishing Company. Soft cover, 380 pages, index, illustrations. Excellent condition. A great addition to any Lincoln library.


Among the many credentials of Harold Holzer are Chief Communications Officer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, chairman of the Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation, and he is the author of many books on the Civil War and Abraham Lincoln. For "Dear Mr. Lincoln" Mr. Holzer won the Barondess/Lincoln Award of the Civil War Round Table of New York and the Award of Achievement of the Lincoln Group of New York. He has received numerous other awards for his work including the Lincoln Prize and the National Humanities Medal, and is one of the leading authorities in the world on Abraham Lincoln.  


The letters sent to Abraham Lincoln at the White House contained praise and damnation, advice and job requests, battlefield reports, family nagging, and more. Readers and historians welcomed this first major compilation of these documents for offering a unique picture of Lincoln as President and of life during the Civil War.


<u>Reviews of Dear Mr. Lincoln</u>


"A fascinating new compilation." Geoffrey C. Ward, American Heritage


"Fascinating...the letters offer further proof of the degree to which many Americans saw Lincoln more as an amiable neighbor than as an unapproachable head of state. They also offer a rough, vigorous glimpse of the North in wartime." Richard E. Nichols, The New York Times Book Review


"A fascinating look at a cross section of letters from the high and mighty and from the lowliest of common soldiers, dirt farmers and struggling widows. Holzer's introduction to the book itself gives a good view of the operations of Lincoln's personal office during his presidency...all in all, Holzer's latest Lincoln  offering is an informative look at the life and times of the sixteenth president from an unusual and rewarding perspective." Doug Pokorski, Springfield State Journal Register


"Harold Holzer, a Lincoln authority, says the President received between 200 and 300 letters a day, some praising him, some assailing him, many seeking jobs or favors. Holzer had the clever idea of compiling a varied and stimulating selection. Holzer also includes a substantial character study of the two secretaries [Nicolay & Hay] who actually opened  the mail. This book provides an illuminating sidelight on what America was really like as it underwent its greatest crisis." Herbert Kupferberg, Parade Magazine  


"A fascinating account of the thoughts of a nation." Library Journal




 Beautiful antique 19th C. walnut and burl wall clock in perfect working order.

 Magnificent R.J. Horner walnut grandfather clock in mint condition. The clock is a Herschede Movement piece composed of nine tubes and three weights. The face is in mint condition and is signed Tiffany. It has been professionally serviced on a regular basis and is in perfect working condition. 8'3"H x 28"W at the base.Fine antique grandfather clock.


Herschede Serial #42401

17th Missouri Infantry Memorial Broadsid $125.00

 

Dear Mr. Lincoln; Letters to the Preside

 

Walnut & Burl Antique Wall Clock $1250.00

 

Monumental R. J. Horner Walnut Grandfathe $52000.00

3 white ironstone plates in the Corn + Oats shape. All made by Davenport. Ca. 1863. 5 1/4 inches D. Mint condition with great color and detail. Price is for all 3.  Fourteen(14) white ironstone plates in the Corn + Oats shape. 5 are made by Wedgwood, 9 made by Davenport. 8 3/4 inches D. Ca. 1863. Excellent condition with 2 with spots and minor chiggers on rims(pictured). Price is for all 14.  Six(6) white ironstone plates in the Corn + Oats shape. 5 made by Wedgwood, 1 made by Davenport. Ca. 1863. Excellent condition except one has a rim hairline(pictured). Minor roughness on a couple of rims. Price is for all 6.  Fifteen(15) white ironstone Honey Plates in the Corn + Oats shape. 8 made by Wedgwood, 7 by Davenport. Ca. 1863. They are 4 3/4 inches D. Crisp detail and good color. Mint condition with no chips or hairlines. Minor roughness on some rims, 3 have spots(pictured). Price is for all 15. May break up leaving an even number left.

3 WHITE IRONSTONE PLATES, CORN + OATS $30.00

 

14 WHITE IRONSTONE PLATES, CORN + OATS $280.00

 

6 IRONSTONE PLATES, CORN + OATS $90.00

 

15 WHITE IRONSTONE HONIES, CORN + OATS $180.00

Six(6) white ironstone plates in the Corn + Oats shape. Made by J Wedgwood. Ca. 1863. Mint except for one with rim chigger and one with glaze pop(pictured). Nice color and detail. Price is for all 6.  Ten(10) white ironstone Corn + Oats Soup Bowls. Al made by J Wedgwood. Ca. 1863. 8 3/4 inches D. Great color and crisp detail. Mint condition with no chips or hairlines. One has a glaze crease which is not a hairline(pictured). Price is for all 10.  Pair of Mid Century Modern Thonet chairs, excellent quality, very substantial, in original condition

Dimensions:


31.5" H x 22.5" W x 24.5" D  


7 3/4 x 10, imprinted form, with vignette of the Missouri State Seal, filled out in ink.


Head Quarters, State of Missouri,

Adjutant General's Office,

St. Louis, September 29th, 1864


E.[nrolled] M.[issouri] M.[ilitia]


Special Orders,

No. 171


IV. F. Wilhelmi having been appointed a Lieut. Colonel in the Enrolled Militia of the State, you are hereby directed to report to Col. D.Q. Gale, commanding 54th Regiment for orders.


Official


W.M. Cord, A.A.G.


By order of the Commander in Chief:

Signed John B. Gray

Adjutant General


[to] Lieut. Col. F. Wilhelmi


Light staining, age toning and wear. Scarce war date Missouri document.


Francis Wilhelmi, also had service as captain and major in the 17th Missouri Infantry, known as the Western Turner Rifle Regiment, during the Civil War.

6 WHITE IRONSTONE PLATES, CORN + OATS $120.00

 

10 IRONSTONE SOUP BOWLS, C + Os $250.00

 

2400 Pair of Mid Century Chairs Thonet $1900.00

 

1864 Special Orders, Head Quarters, Stat $45.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with illustrations of General Fremont and battle vignette. Major General John C. Fremont is printed along the left edge. Published by J.E. Tilton & Co., Boston. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


(1814-90) Born in Madison County, Alabama, he graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in the class of 1835, but resigned to study law. He served as a volunteer during the Creek uprising, and subsequently practiced law, was engaged in cotton manufacturing, and was active in the Alabama state militia, making his residence in Tuscaloosa and Mobile. At the outbreak of the Mexican War he was reappointed in the U.S. Army as lieutenant colonel of the 13th U.S. Infantry, and was later promoted to colonel of the 9th U.S. Infantry, resigning again after the hostilities ended. From that time until the beginning of the War Between the States he was a merchant in Mobile, and served as mayor of that city from 1858 to 1861, and he also served in the state legislature. Entering the Confederate Army as colonel of the 3rd Alabama Infantry, he was promoted to brigadier general on July 10, 1861, and major general, April 6, 1862. He was in command of the Mobile defenses; then fought at Shiloh at the head of two brigades; took part in the Kentucky invasion; and at Murfreesboro where he was highly commended by both General Braxton Bragg and General Leonidas Polk. He subsequently served out the rest of the war in Alabama. Thereafter he was a cotton broker; editor of the Mobile Tribune; again mayor of Mobile; city treasurer; and later was a claim agent in Washington, D.C. Source: Generals in Gray     


Authentic, portrait engraving, in Confederate uniform, with printed facsimile autograph below. Etched by Charles B. Hall, New York. 12 x 16. Comes with printed biographical record outlining the military career of General Withers. Scarce.  This Civil War postal cover is complete with its original stamp and postmark .  It bears the ink penned name and postal address of its original recipient:  <B>A. O. Shaw M.D.</B> who served as Surgeon 20th Maine Regiment </B>    Maine Surgeon, Abner O. Shaw had a distinguished Civil War record and is best remembered for his night long work in a Petersburg field hospital when he was brought to the aid of the horribly wounded Colonel Joshua L. Chamberlain by the fallen hero’s brother, Capt. Thomas Chamberlain.  Dr. Shaw would be credited with saving the life of the Colonel, soon to be Brigadier General, <B>Joshua L. Chamberlain</B>.   The skilled regimental surgeon would remain a close friend and the lifelong personal physician to Chamberlain.  As a matter of interest, this cover was acquired some years ago with others to Shaw that were noted as having been written by <B>Dr. John Benson</B>.  <U>Dr. Benson had served as Regimental Surgeon to the 20th Maine in July and August 1863.</U>  A nice Chamberlain related Civil War relic without spending a lot of money.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 This attractive little oil lantern in marked Pat. Aug. 13, 1878 and stands approximately 7 ½ inches to the chimney top; about 14 inches total height including bail handle. The reservoir is of spun brass with sheet iron bottom.  The bail handle is of iron, all else is of formed sheet brass.  All in nice condition, unpolished with an eye appealing natural age patina.  A nice camp item for the Indian Wars era enthusiast, this little lighting device is ready to set in any period collection.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <U>key word</U> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

Major General John C. Fremont $15.00

 

Confederate General Jones M. Withers $25.00

 

20th MAINE SURGEON Civil War Postal Cove $55.00

 

Patent 1878 LANTERN $135.00

We’ll not repeat the entire story of <I>Butler’s Folly</I> here except for a quick reminder that it was a Union initiated scheme to strip and disguise a government ship (USS Louisiana) to look like a blockade-runner, load it with 215 tons of black powder and, under cover of darkness, anchor the thing in the shallow just off Fort Fisher at the mouth of North Carolina’s Cape Fear River.  Upon setting an elaborate clockwork fuse system the Yankee sailors abandoned the rouse ship to wait in the clear for what they knew would be a disastrous result upon the Confederate fort. But alas, once the eruption of flames and rattling shock waves cleared, Fort Fisher stood pretty much as before, stout and proud.  A report of the Union fiasco wound be included in the 1891 Government Printing Office publication of the <I><B>Official Records of the Union & Confederate Armies</I></B>.  The product of this 4 X 8 X 7/8 inch wood and type lead printing plate of the Union <I>Powder Vessel</I>is seen in the Government Printing Office  Official Record Atlas, Vol. 40, Plate 1.  Emanating from a local estate sale the printing plate bears an old pencil inscription <I>Lower Cape Fear Historical Society</I> on the back. 

 <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  

      Outstanding as a standalone example of early American country blacksmithing, an understanding of the artisan who left his name boldly set in the skillet’s iron handle, will be necessary to full appreciation of the old fry pan’s historic potential.  Deeply set in the handle of this hand forged skillet is <B>AMES</B> a name that will ring true to the student of early American manufacturing as well as Mexican War and Civil War collector /historians.  With a history too extensive to cite here, suffice it to say that it was as early as the later 1700s that blacksmith Oliver Ames set up his single forge shop in Massachusetts.  Typical of the usual country blacksmith, in his early days, Ames would eak out a living fabricating all manner of iron tools and equipment from cooking grates and fry pans to door hinges, to farming and artisan tools.  From here Oliver Ames’s would become the largest shovel manufacturer in the country. The Ames bloodline continued to expand in the foundry busuness to include John Ames in Chelmsford and John’s son N. P. Ames in old Springfield who would establish the Ames Sword Co. as the best known of Union Civil War contractors supplying all manner on military arms to the Union cause. (see: <I>Sketches of the Old Inhabitants and Other Citizens of Old Springfield</I> by Charles Wells Chapin ) This hand wrought skillet to include the <B>AMES</B> marked handle was blacksmith forged from a single piece of black iron.  The bowl measures approximately 8 1/8 inches in diameter with an 8 ¾ inch handle.  All remain in excellent original condition with a pleasing patina and good evidence of age and originality.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  



 Grand scale pair of early 20th century Mahogany entry doors with   inset Jeweled and beveled glass with floral motif.


The dimensions are 96" H x 72" W x 1.5" Deep  

Pair alone is 96" H x 36" W x 1.5" Deep  Massive mahogany English partners desk with raised panels and black leather top. These high quality monumental desks are becoming increasingly difficult to find.

Fort Fisher N. C. - Powder Vessel - Offi $135.00

 

early AMES marked Blacksmith Forged Skil $235.00

 

322 Mahogany Entry Doors with Beveled Gl $25000.00

 

Antique Partners Desk with Black Leather $9500.00

A 3 piece white ironstone Soup Tureen in the New York shape. Potted by J Clementson. Ca. 1858. Underplate is 15 x 10 1/2 inches, 13 inches H. Excellent color and detail. Wear on the finial, bowl rim. Chip under one handle that barely shows from the side(pictured). Priced as is.  Remarkable 17th century oil on canvas portrait of Sir John Morden (Aug. 23, 1623 - Sep. 6, 1708). Sir John Morden was founder of Morden College in Blackheath, Kent, England. This painting is in pristine condition and includes its original gilt wood frame.


We also have a portrait of Nathaniel Brand which is a mate to this piece. Both paintings may be purchased as a set for $50,000.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of Commodore Louis M. Goldsborough with caption below, "Commodore Goldsborough, Commanding Naval part of Burnside's Expedition." Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3. Scarce.


***Please read the history about these Union patriotic imprints recently discovered in their individual category section on the website. CIVIL WAR MEMORABILIA/Patriotic Imprints.  


<u>Louis M. Goldsborough</u>: (1805-73) Born in Washington, D.C., he was the son of a chief clerk of the U.S. Navy Department. He received his lieutenant's commission in 1825, and saw service during the Seminole and Mexican Wars. Upon the outbreak of the Civil War, he was appointed commander of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. He earned the Thanks of Congress in 1862 for the capture of Roanoke Island and the closing of the North Carolina sounds. He was promoted to Rear Admiral in August 1862. In June 1865, he was appointed as the first commander of the European Squadron. He took command of the Washington Navy Yard in 1868, and served there until his retirement in 1873.



 


By Pulitzer Prize Winner, David Herbert Donald. Published by Simon & Schuster, New York, 2003. Hard cover with dust jacket, 269 pages, index, illustrated front piece, brand new condition.


"We Are Lincoln Men" examines the significance of friendship in Abraham Lincoln's life and the role it played in his presidency. Though Lincoln had hundreds of acquaintances and dozens of admirers, he had almost no intimate friends. Behind his mask of affability and endless stream of humorous anecdotes, he maintained an inviolate reserve that only a few were able to penetrate. In this highly original book, two time Pulitzer Prize winner David Herbert Donald examines, for the first time, those close friendships and explores their role in shaping Lincoln's career.


"We Are Lincoln Men" shows how Lincoln's experiences as a boy growing up in frontier Indiana made it hard for him to develop warm, supportive relationships later in life. Not until 1837, when he met Joshua Fry Speed, with whom he shared a room and bed for the next four years, did he learn the real meaning of friendship. These two young men confided everything to each other, and they even helped each other as they diffidently sought brides. After Speed returned to Kentucky, Lincoln developed a close relationship with his younger law partner, William H. Herndon. He became Herndon's mentor and hero, and Herndon's idealization of him satisfied one of Lincoln's basic psychological needs.


When he was elected President, Lincoln had no close personal friends in Washington until Illinois Senator Orville H. Browning arrived. Browning became his confidant and, under Lincoln's skillful guidance, served as his strongest supporter in Congress. This useful friendship dissolved when the two men disagreed over emancipation, and Browning became further alienated when Lincoln three times passed over the opportunity to name him to the United States Supreme Court.


In his greatest triumph of friendship, Lincoln won over his powerful, opinionated Secretary of State, William H. Seward, who thought he was better qualified than the President for his job. With psychological insight and charm, Lincoln gained Seward's friendship and secured his loyal support.


Lincoln's closest, and most genuine, friendships while he was in the White House were with his private secretaries, John G. Nicolay and John Hay. Always at his best when dealing with young men, he served as a role model, and they, in effect, were his surrogate family. He won their devotion, and they became his most ardent supporters and, ultimately, his official biographers.


Professor Donald's remarkable book offers a fresh way of looking at Abraham Lincoln, both as a man who needed friendship and as a leader who understood the importance of friendship in the management of men. Donald penetrates Lincoln's mysterious reserve to offer a new picture of the President's inner life and to explain his unsurpassed political skills.


<u>Acclaim For David Herbert Donald's Lincoln</u>


"Eagerly awaited, Lincoln fulfills expectations. Donald writes with lucidity and elegance." James M. McPherson


"A grand work, the Lincoln biography for this generation."  Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.


"Mr. Donald's Lincoln is so lucid and richly researched, so careful and compelling, that it is hard to imagine a more satisfying life of our most admired and least understood president." Geoffrey C. Ward


"The best biography of Abraham Lincoln I have ever read." Mark E. Neely


"Never has the man [Lincoln] been brought so effectively to life or portrayed with such richness and freshness of detail. This book must be considered the best biography of Lincoln ever published." Richard N. Current

3 pc. IRONSTONE SOUP TUREEN, NEW YORK $200.00

 

17th C. Oil on Canvas Portrait of Sir Jo $25000.00

 

Commodore Louis M. Goldsborough $15.00

 

We Are Lincoln Men; Abraham Lincoln and $25.00




<b>United States Congressman from Missouri


Confederate Senator and Congressman</b>


(1802-85) Born in Madison County, Kentucky, he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1824, and practiced in Fayette, Missouri. During the Black Hawk Indian War he served as colonel of the Missouri Mounted Volunteers. He was commissioned major general of the Missouri Militia in 1848. Served as a member of the Missouri State House of Representatives 1850-51; and was a U.S. Congressman, from 1857 until July 13, 1861, when he was expelled for taking up arms against the United States. Clark was a strong secessionist and a leader in Missouri's secession movement. In the spring of 1861, his worth was estimated at a million dollars and he owned 160 slaves. Appointed brigadier general of the Missouri State Guard in May 1861, he fought at the battle of Wilson's Creek, where he was wounded. Known by the soldiers to be a brave and genial old gentleman, he was soon elected to represent Missouri in the Confederate Provisional Congress. He won election to the First Confederate Senate and the Second Confederate House of Representatives. While in Congress he was a strong supporter of the administration and of a more Draconian prosecution of the war. The Federal government offered a $10,000 reward for the capture of General Clark and when Richmond fell he disguised himself, adopted an alias, and fled to Mexico where he remained until he heard that the Federal authorities no longer wanted him. Crossing the border into Texas, Clark was promptly arrested and imprisoned at Fort Jackson. Eventually freed by President Andrew Johnson, he did not return to Missouri until five years after the war when he resumed his law practice in Fayette and attempted to restore his fortunes. He made one final effort to win a nomination for the U.S. Congress, but suffered defeat at the hands of his own son, Confederate Brigadier General John B. Clark, Jr., who went on to have a long congressional career. Clark, Sr. died in Fayette on October 29, 1885, and is buried in Fayette Cemetery. Source: More Generals in Gray


Oval salt print photograph. 3 1/2 x 5. Displayed in archival gray mat with gold oval trim. The mat measures 8 x 10. This photograph came from a Whitehurst Gallery scrapbook, circa 1857-59. Very fine image. Scarce.     


<b>United States Congressman from Michigan</b>


(1823-80) Born in Dansville, New York, moved to Michigan in 1844, taught school in Ingham County, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1849, and practiced in De Witt, Clinton County, Michigan. He was elected prosecuting attorney for Clinton County in 1852, 1854, 1856, 1858, and 1862. He was a member of the Michigan State Senate in 1861-62; and provost marshal of the Sixth Congressional District, 1863-65. He was a delegate to the Republican National Conventions of 1856 and 1868; and served as U.S. Congressman, 1869-71.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 3/8 x 4 3/4. Huge ink signature, R. Strickland, St. Johns, Mich.  


8 pages. From The Army of the Potomac. The Battle of Falling Waters. An Official Dispatch from Gen. Meade Refuting Gen. Lee's Denial. The Report of General Kilpatrick. A New Rebel Camp Discovered. Changes and Promotions. General Meade and the Army. A Letter From General Sickles. Naval Movements. Reception of the Flagship Hartford by the Navy Yard. Effect of the Rebel Fire on Our Vessels. Survey of the Steamer Richmond. Mysterious Naval Battle. A United States Gunboat and a Rebel Privateer Engaged on the Coast of Maine. The Battle Witnessed by a Number of Persons. No Official Report of the Affair. Jeff Davis Captured Correspondence. The Indian War. Fight on the Missouri River. All the Indians This Side of the Rocky Mountains Hostile. News From Fortress Monroe. Advice From Charleston. The Draft. Who Are Deserters? Skedaddlers Arrested. Important From California. Trouble With the Secessionists in the Southern Counties. The Operations Against Vicksburg. General Grant's Report. The National Draft. Report of the Judge Advocate to the Governor of New York. The Metropolitan Police. Their Service During the Riot Week. Their Honorable Record. Affairs in Tennessee, and much more war news. Light wear.  A white ironstone Teapot in the popular Laurel Wreath shape. Elsmore + Forster. Ca. 1867. Mint condition with excellent color and detail. 8 1/2 inches H.

Salt Print Photograph, Confederate Gener $250.00

 

Autograph, Randolph Strickland $10.00

 

The New York Times, August 13, 1863 $35.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE TEAPOT, LAUREL WREATH $160.00




<b>Commander of the 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry</b>


Civil War patriotic imprint with an excellent illustration of Colonel Richard H. Rush wearing a Hardee hat with plume and cavalry insignia. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. 5 x 3. Rare.


WBTS Trivia: Richard H. Rush graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point on July 1, 1846.


 


Edited by Michael Burlingame. Published by the Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland, 1998. Hard cover with dust jacket, 291 pages, index, new condition.


With this volume Michael Burlingame exhumes yet another valuable but largely forgotten trove of Lincolniana. Noah Brooks observed Lincoln almost daily in various settings, and with a reporter's keen eye for detail.


During the Civil War, few outside Abraham Lincoln's immedite circle of family, friends, and advisers had as much access to the president as the young journalist Noah Brooks. Brooks had lived in Illinois where he first met Lincoln before migrating to California. The Sacremento Daily Union posted him to Washington, D.C., in 1862. From the Union capital, Brooks filed dispatches that were unusually candid, not only because he and the president were so close but also because of the long delay between the time Lincoln disclosed something to Brooks and the time the issue of the Sacremento Daily Union containing that information could reach Washington. Meeting with Lincoln nearly daily during the last two and a half years of the war, Brooks witnessed firsthand the president's actions and was privy to his thoughts and feelings about political enemies and the evolving purpose of the war. The relationship was such that Brooks was slated to be the president's personal secretary during the second term.


Brooks's famous 1895 memoir, Washington in Lincoln's Times, included none of the raw material- wartime dispatches, selected letters, and personal reminiscences- which Michael Burlingame collects for the first time in Lincoln Observed. This new volume provides a singular perspective on Lincoln's last years and a solid appraisal of the president's personality and politics. It also reveals much about Washington politics during those anxious times and reflects public opinion in the North about the conduct of the war. Lincoln Observed offers an intimate portrait of Abraham Lincoln and a riveting insider's account of Washington during the Civil War.  


Sixth plate ambrotype of seated Union officer wearing a single breasted frock coat with shoulder straps. His coat is worn open to show his military vest. He poses next to a table with a book visible on top. Comes in a full case with brass mat, keeper and glass. Very sharp and clear image. The original photograph is much clearer than the scan indicates.  


Large coat size button, Albert LA. 24a, monogram two piece button with interlaced PG initials. 20mm, with backmark of T.W. & W., Paris, complete with shank with anchor and bomb. This button came from a coat found in Houston in the early 1970's from which Albert obtained the buttons and used to illustrate in his excellent reference book. It comes with a note [copy] by Albert written in 1975 expressing his gratitude in obtaining several of these buttons. The Pelican Guards were Company B, organized on October 26th, 1861, [Orleans] and they served aboard the floating battery New Orleans at Columbus, Kentucky, and at Island #10, Tennessee, where they were captured, on April 8th, 1862. Very desirable.

Colonel Richard H. Rush $25.00

 

Lincoln Observed, Civil War Dispatches o $25.00

 

Ambrotype, Union Officer $200.00

 

Confederate Louisiana Pelican Guard Butt




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