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Weíll let our photo speak to the general condition and eye appeal of this Civil War   period CDV by Washington Street, Boston, photography, frame and album dealer Joseph Ward.  The general history of the subject will be of special interest to the Abraham Lincoln enthusiast though.  Titled <B>President Lincolnís First Home in Illinois</B>,this cabin was built on the banks of the Sangamn River in Macon County, Illinois by Lincoln cousins the Hanks brothers John and Dennis who appear here in the front of the cabin.  In time the cabin became the property of Hanks brothers who promoted their connection to the old Lincoln place and their famous cousin by selling fragments of the place as souvenirs.  Copies of this view were offered for sale at the <B>1865 Great Sanitary Fair </B> in Chicago.  The once popular remembrance of the fallen President, these <I>Hanks</I> photos once graced many a family CDV album. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!



 Once upon a time before the modern day advent of plastics and other alloys, bone was the staple from which any number of decorative or utilitarian <I>smalls</I> were cut, shaved and filed to shape, frequently as a gift to a loved one or friend.  Rings, pendants and assorted carved objects of the imagination called <I>whimseys</I> were often an object of the attention of a country craftsman squinting in the lantern light while winter winds howled at the night door.  Sewing implements as are offered here offered many an eveningís pastime to the maker and a durable token of affection to the recipient.  More difficult to find now there was a time not so long ago when these little decorative <I>whimseys</I> and utilitarian tokens were commonly found in attic stored antique sewing baskets, keepsake thread  or candy boxes.  Saved away among  relics of the family attic, their stories, as unique as their shape and origin, long since lost in time.  This little grouping of four antique sewing tools (illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison) will offer an attractive example of such long ago crafted implements and will display well in any antique sewing implement grouping or Civil War winter camp or personal item collection.    Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 Height:	20 in. (50.80 cm)

Width:	38 in. (96.52 cm)

Depth:	25.5 in. (64.77 cm)

Country of Origin:	USA

Style:	

Condition: Original

Year:	19th C.


Lovely Rosewood American Renaissance Revival Inlaid Parlour /Coffee table    This table is executed in rosewood. walnut and mixed woods with floral and musical motif.  Berkey and Gay was one of foremost cabinetmakers of the 19th century and known for their superior quality and craftsmanship.  

 Height:	43 in. (109.22 cm)

Width:	228 in. (579.12 cm)

Depth:	50.5 in. (128.27 cm)

Country of Origin:	USA

Style:	Art Nouveau

Condition:	Original

Year:	c. 1920


Truly Monumental in Scale and Style, a Custom Made, one-of-a-kind Architect or Artists Cabinet, with 5 sections. Executed meticulously in Exotic veneers, walnut and Birdís eye maple.  Each side sections has 16 drawers with bronze hardware, maple interior, and gorgeous veneer on drawer fronts.  The center section has 20 drawers, and the top is walnut with inset birdís eye maple veneers.  The sides have raised burl veneer decorative panels.  This is THE piece to design your room or store around, it is a lovely combination of understated elegance and function.

period cdv - Pres. LINCOLN'S 1st HOME I $95.00

 

hand carved antique BONE SEWING IMPLEMEN $65.00

 

American Rosewood Renaissance Revival In $4500.00

 

Architect / Art Cabinet, 19íLong, Custom $20000.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a Union soldier holding an artillery sponge with cannon and cannon balls behind him and the above motto. An American flag is at the top of the imprint. Published  by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.    


Two volume boxed set. Published by The Library of America. Volume 1, Abraham Lincoln, Speeches and Writings, 1832-1858. Speeches, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings, and The Lincoln Douglas Debates. 898 pages, index.  Volume 2, Abraham Lincoln Speeches and Writings 1859-1865, Speeches, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings, Presidential Messages and Proclamations. 787 pages, index. Both volumes are in brand new, never read, mint condition. Each volume comes in its own high quality box. A must have set for any serious Abraham Lincoln library or collection. 


Abraham Lincoln measured the promise and cost of American freedom in lucid and extraordinarily moving prose, famous for its native wit, simple dignity of expressions, and peculiarly American flavor. Volume I, comprises the most comprehensive selection ever published with over 240 speeches, letters, and drafts that take Mr. Lincoln from rural law practice to national prominence, and chart his emergence as an eloquent antislavery advocate and defender of the constitution. Included are the complete Lincoln-Douglas debates, perhaps the most famous confrontation in American political history.


Abraham Lincoln was the greatest writer of the Civil War as well as its greatest political leader. His clear, beautiful, and at times uncompromisingly severe language forever shaped the nationís understanding of its most terrible conflict. Volume II, comprises the most comprehensive selection ever published with over 550 speeches, messages, proclamations, letters, and other writings including the Inaugural and Gettysburg addresses and the moving condolence letter to Mrs. Bixby that record the words and deeds with which Lincoln defended, preserved, and redefined the Union.

  


By Michael Shaara. Published by Random House, New York, 1993. Hardcover, 374 pages, maps, illustrated end pages. No dust jacket. Gold embossed initials "M.S." [Michael Shaara] on the front cover. Gold embossed imprint with book title, author and publisher on the spine. Excellent condition.


This is the late Michael Shaara's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel (1974) about the epic three day Civil War battle of Gettysburg, which was fought on July 1,2,3, 1863. This superb book was the basis for the 1993 film Gettysburg starring Tom Berenger, Martin Sheen, Jeff Daniels, Sam Elliott, and Stephen Lang. The events immediately before and during the battle are seen through the eyes of Confederate Generals Lee, Longstreet, Armistead and Pickett, as well as Union General Buford, and Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his conspicuous gallantry at Little Round Top, on July 2, 1863.  


<b>Civil War Congressman from Pennsylvania</b>


(1817-91) Graduated from Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y., in 1840; engaged in teaching; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1842, and commenced practice in Warren, Pa.; served as district attorney, 1846-48; member of the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives, 1849-51; served in the Pennsylvania State Senate, 1857-59; appointed president judge of the eighteenth judicial district of Pennsylvania in 1861; served as U.S. Congressman, 1863-75; was chairman of the Committee on Revisal and Unfinished Business; served on the Committee on Naval Affairs; appointed Register of the Treasury by President Hayes and served 1878-81; Associate Justice of the United States Court of Claims, 1881-91.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 3/8 x 5 5/8, in ink, G.W. Scofield, Warren, Penna. Very fine.

Our Union Volunteers

 

Abraham Lincoln, Speeches and Writings

 

The Killer Angels $15.00

 

Autograph, Glenni W. Scofield




Civil War patriotic imprint with ornate full color vignette of American flags and the motto Liberty And Union Forever at the top, and a large American shield with the slogan, The Union & Constitution at the bottom. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. Light staining. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published in the June 14, 1864 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: President Lincoln And His Secretaries. 11 x 16. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin. Their is staining at the left edge which can be matted out if you were inclined to frame this print. 


WBTS Trivia: President Lincoln with his private secretaries John G. Nicolay and John Hay, visited the gallery of Alexander Gardner, in Washington, on Sunday, November 8, 1863, and had several pictures taken. John Hay wrote in his diary of the occasion, "We had a great many pictures taken...some of the President the best I have seen...Nico & I immortalized ourselves by having ourselves done in a group with the President."

 


<b>Requests evidence in favor of or against him!</b>


7 1/2 x 9 3/4, in ink, on imprinted letter sheet.


Head Quarters, Middle Military Dept.

Office, Chief Quartermaster,

Baltimore, Sept. 25th, 1865


Bvt. Maj. Genl. A. Flagg, A.Q.M.

Harpers Ferry, Va.


Major,


You will please make an investigation, and ascertain as to the loyalty of Joshua Pusey, who lives somewhere in Loudon County, Va. He has certificate of Provost Marshal, but it is not enough. Furnish all evidence in his favor, or against, that you can readily procure.


Very Respectfully,

Your Obt. Servant,

G.W. Bradley

Colonel, Chief Q.M.


Light age toning and wear. There are four very small punch holes at the top of the document which do not affect any of the content. Very interesting document regarding the loyalty of this possible ex-Confederate soldier or Virginia farmer or merchant. Soldiers and citizens living in states that had been in rebellion with the Federal government were required to swear and sign loyalty oaths to the United States. Apparently this fellow had a certificate from a Provost Marshal, but Colonel Bradley wants more proof of his loyalty to the United States and so he orders an officer at Harpers Ferry to start an investigation into the matter. 


George W. Bradley, who signed this document, enlisted as a captain, on November 26, 1862, and was commissioned into the U.S. Volunteers Quartermaster's Department. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel, on September 17, 1864. He was discharged for promotion, November 4, 1864, and was commissioned colonel, U.S. Army Quartermaster's Department. He was assigned as depot quartermaster at City Point, Va., and among other duties he had charge of water transportation on the James River.

 The three-piece Asiatic Pheasants sauce tureen consists of underplate, bowl, and lid.  The under plate measures 8 3/4 by 6 3/4 inches.  The tureen with lid measures 8 inches wide by 6 inches tall.


Asiatic Pheasants is a very popular pattern from the nineteenth century, one that is reproduced even today.  


It is in presentable condition.  The base is free of all chips and cracks. Inside, slight discoloration is evident.  The under tray has a few minor and tiny glaze flakes on the underside, not seen unless it is upended. Also unseen unless turned upside down is a chip to the flange of the lid, the part that fits into the base to hold the lid in place securely. The low price reflects these flaws.

Liberty And Union Forever

 

President Abraham Lincoln & His Secretar

 

Yankee Colonel Questions the Loyalty of $45.00

 

Blue Transferware Sauce Tureen with Unde $49.00

This large and distinctively designed tea pot was made in the Jacob Furnival pottery and dates to the 1850 decade. 


 This is Grand Loop, a design featuring bulging  and dramatic loops down the sides of the vessel and on the sides of the domed lid.  Also of note is the open bud finial.


  Usually, one finds this shape with a closed pod finial, so it is a pleasure for me to find that the pottery also produced this alternative.  I also love the design on the rim surrounding the lid.  It is broad with an undulating band.


This teapot is large and heavy, measuring 10 1/2 tall by 10 inches wide.  I can't gush enough about its condition:  free of all chips and cracks, no stains, very white, and sharply embossed.  It possesses all the features prized in antique English white ironstone. Usually, one finds a few dings to the spout, but even that is free of flaws.  The previous owner kept is shelved, and it  looks like that was the case for its entire life.


 


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of two hands clasping each other in friendship, The Constitution document, fireworks and stars with verse below, "Hail, brothers in a common cause! True to your Country stand! The Constitution and the Laws Must know no Vandal hand. Let foreign foes invidious gaze, To see our light expire; They'll shrink in awe before the blaze Of Freedom's deathly fire." Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.    H 36in. x D 19in.  H 34in. x D 14in.

Furnival White Ironstone Teapot, Grand L $175.00

 

The Constitution

 

H 36in. x D 19in. $0.00

 

H 34in. x D 14in. $0.00




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"Well dear I will tell you about our scout.  We left camp on Wednesday morning, that is 8 companies of our Regiment, and 8 comp.[anies] of the 123rd, two companies of cavalry and 2 pieces of artillery.  We took two days rations and the men took their blankets.  There was also about five hundred cavalry went out on another road under the command of Gen. Elliot."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Winchester, Va., Friday, April 24th/63</b></u>


My Dear and loving wife,


After my love to you I will inform you that I recd. your letter of the 19th and also one from J.L. Hanson on yesterday.  I was glad to hear that you thought that Laura seemed better and I am in great hopes that she will soon get well for I do not see how you are to stand the hardships and troubles you have to endure.  I did think that I would try and get leave to come home but if she does not get a backset I donít know as I will try it for it is a very uncertain thing.  If I had not been ordered to go to Stausburg on Wednesday I should have tried to get a leave of absence yesterday, but I did not get back until about 2 oíclock yesterday and then I got your letter in which you thought she was a little better.  My Dear I do wish that I was at home to help you take care of the poor dear little children, but it seems like I canít be there at this time.  The Captain has sent for leave of absence again.  He has had two papers sent back disapproved, but the third time is the charm and maybe he may get to come home at last.  Well dear I will tell you about our scout.  We left camp on Wednesday morning, that is 8 companies of our Regiment, and 8 comp.[anies] of the 123rd, two companies of cavalry and 2 pieces of artillery.  We took two days rations and the men took their blankets.  There was also about five hundred cavalry went out on another road under the command of Gen. Elliot.  Well we started for Strausburg about 7 oíclock distant 18 miles.  We had a nice march and got there about 3 oíclock.  We encamped in an open field without any fence around to keep out the cold and there we had to stay all night.  Just as we got there some of the cavalry which had went on before came back and said they had met the enemy and had a fight and had got one of our men killed and one wounded and wanted an ambulance to go and bring them in.  Our men killed 4 of their men and took 3 prisoners.  Just at sundown Gen. Elliot came in with his men and he had twenty prisoners and the men said they had killed five or six of the enemy and did not get any of our men hurt.  It seems that the intention was for the cavalry to get around the enemy and drive them in towards Strausburg and we were to head them there and capture the whole lot, but they got into the Mountains so got away, and we had nothing to do in the matter and they will leave I think for it is getting too hot for them.  Well I was detailed as officer of the guard at night and our men got to stay at a house where there was two old darkeys living.  It commenced raining just after dark and you may think that it was not very pleasant for the men, but it did not rain much until morning when we were ordered to start back, and it rained on us all the way back and you may be sure we were wet enough before we got home.  We had to wade a creek before we got to camp.  It came above the boots of most of our men so that their boots were full of water, but I do not feel any worse for the trip.  It has been raining all this morning and everything is very wet and it is mighty disagreeable, but I hope it will be better soon.  Well I must conclude, so good by my Dear wife, from your ever loving husband.


Lieut. Levi Lupton         


Light age toning, staining and wear.


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.      


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of an Indian wearing headdress in a postage stamp like design with the above motto. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. Light staining. 5 3/8 x 3. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a spread winged eagle perched on top of an American shield with quote from Parson William G. Brownlow below: "And whether my humble voice is hushed in death, or my press is muzzled by foul legislation, I beg you, and all into whose hands this letter may fall, to credit no Secession falsehood which may represent me as having changed. Parson Brownlow." Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.    


<b>U.S. Congressman and Senator from North Carolina</b>


(1812-97) Born at Huntsville, North Carolina. He graduated from N.C. State University in 1832, and was admitted to the bar in 1834. He then started a political career, first in the state legislature, and then as a U.S. Congressman, 1843-45, and 1847-58. He was then elected U.S. Senator in 1860. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; and was one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Clingman was commissioned colonel of the 25th North Carolina Infantry, and appointed brigadier general, May 17, 1862. He served in North and South Carolina until the spring of 1864 when his brigade was ordered to Virginia, where he saw action at Cold Harbor, Drewry's Bluff, and Petersburg. In the battle on the Weldon Railroad in August 1864, he was severely wounded and was unable to return to his command until just before the army surrendered at Greensboro.


<u>Signature</u>: 3 1/4 x 1 1/2, in ink, Free, T.L. Clingman. Free frank signature cut from an envelope while he served in the U.S. Congress. Light age toning and wear.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

Union And Liberty Now And Forever

 

Eagle & American Shield

 

Autograph, General Thomas L. Clingman




<b>The Lexington Years</b>


By Lenoir Chambers. Foreword by Lieutenant General George R.E. Shell. Published by the Garland Gray Memorial Research Center, Stonewall Jackson House, Historic Lexington Foundation, Lexington, Virginia. Second Printing, 1986, Copyright 1959. Hardcover, with dust jacket, 181 pages, index, profusely illustrated. New condition.


Stonewall Jackson, one of the greatest generals of the Civil War, has been dealt with by numerous authors during the last 120 years. Many of those writers concluded that he remains the Civil War's greatest enigma, pointing out that he emerged from peacetime life of seeming mediocrity to become in war a dynamo in thought and a thunderbolt in action.


In 1959 Lenoir Chambers, Pulitzer Prize winning editor of the Norfolk Virginia Pilot, published what has since been regarded as the definitive biography of Jackson to date. Chambers, in his two volume work, Stonewall Jackson, examined every available fact of Jackson's life, applied a fresh analysis and interpretation, and presented it with authority and distinction.


One aspect of Jackson's life held a special fascination for Chambers; his years in Lexington as professor, husband, father, businessman, and devout churchman.


Chambers was the first major writer to examine in depth those important ten years and to look for the indicators of his future excellence; the uninspired, prosaic professor at VMI, the tender, devoted, and often lighthearted husband, who would spiritedly dance the polka with his wife behind doors closed against the pious eyes of Lexington; the doting father; and the teacher of a Sunday school for black members of the local Presbyterian church.


"Stonewall Jackson and the Virginia Military Institute; The Lexington Years," would be a desirable edition to any Stonewall Jackson collection.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"I went out on picket yesterday...we thought there was some rebels about, and I guess there was a few horse thieves for some of our [men] seen 8 or 10 of them and fired several times, but it was so dark they did not hurt anybody and the rebels did no fire at our men at all which makes me think that they were trying to creep into our lines for the purpose of getting a few horses.  I think there is not many secesh about here for our cavalry has been scouting around and they say they cannot see but very few."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his children. 


<b><u>Winchester, Va., April 13th, 1863</b></u>


My Dear Children,


As I am likely to have a chance to send you a letter by the hand of John Sill [1] I thought I would try and write a few lines to you although I do not feel much like writing as I went out on picket yesterday and was up all of last night and I feel kind of sleepy today.  We are not allowed to sleep when we are out on picket.  We take about sixty men and we keep from 12 to 18 men on duty at one time and sometimes we allow one third of the men to sleep at one time, but sometimes we keep them all awake which was the case last night as we thought there was some rebels about, and I guess there was a few horse thieves for some of our [men] seen 8 or 10 of them and fired several times, but it was so dark they did not hurt anybody and the rebels did no fire at our men at all which makes me think that they were trying to creep into our lines for the purpose of getting a few horses.  I think there is not many secesh about here for our cavalry has been scouting around and they say they cannot see but very few.  Well we have very nice weather here now and I hope it will keep that way.  It seems like it was time to make gardens and some of the people here are making gardens.  I wish that I was at home to help make [a] garden but I guess I canít get home in time to do much in that way, but I think I will get home in time to help eat tomatoes and other good things.  Well my dear children you donít know how I long to come home and stay with you and I do hope it will not be long before I can enjoy that blessing for according to all accounts we are gaining on the enemy at every point and I think the war will soon be over.  I often think of you and pray that you may be kept from the dangers and temptations that surround the youth.  My Dear children I want you all to be good and kind to each other and oh to be kind to your Dear Mother for she has a heap of trouble to bear and I want you to help her all you can for I want you to remember that the Lord loves children that are obedient to parents and oh how happy it will make me feel in my most lonely hours to know that you are doing all you can to lighten the toils and troubles of your Dear and loving Mother and when I get home how happy we will be in each otherís love.  Dear Children I must bring my letter to a close.  I wrote one to Mother on Saturday night but you may get this first.  I want you to write to me whenever you can for it does me so much good to get a letter from home for almost all the comfort I had is in writing to you and reading your letters, so good by Dear Children.  Some day when I have more time I will write to each of you.  May the Good Lord keep you in health and peace is the prayer of your absent but loving Father.  Kiss Mother and Seigel for me.  Give this inside to Jim.


Lieut. Lupton      


Light age toning, staining and wear.


[1] John Sill, was 36 years old, when he enlisted on July 31, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was mustered out of service, June 14, 1865, at Richmond, Va. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.      


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of an American flag with the motto, "Our Country Forever." 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


By General Horace Porter. Published by The Blue & Grey Press, Secaucus, New Jersey, 1987. Hardcover, with dust jacket, index, maps and illustrations, 546 pages. Very fine to excellent condition. 


From April 1864 until the end of the war Horace Porter served as lieutenant colonel attached to General Ulysses S. Grant's staff. He accompanied Grant into battle in the Wilderness, Cold Harbor & Petersburg campaigns and was there at the final surrender at the McLean house at Appomattox Court House, Va. During this time he kept extensive notes of Grant's conversations, as well as of his own observations of military life.


Porter brings to his recollections not only a soldier's practiced eye, but also a writer's intelligence. His portrait of Grant is the most incisive and readable first hand account that we have. We see Grant as soldier and hear in his own words the tactical evaluations that led to many of the war's most critical decisions. We find ourselves in the midst of battle and see the general's indifference to personal safety and his compassion for his men. At the same time there is a weath of fascinating anecdotes, such as the general's own description of how he became a confirmed cigar smoker.


Through these pages pass many of the other great figures of the war. We read of Grant's dealings with Lincoln, of the close relationship between Sherman & Grant, and of General Robert E. Lee's noble bearing at the culminating meeting of these two great opponents. Here is an account both stirring and down to earth, that brings to life our country's most memorable conflict.

Stonewall Jackson and the Virginia Milit

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

Our Country Forever

 

Campaigning With Grant




<b>1861 Document Signed, 8th Indiana Infantry</b>


(1828-67) Born in Frederick County, Maryland, he moved to Richmond, Indiana when he was 8 years old. During the Mexican War, he served as a private in the Regiment of Mounted Riflemen, seeing action in the battles of Contreras, Churubusco, Chapultepec, and in the capture of Mexico City. After the war, he returned to Indiana to study law, and was admitted to the bar in 1851. He served as the district attorney of Wayne County, 1852-54, and was judge of the court of common pleas, from 1856-58. When President Lincoln's call for 75,000 volunteers went out, Benton was the first man in his county to answer the call. He was unanimously elected captain of the 8th Indiana Infantry, a 90 days regiment, and colonel of the 8th, on September 5th, when the regiment was reenlisted for 3 years service, or the duration of the war. He served in the 1861 western Virginia campaign, at Elkhorn Tavern, Port Gibson, Jackson, where he was wounded, Champions Hill, Big Black River, Vicksburg, and Mobile. He was commissioned brigadier general, April 28, 1862, and brevet major general, March 26, 1865. After the war he resumed his law practice, and he died on March 14, 1867, in New Orleans. He was working at the time as an agent for the government and fell victim to the yellow fever epidemic that struck the Crescent city.


<u>War Date Document Signed</u>: 10 3/4 x 8 1/2, imprinted form, with vignette of spread winged eagle and shield, filled out in ink.


This is a discharge certificate for Private Jeremiah A. Shepard, of Co. B, 8th Indiana Infantry, who enrolled on the 23rd day of April, 1861, to serve three months. He is being discharged by reason of expiration of his term of service. It further states that he was born in Franklin Co., Indiana, is twenty years old, 5 feet, nine inches high, with fair complexion, hazel eyes and brown hair. The discharge was issued at Indianapolis, on August 6, 1861, and it is signed, Wm. P. Benton. The document shows age toning and wear with fold splits being repaired with old tape on the reverse. 


Jeremiah A. Shepard, had further service in the 19th Indiana Infantry, 1861-62.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with "From U.S.A., At Camp, and State of" printed at the upper left corner. The object was for the soldier to write in the name of the camp he was stationed at, and the state in which it was located in on the lines provided after the imprint. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with a beautiful full color vignette of a spread winged eagle on top of an American shield with a riband with the slogan, "Liberty or Death." The outer edges of the imprint are adorned with red stars containing the names of the individual states of the Union at the start of the Civil War. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of General John Pope. Light staining at the corners. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

Autograph General William P. Benton $95.00

 

From U. S. A.

 

Liberty or Death

 

General John Pope




3 1/3 pages, 4 1/8 x 6 5/8, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, D.C., November 13, 1863


General Orders

No. 366


The following revised order is published for the guidance of Mustering and Disbursing Officers in relation to their expenditures from the appropriation for "collecting, drilling, and organizing volunteers," and all previous orders or regulations conflicting therewith are hereby revoked. Gives the details of the above order in 13 numbered sections. By Order of the Secretary of War. Signed in print by E.D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant General. Small stain at the top of each page and trimmed at the edge neither of which affects any of the content. Interesting 1863 imprint.  


(1811-68) He served as chief of staff of General John C. Fremont in 1861. Appointed brigadier general on March 21, 1862, he was wounded while in command of a division at the battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas. In 1863, he was in command at Columbus, Ky., and he later commanded the District of West Florida. In 1864, at the battle of Marianna, he was badly wounded in the left cheek bone and the left arm. He was appointed U.S. Minister to the Argentine Republic and Uruguay in 1866.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view pose. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York. Excellent condition.  <b>and Their Stories</b>


By Ronald S. Coddington, with a Foreword by Michael Fellman. The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 2008. Hardcover with dust jacket, 288 pages, illustrated, index. Brand new condition. Excellent content.


"The history of the Civil War is the stories of its soldiers," writes Ronald S. Coddington in the preface to Faces of the Confederacy. This book tells the stories of seventy-seven Southern soldiers; young farm boys, wealthy plantation owners, intellectual elites, uneducated poor, who posed for photographic portraits, cartes de visite, to leave with family, friends, and sweethearts before going off to war. 


Coddington, a passionate collector of Civil War era photography, conducted a monumental search for these previously unpublished portrait cards, then unearthed the personal stories of their subjects, putting a human face on a war rife with inhumananity. 


The Civil War took the lives of 22 of every 100 men who served. Coddington follows the exhausted survivors as they return home to occupied cities and towns, ravaged farmlands, a destabilized economy, and a social order in the midst of upheaval. This book is a haunting and moving tribute to those brave men. 


Like its companion volume, Faces of the Civil War; An Album of Union Soldiers and Their Stories, this book offers readers a unique perspective on the war and contributes to a better understanding of the role of the common soldier.

 


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of an eagle clutching an American flag and swooping down on its prey, a buzzard clutching a Confederate flag. Light staining. 5 1/4 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

1863 Orders Regarding Drilling & Organiz

 

CDV General Alexander S. Asboth

 

Faces of the Confederacy; An Album of So

 

Union Eagle & Confederate Buzzard in Mor




Civil War patriotic imprint with fanciful vignette of a cherub and the motto "Union" within oval. 4 5/8 x 2 5/8.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with the above slogan in large letters across the top. Light staining. 5 1/4 x 3 1/8. Scarce.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of an eagle on an American shield with steamboat and train in the background. Motto below, "The Union Forever." Light staining. 4 5/8 x 2 5/8.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a globe in the ocean with the motto, "Our Country" emblazoned across it and an American flag flying at the top of the globe. Union! in stars and stripes letters is printed at the top center. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

Union

 

The Great Rebellion Of 1862

 

The Union Forever

 

Our Country, Union




Civil War patriotic imprint with the above motto spelled out in stars and stripes letters at the top. Vignette below of an Indian with headdress and an American flag. Light staining. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   H 12in. x W 9in. x D 10in.


 H 8in. x W 7in. x D 12in.  H 23in. x D 9in.

To The Gallant Dedicated Defenders of Ou

 

OLD WALL LIGHTS $0.00

 

WALL SCONCES. . OLD GLASS $450.00

 

Vintage filigree pendant light $350.00

H 7in. x D 15in.

\

Quantity available  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"I got a letter from old Andy Ault yesterday.  He is in Tennessee.  He says he is very tired of the war but is not willing to go home until the war is over, and I think according to the accounts in the papers that it will not be long until it will be settled.  There has been some little skirmishing between some of our cavalry and some of the Secesh about 12 miles from here, but they have not done much and I donít think we will have any fighting in this part of the state."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Winchester, Va., April 11th, 1863</b></u>


My Dear and loving wife,


After my love to you and the children I will inform you that I recd. your very acceptable letter of the 6th of this month which found me in good health and you better think it done me good to hear from home, although I was sorry to hear that you were no better.  I do hope and wish that your health would improve when the weather gets settled.  If you do not soon get better I wish you would send to the Dutch Doctor at Wheeling and I think he would help you.  Well dear this is the fourth letter I have written to you since I came back and I will try and write at least twice every week for it helps to pass the time away and it does me good to write home and to read letters from home.


8 oíclock at night- Dear I should not have written this tonight but our company is detailed to go on picket tomorrow, and Capt. and myself go with them, so I will not have time to write tomorrow.  It is a hard way of spending Sunday but we cannot help it and so we have to do the best we can and try to be satisfied or at least submit to our duty as best we may.  Well dear I got a letter from old Andy Ault yesterday.  He is in Tennessee.  He says he is very tired of the war but is not willing to go home until the war is over, and I think according to the accounts in the papers that it will not be long until it will be settled.  There has been some little skirmishing between some of our cavalry and some of the Secesh about 12 miles from here, but they have not done much and I donít think we will have any fighting in this part of the state and to all appearances we will stay here a good while.  Well I think that Friend Nate had better be cautious how he tries fighting everybody that does not please him.  I had heard about their fuss but it was different from what you state for I think it was from some person who wanted to shield Nate.  It was said that Elihu drove along on the sidewalk and Nate wanted him to drive on the other side and after a while Elihu came back and dared Nate out to fight him and that Nate was going to pitch into him but Lidy Eaton got in between them and kept them from fighting but enough of this.  If Miss Frame thinks the letters that came from camp were so soft she may find some things hard enough for her when the boys get back to old Monroe.  She must be pretty hard up if she has to put up with old Moore.  Well I wrote a letter to Jim this afternoon and one to Barnesville to Mr. Stephens.  Well I must tell you what I had for supper this evening.  I bought a quart of milk for 10 cents and had bread and milk for supper.  I bought one pound of butter since I came back and paid 50 cents for it.  I tell you it tastes pretty strong of the green backs and we had to spread it so thin that I think I shall not buy any more soon, in fact everything is very high here, but I expect to try and live as cheap as possible.  Tell Mary that I will try and take care of her boy.  He told me to tell her that he has something like the ague, in fact he has been right poorly for two or three days.  So no more my Dear wife, but I remain your loving husband.


Lt. Lupton      


Light age toning and wear. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.      


<b>For Company F, commanded by Captain J. McLeod Turner, a Confederate officer who was wounded at New Bern, N.C., 2nd Manassas, and Fredericksburg, Va., and was wounded and captured while in command of the regiment during Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg!


He was pierced by 11 bullets during the War Between the States and survived to be confined in a Yankee prison!</b> 


7 3/4 x 6, in ink. Provision Return of Captain J. McLeod Turner's Co. F, 7th N.C.T., for 3 days commencing January 29th/62 & ending January 31st/62. Itemized account for the number of men and servants, for rations of fresh beef, pork, flour, beans, rice, rye, sugar, vinegar, candles, soap, salt, molasses and potatoes. J.M. Turner, Captain, Commanding Co. F. The A.C.S. will issue agreeably to the above return. Light age toning and wear. 


John McLeod Turner, was a 21 year old engineer, from Rowan County, N.C., when he enlisted on May 16, 1861, as a captain, and was commissioned into Co. F, 7th North Carolina Infantry. He was wounded on March 14, 1862, at New Bern, N.C.; wounded on Aug. 29, 1862, at 2nd Manassas; wounded on Dec. 13, 1862, at Fredericksburg, Va.; promoted to major, May 3, 1863; wounded and captured on July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg; hospitalized at Gettysburg; hospitalized at Baltimore, Md.; confined at Fort McHenry, Baltimore; transferred to Fort Delaware, Del., Sept. 10, 1864; promoted to lieutenant colonel, Nov. 28, 1864; paroled on May 1, 1865, at Salisbury, N.C. <b><i>During the War Between The States, Captain Turner was pierced by 11 bullets, and was partially paralyzed!</b></i> 


The hard fought 7th North Carolina Infantry took an active part in the fight at New Bern, then moved to Virginia where they became part of the Army of Northern Virginia. After fighting at Hanover Court House, the regiment participated in the various campaigns of the A.N.V. from the Seven Days Battles to Cold Harbor, and were also involved in the siege of Petersburg. They suffered 51 casualties at New Bern, 253 out of the 450 engaged during the Seven Days Battles, 69 at 2nd Manassas, 52 at Sharpsburg, 86 at Fredericksburg, 37 killed and 127 wounded at Chancellorsville, of the 291 engaged at Gettysburg, 31% fell, 5 were killed and 62 wounded in the Wilderness, and 11 were killed and 28 wounded at Spotsylvania. On Feb. 26, 1865, the regiment was sent back to North Carolina where they eventually surrendered with the Army of Tennessee with 13 officers and 139 men. A detachment of the unit had also been left with the A.N.V. and they surrendered with only 1 officer and 18 men left.

 


<b>U.S. Congressman from New York</b>


(1813-98) A lawyer, he was a devout Democrat and upheld the Southern point of view on most issues. He served as a U.S. Congressman from New York from 1857-61, firmly supporting states rights. A delegate to the Democratic convention of 1860, he believed the North was responsible for Southern discontent. Despite these feelings, when secession became a reality, he supported the Union, and recruited the 65th New York Infantry, and served as their first colonel. He was promoted to brigadier general of U.S. Volunteers on June 11, 1862. In the interim he commanded his regiment at Seven Pines during the Peninsular campaign, and served with General John Newton's division of the 6th Corps at Fredericksburg. Resigning from the army due to ill health, he was soon elected attorney general of New York. The following year he was nominated for vice president, running with John C. Fremont, but the ticket was withdrawn before the election, and Cochrane actively supported Abraham Lincoln for reelection.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 4 1/4 x 1 1/2, in ink, J[o]hn. Cochrane, New York C[i]ty. Light age toning.

Flush mount ceiling light circa 1930 $350.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

7th North Carolina Infantry Provision Re

 

Autograph, General John Cochrane $35.00




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"Gen. Milroy is sending the Secesh out of town. He has got his wife and family here with him. There was some Secesh women in town who threatened to scold Mrs. Milroy if she came about their houses so the old General just sent them out of the lines and moved into their houses himself."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Winchester, Va., April 9th/63</b></u>


My Dear and loving wife,


After my love to you and the children I will inform you that I am well at present and hope this letter may find you the same.  I have not heard a word from home since I left which is twelve days and I am very anxious to hear from home for it seems like a long time since I seen you or heard from home, but I think I will get a letter this evening however. I hope I will.  Dear we have had plenty bad weather here since I got back.  We had a big snow on Sunday and there is a good deal of it on the ground yet and the wind blows so strong here that it makes it very chilly to stand on guard.  I was out on Tuesday and Tuesday night.  I was pretty cold but we got along first rate, but I tell you it makes a fellow think of home and wish he was there with my little family and I do hope that it will not be long before I have that privilege.  The present appearances at this time is that we will stay here for some time.  Gen. Milroy is sending the Secesh out of town.  He has got his wife and family here with him.  There was some Secesh women in town who threatened to scold Mrs. Milroy if she came about their houses so the old General just sent them out of the lines and moved into their houses himself.  The old lady and one of their daughters were in camp yesterday.  They are very plain folks.  Mrs. Milroy looks some like old Mrs. Vanhorn.  She is quite gray headed, the daughter is a young woman.  She looks like she might be 17 or 18 years old.  She is not at all handsome and she has the St. Vitus dance or a nervous affliction of the face very much like Magy had a year or two ago.  Her and her mother brought out testimonials and tracts for the soldiers.  They gave testaments to all that had none and tracts to all and hymn books to a great many.  There was a Lieut. of Artillery along with them.  He gave me a handful of tracts for the boys.  I will send you one of them in this.  Well some people have commenced to make gardens out here, but it is so cold that I do not think anything can grow.  There is one man that has cabbage and tomato plants about large enough to set out.  He has them in hot beds with glass over them.  It donít seem hardly worthwhile for the people to plant anything here for the soldiers will be very apt to pitch in and help themselves as soon as things are fit to eat.  I do not see how the people are to live in this country through next winter for they cannot raise but very little grain here this summer and if the war does not end pretty soon the poorer class must suffer for something to eat.  We ought to be very thankful that we did not live in the states where the war was carried on for it is a most distressing thing to see so much destruction of property of all kinds.  Well dear, I must bring my letter to a close as I have not much that is interesting to tell you at this time.  Hoping to hear from you soon.  Give my love to Father, kiss the little Gen. for me and remember me in your prayers and may the good Lord keep you safe is the prayer of your loving husband.


Lieut. L. Lupton      


Light age toning, staining and wear. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.      


10 1/2 x 8 1/2, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Special Requisition For Quartermaster's Stores for Company I, 1st S.C.V., Stationed in the Field. Itemized account for jackets, pants, shoes, drawers and socks. 


I certify that the above Requisition is correct, and that the articles are absolutely requisite for the public service. Signed by Wallace J. Delph, Lt. Comdg. Co. I, 1st S.C.V.


Capt. R.E.B. Hewetson, A.Q.M., will issue the articles specified in the above Requisition. Signed by A.P. Butler, Maj. Commanding.


The reverse panel on this special requisition indicates that it was for the 2nd quarter of 1864. At this time the 1st South Carolina Infantry were stationed in Virginia.


Light age toning and wear with some archival tape repair on the folds on the reverse. Fine Confederate document from a very desirable regiment. Printed on brown "necessity paper." 


The hard fought 1st South Carolina Infantry Regiment fought with the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days' Battles to Cold Harbor, and in the Petersburg and Appomattox campaigns. The regiment lost 20 killed, and 133 wounded during the Seven Days' battles; had 53% disabled of the 283 engaged at 2nd Manassas and Ox Hill; it had 4 killed and 30 wounded at Sharpsburg; it sustained 73 casualties at Fredericksburg; and 104 at Chancellorsville; then lost 34% of the 328 engaged at Gettysburg; they had 16 killed and 114 wounded at the Wilderness; 19 killed and 51 wounded at Spotsylvania; and they surrendered on April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Court House with 18 officers and 101 men.


Source: Units of the Confederate States Army

 


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a spread winged eagle, American shield and ships in the background. "Victory" in stars and stripes letters at the upper right. Light staining. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


<b>Created the Atlantic Telegraph Company and laid the first telegraph cable across the Atlantic Ocean


Desirable 1863 letter written to James T. Ames, head of the famous Ames Mfg. Co., regarding the Williams bullet!</b>


(1819-92) Born in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, he was a famous American businessman and financier who created the Atlantic Telegraph Company and laid the first telegraph cable across the Atlantic Ocean in 1858.


7 1/2 x 9 3/4, in ink, Civil War date letter signed. Written to James T. Ames, head of the famous Ames Mfg. Co. regarding the Williams bullet!


<b><u>New York, Jany. 6, 1863</b></u>


My dear Sir,


Your letter of 2nd ultimo was received by me just as I was leaving London for home. 


The interest in the Williams Bullet which I offered to you, and which you declined, was purchased by other parties, but when I see them will ascertain whether they will sell any portion.


It will give me pleasure to se you when in New York.


I remain,

Very truly your friend,


Cyrus W. Field


[to] James T. Ames, Esq.

Chicopee, Mass.


Light age toning and wear. Very minor paper loss at lower left corner of the letter which does not affect any of the content.


Very interesting war date letter from Cyrus W. Field to James T. Ames regarding the Williams bullet which was used during the Civil War.


James T. Ames (1810-83) was the head of the Ames Manufacturing Company from 1847-1874. Their historic sword and armament factory was located at 5-7 Springfield Street, Chicopee, Mass. 


* Comes with a complete issue of Harper's Weekly (16 pages) dated August 21, 1858, with a beautiful front page illustration of Cyrus W. Field. There are also some other illustrations and related stories regarding Mr. Field in this newspaper.


** Also comes with a newspaper clipping from the Chester Times, Chester, Pa., dated Wednesday, July 13, 1892, announcing the death of Cyrus W. Field. The article also includes an illustration of Mr. Field.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

1st South Carolina Infantry Special Requ

 

Victory

 

Autograph, Cyrus W. Field $495.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with ornate full color vignette of an American eagle, shield and flags. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3 1/4.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


By Roy Meredith. Published by The Fairfax Press, New York, 1981. Hardcover with dust jacket, 144 pages, with 125 illustrations. Very fine to excellent.


Robert E. Lee must be regarded as one of the most photogenic of great men, but in the early and clumsy days of the photographic process he was a most reluctant subject. Making a plate was a slow and tedious business, and Lee did not like to pose for his picture. He equally disliked sitting for a painter of portraits. In consequence it had been supposed that the authentic pictorial record of him was very meager. On the contrary, more than a year of research has disclosed an impressive amount of material. Roy Meredith presents the existing daguerreotypes, photographs, and paintings made from life, and many of the lithographs, engravings and sculptures. There are some likenesses that to the general public have been little known or quite unknown. Originally published in 1947, "The Face of Robert E. Lee" has now been revised with a new foreword and a new section of striking illustrations.  


 


Civil War patriotic imprint with the motto as above in stars and stripes letters. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. Light staining at the corners. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Imprinted envelope with vignette of horse drawn stage coach with imprint above, Pacific Stage & Express Co. and Paid below. Excellent condition.

Eagle, American Shield & Flags

 

The Face of Robert E. Lee In Life and Le

 

The Government & Flag Must & Shall Be Su

 

Imprinted Cover, Pacific Stage & Express

H 42in.. x W 14in. x W 6in.  H 43in. x D 7in

4 AVAILABLE

PRICE FOR EACH ITEM  H 34in. x D 25in

VERY COOL AND OLD  H 64in. x D 8in.

CIRCA 1920

PRICE PER PAIR

H 42in. . x W 14in. x W 6in. $0.00

 

CHROME PENDANT EDISON BULB $350.00

 

ARTS AND CRAFTS HANGING LIGHT $2500.00

 

MONUMENTAL PENDANT LIGHTS $12500.00

H 38in. x D 14in.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a female blowing a horn while riding on the back of an eagle with a riband in its mouth with the slogan, "Freedmen To The Rescue." Published by James Gates, Cincinnati. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.    


Bust view of General McClellan in uniform on the obverse with his name, Geo. B. McClellan above, and the year 1863 below. Army & Navy within wreath design with crossed sabers and anchor on the reverse. The token retains much of its original luster. Rare to find this nice.  


Excellent vignette of the monitor flying the American flag with stars above and the year 1863 below, on the obverse. "Our Navy" within wreath on the reverse. Very high grade condition.

H 38in. x D 14in. $0.00

 

Freedmen to the Rescue

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, General $150.00

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, Monitor




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