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A white ironstone food mould with the Brown + Polson's Corn Flour Blanc-Mange recipe in a nice bold black print. Ca. 1900. It is 6 1/2 x 5 inches, 4 1/2 inches H. Mint condition and wonderful color. The design is geometric.  A white ironstone Punch or Toddy Bowl with wonderful ribbed handles. Made by J + E Mayer. Ca. 1890-1900. Mint condition with no chips or hairlines. Great color. 9 inches D., 5 inches H.  


<b>Wearing 5th Corps badge</b>


(1825-88) Graduated from West Point in 1847. He served in garrison duty at Puebla and Mexico City and was captain of the 5th U.S. Artillery at the start of the Civil War. He commanded a battery at 1st Bull Run and served with the Army of the Potomac until Lee's surrender at Appomattox. His gallant leadership as an artillery commander was noteworthy during the battles of Antietam and Fredericksburg and as a brigade and division commander at Chancellorsville, and from Gettysburg to Appomattox.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 5/8 card. Half view in uniform with rank of brigadier general wearing 5th Corps badge. Backmark: Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries, New York and Washington, D.C. Top of card is trimmed. Light age toning and wear. Scarce.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of General Washington, Liberty, American shield and flags. Light staining at the corners. 5 1/2 x 3 3/8.

IRONSTONE BLANC MANGE FOOD MOULD $160.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE PUNCH / TODDY BOWL $350.00

 

CDV General Romeyn B. Ayres

 

General George Washington




<b>Free frank on cover as U.S. Senator


Civil War Governor of Connecticut


U.S. Senator from Connecticut</b>


(1804-75) A successful merchant and manufacturer, he was the Republican Governor of Connecticut from 1858 to 1866 when he refused nomination. During the Civil War he worked very closely with President Lincoln and raised more soldiers than were required from his state. He served in the Senate until his death and contributed generously to philanthropies, including the Yale theological school. There is a statue of him in the statehouse in Hartford.


<u>Free Frank on Cover</u>: addressed to Mr. Henry S. Hoover, 1030 Morgan St., Philadelphia, with C.D.S., Washington, D.C., Free. Free frank signature at upper right, Wm. A. Buckingham, U.[nited] S.[tates] S.[enate]. Docket on the reverse, W.A. Buckingham, U.S. Senator, with C.D.S., Phild'a, Feb. 14, 10 P.M. Light age toning. Large bold signature. Very fine.


 


<b>1859 U.S. Army Document Signed</b>


(1827-1906) Graduated in the West Point class of 1849, he served in the 9th U.S. Infantry before the War Between The States. Resigning his U.S. Army commission in March 1861, he was appointed lieutenant colonel of the 8th Alabama Infantry. He soon became colonel of the 28th Alabama Infantry, which he led in the 1862 Kentucky campaign. He was appointed brigadier general on May 19, 1863, and was sent with 3 regiments of Georgia and North Carolina troops and a battery of artillery to oppose the Federal occupation of East Tennessee. After fortifying Cumberland Gap, Frazer learned that Knoxville had already been occupied by Union General Ambrose E. Burnside, and that Confederate General Simon B. Buckner had been forced to retreat toward Chattanooga. Finding his situation hopeless, he surrendered unconditionally to General Burnside, an action which was severely criticized. He was sent to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor, and remained a prisoner until the end of the war.


<u>Document Signed</u>: 7 3/4 x 9 3/4, in ink.


Provision Return for Captain J.W. Frazer's Co. C, 9th Infty., for 31 days commencing Oct. 1st and ending Oct. 31st, 1859. Camp Lake, Osoyoos, W.[ashington] T.[erritory], Oct. 1st, 1859. Itemized account of rations for 60 men for 31 days. Includes fresh beef, pork, flour, beans, rice, vegetables, coffee, sugar, vinegar, candle, soap, and salt.


J.W. Frazer

Captain 9th Infty.

Comdg. Co. C


Excellent document written on blue lined paper.   


<b>Killed at the battle of the Little Big Horn!</b>


(1839-1876) Graduated from West Point in 1861. He was destined to become one of the most celebrated, yet controversial figures in all of American military history. Custer was brave, dashing and enterprising. He served on the staffs of Generals George B. McClellan and Alfred Pleasanton until the spring of 1863, distinguishing himself on dozens of occasions. On June 29, 1863, he jumped rank from 1st Lieutenant to Brigadier General and was assigned command of a cavalry brigade under Gen. H. Judson Kilpatrick which he led with distinction in the Gettysburg campaign. From then until the end of the war he fought with the utmost distinction in all of the cavalry battles of the Army of the Potomac. Custer became a famous Indian fighter in the post war U. S. Army and was massacred with his entire command of the 7th U.S. Cavalry on June 25, 1876, at the battle of the Little Big Horn.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform as brigadier general. Backmark: stamped, Lindmark, Pokepsie, New York. Light age toning. This view was originally done by Brady, on February 15, 1864, when General Custer was in Washington to present captured Confederate battle flags to the War Department. Katz #29.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"pitched our tents in a fine meadow that belonged to a Union man who had his house burned by the Secesh. Well just now the news came here that Gen. McClellan had taken 20,000 prisoners, but it is too good news to be true I am afraid."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Buckhannon, [Va.], Oct. 28th, 1862</b></u>


My Dear wife,


After my love to you and the children I can inform you that I am well at this time as I have been ever since I left home, and I hope these few lines may find you enjoying the same blessing.  Well dear, we did not get to stay at Clarksburgh long.  We had just got comfortably fixed to stay when we were ordered to this place and the 110th Ohio took our place there.  We started from there about 2 o’clock on Saturday the 25th and marched six miles and pitched our tents for the night.  It commenced raining about 4 o’clock on Sunday morning and it was a hard looking chance to start, but start we did about 8 o’clock.  We marched until 3 o’clock and pitched our tents in a fine meadow that belonged to a Union man who had his house burned by the Secesh.  It still rained very hard but we had plenty of hay today, and we made a fire in our tent and dried our things, and we had a first rate night’s rest.  We started again yesterday morning.  I had the advance guard of 50 men.  We got here at 4 o’clock yesterday evening and encamped about ½ mile from town.  This is a very mountainous country.  There was snow on all the high hills yesterday morning, but it melted off before night.  We found several of our old acquaintances here amongst the rest was Jack Lilley and Rob Meremidt.  He is working at his trade and has been ever since he was at home.  This is a very nice place and the people seem very clever.  There is a good many soldiers here at this time.  There was two regiments left here this morning for Beverly and some more is to leave tomorrow morning, but there will be several left besides our men.  Well Dear, what do you think I have been doing today.  Well I have been doing my own washing today.  I have been hiring it done by others, but I thought I would try it, so at it I went.  I washed one shirt, 1 pair drawers, 3 towels, 2 handkerchiefs, and 1 pr. socks, and I got a pretty good job of it, not quite as good as I get at home, but then it will do for a soldier.  The fact is I have to get used to a good many things that I have not been used to, but I try and do the best I can and try to be satisfied, but we are just beginning to know something about soldiering in earnest.  Some of our boys made a heap of fuss about the times at Marietta and Gallipolis, but they would be glad to have those times over again, but they will not see such times soon again, but I do hope the war will soon be over.  Well just now the news came here that Gen. McClellan had taken 20,000 thousand prisoners, but it is too good news to be true I am afraid.  Well dear, I must conclude as I have told you all the news.  I want you to write to me soon.  I have not heard from you since M. Maris got back.  I suppose your letters have not got along.  So good by Dear.  Kiss the children for me and may God bless you and keep you safe.  


From your true and loving husband,


Lieut. Lupton


Direct to Buckhannon, Upsher Co., Va.


Co. C, 116th Reg. O.V.I.    


Light age toning and wear. Very fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.

Autograph, William A. Buckingham $50.00

 

Autograph, General John W. Frazer $175.00

 

CDV General George A. Custer

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter




<b>Chief of the U.S. Military Railroads during the Civil War


The unsung hero of the Union victory at Gettysburg! 


He kept the Army of the Potomac well supplied during the battle and organized the returning trains to carry thousands of wounded soldiers to hospitals saving countless lives!</b>


(1817-1905) Born in Philadelphia, Pa., he was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at the age of 14 by President Andrew Jackson. He graduated in 1835, and was commissioned 2nd lieutenant in the 3rd U.S. Infantry. He resigned his commission on September 30, 1835, to become a civil engineer, and he worked on railroad, bridge and tunnel construction. In 1839, he designed and patented a novel bridge construction technique that is known as the Haupt Truss. He taught mathematics and engineering at Pennsylvania College (now Gettysburg College) from 1840-47. Returning to the railroad business in 1847, he was a construction engineer on the Pennsylvania Railroad, and he later served as their general superintendent, from 1849-51. He was the chief engineer of the Southern Railroad of Mississippi, from 1851-53, and the chief engineer of the Pennsylvania Railroad until 1856. During the second year of the Civil War, in the spring of 1862, the U.S. War Department organized a new bureau for the construction and operation of railroads in the United States. Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton, appointed Haupt as chief of the bureau with rank of colonel, and an aide de camp to General Irvin McDowell. He repaired and fortified the war damaged railroads in the vicinity of Washington, armed and trained railroad personnel, and improved telegraph communications all along the lines. President Lincoln was so impressed with Haupt's work, that on a visit in May 1862, he observed: "That man Haupt has built a bridge four hundred feet long and one hundred feet high, across Potomac Creek, on which loaded trains are passing every hour, and upon my word, gentlemen, there is nothing in it but cornstalks and beanpoles." Promoted to brigadier general on September 5, 1862, Haupt officially refused the appointment, explaining that he would be happy to serve without official rank or pay, because he did not want to limit his freedom to work in private business, nor was he fond of military discipline and protocols. He did however serve unofficially as a general, and made an enormous impact on the Union war effort. The Civil War was one of the first wars in which large scale railroad transportation was used to move and supply armies rapidly over long distances. Haupt was particularly effective during the Gettysburg campaign where his hastily organized trains kept the Union Army well supplied, and he organized the returning trains to carry thousands of Union wounded to hospitals. He revolutionized military transportation in the United States and was one of the unsung heroes of the Civil War.  After the war, Haupt published an impressive array of technical publications, was chief engineer and general manager of the Northern Pacific Railroad, was a pioneer in oil pipeline development and in the use of compressed air for motors and mine machinery.  He also was the author of "Reminiscences of Herman Haupt," which was published in 1901.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Seated pose in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Brig. Gen. H. Haupt is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Excellent. Very rare!

 


(1827-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1852. Subsequently, he performed duties in Texas and Washington as an infantry officer. His first Civil War service was as commander of the Union troops sent on the "Star of the West" to relieve the garrison at Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, an unsuccessful attempt during which the first hostile shot of the war was actually fired. Commissioned colonel of the 76th Ohio Infantry, Woods took part in the 1861 West Virginia campaign, was present at the capture of Fort Donelson and served in Lew Wallace's division during the battle of Shiloh. During the advance on Corinth he was elevated to brigade command. He also saw action in the Chickasaw Bluffs expedition, and the movements on Arkansas Post. During the Vicksburg campaign he commanded a brigade of Sherman's 15th Corps and on August 4, 1863 was promoted to brigadier general. He was breveted for gallantry at Chattanooga and in the Atlanta campaign he commanded a division of the 15th Corps. He also participated in Sherman's March to the Sea and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Superb quality half view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. C.R. Woods is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. 2 cents orange Internal Revenue tax stamp on the reverse. Very sharp image. Scarce.  


<b>Medal of Honor recipient for gallantry at Gettysburg</b>


(1835-1911) Graduated in the West Point class of 1855. He fought against the Florida Seminoles after his graduation and returned to the Academy in 1856 as an instructor in mathematics. At the outbreak of the Civil War he took part in the defense of Fort Pickens and also served at 1st Bull Run and in the Peninsular campaign. During the Antietam campaign, Webb was chief of staff of General Fitz John Porter's 5th Corps. Just prior to the battle of Gettysburg, he was promoted to brigadier general, and took command of the 2nd Brigade, Gibbon's Division, of Hancock's 2nd Corps. On July 3, 1863, during the 3rd day's battle at Gettysburg, Webb's four Pennsylvania regiments were posted in the vicinity of the copse of trees which was the focal point of the famous Pickett's charge. His command lost 451 men killed and wounded in the encounter, Webb among the wounded, and was awarded the Medal of Honor for his gallantry! He was very seriously wounded at Spotsylvania, Va. in May 1864, and did not return to duty until January 1865, when he became chief of staff to General George G. Meade. Webb received the brevet of major general in both the regular and volunteer services. He again taught at the Military Academy after the war and was honorably discharged from the army in 1870. He then accepted the presidency of the College of the City of New York. General Webb is buried at West Point.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Superb quality half view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Alex. S. Webb is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very sharp image. Desirable Gettysburg General.   


<b>Died in 1863</b>


(1812-63) Born in Germany, he belonged to the Bavarian Legion. In 1848 he participated in the revolution against the monarchy and had to seek asylum in Switzerland, but was expelled the following year and came to the United States, settling in Rockland County, New York. His reputation as a revolutionary patriot enabled him to recruit a regiment which was mustered into the Federal service in 1861 as the 8th New York Infantry, with Blenker as their colonel. He was appointed brigadier general on Aug. 9, 1861, and at 1st Bull Run he had command of a brigade, part of Colonel Dixon Miles's division, who performed capably in covering the Union rear on their confused retreat toward Washington. Blenker later commanded a division in the Shenandoah Valley against Stonewall Jackson. He died on Oct. 31, 1863.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Excellent full standing view in uniform with rank of brigadier general, wearing kepi with numeral "8" inside of hat wreath insignia, sash, high black leather boots, and holding sword at his side. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative from Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very sharp image. Desirable pose.

CDV General Herman Haupt

 

CDV General Charles R. Woods

 

CDV General Alexander S. Webb

 

CDV General Louis Blenker $175.00




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"General Milroy who has command of this Division is at Beverly.  I have never seen him but twice.  He is a queer looking man. His hair is very white and his beard is very red so it makes him look rather odd."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Buckhannon, Va., Oct. 20th, 1862</b></u>


My Dear Wife,


I recd. your very acceptable letter of the 26th this evening.  I was glad to hear from you but sorry to hear that Mary was not much better, but glad to hear that Dear little Irena was getting along so well.  I am in hopes that it will please our heavenly Father to heal all your bodily infirmities and give you strength to bear up under your troubles and trials for you have a great many to endure, but I do not want you to blame yourself with being the cause of this separation for I believe if I had done right that it might have been otherwise, but I will bear all the blame and as much of the trouble as I can, and I tell you Dear that I have never known as much trouble in all my life as I have since I left home the last time, and if I had recd. your letters that you sent to Gallipolis in time I should have been at home at all risks, but I did not get them until last night.  I also got two from L. Hanson.  Yours and his were dated from the 14th to the 18th of this month, and maybe it was for the best that I did not get them sooner as it might have got me into trouble.  Well dear we have a very nice situation here and it is in a first rate part of the country although it is full of mountains, but there is no secesh here nor within fifty miles of this place.  From a hill near our camp we can see the top of Rich Mountain and Cheat Mountain, and also the Blue Ridge of the Alleghenies and some others that I do not know well.  We may stay here this winter although there is talk of us going back to Gallipolis to winter, but I think that I shall spend some part of it at home.  I would try and come home now, but our Colonel is not here and I don’t know when he will be here, and General Milroy who has command of this Division is at Beverly.  I have never seen him but twice.  He is a queer looking man. His hair is very white and his beard is very red so it makes him look rather odd.  Well dear in regard to Jerry I do not know what to ask.  I think that I ought to have seventy five or eighty dollars, but just tell him to do the best he can for me.  I do not think that he will cheat me under the circumstances.  If he does God will reward him for it at the judgment day.  Please keep this to yourself and in regard to those other matters I think that I have papers that will keep matters straight.  Well dear, I must conclude for I don’t know whether you can read this or not, so good by dear and may God bless you and the children.  Tell Irena that Pap was glad to get her letter.


From your true and loving husband,


Lieut. L. Lupton


Direct to Buckhannon, Upsher Co., Va.


Co. C, 116 Reg. O.V.I.    


Light age toning, staining and wear. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


(1823-1874) Graduated 4th in the West Point class of 1846. He won two brevets and was severely wounded in the Mexican War. As chief engineer of the fortifications of Charleston Harbor, he was a leading participant in the bombardment of Fort Sumter. He later took part in General Burnside's North Carolina expedition, and commanded the Department of North Carolina, the Department of Ohio, the Department of the South, and the Department of Florida respectively.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Excellent half view pose in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries, Washington, D.C., and New York. Very sharp image.  


<b>1st Commander of the Iron Brigade</b>


(1814-76) Born in New York City, he graduated from West Point in 1833. He owned and edited newspapers in Albany, N.Y., and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Served as Adjutant General of New York. He was prominent in framing the Wisconsin constitution in 1848, and served as superintendent of Milwaukee schools and as one of the first regents of the state university. He was appointed minister to the Papal States by President Lincoln, but resigned when Fort Sumter was bombarded, and was appointed one of the very first volunteer brigadier generals, his commission dating May 17, 1861. He organized the famous "Iron Brigade" which went on on to glory during the war. He served in the Washington defenses during the winter of 1861-62, and was then assigned to command a division in General Irvin McDowell's 3rd Corps and occupied the line of the Rappahannock until the 2nd Bull Run campaign, his men fighting quite well at Groveton. He subsequently served on the court martial of General Fitz John Porter and resigned in 1863 due to his failing health. Afterwards he served as minister to Rome and later as deputy collector of customs in New York. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Superb quality half view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Period ink ID on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative from Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very sharp image. Scarce.  


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient</b>


(1831-1901) He was mustered into the Federal service as colonel of the 12th New York Militia on May 2, 1861, the first Union regiment to set foot on Virginia soil. He was appointed brigadier general to rank from September 7, 1861; commanded a brigade of the 5th Corps; wounded at Gaines's Mill, Va. in 1862, and was awarded the Medal of Honor for his gallant actions there; saw service at 2nd Bull Run, and Fredericksburg; later became the chief of staff of the Army of the Potomac under Generals' Hooker and Meade; he was severely wounded at Gettysburg; and commanded a division in the Atlanta campaign. One of his most noteworthy claims to fame was the bugle call "Taps," which he composed at Harrison's Landing in 1862.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Superb quality half view in uniform with rank of major general. Maj. Gen. D. Butterfield is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Nov. 29th, 1862 is written in period ink on the reverse. Very sharp image.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

CDV General John G. Foster $125.00

 

CDV General Rufus King

 

CDV General Daniel Butterfield




Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published in Harper's Weekly. Caption: Miss Slidell On The Ram-Page. "I say, with my hand on my heart, that Miss Slidell, in her agony, did Strike Mr. Fairfax Three Times in the Face. I wish that her Knuckles had Struck me in the Face." [Vide Commander Williams's Account of the Seizure of Mason and Slidell]. 4 3/4 x 5.


WBTS Trivia: Fairfax was the Union naval officer who arrested Confederate Commissioners Mason & Slidell.  


<b>Served as a Confederate officer during the War Between the States being twice wounded, one resulting in the amputation of his leg!</b>


Legh Wilber Reid, was born near Brentsville, Va., on April 15, 1833. He graduated #2 in the Virginia Military Institute class of 1858, thus one of his professors would have been Thomas J. Jackson, soon to be immortalized as "Stonewall" Jackson. A civil engineer by occupation, Reid was General Superintendent of the Great Kanawha Coal & Oil Co. Upon the outbreak of the War Between the States, he was appointed a Lieutenant in the Provisional Army of Virginia, and sent into the Kanawha Valley to recruit. He was appointed Lieutenant Colonel of the 36th Virginia Infantry, on July 16, 1861, and was later detached to command the 50th Virginia Infantry at Fort Donelson, Tenn., where he was wounded in action on February 15, 1862. On September 1, 1862, he joined the 27th Virginia Battalion, which later became the 25th Virginia Cavalry, and was appointed adjutant of the regiment on September 15, 1862. He was severely wounded in action on October 8, 1862, near Woodstock, Va., resulting in the amputation of his left leg. He applied to be Colonel of a Negro regiment in March 1865, and was paroled at Lynchburg, Va., on April 15, 1865. After the war he worked for the Virginia Midland Railroad; was Assistant Registrar, of the U.S. Treasury, in President Cleveland's first administration; was Trustee of the Lee Memorial Association; served as President of the Charlottesville & Rapidan Railroad; and was a member of the Board of Alderman in Alexandria, Va. He died at Alexandria, on November 26, 1908, and is buried in Ivy Hill Cemetery, Alexandria, Va.


<u>Cover From V.M.I. Cadet</u>: 5 3/8 x 3, addressed in ink by Cadet Reid to his mother, Mrs. James H. Reid, Alexandria, Virginia. Signed at the top, Charge, Cadet L.W. Reid. PAID 3, and C.D.S., Lexington, Va., Jul. 21 are stamped in blue. Light age toning and wear. Very fine. Desirable V.M.I. related item!       


 


(1801-1870) He entered the navy as Midshipman in 1810 after having been virtually adopted by Commodore David Porter. The friendship between the two families began when Porter's father was buried on the same day as Farragut's mother in New Orleans. He fought in the Mexican War and was awaiting orders at his Norfolk, Va. home when the Civil War broke out. Told that a person with Union sentiments could not live in Virginia, he packed up his family and Virginian wife and moved north. He was given command of the New Orleans expedition in December 1861, and helped capture the city in the spring of 1862. Promoted Rear Admiral in July 1862 for his success in opening up the Mississippi River to Vicksburg, he spent the next year in operations against Port Hudson, La., and returned to NYC in August 1863 to a hero's welcome. He returned to the Gulf in January 1864 to prepare for the assault on Mobile Bay, taking the port on August 5th. It was during this attack that Farragut was to have coined the famous expression, "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead." He again returned to NYC, this time in failing health. The city gave him a public reception and $50,000 to purchase a home there, and on Dec. 23, 1864, he was promoted to Vice Admiral, the rank just having been established. He was one of the first to enter Richmond after it's capture. On July 25, 1866, he was promoted to full Admiral, the first in the U. S. Navy to ever hold that rank!


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Full standing view in naval uniform striking a Napoleonic pose. 1862 E. Anthony, New York imprint on the front mount. Very fine image. Desirable pose.  


<b>Autograph letter signed regarding West Point and the Mexican War!</b>


(1807-82) Graduated in the West Point class of 1826. Distinguished himself during the Mexican War battles of Contreras, Churubusco, Molina del Rey, and Chapultepec, earning the brevets of major and lieutenant colonel for gallantry. Appointed a brigadier general of volunteers on Aug. 31, 1861. At the battle of Seven Pines, Va., in 1862, his division of the 4th Corps, bore the brunt of the Confederate attack by Gen. A.P. Hill's troops, and "Casey's Redoubt" was named for him. He later commanded a brigade in the Washington defenses and served as president of a board to examine candidates for officers of Negro Troops. General Casey also compiled and edited "Infantry Tactics," which was adopted by the government in 1862.


<u>Autograph Letter Signed</u>: 5 x 8, in ink.


No. 155 South Oxford Street

Brooklyn, March 25th, 1875


H. Storm,


I have received yours of the 23d inst. requesting my autograph &c. I entered the Military Academy at West Point in July 1822 and graduated in 1826 when I received a commission of Lieut. in the Army. In the Mexican War I was engaged in the battles of Contreras and Cherubusco for which I received the Brevet of Major. I led the storming party at the storming of Chapultepec where I was severely wounded and for my conduct received the Brevet of Lieut. Colonel.


Very respectfully,

Silas Casey

Bvt. Maj. Gen. U.S.A.


Excellent content.

Miss Slidell On The Ram-Page $7.00

 

Franked Cover From V. M. I. Cadet Legh Wil $125.00

 

CDV Admiral David G. Farragut $125.00

 

Autograph, General Silas Casey $125.00




<b>Assistant Provost Marshal General for Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado and Dakota during the Civil War


United States Congressman from Kansas</b>


(1831-1909) He resided in Lawrence, Kansas at the outbreak of the Civil War and enlisted as a volunteer. He was appointed Assistant Adjutant General of Volunteers by President Lincoln on February 9, 1863. Served as Captain and Assistant Provost Marshal General for Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado and Dakota. Elected as a Republican to the 39th, 40th and 41st U.S. Congresses, serving 1865-71, which included the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. Served as Chairman of the Committee on Indian Affairs. Served as a member of the Kansas State House of Representatives in 1879, and served as speaker. He moved to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1889, and engaged in railroad building, was chairman of the statehood executive committee in 1891, and was a member of the Territorial Council, 1898-1902.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 4 5/8, in ink, Sidney Clarke, Lawrence, Kansas.   


<b>Wounded during Pickett's charge at Gettysburg</b>


(1824-1886) Graduated in the West Point class of 1844. He won a brevet for gallantry in the Mexican War. Played a gallant role in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and in the 1862 Maryland campaign which climaxed into the battle of Antietam. He greatly distinguished himself in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. During the battle of Gettysburg, Hancock commanded the 2nd Corps, Army of the Potomac. His decisive actions on July 1, 1863 helped to save the strategic Culp's Hill for General Meade's army. On July 3rd, his corps became the focal point for the celebrated Pickett's Charge in which he was seriously wounded. After his recovery, he went on to fight in the bloody battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania and Cold Harbor, and earned the sobriquet "Hancock The Superb." In 1880, he was the Democratic nominee for the Presidency of the United States. He was narrowly defeated by another ex Civil War General, the soon to be assassinated, James A. Garfield.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Superb quality seated view in uniform with rank of major general. Maj. Gen. W.S. Hancock is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Nov. 29th, 1862 is written in period ink on the reverse. Very sharp image. Desirable pose.  


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient


With scarce Detroit, Michigan imprint</b>


(1824-1905) Graduated in the West Point class of 1849. He fought against the Seminoles in Florida, instructed for six years at West Point, and served on the Texas frontier. He was under the command of General Daniel Tyler at 1st Bull Run, and later took part in the 1862 Peninsular campaign at Yorktown and Williamsburg. Appointed a brigadier general on April 28, 1862, his subsequent career was in the western theater, as a division commander under Generals' Rosecrans, G.H. Thomas and W.T. Sherman. He played a prominent role in all the operations of the forces which swept Braxton Bragg out of Tennessee, held the famous Horseshoe Ridge at Chickamauga, manuereved Joseph E. Johnston from Dalton to Atlanta, and moved through Georgia to Savannah on Sherman's march to the sea, and then up the coast until the final surrender in North Carolina. Baird was awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantry at Jonesboro, Ga.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 5/8 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: G. Grelling, Detroit, Michigan. Card is trimmed. Rare card.  


<b>U.S. Minister to Russia


Autograph Note Signed</b>


(1810-1903) Born in Madison County, Kentucky. Although his father was a slaveholder, Clay hated slavery and was embittered by his defeat for the Kentucky legislature in 1836. In 1845 he established an anti-slavery newspaper in Lexington, Ky. which his fellow townsmen stole when Clay was absent. In 1846 he served as a captain of the 1st Kentucky Cavalry in the Mexican War. Clay was a prominent figure in the Republican party in Kentucky before the Civil War and earned the gratitude of Abraham Lincoln when the latter was elected president. Clay served as a major general of U.S. Volunteers, 1862-63, and from 1863-69, he served as U.S. Minister to Russia. 


<u>Autograph Note Signed</u>: written in ink by Clay on a 4 3/4 x 3 card. 


White Hall, Ky. 

Jan. 14, 1891 


The rail-roads have usurped all the Powers of Sovereignty- They must be owned by the People- or our Liberty is lost forever!


Cassius Marcellus Clay


Light age toning. Very desirable.

Autograph, Sidney Clarke $20.00

 

CDV General Winfield S. Hancock

 

CDV General Absalom Baird

 

Autograph General Cassius M. Clay $195.00




<b>Killed on July 1, 1863, at the battle of Gettysburg</b>


(1820-1863) Born in Lancaster, Pa., only about 50 miles from where he would be killed in battle, he was a West Point graduate in the class of 1837, and a Mexican War veteran. He was captured on the Virginia peninsula in 1862, and commanded the I Corps, Army of the Potomac, at Fredericksburg. Reynolds is said to have been offered command of the Army of the Potomac after Chancellorsville replacing Joe Hooker, but he declined the honor because he felt Washington would not give him a free hand. On July 1, 1863, during the 1st day's fighting at Gettysburg, Reynolds was shot off his horse by a Confederate sharpshooter, and killed instantly.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform. Maj. Gen. J.F. Reynolds is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: J.E. McClees, Philadelphia. Nov. 29th, 1862 is written in period ink on the reverse. Excellent. Extremely desirable Gettysburg General.  


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient</b>


(1830-1909) Graduated #4 in the West Point class of 1846. Was appointed Colonel of the 3rd Maine Infantry, in June 1861. He saw action at 1st Bull Run, Yorktown, and Fair Oaks where he received two serious wounds and lost his right arm. He later fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and the Atlanta campaign. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions at Fair Oaks, and the Thanks of Congress for Gettysburg. He founded Howard University for negroes in Washington, D.C., and served as it's president from 1869-74. Continuing in the Regular Army, he was peace commissioner to the Apaches, participated in Indian fighting and served as superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Superb quality half view in uniform with rank of major general. Maj. Gen. O.O. Howard is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Nov. 29th, 1862 is written in period ink on the reverse. Very sharp. Excellent.  


<b>Photograph taken in Corinth, Mississippi</b>




(1826-1906) Born in Scotland, he was captain of a militia company called the "Chicago Highland Guards" before the Civil War. On May 3, 1861, he was appointed colonel of the 12th Illinois Infantry. From the capture of Forts Henry and Donelson in February 1862, until the end of the war, the tall, brawny Scotsman, compiled a combat record second to none. Promoted to brigadier general in March 1862, he saw action at Shiloh, Iuka, Corinth, and the Vicksburg campaign, and was commander of the city itself until Aug. 1864. At that time he was ordered to join Sherman before Atlanta. In Nov. 1864, he went to Nashville, and the following month, his 4,000 men rolled up John Bell Hood's left on the first day of battle. Thereafter he served under E.R.S. Canby in the campaign which concluded the war. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: Armstead & White, Corinth, Miss. Corners of the mount are slightly trimmed. Light edge wear. Scattered staining. Rare.  


<b>Killed in the battle of Antietam</b>


(1803-1862) Graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1822. He served as chief engineer under General Zachary Taylor in the Mexican War. He fought gallantly at Fort Brown, Monterey and Buena Vista, and won the brevets of major, lieutenant colonel and colonel in the Regular Army. On May 18, 1861, he was appointed Brigadier General in the regular army and assigned to the command of Washington and its environs by President Lincoln. He later commanded the XII Corps at the battle of Antietam, and led his command into action to support Hooker's I Corps. Seeing his raw recruits waver, he rode into the fray where the action was the hottest. Mansfield was shot down and died from his wounds the next day, Sept. 18, 1862.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Superb full standing view wearing double breasted frock coat with epaulettes, eagle belt plate, sash, and gauntlets. He poses resting his hands on the hilt of his sword at his front. His cap with U.S. hat wreath insignia sits on the studio column at his side. Back mark: E. Anthony, N.Y., made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Sharp image.

CDV General John F. Reynolds

 

CDV General Oliver O. Howard

 

CDV General John McArthur $195.00

 

CDV General Joseph K. F. Mansfield $250.00




(1824-1897) Graduated in the West Point class of 1844. In 1846 he was awarded the brevet of first lieutenant for gallantry in the Mexican War. He later served on the Indian frontier and in Florida against the Seminoles as an officer of dragoons. Distinguished service in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign gained him promotion to brigadier general. He commanded a division of the Cavalry Corps in the Antietam, Fredricksburg and Chancellorsville campaigns. Promoted to major general in June 1863, he took over command of the Cavalry Corps and directed 10,000 Federal horsemen in the battle of Brandy Station, Va., the biggest cavalry fight of the Civil War. The battle was said to have made the Union Cavalry. He also served in the Gettysburg campaign, and also led the cavalry corps at Beverly Ford, Aldie, Middleburg, Upperville, Culpeper Court House and in 1864 served in the Department of Missouri.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Superb quality half view in uniform with rank of major general. Maj. Gen. A. Pleasanton is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. June 22, 1863 is written in period ink on the reverse. Very sharp image. Excellent.  


<b>Civil War Congressman from Rhode Island


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1812-81) Born in Westerly, R.I., he graduated from Brown University, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1837, and commenced practice in Westerly. Member of the Rhode Island State House of Representatives, 1841-49, 1851-54, 1858-62, and 1871-77. U.S. Congressman, 1849-51, and 1863-71, including the 40th U.S. Congress, which was the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. Served as chairman of the Committee on Commerce. Delegate to the Union National Convention at Philadelphia in 1866.


<u>Signature with Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 5, in ink, Nathan F. Dixon, Westerly, R.I.  


<b>Vice President of the United States


Ran for president in 1860 against Abraham Lincoln


Confederate Secretary of War</b>


(1821-75) After attending Centre College and Transylvania University, he began practicing law in his home town of Lexington, Ky. in 1845. A member of the Kentucky legislature from 1849-51, he became Vice President of the United States in 1856 in the Buchanan administration. He was defeated by Abraham Lincoln in the 1860 presidential election. On November 2, 1861, he accepted a commission as brigadier general in the Confederate army, and was promoted to major general to rank from April 14, 1862. He served at Shiloh, Vicksburg, Baton Rouge, Murfreesboro where he distinguished himself, Chickamauga, and the 1864 Shenandoah Valley campaign including the battle of New Market, Va. where the VMI cadets received their baptism in battle. In February 1865, President Jefferson Davis appointed him Confederate Secretary of War. After the fall of the Confederate capital at Richmond, he ensured the preservation of Confederate military and governmental records. He then fled to Cuba, Great Britain, and finally, to Canada. In exile, he toured Europe from August 1866 to June 1868. When President Andrew Johnson extended amnesty to all former Confederates in late 1868, he returned to Kentucky, but resisted all encouragement to resume his political career. 


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/2 x 1 1/2, in ink, John C. Breckenridge, Lexington, Kentucky. Cut slightly irregular at the bottom which does not affect the signature.  


<b>Signed by Brevet Brigadier Generals' Timothy P. Andrews & Cary H. Fry</b>


7 3/4 x 9 7/8, manuscript in ink.


Pay Department

June 8th, 1863


Major,


My Bond having been approved, I am anxious to pay the Regiments assigned to me.  In view of the fact, that I have a large number of men in Hospital, and that, I paid my Regiments to Feby. 28th after the movement of the army in May.


I respectfully ask an extra clerk for ten days.


Your Obdt. Servant,

H.G. Rodgers

A. Paymr., U.S.A.


Major Cary H. Fry, Paymr., U.S.A.

Chief of District, &c.

Washington, D.C.


Appr., Cary H. Fry

P.M.


June 8th, 1863

T.P. Andrews

Pay Mr. Genl.


Light age toning, fold splits, and paper loss at one of the folds at left edge which does not affect any of the content. Tape repairs on the reverse.


<u>Timothy P. Andrews</u>: Born in Ireland; major & paymaster, May 22, 1822; colonel voltgs., Feb. 16, 1847; lieutenant colonel, D.P.M.G., Dec. 17, 1851; colonel & paymaster general, Sept. 6, 1862; retired Nov. 29, 1864. Brevet Brigadier General, Sept. 13, 1847, for gallantry in the battle of Chapultepec, during the Mexican War. He was the father of Richard S. Andrews, who fought for the Confederacy during the War Between the States.


<u>Cary H. Fry</u>: Born in Kentucky; graduated from the U.S. Military Academy, in 1834; brevet 2nd lieutenant, 3rd U.S. Infantry, July 1, 1834; 2nd lieutenant, Aug. 31, 1835; resigned October 31, 1836; studied medicine and became a doctor in Louisville, Ky. Returned to the army to fight in the Mexican War, major, 2nd Kentucky Infantry, June 9, 1846; honorably mustered out, June 9, 1847. Again returned to Kentucky to resume his medical practice. Commissioned Major Paymaster, Feb. 7, 1853; brevet lieutenant colonel, Mar. 13, 1865; lieutenant colonel, D.P.M.G., July 28, 1866; brevet brigadier, Oct. 15, 1867, for faithful and meritorious service during the Civil War; died on active duty in U.S.A., Mar. 5, 1873.


Harris G. Rodgers, born in New York; additional paymaster vols., Oct. 22, 1862; brevet lieutenant colonel, Oct. 23, 1865, for faithful and meritorious service during the Civil War; honorably mustered out, Mar. 31, 1866.

CDV General Alfred Pleasanton

 

Autograph, Nathan F. Dixon $15.00

 

Autograph, General John C. Breckenridge $250.00

 

1863 Letter From Pay Department $75.00




(1805-80) Graduated in the West Point class of 1826. He won a brevet for gallantry in the Mexican War and one for his services in the Southwest, especially at Fort Yuma, California, on the Colorado River. He was promoted to rank of brigadier general on May 17, 1861, and wounded during the first battle of Bull Run. He commanded the 3rd Corps at Yorktown, and at Seven Pines he was commended for his personal gallantry in rallying the retiring Union troops. He also served in the 7 Days battles and at 2nd Bull Run. He spent the latter part of the war in command of portions of the Washington defenses and on court martial duty.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Seated view posing with his hand inside of his general's uniform coat. Maj. Gen. S.P. Heintzelman is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Period ink date is written on the reverse, "May 5th, 1862." Very sharp image. Excellent.  


<b>Killed at the battle of Ball's Bluff, Va. in 1861</b>


(1811-61) He read law and was admitted to the bar at the age of 19. A private during the Black Hawk War, he moved to Springfield, Illinois where he became a close friend of Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln later named his second son, "Eddie," after Baker. Attaining prominence as a great orator, he soon became involved in politics and became a representative of the Illinois general assembly; defeated Lincoln to become a representative in Congress; served in the Mexican War as colonel of the 4th Illinois Infantry; was again elected to Congress; was a presidential elector in 1848; and four years later moved to California where he became a prominent lawyer and public speaker. In 1860, Baker moved to Oregon at the request of the Republican Party of the newly admitted state and in October of that year was elected to the U.S. Senate. He did much to hold the Pacific coast in the Union by delivering several remarkable speeches. Shortly after Lincoln's inauguration he raised a regiment in New York, and Pennsylvania, named the 71st Pennsylvania Volunteers and became their colonel. He was appointed major general of volunteers, Sept. 21, 1861, and was killed in action while commanding a brigade at Ball's Bluff, Va., on Oct. 21, 1861.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in civilian attire. Backmark: E. Anthony. Col. E.D. Baker is written in period ink on the front mount. Excellent.


WBTS Trivia: Edward D. Baker had known "Willie" Lincoln since he was a baby in Springfield. When Baker was killed at Ball's Bluff, Va., the entire Lincoln family was grief stricken, and Willie wrote a tribute to the fallen Baker in the form of a poem, and wrote the following note to the editor of the Washington National Republican: "Dear Sir, I enclose you my first attempt at poetry. Yours truly, William W. Lincoln." 


The editor thinking the lines quite creditable, especially for one so young, published them in his newspaper on November 4, 1861.


There was no patriot like Baker,

So noble and so true;

He fell as a soldier on the field,

His face to the sky of blue.


His voice is silent in the hall,

Which oft his presence grac'd,

No more he'll hear the loud acclaim,

Which rang from place to place.


No squeamish notions filled his breast,

The Union was his theme,

No surrender and no compromise,

His day thought and night's dream.


His country has her part to play,

To'rds those he has left behind,

His widow and his children all,

She must always keep in mind.


William W. Lincoln, 1861    


 


<b>Inventor of the Dahlgren gun!</b>


(1809-70) Appointed Midshipman in the U.S. Navy in 1826, he served as an ordnance officer for 16 years, during which time he invented the "Dahlgren Gun," a rifled cannon, which became one of the standard weapons of the Civil War navies. Taking command of the Washington Naval Yard on April 22, 1861, when Franklin Buchanan went with the Confederacy, he was appointed Chief of the Ordnance Bureau on July 18, 1862. Promoted to Rear Admiral on February 7, 1863, he took command of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. His main task was to seal off Charleston Harbor and his efforts contributed greatly to the capture of both Charleston and Savannah.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in naval uniform. Adml. J.A. Dahlgren is written in period ink on the front mount. No imprint. Very sharp image. Excellent.  <b>Virginia, 1862</b>


Pair of wet plate, albumen photographs, mounted to 7 x 4, orange card mount. The War For The Union, 1861-1865, Photographic War History. View #2348. Professor Lowe in His Balloon. Descriptive text on the reverse: Professor Lowe in his Balloon. During the Peninsula Campaign in 1862, the army balloon was a valuable aid in the signal service. This view shows Professor Lowe up in his balloon watching the battle of Fair Oaks. He can easily discern the movements of the enemy's troops and give warning to our General's how to head them off. The men at the ropes permit the balloon to rise to whatever elevation he desires and they then anchor it to a tree.  Published by Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. Circa 1880's. Bottom left corner of the mount has been chewed off. Light age toning and wear. The E. & H.T. Anthony version of this view generally sells in the $500 price range.

CDV General Samuel P. Heintzelman $150.00

 

CDV Colonel Edward D. Baker $125.00

 

CDV Admiral John A. Dahlgren

 

Stereo View, Professor Lowe in His Ballo




<b>Morse's Gallery of the Cumberland imprint</b>


(1817-83) Served in the Texas army during the Mexican War, was in the Ohio legislature, a forty-niner in the California gold rush, and owner of the Toledo Times. He was an avowed Stephen A. Douglas supporter and in 1860 was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in Charleston. Steedman became colonel of the 14th Ohio Infantry on April 27, 1861. He took part in the battle of Philippi in West Virginia and then was sent west. He was promoted to brigadier general, July 17, 1862, and rendered distinguished service at the battles of Perryville and Murfreesboro. He also commanded a division during the Tullahoma campaign. At the battle of Chickamauga, Steedman performed the most conspicuous act of personal courage recorded of any general officer on the Union side. His heroism was virtually the salvation of the Union forces left on the field. He served in Sherman's army during the Atlanta campaign and also fought John Bell Hood in the battle of Nashville. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: Morse's Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tenn. Light age toning. Very fine. Scarce.   


<b>Died in 1863</b>


(1812-63) Born in Germany, he belonged to the Bavarian Legion. In 1848 he participated in the revolution against the monarchy and had to seek asylum in Switzerland, but was expelled the following year and came to the United States, settling in Rockland County, New York. His reputation as a revolutionary patriot enabled him to recruit a regiment which was mustered into the Federal service in 1861 as the 8th New York Infantry, with Blenker as their colonel. He was appointed brigadier general on Aug. 9, 1861, and at 1st Bull Run he had command of a brigade, part of Colonel Dixon Miles's division, who performed capably in covering the Union rear on their confused retreat toward Washington. Blenker later commanded a division in the Shenandoah Valley against Stonewall Jackson. He died on Oct. 31, 1863.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of full colonel, wearing kepi, and holding sword at his side. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Light age toning and wear. Very fine.  


<b>Captured at Cedar Mountain, Va. in 1862</b>


(1811-92) Graduated from West Point in the class of 1835. Fought in the Florida Wars against the Seminoles and Creeks and was wounded at Camp Izard in 1836. He was twice brevetted in the Mexican War and so badly wounded at the battle of Molino del Rey that he was disabled for 3 years. He was appointed brigadier general on April 20, 1862, and commanded a brigade and later a division in General N.P. Bank's army. He was captured at Cedar Mountain, Va., on August 9, 1862. His principal field service after his exchange was in the Rapidan campaign which followed General. Robert E. Lee's retreat from Gettysburg. Prince commanded a division in General French's 3rd Corps in this campaign and during the Mine Run campaign. In 1864-65, he held commands in Tennessee, Alabama and South Carolina. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 1/2 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Card is trimmed, otherwise an excellent, sharp image.  


<b>Severely wounded at the battle of Gettysburg</b>


(1831-79) Graduated in the West Point class of 1853. He resigned his U.S. Army commission on April 17, 1861, and thereafter distinguished himself on many Civil War battlefields as a regimental, brigade, division and army commander. The hard fighting Hood saw action in the Virginia peninsular campaign, 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, he was severely wounded at Gettysburg, lost a leg at Chickamauga, and later fought at Atlanta, Franklin and Nashville. He died of yellow fever at New Orleans, La., together with his wife and one of their children, on Aug. 30, 1879.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in Confederate uniform. Maj. Gen. J.B. Hood, C.S.A. is written in period ink on the front mount.  Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York. Excellent.

CDV General James B. Steedman $250.00

 

CDV General Louis Blenker $150.00

 

CDV General Henry Prince $125.00

 

CDV General John Bell Hood

This attractive paper sewing needle packet is all original and retains its original content of needles. Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison this neat little needle packet is  dated U.S. Pat. 1857 and is labeled <I>H. Willard & Sons’ Patent Helix Needles – SHARPS #9 – J. F. Milward Sole Agent / Washford Needle Mills England </I>. An eye appealing companion piece for the Civil War vintage ladies sewing basket or soldiers personal things. <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques ! 


 Not a big deal but when we found these <I>as new</I> and un-used old safety pins in a vintage country store grouping we felt they were worth preserving.  Just the thing to lay in an old sewing basket or period <I>housewife</I> sewing kit, these early brass plated safety pins are priced by the group of a dozen in graduating sizes just as they were offered those many years ago.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. 


 This attractive paper sewing needle packet is all original and retains its original content of needles. Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison this neat little needle packet is  dated U.S. Pat. 1857 and is labeled <I>H. Willard & Sons’ Patent Helix Needles – SHARPS #1 – J. F. Milward Sole Agent / Washford Needle Mills England </I>. An eye appealing companion piece for the Civil War vintage ladies sewing basket or soldiers personal things. <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 This attractive paper sewing needle packet is all original and retains its original content of needles. Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison this neat little needle packet is  dated U.S. Pat. Oct. 18,1863 and is labeled <I>BLOOD’S Genuine Helix NEEDLES</I>. An eye appealing companion piece for the Civil War vintage ladies sewing basket or soldiers personal things. <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

original Pat 1857 NEEDLE PACKET $45.00

 

Vintage Brass Plated SAFETY PINS $12.00

 

original Pat 1857 NEEDLE PACKET $45.00

 

original Pat 1863 NEEDLE PACKET $42.00




(1821-1877) A self made man with little formal education, he had acquired by the time of the Civil War a substantial fortune as a planter and slave dealer. He enlisted as a private in the 7th Tennessee Cavalry and raised and equipped at his own expense a battalion of mounted troops, of which he was elected lieutenant colonel in October 1861. As the war progressed, he took part in numerous engagements, and his fame as a cavalry commander became legendary and his exploits went unabated until the end of the war! Union General William T. Sherman was quoted as saying, "That devil Forrest must be hunted down and killed if it costs ten thousand lives and bankrupts the Federal Treasury." During the course of the Civil War, Forrest had 29 horses shot out from under him, killed or seriously maimed at least 30 enemy soldiers in hand to hand combat, and himself suffered 4 wounds. In April 1867, he was elected Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Clan. In 1868 he became President of the Selma, Marion & Memphis Railroad.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. Lt. Gen. N.B. Forrest, C.S.A. is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York. Excellent.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"Well Dear, you must not think that I have forgotten you or the children.  I tell you there is not a day, nor one hour in the day that I do not think of you, and try to pray for you & it made me sick today when I read your letter, to think of your trials that you have endured."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Camp Marietta, [Ohio], Sep. 11th, 1862</b></u>


My Dear Wife,


I recd. it, letter from you day before yesterday and another one this morning, the first was dated on the 31st day of August, the other on the 7th of this month.  In the first you stated that you had not recd. a letter from me and you thought hard of me.  Well Dear, I wrote three letters to you, one on the Sunday after we got into camp, one I sent by J. Gatchel, one by mail, and one by Goretson.  All these, I sent to you before I recd. any from home, except the one that Gatchel brought.  Well Dear, you must not think that I have forgotten you or the children.  I tell you there is not a day, nor one hour in the day that I do not think of you, and try to pray for you & it made me sick today when I read your letter, to think of your trials that you have endured.  There is not a night that I do not see you in my dreams and many lonesome hours I spend by myself.  It is then that I feel how near you are to me.  Well we have been out guarding the railroad since last Monday week.  We are expecting to be relieved every day but don’t know how soon it will be.  I came up to camp day before yesterday to try to get leave to come home but the Major was not willing for me to go as he thought that we would be mustered into the Regiment today.  I came again to camp and when I got your letter this morning I went to see the Colonel but he would not let me have permission to come home until he heard from the Governor, so I will have to wait a few days longer, but as soon as I can get a furlough I will be at home, so try and keep in good heart, but if you or the children get any worse send me word and I will come home.  Well in regard to John I don’t know what to say.  I talked to the Colonel but he did not give me much satisfaction.  Tell John to keep a sharp look out and if that man Kopper is bound to take him tell him to watch his chance and come down here and we will take him in.  Well Dear, I must conclude as I have to start back to railroad pretty soon.  My prayer is that you may have health and peace.  Give my respects to all inquiring friends.


Your loving husband,


Levi Lupton


Light age toning, staining and wear. Fine.

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"There was considerable excitement at Marietta a few days ago and yesterday there was two companies sent to Sisterville to guard it. It is just about such times as they had at Sunfish last summer when our brave home guards turned out so strong and that is the way they do matters up here, they will call out two or three hundred men and bluster and march around a day or two and then return to camp."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Camp Marietta, [Ohio], Thursday night, 9 o’clock, Sept. 4th/62</b></u>


Dear wife,


As I have a good opportunity of sending you a few lines by the hands of Brother Garetson I thought it best not to miss the chance.  I was very glad to hear that you were well.  I am enjoying first rate health with the exception of a little cold I got last night.  I have just returned from railroad duty.  Our men have been guarding about twenty five miles of the Marietta and Cincinnati Road for about a week, and we may have to go at it again.  About one half of our men have gone to Parkersburg and I don’t know but we will have to go there to be mustered into service as our Colonel is there and I heard that the Adjutant and pay master went there today.  If we do not go there to be mustered into the regiment I think that I will be at home in a few days.  If I go there I may not be at home for a week.  There was considerable excitement at Marietta a few days ago and yesterday there was two companies sent to Sisterville for to guard it.  It is just about such times as they had at Sunfish last summer when our brave home guards turned out so strong and that is the way they do matters up here, they will call out two or three hundred men and bluster and march around a day or two and then return to camp.  Well there has some half a dozen of our men took French furloughs and have gone home and if they do not come back before long we will have to send some more after them.  There has about thirty of Captain Morrow’s Company left the same way.  Our Captain gave four of our men leave of absence tonight to go home and tend to some business.  Well times are about the same here as they have been for some time.  Our boys get along first rate with the exception of diarrhea.  Some of them have been pretty bad and one or two have something like the ague but are not very bad.  Well I must conclude for it [is] getting late and I must go to bed and it is kind of lonesome sleeping by myself, but I see you and the children almost every night in my sleep and it makes me feel bad when I wake up and find it is only a dream.  With my undying love to you all, I remain your loving husband,


Levi Lupton


Light age toning and wear. Very fine.

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"Capt. Arckenoe, Lieutenant Mann with 80 of our company were sent off last night between eleven and twelve o’clock down the river some place. We suppose to Gallipolis to guard railroad bridges, and I am left here with 24 men under my command."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Camp Marietta, [Ohio], Aug. 28/62</b></u>


Dear and much beloved wife,


I recd. your letter this morning by the hands of J. Gatchell and was very glad to hear from you, but it made my heart sick to think of your troubles and the hardships you have in taking care of the children when they are sick, but I hope that our heavenly Father will uphold you and give our little family health and strength to bear up through these trying times.  If I could only be with you at night it would not seem so hard, but when the time comes to go to bed then is when it brings one to their feelings, then is when I would give almost anything in reason to be with my little family.  Poor Mag, I was in hopes that she would not have the [?] any more, and poor little Rena.  If she was here she might then want to live with Mama.  Well you wanted to know when I would be at home, well I do not know just when I can come.  Capt. Arckenoe,* Lieutenant Mann** with 80 of our company were sent off last night between eleven and twelve o’clock down the river some place.  We suppose to Gallipolis to guard railroad bridges, and I am left here with 24 men under my command, and I cannot leave here till he comes back and I don’t know when that will be, but I expect to come home as soon as our regiment is organized and the men mustered into service.  About the yard, I don’t know what I shall do with it.  I met Lawrence the day we started down here.  He did not know whether he would take it or not.  He said he would be down to see me soon but has not come yet.  I wish J.L. Hanson would get somebody to grind enough of bark to make a beach for some heavy leather there and get it tanned out.  Tell Alamses that Clark is well and has gone down the river with the Captain.  All our boys are well except 2 or three.  Some have been troubled with the diarrhea, but none of them very bad.  James M. Thornberry is in an awful sweat about going home.  He thinks that he cannot stand it to soldier any longer.  He is the sickest fellow about home that I ever saw.  Well I must conclude.  Kiss the children for me and may the good Lord keep you in his care until I return home.


Farewell Dear,


L. Lupton


Light age toning, staining and wear. Fine.


* Captain Frederick H. Arckenoe, commanded Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was killed in action on June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He is buried in the Winchester National Cemetery. Gravsite: Sec. 20.


** 1st Lieutenant James P. Mann, served in Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to captain, June 13, 1863, and was mustered out of service at Richmond, Va., on June 14, 1865.     


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.

CDV General Nathan Bedford Forrest

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"There was about one hundred and fifty men left here this morning to guard the railroad bridges between here and Cincinnati as the secesh have burned 2 bridges on that road."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Camp Marietta, [Ohio], Sunday, Aug. 24/62</b></u>


Dear Wife,


I have delayed to write this long on account of being so busy.  We have had a heap to do since we got here, but I hope we will not be so hurried after this.  Well dear we left Malaga about seven o’clock and got along fine.  We stopped at Louisville and got our dinners.  The citizens furnished us a free dinner.  We got to Harrietsville that evening without accident except some few of our men got drunk.  They treated us first rate and charged us nothing.  The next day we had no dinner but what we had with us.  We got here about 5 o’clock on Thursday evening and found everything stirring.  There is about twelve hundred men here at this time.  There was about one hundred and fifty men left here this morning to guard the railroad bridges between here and Cincinnati as the secesh have burned 2 bridges on that road.  Well we have all sorts of men here from the lowest to the highest, from the pious to the most profane.  There is some of the wickedest men that I have ever seen to swear, but goodhearted fellows to each other.  There is all kinds of amusements going on.  Some will be reading their testaments, some playing cards, some fiddling, and some dancing and some doing other things.  Well I will tell you about our fare.  The first 2 or 3 meals were pretty hard.  We got supper and breakfast with the Woodfred boys and they are not very clean cooks, but since we have got to cooking for ourselves.  It is better.  We have good bread, good bacon shoulders, beans, hominy, rice and coffee and sometimes potatoes.  We have for cooks John Sill, Oswald Heck,** Jim Barrett and one or two others and they are first rate cooks.  Well I went to meeting at Marietta today.  There was 49 of our men went with me.  They behaved very well and came back with me.  Well silly, I would be pretty well satisfied if I could have you and the children here with me.  We have first rate houses to lodge in.  They are about 20 ft. square with two rows of bunks one above the other.  We have plenty of straw and blankets.  Well I must conclude as I have a good deal to do this evening.  I don’t know when I shall be at home as we have not been mustered into service yet, and I don’t know how many days it will be before we will be mustered into service.  I hope I shall see you soon.  Till then don’t forget to pray for me and I shall do the same for you and the children.  Give them all a kiss for me and tell them to be good.  Good by and may God bless you and keep you and keep you safe.


L. Lupton


Light age toning and wear. Very fine.


** Sergeant Oswald Heck, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, was wounded on June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He died of his wounds nine days later, on June 23, 1863.     


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


<b>Killed at the battle of Gettysburg!</b>

 

(1821-63) After attending the University of Nashville, and studying law, he became the editor of the Columbus, Mississippi Democrat. He served in the Mexican War as an enlisted man and officer, and was elected to Congress from Mississippi in 1852, where he vehemently upheld the cause of states rights until his resignation upon the secession of Mississippi from the Union. Barksdale was at first appointed quartermaster general of Mississippi; then entered Confederate service as colonel of the 13th Mississippi Infantry, which he commanded at 1st Manassas. As a regimental commander and subsequently as a brigadier general, to rank from Aug. 12, 1862, he distinguished himself on all the early battlefields of the Army of Northern Virginia. At Fredericksburg, his Mississipians frustrated for hours the attempts of Ambrose E. Burnside's engineers to build their pontoon bridges across the Rappahannock. On July 2, 1863, during the second day's fighting at Gettysburg, Barksdale was mortally wounded leading his Mississippi Brigade, and died the next day within the Union lines. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in civilian attire. No uniformed pose of Barksdale is known to exist. Brig. Gen. W. Barksdale, C.S.A. is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York. Excellent quality with nice rich tones. Scarce and very desirable!  


(1818-1902) He served in both houses of the South Carolina legislature, 1852-61. In 1861, he was reputed to be the largest landowner in the South. He organized and equipped at his own expense the famed "Hampton Legion," taking them to Virginia in time to fight in the battle of 1st Manassas, where he was wounded. He commanded an infantry brigade in the Virginia Peninsular campaign, and then in the summer of 1862, was assigned a cavalry command under General J.E.B. Stuart. He participated in most of their actions from 1862-64, and was seriously wounded at Gettysburg. After the death of Stuart, Hampton took over command of the cavalry corps. In the post war South, he was elected Governor of South Carolina in 1876, and later U.S. Senator, 1879-91.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in Confederate uniform. Brig. Gen. Wade Hampton, C.S.A. is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York. Excellent.  Issued by and marked <I><B>Frank L. Gay - Book Seller & Stationery -  140 Westminster St. – Prov. RI . </B></I>   These little penny sized coins were struck in the early years of the American Civil War to fill a commercial need when people began hording hard currency.  By July of 1862 even the lowly copper cent had all but disappeared from public circulation.  Though the U. S. Mint began issuing substitute paper money in the usual coinage denominations and folks began using postage stamps to augment that effort, commercial needs demanded something more familiar and more durable. The private minting of what collectors refer to as <I>HARD-TIME</I> TOKENS began to appear in the fall of 1862.   These private issue coins fell in two categories, the <I>patriotic token</I> which did not carry the name of a specific redeemer and the so called <I>store-card</I> such as offered here, which carried the name of a specific merchant.  The little private issue ‘penny’  filled the commercial need and soon enjoyed general acceptance as a means of exchange usually allotted the value of one cent.  The little copper cent was minted in several variations and designs (usually patriotic) and were almost immediately a collectable accounting for some limited availability of nice condition examples still available on today’s collectors market.  Not a common find outside of collector circles though, as the short lived Civil War token was outlawed by act of Congress in 1864 when the issuance of currency in any form by private individuals was forbidden.  We have acquired a small collection of these little relics and are offering them individually in our online shop for the collector who would enjoy a nice original example to go in a Civil War grouping or coin collection.  The patriotic example offered here remains in pleasing, uncirculated condition with a natural age patina.  (Will make a neat original Civil War vintage gift without spending lots of money.)You may view all of these that are currently on our site by entering ‘ patriotic token ’  in our search feature.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

CDV General William Barksdale

 

CDV General Wade Hampton $250.00

 

1863- Rhode Island Book Seller / Station $65.00

A nice size for display is this 9 ½ X 8 ¼ inch broadside advising of a <B>DEMOCRATIC MEETING of the Democracy of Henderson County May 28, 1853.</B>   The meeting is to be held at <B>R. D. Burbank’s Tobacco Stemmery</B> for the purpose of <B> transaction of important business</B> to be submitted to the <B>Central Committee</B>.  Printed on one side and all in nice original condition with no rips, tears or repairs, this historic broadside comes a letter from Kentucky’s  U. S. Congressman <B>Benjamin Edwards Grey</B> to Kentucky lawyer  and state senator <B>John B. Burner</B>.  (see: Capt. Thomas Speed’s - <I> The Union Cause in Kentucky 1860-1865 </I>)   The broadside was folded in the letter which reads: 


<I>CENTER> Henderson May 24th 1853     Dear Burner, You see from the enclosed that the Democrats are getting up the most thorough organization possible in order to carry this Congressional election & to carry the next Legislature.   If Whigs would ¬¬¬¬stand in voting against me they are at the same time defeating their own party.  They would hesitate long before they do so.  If they defeat me with Dande what Whig in the District can next time defeat _____ or some other Democrat who may run.  It is the interest of the Whig party to heal all breaches in the party.  It may be said that I created the breach but it may also be said the convention created the breach.  I will do all to conciliate, will they do the same.  I am you friend truly. Benjamin Edwards Grey   </CENTER>


The brown ink penned letter is faint but legible, signed and in the hand of Congressman Grey.  All in original condition with no rips , tears or repairs, the letter is franked by Grey and postmarked  <I>HENDERSON KY – MAY 25</I>.  Grey was elected as a Whig to the 32nd and 33rd Congress but it seems his concerns expressed in the letter to John Burner were well founded as he was unsuccessful in his bid for reelection to the 34th Congress.  A neat early Kentucky Political broadside with its accompanying letter ! 

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  


  A most essential accoutrement for the Cavalryman, Mounted Artillery or in any mounted troop’s saddlebag, the hoof hook was designed to aid in the removal of a stone lodged between hoof and iron shoe.   Difficult to find on today’s market we acquired this antique example some years ago here in Maine, we set this piece until now.  Our photos will do best to speak for condition but suffice it to say the little saddlebag utility remains in untouched condition, functional with a pleasing natural age.   <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <U>key word</U> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  This outstanding grouping of <I>Mjr. General Henry Francis Clarke</I>, (won his Brig. General star for <U>gallantry at the battle of Gettysburg</U>), includes a plaster bust of Clarke by noted sculptor <B>Leonard W. Volk</B>,best known for his earlier work with Abraham Lincoln.  The 12 inch high painted plaster bust is inscribed <I>Genl. H. F. Clark U. S. A.</I> on the front and <I>L. W. Volk 1889</I> on the back.  The bust depicts Clarke in uniform wearing his <B>Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States</B> medal.  Included in this grouping is General Clarke’s<U>personal issue</U> gold <B>Loyal Legion Medal</B> <I>#733</I>. ( see published MOLLUS roster with inscribed medal numbers: <I>UNION BLUE</I> by Robert G. Carroon and Dana B. Shoaf)  The group also includes two <B>Loyal Legion lapel rosettes</B>, his <B>Grand Army of the Republic membership medal</B>,complete with its original well worn and tattered suspension ribbon.  With the group a  GAR, 1902 Washington <B>National Encampment medal</B> and Clarke’s jeweler made <B>monogram cuff buttons</B>(<I>HFC</I>).  These were fashioned from 1854 and 1855 US silver quarters, nicely handengraved with blue enamel highlights.  Last but not the least is a personally inscribed  carte de viste of Clarke from the  Matthew Brady, Washington studio  .  The CDV remains in excellent condition and is signed on the verso <I>Yours truly H F Clarke</I>.    As to provenance, all of the preceeding General Henry Francis Clarke artifacts, with the <U>exception of the signed Clarke photograph</U>, came to us as a group when offered as such by an established New England auction house.  In our own research we found sale of Clarke material, to include a camp chair offered by Cowans, leading back to the family and a sale of the estate of the General’s Great Granddaughter Mary Clark..  While the time and location of that sale will take some additional research.  The Volk bust of Clarke had been offered by the Heritage auction house in Texas with the attributation of the Clarke family via the Tharpe collection of American Military History, exhibited by the Liberty Heritage Society Museum.   General Clarke’s MOLLUS medal will speak for itself with its recorded and inscribed issue number as will the silver cuff buttons which offer the the General’s <I>HFC</I> monograhm.  We added the signed CDV to the grouping when we had the opertunity.  

<CENTER><B> Mjr. Genl. Henry Francis Clarke </CENTER></B>

Henry Francis Clarke was born in Brownsville, Pa., Nov. 9, 1820. He was graduated from West Point, in 1843, and was commissioned 2nd Lt., 2nd US Artillery.  A veteran of the Mexican War, Clarke was wounded at Chapultepec, where he was brevetted captain for his gallantry, Sept. 13, 1847.   Clark served as an instructor of artillery at the Military Academy at West Point, 1848-49, then as professor of mathematics, 1850-51.  He served in the Seminole War, 1851-52; then as Adjt., 2nd US Artillery at Fort Monroe, 1852-53 then at Pensacola, 1853-55.  Assigned back at West Point as instructor of artillery in 1855-56 Clarke was then stationed at Fort Hamilton in New York, 1856-57.  Promoted Captain Jan. 12, 1857 Clarke served in the challenging position of chief of commissariat on the Utah Expedition, (a.k.a. Utah War / Mormon Rebellion) 1857-60. Clarke was assigned Chief of Commissariat, Dept. of Florida, April and May, 1861 then served as Chief of Commissariat of the Army of the Potomac, 1861-64. He participated in the campaigns of the Peninsula, Maryland, the Rappahannock, Pennsylvania, and the Rapidan, and was brevetted colonel Sept. 11, 1863, for gallant and meritorious services in the Maryland campaign. He received the brevet of brigadier-general, March 18, 1865, for services at gallantry at <B>Gettysburg</B> and was at the same time brevetted major-general of the United States army for faithful and meritorious services in the subsistence department during the war.  He was in charge of the subsistence department in Connecticut, New York and New Jersey, 1864-67; division of Missouri, 1867-75; and of the division of the Atlantic, 1879-84.  He was promoted colonel May 20, 1882, and was retired Nov. 9, 1884. He died in Washington, D.C., May 10, 1887. (Source: <I>Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans</I>)


We take special care in presentation of our photographs and apologize for our host’s insistence of the distracting watermarking of enlargements. Please inspect our illustrations carefully however and if you have any questions please let us know.       <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I> 


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>

 


 


(1816-94) Graduated in the West Point class of 1837. After fighting against the Seminoles, he resigned to study law and afterwards began practice in Rocky Mount, Va. He became a member of the house of delagates, and the commonwealth's attorney, and when war broke out with Mexico he was a major of Virginia volunteers. At the start of the Civil War he was promptly appointed as colonel of the 24th Va. Inf., which he led at 1st Manassas. He was promoted to rank of brigadier general to rank from July 21, 1861, and took part in all the engagements of the Army of Northern Virginia from 1862-64. Promoted to major general to rank from Jan. 17, 1863, he was prominent at Salem Church during the Chancellorsville campaign, and at Gettysburg. At the Wilderness he commanded Gen. A.P. Hill's corps for a time, and was promoted to lieutenant general from May 31, 1864. He later saw action in the Shenandoah Valley at Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. No imprint. Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early, C.S.A., is written in period ink on the front mount. Excellent.

1853 Kentucky POLITICAL BROADSIDE & LETT $235.00

 

Civil War era POCKET - FOLDING HOOF HO $95.00

 

important - Union Mjr. Gen. Henry F. Cla $3295.00

 

CDV General Jubal A. Early $495.00




(1837-1922) The second son of General Robert E. Lee, nicknamed "Rooney." A Harvard educated man, he promptly entered the Confederate service upon the secession of his native state, and became colonel of the 9th Virginia Cavalry. He served with the famous Confederate cavalry General J.E.B. Stuart through virtually all of the cavalry campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia. He was promoted to brigadier general to rank from Sept. 15, 1862. He was severely wounded during the battle of Brandy Station, Va., and was captured while he was recuperating. He was not exchanged until March 1864. Promoted to major general on April 23, 1864, the youngest in the CSA service, he continued to play an important role in the A.N.V. until their surrender at Appomattox.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. Brig. Gen. W.H.F. Lee, C.S.A., is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York. Excellent.  <b>in the Army of Tennessee</b>


By Nathaniel Cheairs Hughes, Jr. Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge, La., 1997. Hardcover, dust jacket, 384 pages, index, illustrations. New condition.


While the wartime experiences of the other four companies of the Washington Artillery; those that served in the Army of Northern Virginia, have been thoroughly documented, the exploits of the Fifth Company have been curiously neglected. In <i>The Pride of the Confederate Artillery,</i> Nathaniel Cheairs Hughes, Jr., illustrates the significance of the unit and, for the first time, positions this pivotal group in its rightful place in history.


The Fifth Company, Washington Artillery of New Orleans, fought with the Army of Tennessee from Shiloh to Chickamauga, from Perryville to Mobile, and from Atlanta to Jackson, Mississippi. Slocomb's Battery, as it was also known, won repeated praise from every commander of that army. Although it sustained high losses, the company was recognized for its bold, tenacious fighting and was considered the Army of Tennessee's finest close combat battery.


The Fifth Company was composed of educated, propertied men (they were sometimes referred to as a "silk stocking" unit) who had known one another prior to the war and who would band together as a benevolent association at its end. The Confederacy possessed no finer soldiers than those of the Fifth Company. Their popular and capable leader, Cuthbert H. Slocomb, repeatedly refused promotion so that he might remain with the battery. P.G.T. Beauregard specifically asked the Fifth Company to remain in the west with the Army of Tennessee to fight beside the Louisiana Brigade until Missionary Ridge. The unit was also associated with William B. Bate's division, which contained the famed Orphan Brigade.


<i>The Pride of the Confederacy Artillery</i> is the compelling story of four hundred men; brave yet infinitely human, their organization and service, their victories and defeats in over forty battles. "Try us!" the enthusiastic artillerymen would shout. And they would be tried, again and again.  


(1835-1905) Nephew of General Robert E. Lee. Graduate of the West Point class of 1856. A special favorite of General J.E.B. Stuart, Fitz Lee played a gallant role in all of the operations of the Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, particularly distinguishing himself at Spotsylvania Court House, where his division's gallant stand enabled the 1st Corps to secure the strategic crossroads in advance of Grant's army. He was severely wounded at Winchester, Va. After Wade Hampton was ordered to North Carolina in January 1865, Fitzhugh Lee commanded the Cavalry Corps until the surrender at Appomattox. He was elected Governor of Virginia in 1885. At the outbreak of the war with Spain, he was commissioned major general U.S.A., and once again donned the blue uniform which he had taken off in 1861!


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. Brig. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee, C.S.A. is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York. Excellent.  




<b>Killed at Chantilly, Va. in 1862


With scarce 1861 New Jersey imprint</b>


(1815-62) During the Mexican War, in 1846, his company served as escort for commanding General Winfield Scott during the advance on Mexico City, and at Churubusco his left arm was shattered necessitating amputation. For his gallant conduct here he was brevetted major. In 1859 Kearny went abroad and served in Napoleon III's Imperial Guard during the Italian War. He took part in every cavalry charge at Magenta and Solferino with the reins of his horse clenched in his teeth. When the Civil War broke out he hurried home and was one of the first brigadier generals of volunteers appointed. He was assigned to command the "New Jersey Brigade," part of Gen. W.B. Franklin's division. He fought in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, rising to division command. At the close of the 2nd Bull Run campaign, on Sept. 1, 1862, at Chantilly, Va., he was killed. Respected by officers of both the North & the South, his body was sent through the lines under a flag of truce by Gen. Robert E. Lee. The originator of the "Kearny Patch," the forerunner of the corps badge, he was termed by Gen. Scott as "the bravest man I ever knew, and a perfect soldier." High praise indeed! He also earned the sobriquet, "Kearny The Magnificent." Kearny's own motto was, "It is sweet and fitting to die for one's country."


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of major general. 1861 O.C. Benjamin imprint on the front mount. Backmark: O.C. Benjamin, 274 Broad St., Newark, N.J. Period ink inscription on the reverse, "July 4th, 1862. Killed at Chantilly, Sept. 1st, 1862." Scarce New Jersey imprint.

CDV General William Henry Fitzhugh Lee $295.00

 

The Pride of the Confederate Artillery;

 

CDV General Fitzhugh Lee $250.00

 

CDV General Philip Kearny




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