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<b>With Christmas Message


Original pencil sketches on the reverse of the broadside</b>


5 7/8 x 9, imprint.


Our Subscription Books


Are Now Open For 1897


Winter is coming and the evenings are long; why not make a CHRISTMAS PRESENT to some one, of the POPULAR MAGAZINES. We have one advantage over our competitors- we get them earlier and deliver them at once by newsboys to any part of the city.


Review Of Reviews. McClure's. Cosmopolitan. Ladies' Home Journal. Century. Munsey. Harper's. Scribner's. And any other Publication you may want.


CARTER & LUPTON.


Printed by Evans. Light age toning and wear. Archival tape repairs on the reverse.


Interestingly there are 3 original pencil sketches on the reverse. Their origins are unknown.  


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color and was published in the March 21, 1863 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: The Loss Of The Queen Of The West. Sketched by Mr. M'Cullagh. 10 1/4 x 8. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin.  


7 3/4 x 9 3/4, in ink, written by William G. Broadfoot, a Confederate Treasury Official, to his son Charles who would be a Confederate colonel later in the war. 


<b><u>Fay.[etteville], [North Carolina], Apl. 30/61</b></u>


Dear Charles,


Your Mother got your letter by Dobbin & I sent another by mail to her this morning- but do not know anything of its contents.  I had occasion to write Col. [Theophilus] Holmes** & took occasion to say to him that you might soon be at his disposal & possibly when, &c.  If the college breaks up come home & by Raleigh- and we then can better concert what’s best to be done.  Indeed you might go & see your uncle, &c.  Let me know what you will want and if a ck. on Wilmington will serve to pay your bills at Chapel Hill [he is referring to his attendance at The University of North Carolina] & get anything over in cash for travelling expenses- but above all do not stain your character by participation in any sort of insubordination at Chapel Hill or anywhere else- my dear Boy- disregard of authority is the root from which our present frightful evils all spring- discipline is the first quality of the soldier- God bless & preserve you.


Your F.[ather]


Boldly written. Excellent content, early war letter as a father gives his son some prudent advice as he is getting ready to leave college to join the Confederate army. The young Broadfoot would in fact serve as an aide-de-camp on the staff of then General Theophilus Holmes who was his uncle later in the war. (see below)  


This letter was written by William Giles Broadfoot, (1806-72), the father of Confederate soldiers Charles W. Broadfoot, and George B. Broadfoot, (1844-85) (5th North Carolina Cavalry). The elder Broadfoot was a Confederate official in the C.S.A. Depository at Fayetteville, North Carolina. 


The recipient of this letter, Charles Wetmore Broadfoot, (1842-1919), was an 18 year old student at the University of North Carolina when he enlisted as a private on July 15, 1861, and was mustered into Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He was mustered out of this regiment on November 12, 1861. He then served in Company D, 43rd North Carolina Infantry, also known as the "Cumberland Plough Boys," and was discharged for promotion on September 7, 1862, being commissioned 1st Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp, on the staff of General Theophilus H. Holmes, who was his uncle.** On July 1, 1864, he was commissioned into the Field & Staff of the 1st North Carolina Reserve Infantry, with rank of lieutenant colonel and colonel. His date and method of discharge are unknown. After the war, in 1870, Charles was elected to the state legislature. He served as Dean of the Cumberland County Bar, and was elected as a trustee of the University of North Carolina in 1911.


This note came out of a small grouping of Broadfoot family letters and documents that I acquired a couple of years ago. 


** Frances "Fannie" Rebecca Wetmore Broadfoot (1825-92), was the wife of William G. Broadfoot, and the mother of Charles W. Broadfoot. Fannie's older sister, Laura Jane Wetmore, was married to Confederate General Theophilus H. Holmes.  

 


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color and published in Harper's Weekly. Caption: Repairing The Levee At New Orleans At The Expense Of The United States Government. Sketched by an Occasional Correspondent. 9 1/2 x 7.

1897 Advertising Broadside For Carter & $20.00

 

The Loss of the Queen of the West

 

Letter to Future Confederate North Carol $100.00

 

Repairing the Levee at New Orleans, Loui




Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color and was published in the July 23, 1864 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: General Sherman's Campaign- The Rebel Charge On Our Right, Near Marietta, June 22, 1864. Sketched by Theodore R. Davis. 15 1/4 x 4 3/4. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin.   


<b>Signed and addressed by a Confederate captain who was wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and Fort Harrison, Va.</b>


Confederate war period used postal envelope. The cover has been signed and addressed by Captain Winsmith as follows. Written at the upper left corner is, "From Capt. Winsmith, Co. H, 1st S.C.V." He has addressed it to his father, "Dr. J. Winsmith, Glenn Springs P.O., South Carolina." The cover has a C.D.S. from Winchester, Va., Oct. 18, and it has been stamped in black at the upper right, "Due 10." Light corner wear but otherwise a very nice war date Confederate cover.


John Christopher Winsmith, was a resident of Spartanburg, South Carolina, when he enlisted as a private on March 1, 1861, and was mustered into the 1st South Carolina Volunteers. He was promoted to lieutenant, and then captain of Co. H, the dates of his commissions being unknown. During the War Between the States, Winsmith was twice wounded; the first time being in the bloody battle of Sharpsburg, Md., in 1862, and his second wound was received in 1864 during action at Fort Harrison, Va., which was a very important part of the Confederate defenses of Richmond. 


The hard fought 1st Regiment of South Carolina Infantry were assigned to the brigades of Generals' Maxey Gregg and Samuel McGowan, and fought with the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days' Battles to Cold Harbor. It then participated in the very difficult Petersburg, Va. campaign and siege, and in the Appomattox campaign. The regiment lost 20 killed and 133 wounded during the Seven Days Battles, had 53 percent disabled of the 283 engaged at Second Manassas, and had 4 killed and 30 wounded at Sharpsburg. It suffered 73 casualties at Fredericksburg, and 104 at Chancellorsville, and then lost 34 percent of the 328 that fought at Gettysburg. There were 16 killed, 114 wounded, and 7 missing at The Wilderness, and 19 killed, 51 wounded, and 9 missing at Spotsylvania. On April 9, 1865, the regiment surrendered at Appomattox Court House with 18 officers and 101 men.            


Austin, June 11, 1862. Under Act of Jany. 14, 1862, for Military Service. The Treasurer of the State of Texas Will Pay Five Dollars. Vignette of George Washington holding sword at the left. Printed on light blue paper with green overprinting. Roman numeral "V" at upper right. Fancy "FIVE" overprint at the bottom. You will seldom find these not cut cancelled like this one. Choice condition.  


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color, and was published in Harper' Weekly. Caption: General Sherman's Campaign- The Army Of The Cumberland Swinging Around Kenesaw Mountain. Sketched by Theodore R. Davis. 14 1/4 x 5 1/4. Circa 1864.

The Rebel Charge Near Marietta, Georgia

 

Confederate Cover From Captain of 1st So $150.00

 

1862 State of Texas $5 Treasury Warrant $125.00

 

The Army of the Cumberland Swinging Arou




One Shilling is printed in red at the top. This Bill of One Shilling. Proclamation, is emitted by a Law of the Colony of New Jersey, passed in the Fourteenth Year of the Reign of his Majesty, King George the Third. Dated March 25, 1776. One shilling printed in red. Vignette at the left. Signed by Robt. Smith, Jno. Johnston and John Smyth. The reverse of the note has an illustration of a leaf with the imprint, One Shilling. 'Tis Death to counterfeit. Burlington in New Jersey. Printed by Isaac Collins, 1776. Rounded corners with vertical split at the center. This colonial note is currently 241 years old! Colonial New Jersey items are always in demand.  


<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!


From Libby Prison, Richmond, Virginia


Rare letter written by this Ohio officer desperately seeking the help of his U.S. Congressman in Washington, D.C.! Includes the original envelope!</b>


4 3/4 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, signed with his full military ID, to U.S. Congressman James R. Morris. Comes with the original envelope addressed to Hon. James R. Morris, Washington, D.C., with C.D.S., Old Point Comfort, Va., Mar. 9, with 3 cents George Washington [Scott #64] U.S. postage stamp.


<b><u>Libby Prison, Feb. 27th, 1864</b></u>


Hon. Jas. R. Morris,


Dear Sir,


My health has been very poor for some time and the Surgeon says my only chance for recovery is in a change of place.  I want you to try and get me exchanged on some terms for if my life is not worth much to others it is worth something to my little family and God knows how bad I want to live to see them again.  For God’s sake do all you can for me and that soon, and if we should ever meet again upon a level we can part upon the square.

  

Yours Fraternally,

Levi Lupton, 2nd Lt.

Comp. C, 116th Regt.

O.V.I.


Rare and desirable Libby Prison officer's letter written to his U.S. Congressman from Ohio at Washington, D.C. desperately seeking his help to be exchanged. 


Since prisoner of war letters were highly regulated you will seldom find one written to a member of the United States Congress, from a Union prisoner, that made it through the censor. This is the type of letter that would have been stopped just on general principal based of the fact that it was written to a high ranking member of the Federal Government!  


The recipient of this letter, James R. Morris, (1819-99) studied law, was admitted to the Ohio bar in 1843, and commenced a law practice in Woodsfield, Ohio. He was the editor and manager of the Spirit of Democracy, 1844-48. He served as a member of the Ohio State House of Representatives, 1848-49; and was a U.S. Congressman, 1861-65. He served as judge of the probate court in Ohio, 1872-77; and was the postmaster of Woodsfield, Ohio, 1886-89.  


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.  


7 3/4 x 5 1/4, in ink, written by William G. Broadfoot, a Confederate Treasury Official, to his son Charles who would be a Confederate colonel later in the war. This note has no date or place, but was most likely written in early 1861.


Dear Charles,


I have acknowledged the receipt of yrs. of the 26th made in a short note before & now can only add another not having the time to spare to write at length as I wish to do.  Give yourself no uneasiness about money matters.  If you can make your pay over your own expenses, and in the purchase of a horse I hope your only care will be to secure a good one without merely considering the price.  I hope you have made the most of your acquaintance with Bishop Lay.  I have a very high opinion of him that is of his character not knowing him personally.  I believe him a true & good son of the Church- this while the highest donor here is a passport to a higher & better state hereafter.  My regards to all- & may God direct my son.



Yr. Aff. F.[ather]


Boldly written. 


This letter was written by William Giles Broadfoot, (1806-72), the father of Confederate soldiers Charles W. Broadfoot, and George B. Broadfoot, (1844-85) (5th North Carolina Cavalry). The elder Broadfoot was a Confederate official in the C.S.A. Depository at Fayetteville, North Carolina. 


The recipient of this note, Charles Wetmore Broadfoot, (1842-1919), was an 18 year old student at the University of North Carolina when he enlisted as a private on July 15, 1861, and was mustered into Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He was mustered out of this regiment on November 12, 1861. He then served in Company D, 43rd North Carolina Infantry, also known as the "Cumberland Plough Boys," and was discharged for promotion on September 7, 1862, being commissioned 1st Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp, on the staff of General Theophilus H. Holmes, who was his uncle.** On July 1, 1864, he was commissioned into the Field & Staff of the 1st North Carolina Reserve Infantry, with rank of lieutenant colonel and colonel. His date and method of discharge are unknown. After the war, in 1870, Charles was elected to the state legislature. He served as Dean of the Cumberland County Bar, and was elected as a trustee of the University of North Carolina in 1911.


*This note came out of a small grouping of Broadfoot family letters and documents that I acquired a couple of years ago. It was oftentimes the habit of Mr. Broadfoot to include a note to Charles in the same letter that his mother wrote to him. Based on other letters and notes he wrote to Charles this was most likely written in 1861.


** Frances "Fannie" Rebecca Wetmore Broadfoot (1825-92), was the wife of William G. Broadfoot, and the mother of Charles W. Broadfoot. Fannie's older sister, Laura Jane Wetmore, was married to Confederate General Theophilus H. Holmes.  


(1786-1866) A year older than the Constitution, the venerable Scott, hero of the War of 1812 and the Mexican War, became General in chief of the U.S. Army in 1841, a position he still held at the start of the Civil War. A true professional soldier, he was one of the very few men in the country who saw the need to prepare for a major military effort. His Anacondona Plan proved to be very sound. Succeeded by General George B. McClellan in Nov. 1861, he retired to write his memoirs, and died at West Point in 1866 where he is buried. A Virginian, he was the only non-West Pointer of Southern origin in the Regular Army to remain loyal to the Union.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Outdoor seated view of General Scott in his dress uniform with epaulettes and holding his sword. This view was taken at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, N.Y., circa 1861. Period ink ID written (not in Scott's hand) in ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, From Photographic Negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very fine.

1776 Colony of New Jersey One Shilling N $125.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $250.00

 

Letter to Future Confederate North Carol $25.00

 

CDV General Winfield Scott $125.00




Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published in Harper's Weekly. Illustration of a negro man with a hoe and pick and several negroes working in the field can be seen in the background, while the plantation family sits on their porch. A caption from the mouth of the plantation owner says, "My boy we've toiled and taken care of you long enough. Now you've got to work." Caption below: The Great Labor Question From a Southern Point of View. 9 1/2 x 9 1/2.  


<b>With extremely desirable vignettes of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson & Revolutionary War General & first President of the U.S.A. George Washington!</b> 


T-64. Richmond, Feb. 17, 1864. Vignettes of General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson in his Confederate uniform at right, and equestrian statue of General George Washington, with Confederate flag, drum, cannon balls and bugle at left. Low serial number. Very fine.

 


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color and was published in the January 17, 1863 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: General Banks's Forces Landing At Baton Rouge, Louisiana. From a Sketch by Our Special Artist. 14 1/2 x 5 3/4. "Harper's" and "January 17, 1863" are printed in the margin.  


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published in the August 5, 1865 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: PARDON. Columbia- Shall I Trust These Men. Executed by the notable illustrator Thomas Nast. Interesting scene showing Columbia sitting in a chair that looks like a throne with Union patriotic symbols all around her. Confederate General Robert E. Lee, down on one knee, is bowing before her as he presents his sword and a battle flag. At Lee's right is Confederate General Roger A. Pryor, a former U.S. Congressman, who is holding out a large document or newspaper to her. Among the notable Confederates seen kneeling in the view are Captain Raphael Semmes, C.S.N., commander of the famous Confederate raider, the C.S.S. Alabama; Governor John Letcher of Virginia; Confederate Secretary of State, and General Robert Toombs, who before the war was a U.S. Congressman and Senator from Georgia; General Richard S. Ewell, of Gettysburg fame; and General John Bell Hood, of Gettysburg fame, and who later was commander of the Confederate Army of Tennessee; and others. 10 1/8 x 15. Light age toning. Harper's Weekly and date are printed at the top. Very desirable Nast illustration.

Slave With Hoe and Axe $35.00

 

1864 Confederate $500 Note

 

General Banks's Forces Landing at Baton

 

Pardon, Shall I Trust These Men $95.00




Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published in the August 5, 1865 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: FRANCHISE, And Not This Man? This poignant illustration shows Columbia with patriotic adornments all around the scene. Columbia is standing with her hand on the shoulder of a wounded negro soldier in uniform. The soldier is holding his kepi in one hand while he proudly stands wearing the uniform of the Union Army with his U.S. belt plate clearly visible. He is standing on two crutches as one of his legs has been amputated above the knee. Executed by the famous illustrator Thomas Nast. Light age toning in the border areas. 10 x 15 1/4. Harper's Weekly and date are printed at the top. Very desirable negro Civil War soldier related illustration, and a positive piece of black Americana history!  


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color and was published in the June 20, 1863 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: The Battle Of Black River Bridge, May 17, 1863. Sketched by Mr. Theodore R. Davis. 15 1/4 x 10 1/2. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin. Some edge tears have been repaired on the reverse with archival document tape.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a spread winged eagle perched on the top of a globe with a  riband with the slogan, "Original Invention." Light age toning. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


T-66. Richmond, Feb. 17, 1864. Bust view of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Fancy blue reverse. Crisp note that is in about uncirculated condition.

Franchise, And Not This Man? $75.00

 

The Battle of Black River Bridge, 1863

 

The Union: It cannot be Improved

 

1864 Confederate $50 Note

<b>For Port Hudson, May 21, 1863</b>


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color and was published in the June 20, 1863 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: Departure Of General Banks's Troops From Simmesport, Louisiana, For Port Hudson, May 21, 1863. Sketched by Mr. J.R. Hamilton. 15 x 10 3/4. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin.  


<b>Civil War Medal of Honor recipient for bravery at the battle of Stone's River, Tennessee</b>


(1836-1909) Frederick Phisterer was a soldier in the U.S. Army who fought in the Civil War, and received the country's highest award for bravery during combat, the Medal of Honor. His medal was awarded to him for his heroic actions at the Battle of Stones River, at Murfreesboro, Tennessee. The citation on his medal reads, "The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Frederick Phisterer, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 31 December 1862, while serving with 18th U.S. Infantry, in action at Stone River, Tennessee. First Lieutenant Phisterer voluntarily conveyed, under a heavy fire, information to the commander of a battalion of regular troops by which the battalion was saved from capture or annihilation."


Phisterer was born in Stuttgart, Germany, and joined the United States Army from Medina County, Ohio, in December 1855, and served in the 3rd U.S. Artillery Regiment for 5 years. He re-enlisted with the 18th U.S. Infantry Regiment in July 1861, and was commissioned as an officer the following October. He eventually rose to the rank of Captain, and was honorably discharged in August 1870.


Phisterer was a longtime officer of the New York Militia, and he played a prominent role in the reorganization of the militia as part of the National Guard. He attained the rank of Colonel, and was later promoted to Brevet Brigadier General for his services in organizing and training soldiers to fight in the Spanish–American War. He served as Acting Adjutant General in 1901 and 1902, and was promoted to Brevet Major General at his retirement as recognition for his many years of successful service in the U.S. Army.


He died in Albany, New York, and was buried at Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio.


Antique color lithograph portrait of Colonel Frederick Phisterer with his numerous medals pinned to his uniform coat, including his Medal of Honor. Caption: Colonel Frederick Phisterer, Brevet Major General, Acting Adjutant General, May 15, 1901, To Jan. 1, 1902. 7 1/4 x 10 1/2. Circa 1912.  An original 4 ¾ X 7 inch, March 1858, <B>L. M. Hoffman & Co.</B> auction bid card complete with bidders penciled in notations.  The commodities auction will offer 232 hogsheads of <B>PRIME NEW ORLEANS SUGAR</B>.  A family business founded in 1795 with the commission auction house of Hoffman & Seton doing business at No. 67 Wall Street.  Hoffman continued business with various partners until 1822 / 23 when L. M. Hoffman joined the house with the addition of & Co. to the firm name.  The old firm continued to grow under various partner combinations always including a Hoffman until 1834 when the firm became L. M. Hoffman & Co.  The auction house continued under that name and under the watchful eye of L. M. Hoffman until his death in 1861.   (see: The Old Merchants of New York City: By Walter Barrett )  While early commodity auction catalogues appear rarely as they were sometimes preserved in firm records, bid cards utilized by bidders to manage and launch their bids very rarely survived as they were cast away at the auction’s closing.  A rare piece of antebellum Americana from one of the country’s earliest and most successful commission auction houses.  Entirely original with good evidence of age and originality while remaining pleasing condition with no rips, folds or repairs.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 At first glance our <I>well got up</I> young man will not make an exceptional impression on the Civil War enthusiast but little more than a glance at the back of the mount quickly arouses interest as we consider the period brown ink penned identification of <I><B>J. B. Montgomery   Sutler</I></B>.   A quick look at Francis Lord’s early reference <I>Civil War Sutlers and their Wares</I> (see our item # 5784) identifies our subject as <U>Camp Convalescent - Sutler</U>, <I>James B. Montgomery</I>.  The photographer back mark <B>MONITOR  GALLERY – L. H. LARRABEE - <U>Camp Hamilton, Va.</U></B> offers additional interest as the neighboring Union camp was the first to be located on Virginia soil after secession. It was established in May 1861 at the foot of Sutlers Hill, Alexandria, Virginia. (see our item # 4512)  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Departure of General Banks's Troops From

 

Colonel Frederick Phisterer $25.00

 

1858 L. M. Hoffman & Co. - AUCTION BID C

 

Civil War- Camp Convalescent, Virginia ( $225.00

This attractive old  table knife and fork set  is maker marked by Landers, Frary & Clark (<B><I>L.F.&C</I></B>) and remains in pleasing condition, un-touched and as found, with good evidence of age and originality yet remaining in pleasing condition, solid with no cracks, stains, nicks or other issues.  Sturdy enough for use yet with that attractive patina that comes to bone and pewter only with decades of age after careful period use, this set of four knives and four matching forks will go nicely in any 19th century table grouping. (note: Incorporated as <I>Landers, Fray & Clark</I> in 1862, <I>L.F.&C</I> was a housewares company based in New Britain, Connecticut.)  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  In a back corner of our personal collection for years, mostly because we like crutches (Can you believe it?) and have always had a thing about breaking up groups, we have decided, as we attempt to clear some things away and make room, to move this pair along. A classic Civil War era shaving mirror offers the branded identification <B>J. HOAG</B> with a script <I>James Hoag</I> penciled under the brand.  Acquired with the mirror and included in this offering is a well-made, hand crafted, period crutch with the same <B>J. HOAG</B> brand. The crutch utilizes period square cut nails and has a period sheet iron reinforcement or repair (see illustrations).  James Hoag was a Philadelphia resident in 1862 when on August 18 he enlisted and was mustered in as a Corporal of Co. A <B>68th  Pennsylvania Infantry</B>.  He was listed as wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg on July 2, 1863 and was discharged for wounds on January 19, 1864. We have not been able to determine the nature of Hoag’s wounding however it would seem he had some chance of full recovery as he was not discharged immediately but spent six months in recovery before it was determined that he would not be able to return to duty.  A nice grouping for the Pennsylvania or Gettysburg collector.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Not a big deal but a nice little piece for the apothecary and medical enthusiast is this little treen pill box.  <I>Turner's Tic Douloureux or Universal Neuralgia Pills</I> were put up by Turner & Co., 120 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  


8 1/2 x 5 1/4, in ink, written by William G. Broadfoot, a Confederate Treasury Official, to his son Charles who would be a Confederate colonel later in the war.


<b><u>Fay.[etteville], [North Carolina], Feb. 2/61</b></u>


Dear Charles,


I enclose twenty dollars as requested in letter to yr. mother recd. today.  I am glad to hear that your boarding house is fixed with one that I have formed a high opinion of from a rapid hearing of your acc.[ount] of her.  I trust that it may be proved all that I fancy & hope for & that it will be permanent.  I am glad that you have deferred moving for the present & think the charge exorbitant.  Stick to your studies & let politics only enlist your attention when nothing more valuable may or ought to have attention- let it not above all color your feelings on intercourse with any one decision with moderation.  God preserve my boy.


Yr. F.[ather]


Boldly written. Tiny edge chip at the bottom of the paper which does not affect any of the content. Sensible advice is trying to be given by the elder Broadfoot to his son by telling him to stick to his studies and not let politics consume his attention. In 2 1/2 short months after this letter was written the country would be embroiled in a bitter civil war lasting over 4 years and costing over 625,000 American lives. In February 1861 emotions were running very hot in both the North and the South and W.G. Broadfoot, like many parents at that time, were worried about the fate of their sons. By the summer of 1861 young Charles Broadfoot would be serving in the Confederate army like so many other young North Carolinians.


This letter was written by William Giles  Broadfoot, (1806-72), the father of Confederate soldiers Charles W. Broadfoot and George B. Broadfoot, (1844-85) (5th North Carolina Cavalry), prior to the start of the War Between the States, while Charles was still a student at the University of North Carolina. The elder Broadfoot was a Confederate official in the C.S.A. Depository at Fayetteville, North Carolina. 


The recipient of this note, Charles Wetmore Broadfoot, (1842-1919), was an 18 year old student at the University of North Carolina when he enlisted as a private on July 15, 1861, and was mustered into Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He was mustered out of this regiment on November 12, 1861. He then served in Company D, 43rd North Carolina Infantry, also known as the "Cumberland Plough Boys," and was discharged for promotion on September 7, 1862, being commissioned 1st Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp, on the staff of General Theophilus H. Holmes, who was his uncle.** On July 1, 1864, he was commissioned into the Field & Staff of the 1st North Carolina Reserve Infantry, with rank of lieutenant colonel and colonel. His date and method of discharge are unknown. After the war, in 1870, Charles was elected to the state legislature. He served as Dean of the Cumberland County Bar, and was elected as a trustee of the University of North Carolina in 1911.


*This note came out of a small grouping of Broadfoot family letters and documents that I acquired a couple of years ago. It was oftentimes the habit of Mr. Broadfoot to include a note to Charles in the same letter that his mother wrote to him.


** Frances "Fannie" Rebecca Wetmore Broadfoot (1825-92), was the wife of William G. Broadfoot, and the mother of Charles W. Broadfoot. Fannie's older sister, Laura Jane Wetmore, was married to Confederate General Theophilus H. Holmes.

Bone & Pewter mounted - TABLEWARE - KNIF $75.00

 

68th Penn. Vols. / Gettysburg wounded – $425.00

 

mid 1860s TURNER’S NEURALGIA PILL - BOX

 

Letter to Future Confederate North Carol $50.00




<b>War Date Document Signed concerning an officer of the 136th New York Infantry</b>


(1831-78) Graduated in the West Point class of 1853. Military service: 2nd lieutenant, 4th U.S. Artillery, July 1, 1853; promoted to 1st lieutenant, May 1, 1856; regimental adjutant, Dec. 14, 1857, to Apr. 24, 1861; promoted to captain, 15th U.S. Infantry, May 14, 1861; promoted to major, a.d.c., July 3, 1862; promoted to lieutenant colonel, a.a.g., Aug. 20, 1862; served on the staff of Generals' Nathaniel P. Banks and John A. Dix; he was cited for gallantry at the battle of Cedar Mountain, Va., appointed brevet brigadier general, March 13, 1865, for valuable, distinguished and meritorious service in the field during the Civil War. Buried at Arlington National Cemetery. 


<u>War Date Document Signed</u>: 7 3/4 x 10 1/4, imprinted form, filled out in ink. 


War Department,

Washington City, July 7th, 1864


Sir:


I am directed by the Secretary of War to inform you that you have been reported to this Department by the Second Comptroller as having failed to render your accounts for the month of April 1864 within the period prescribed by the act of July 17, 1862, a copy of which is hereto annexed. [the order referenced is printed below the signature of General Pelouze]. 


You are therefore instructed, immediately upon receipt of this communication, to forward your accounts to the proper office, and submit to this Department such explanation as you may desire to make in order to relieve yourself from the penalty of the act above cited.


Very respectfully,

Your obedient servant,

Louis H. Pelouze

Asst. Adjt. Genl.


[to]: Orange Sackett, Jr., Capt. 136th N.Y. Vols., A.C.S.


Below this is the "Act" referenced in the body of the document: 


"AN ACT to provide for the more prompt settlement of the accounts of Disbursing Officers," approved July 17, 1862. [Please click on the enlargement to read the entire contents of this "Act." 


Very fine.


Orange Sackett, Jr., was 27 years old when he enlisted at Portage, New York, as a 1st lieutenant, and was commissioned into Co. G, 136th New York Infantry. He was promoted to captain, on March 18, 1863; and mustered out of the service on June 13, 1865, at Washington, D.C. 


<u>136th New York Infantry</u>


The 136th New York Volunteer Infantry were known as the "Ironclads," and the regiment was recruited in the counties of 

Allegany, Livingston and Wyoming and they  rendezvoused at Portage, New York, where it was mustered into the U.S. service for three years on Sept. 25-26, 1862. It left the state on Oct. 3; was assigned to the 2nd brigade, 2nd (Steinwehr's) division, 11th corps; went into winter quarters with the corps at Stafford, Va.; fought its first battle at Chancellorsville, Va., losing a few men killed, wounded and missing; and was heavily engaged at Gettysburg on the first two days of the battle, losing 109 men in killed, wounded and missing.


In Sept., 1863, it was ordered to Tennessee with the 11th and 12th corps and was engaged the following month at the midnight battle of Wauhatchie, Tenn., losing 6 killed and wounded. It was active at Missionary Ridge in the Chattanooga-Ringgold campaign, losing 11 killed and wounded. When the 20th corps was formed in April, 1864, it was attached to the 3d brigade, 3d (Butterfield's) division of that corps, moving on into the Atlanta campaign early in May.


It was active at the battles of Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Cassville, Dallas, Kennesaw Mountain and in the siege of Atlanta. Its heaviest loss was incurred at Resaca, where the casualties were 13 killed, 68 wounded and 1 missing.  


After the fall of Atlanta it remained there until November, when it marched with Sherman to the sea, engaged in siege of Savannah, and closed its active service with the Carolinas campaign, in which it was engaged at Fayetteville, Averasboro, Bentonville, Raleigh and at the Bennett's House, losing 45 men in killed and wounded in the battles of Averasboro and Bentonville.


After the close of the war it marched with its corps to Washington, D.C., where it took part in the grand review, and was mustered out on June 13, 1865.

  

The regiment lost by death during its Civil War service, 2 officers and 74 men, killed and mortally wounded; 1 officer and 91 men, died of disease and other causes, a total deaths of 168.


Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2


 <b>, C.S.A.


Wounded 3 times during the War Between the States!


Frequently led General N.B. Forrest's immortal Kentucky Brigade into battle!


United States Congressman from Kentucky</b>


(1827-81) Born in Hickman County, Kentucky, he completed preparatory studies; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1852 and began practice at Clinton, Hickman County, Ky. Taking a leading place in the community he was chosen as the first Sheriff of Hickman County and served, 1851-1852. He was a member of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1857-1858. Crossland was among the first to organize companies for service in the Confederate States Army, and he was commissioned captain of the 1st Kentucky Infantry on April 23, 1861. He was soon promoted to major of the regiment and then to lieutenant colonel on April 19, 1862. The 1st Kentucky Infantry, was disbanded on May 14, 1862, after serving their one year term of enlistment, and Crossland was then commissioned to be the colonel of the 7th Kentucky Infantry on May 20, 1862. He commanded the regiment at the battle's of Baton Rouge, Corinth, Champion's Hill, and Jackson. Early in 1864, the 7th, 3rd and 8th Kentucky regiments were mounted and joined the command of the legendary Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest. He served under Forrest until the end of the war, participating in the battle of Brice's Crossroads and in other famous combats in Mississippi, the operations on the Tennessee River, the cavalry fighting of General John Bell Hood in Tennessee, including the defense of the rear guard on the retreat, and in the engagement with General Wilson's Union cavalry forces in the spring of 1865, when he was in command of the famous Kentucky Brigade. He received a serious wound at the battle of Paducah, Kentucky, on March 25, 1864, and barely escaped murder by local guerrillas the following night while recovering from his wounds at a nearby farm. He was also seriously wounded on July 15, 1864, at Old Town Creek, Mississippi, and again on November 21, 1864, at Butler Creek, Alabama. He surrendered on May 6, 1865, at Columbus, Mississippi. After the war Colonel Crossland returned to his home and was elected judge of the court of common pleas of the first judicial district of Kentucky, in August 1867, and he served on the bench until his resignation on November 1, 1870, to run for a seat in the U.S. Congress. Elected as a Democrat, he served from 1871-1875. He then resumed the practice of law in Mayfield, Graves County, Ky.; was elected judge of the circuit court for the first judicial district of Kentucky in August 1880, and served until his death in Mayfield, Ky., on September 11, 1881. He is buried in Maplewood Cemetery, in Mayfield.


<u>Signature as a Member of the U.S. Congress</u>: 3 1/2 x 1 1/8, in ink, Edward Crossland. Imprinted above his signature is "HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES," and at the lower right corner is, "M.[ember] C.[ongress]" Cut slightly irregular. Very desirable Kentucky Confederate related item.         


<b>Part of the Pennsylvania "Emergency Troops" called into action by Governor Curtin during the 1863 Gettysburg campaign!


With Chambersburg, Pa. postmark</b>


War period envelope addressed to Miss Mary J. Flack, Doylestown, Pa., Bucks Co., Penn. Return address is signed at the left edge: Soldiers Letter, James T. Clancy, Major 45th Regt. P.[ennsylvania] V.[olunteers], "in haste" is written at the bottom left corner. C.D.S. Jul. 13,  Chambersburg, Pa. and stamped in black Due 3 at upper right. Typical tears to the back flap where the envelope was opened. Circa 1863. Scarce. 


WBTS Trivia: Major James T. Clancy was promoted to Colonel of the 45th Pennsylvania Infantry on August 13, 1863.


The 45th Pennsylvania Infantry Volunteers were part of the "Emergency Troops" called into action by Governor Andrew G. Curtin in the summer of 1863 during the Confederate invasion of the North resulting in the Gettysburg campaign. A proclamation was issued by Governor Curtin on June 26th, calling for 60,000 men at once to be mustered into the state service for a term of 90 days and to be discharged as soon as the danger was over. 


A force under General Joseph F. Knipe approached Chambersburg, Pa., but found it in the hands of the Confederates and were obliged to retire gradually before the advance of General Edward Johnson's division of General Richard E. Ewell's corps.


Clancy's regiment were in Chambersburg on Jul. 13 as indicated by the postmark on this envelope.   


<b>Includes double page woodcut engraving of The Great Naval Expedition From Fortress Monroe, Oct. 29, 1861</b>


8 pages. WAR AGAINST REBELLION. Important from Washington. Gen. Winfield Scott Retires from the Command of the Army. Gen. McClellan Appointed Commander of the United States Troops. The Pennsylvania Regiments. Indications Of An Advance Of The Rebels. From. Gen. Banks' Division. The Rebel Pickets are Again Seen. From The Lower Potomac. Important from Baltimore, Md. The War In Missouri. Gen. Fremont's Advance Force beyond Springfield. The Rebel Price Still Retreating. The Latest From Washington. Excellent front page articles titled, Retirement Of Lieut. General Winfield Scott From Active Service. Honors To The Veteran. Gen. McClellan At The Head Of The Army. Gen'l McClellan Accepts The Command Of The Army. Remarks of the President. Response of Secretary Cameron.  Other news: Attempt of Traitors to Control the Ballot Box in Baltimore. Important Order of Major General Dix. Release of the Gallant Col. Mulligan. The Great Naval Expedition. Latest News From The South. Death of Gen. Sam Houston. Women and the War. The Daring Fraud Upon the Soldiers Vote, and more news. Very fine early war issue with a scarce large naval illustration and important front page stories about the retirement of Lieutenant General Winfield Scott, who was a major hero in the United States at the start of the Civil War, and the news of his replacement, Major General George B. McClellan who was touted to be the new Napoleon.

Autograph, General Louis Henry Pelouze $75.00

 

Autograph, Colonel Edward Crossland, 7th $75.00

 

Cover Sent by Major James T. Clancy, 45t

 

The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 2, 1

<b>at Vicksburg</b>


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color and was published on the front page of the May 30, 1863 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: The Tug "Rumsey" Accoutered For Running The Rebel Batteries At Vicksburg. 11 x 15 3/4. Includes the ornately illustrated masthead of Harper's Weekly, A Journal Of Civilization, at the top of the page, which also has some hand tinting to it. Date line, New York, Saturday, May 30, 1863.    


<b>The elite 1st Virginia Cavalry was commanded by the legendary Confederate Cavalryman Colonel J.E.B. Stuart in 1861!


Autograph Document Signed by a Confederate officer in J.E.B. Stuart's command who was wounded by a cannon ball in 1862!</b>


7 3/4 x 7 1/2, manuscript in ink, Autograph Document Signed, by Lieutenant John Milton Lock, 1st Regiment Virginia Cavalry.


The Confederate States, To John H. Brown, Dr., 1861 Nov. 26th, To Hire of Horse from Oct. 1st to Nov. 26th @.40 $23.80. 


I certify that the above account is correct and just, that the services were rendered as stated, and that they were necessary for the public service. John M. Lock, Lt. & A.Q.M., 1st Regt. Va. Cav. 


Very fine, neatly written, early war 1861 document from an extremely desirable Confederate cavalry regiment!


John Milton Lock, was a 30 year old farmer from Berryville, Virginia, when he enlisted on June 23, 1861, at Camp Jefferson Davis, Va. as a private, and he was mustered into Co. A, 1st Virginia Cavalry. Lock was promoted to 2nd lieutenant on July 1, 1861, and served for a time as the Regimental Quartermaster and Commissary of the Regiment. He was promoted to captain on April 23, 1862, and was wounded in action on November 1, 1862, when he was hit in the leg by a cannon ball. He was absent from his regiment as he convalesced from his wound until being assigned to command the Confederate post at Harrisonburg, Va., in the Shenandoah Valley, on May 15, 1864. Still needing the service of this gallant and experienced Confederate officer he was later transferred into the Veteran Reserve Corps. The date and place of his official discharge are unknown. After the war Captain Lock was a hotel owner in Harrisonburg, Va. He died on March 30, 1889, and is buried in the Green Hill Cemetery, at Berryville, Va.


<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: After fighting in the First Battle of Manassas, Va., the 1st Virginia Cavalry was brigaded under Generals J.E.B. Stuart, Fitzhugh Lee, Williams Carter Wickham, and Thomas T. Munford. It participated in more than 200 engagements of various types including the Seven Days Battles and General J.E.B. Stuart's famous ride around General George B. McClellan's Yankee army in 1862. The regiment was active in the conflicts at Gainesville, Second Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Kelly's Ford, Chancellorsville, Brandy Station, Gettysburg, Bristoe Station, the Wilderness, Todd's Tavern, Spotsylvania, Bethesda Church, and Cold Harbor. Later it was involved in General Jubal Early's 1864 operations in the Shenandoah Valley, the defense of Petersburg, and in the Appomattox Campaign.


In April, 1862, the unit totaled 437 men, they lost 25 men at Gettysburg, and had 318 men fit for duty in September, 1864. The regiment cut through the Yankee lines at Appomattox and later disbanded. Only 1 man from the regiment was present to surrender at Appomattox Court House! Among the regiment's most celebrated field officers were colonels J.E.B. Stuart, Fitzhugh Lee and William E. "Grumble" Jones, all going on to become famous Confederate generals, with Stuart and Jones both being killed during the war! [Source: Units Of The Confederate States Army].


<b><u>First Virginia Cavalry</b></u>


The Field Report of Colonel J.E.B. Stuart, First Virginia Cavalry, at the 1st Battle of Manassas.


HDQRS. FIRST VIRGINIA CAVALRY REGIMENT,

  

July 26, 1861


GENERAL: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of my regiment in the battle of Manassas:


I received your order to charge the enemy's flank, and proceeded immediately across the run to his left flank, but finding that it would be easier to attain his right flank, I immediately returned and marched rapidly towards the heaviest fire. As I approached the ground General T.J. Jackson, whose brigade was then engaged, sent me word to protect his flanks, but particularly his left flank. I divided the regiment, giving Major Swan half(I had but 300 men for duty), and with the remainder hurried up to Jackson's left, leaving his right to Swan. Entering a skirt of woods, I received intelligence that the enemy was rapidly outflanking us. I hastened forward through several fences just as a regiment dressed in red was running in disorder towards a skirt of woods where the fire had been heaviest. I took them to be ours, and exclaimed with all my might: "Don't run, boys; we are here." They paid very little attention to this appeal. When passing in column of two's through a narrow gap to gain the same field and very close to them, I saw in their hands the U.S. flag. I ordered the charge, which was handsomely done, stopping their flank movement and checking the advance upon Jackson. I rallied again for another charge, as only a portion of my command was in the first, owing to the difficulty of closing up; but finding the enemy had gained the woods to my right and front, leaving no ground for charging, I retired to the next field to give them another dash if they penetrated beyond the woods, which, however, they did not attempt.


In this encounter the enemy's line, or rather column, was broken and many killed. Captain Carter's company on which the heaviest of the action fell, lost 9 men killed or mortally wounded, and 18 horses killed. Captain Carter's horse was shot dead as he was gallantly leading his company into the enemy.


Of the gallantry of those engaged I cannot speak in too high terms. The regiment charged was the Fire Zouaves, and I am informed by prisoners subsequently taken that their repulse by the cavalry began the panic so fearful afterwards in the enemy's ranks.


Just after the charge our reenforcements arrived upon the field and formed rapidly on right into line. The first was Colonel Falkner's regiment of Mississippians, whose gallantry came under my own observation. As these reenforcements formed I gradually moved off to the left, where I soon found myself joined by a battery, under the direction of Lieutenant Beckham, which my cavalry supported. This battery made great havoc in the enemy's ranks and finally put them in full retreat. The principal credit here was due to this battery; but having thrown forward vedettes far out on the eminences, the important information I was thus enabled to give the battery as to position and movements must have contributed greatly to its success, and here I may add that this information was also sent back to the infantry, which was still far to our right, notifying what woods could be gained, &c.


The enemy being now in full retreat, I followed with the cavalry as rapidly as possible, but was so much encumbered with prisoners, whom I sent as fast as possible back to the infantry, that my command was soon too much reduced to encounter any odds, but I nevertheless followed our success until I reached a point twelve miles from Manassas, when, by sending back so many detachments with prisoners, I had but a squad left. The rear of the enemy was protected by a squadron of cavalry and some artillery. We cut off a great many squads, many of whom fired upon us as we approached, and the artillery gave us a volley of grape. One man of ours was killed and another was wounded at this point. I have no idea how many prisoners were taken.


I encamped that night on Sudley farm, where was a large church, used as a hospital by the enemy, containing about 300 wounded, the majority mortally.


I cannot speak in too high praise of those whom I had the honor to command on the field, but to Mr. L.T. Brian, and Mr. P.W. Hairston and Mr. J.F. Brown, having no commissions, whose meritorious conduct and worth have been made the subject of previous letters to the general, I was specially

indebted for their valuable assistance.


Of my regiment the acting chaplain, Reverend Mr. Ball, was conspicuously useful, while my attention was particularly attracted to the adjutant, Lieutenant W.W. Blackford; the sergeant major, Philip H. Powers, and Lieutenant Cummings, whose good conduct on this as on every other occasion deserves the highest commendation. Lieutenant Beckham deserves high praise for the success of his battery, as he acted as gunner to each piece himself. In the pursuit Lieutenant William Taylor alone captured six of the enemy with arms in their hands. A large number of arms, quantities of clothing and hospital stores, and means of transportation were found abandoned on the road.


Most respectfully, your obedient servant,


J.E.B. STUART,

Colonel First Virginia Cavalry


To: General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON


  

Source:  Official Records

[CHAPTER IX.] THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN. 

[Series I. Vol. 2. Serial No. 2.]

    


8 1/4 x 5, in ink, written by William G. Broadfoot, a Confederate Treasury Official, to his son Charles who later in the war would be a Confederate colonel.


<b><u>Fay.[etteville], [North Carolina], Apl. 4/61</b></u>


Dear Charles,


I enclose report as promised in my note of yesterday- and am happy now to add that your Mother impressed herself highly pleased with the whole record- & I trust that you will maintain a quiet & steady [?] at your studies without over taxing your faculties, strive to deserve without caring much how the honors may be awarded- & above all be without reproach- and your father assures you again he is satisfied- & looks forward without a shadow on your future- May God direct & preserve my son.


Yr. F.[ather]


I sent another paper today.


This letter was written by William Giles Broadfoot, (1806-72), the father of Confederate soldiers Charles W. Broadfoot and George B. Broadfoot, (1844-85) (5th North Carolina Cavalry), only 8 days before the bombardment of Fort Sumter and the start of the War Between the States, while Charles was still a student at the University of North Carolina and only 3 1/2 months away from him joining the Confederate Army. The elder Broadfoot was a Confederate official in the C.S.A. Depository at Fayetteville, North Carolina.


The recipient of this note, Charles Wetmore Broadfoot, (1842-1919), was an 18 year old student at the University of North Carolina when he enlisted as a private on July 15, 1861, and was mustered into Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He was mustered out of this regiment on November 12, 1861. He then served in Company D, 43rd North Carolina Infantry, also known as the "Cumberland Plough Boys," and was discharged for promotion on September 7, 1862, being commissioned 1st Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp, on the staff of General Theophilus H. Holmes, who was his uncle.** On July 1, 1864, he was commissioned into the Field & Staff of the 1st North Carolina Reserve Infantry, with rank of lieutenant colonel and colonel. His date and method of discharge are unknown. After the war, in 1870, Charles was elected to the state legislature. He served as Dean of the Cumberland County Bar, and was elected as a trustee of the University of North Carolina in 1911. 


*This note came out of a small grouping of Broadfoot family letters and documents that I acquired a couple of years ago. It was oftentimes the habit of Mr. Broadfoot to include a note to Charles in the same letter that his mother wrote to him.


** Frances "Fannie" Rebecca Wetmore Broadfoot (1825-92), was the wife of William G. Broadfoot, and the mother of Charles W. Broadfoot. Fannie's older sister, Laura Jane Wetmore, was married to Confederate General Theophilus H. Holmes.  

 




7 3/4 x 5, in ink, written by William G. Broadfoot, a Confederate Treasury Official, to his son Charles who later in the war would be a Confederate colonel.


<b><u>Fay.[etteville], [North Carolina], Sep. 14/61</b></u>


Dear Son,


Your Uncle William arrived here today from Rowan where he has been spending some time with his brother George- & will go from Kin.[ston] to Newbern & think this move is on the advice of Bishop A.- whether he will remain there as supposed cannot be determined now.  I told him he would have to go armed with carnal as well as spiritual armor and your cousin John is now in Raleigh & is expected here in a day or two- at the first of this week.  I did not think it would pass without some decisive blow or move at least- but tis not so- Well we must be patient & endeavor to [be] ready at all points & in every way.  God bless my Son.


Yr. F.[ather]


This letter was written by William Giles  Broadfoot, (1806-72), the father of Confederate soldiers Charles W. Broadfoot and George B. Broadfoot, (1844-85) (5th North Carolina Cavalry). The elder Broadfoot was a Confederate official in the C.S.A. Depository at Fayetteville, North Carolina.


The recipient of this note, Charles Wetmore Broadfoot, (1842-1919), was an 18 year old student at the University of North Carolina when he enlisted as a private on July 15, 1861, and was mustered into Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He was mustered out of this regiment on November 12, 1861. He then served in Company D, 43rd North Carolina Infantry, also known as the "Cumberland Plough Boys," and was discharged for promotion on September 7, 1862, being commissioned 1st Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp, on the staff of General Theophilus H. Holmes, who was his uncle.** On July 1, 1864, he was commissioned into the Field & Staff of the 1st North Carolina Reserve Infantry, with rank of lieutenant colonel and colonel. His date and method of discharge are unknown. After the war, in 1870, Charles was elected to the state legislature. He served as Dean of the Cumberland County Bar, and was elected as a trustee of the University of North Carolina in 1911. 


** Frances "Fannie" Rebecca Wetmore Broadfoot (1825-92), was the wife of William G. Broadfoot, and the mother of Charles W. Broadfoot. Fannie's older sister, Laura Jane Wetmore, was married to Confederate General Theophilus H. Holmes.  



*This note came out of a small grouping of Broadfoot family letters and documents that I acquired a couple of years ago. It was oftentimes the habit of Mr. Broadfoot to include a note to Charles in the same letter that his mother wrote to him.

The Tug Rumsey Accoutered For Running Th

 

1st Virginia Cavalry Receipt For Hire of $150.00

 

Letter to Future Confederate North Carol $50.00

 

Letter to Future Confederate North Carol $50.00

Seldom surviving as the vast majority of these utilitarian tools of the Civil War era teamster or <I>wagoner</I> as most frequently referred to in military records, were well <I>used up</I> and cast aside in the period with the hide strands re-purposed as brogan laces or some other worthy use.  This scarce period example sports a 7 foot 6 inch long taper braided hide lash with a cord tip secured to a 4 foot shaft of tapered ash wood.  All clearly handmade and original to the period, the piece offers good evidence of age and period use yet remains in excellent all original condition.  A neat piece with lots of eye appeal !  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  This period CDV by photographer George H. Wood of Towanda, Penn. remains in pleasing condition with only a small chip on the mount back not involving the face of the mount (see illustration).  The photograph offers a full standing 1st Lt. in nine button frock with forage cap in hand displaying a small bullion infantry device on the crown with regimental number.  A period notation on the face of the mount under the photograph identifies the subject as <I>Lieut. B. K. Gustin</I>.  Our rudimentary research tells us that <B>Burton K. Gustin</B> was a resident of Bradford Country, Pennsylvania when on October 24, 1861, he enlisted and was mustered in as <U>1st Sgt.</U> Co. F <B>52nd Pennsylvania Infantry</B>.  Sgt. Gustin was commissioned 1st Lt. on December 21, 1863 and was mustered out January 27, 1865.  During Lt. Gustin’s service with the 52nd PA the regiment saw action at the Siege of Yorktown, Battle of Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Savage Station and Chickahominy then the Battle of Fair Oaks; action before Richmond, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill; operations on Morris and Folly Islands, against Forts Wagner, Morris Island, operations against Charleston and more. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Unlike the heavier and more commonly encountered British style snake buckle that saw common use in England, Canada and yes in the American Civil War where quantities were shipped to this country via blockade runner intended for issue by the Confederacy, collectors will note that this excavated example is the lighter, more finely detailed two headed snake most commonly associated with those marketed by <B>Isaac Campbell & Co.</B>  (see illustrations: <I>Suppliers to the Confederacy</I> by Barry & Burt) as they filled orders from the Southern Confederacy for all manner of arms and accoutrements. This example is offered as found without its ringed keeper but remaining in excellent original condition with a pleasing deep natural age patina. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Measuring a mear 2 1/16 inches from end to end, this all original and period little turned maple rundlet remains in wonderful condition and is without the usual split along its length so frequently seen in the body of this type.  Scarce in any size, these handmade flasks are most frequently at least two or three times larger than this example.  Quite possibly intended for medical use to carry some potion, or simply to hold rum or other spirit, this little <I>emergency</I> swigler will set in nicely with and colonial through Civil War era grouping.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

original ! Civil War vintage TEAMSTER’S

 

Civil War CDV - Identified 52nd Pennsylv

 

Isaac Campbell type - Confederate SNAKE $165.00

 

outstanding little 1700s early 1800s - R $175.00




<b>United States Congressman from Mississippi


United States Secretary of the Interior


Inspector General in the Confederate Army


Confederate Secret Agent</b>


(1810-85) Born in Caswell County, North Carolina, he attended Bingham Academy, graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1831, and served as a member of their faculty in 1831-32. He then studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1834, and commenced practice in Pontotoc, Mississippi. He was elected as a Democrat to the U.S. Congress, and served from 1839-51. He was the chairman of the Committee on Indian Affairs in the 29th Congress. He was appointed U.S. Secretary of the Interior in the Cabinet of President James Buchanan and served from March 6, 1857, to January 8, 1861, when he resigned to throw his lot in with the Confederacy. Horace Greeley's New York Daily Tribune denounced Thompson as "a traitor," remarking, "Undertaking to overthrow the Government of which you are a sworn minister may be in accordance with the ideas of cotton growing chivalry, but to common men cannot be made to appear creditable." He served as Inspector General in the Confederate States Army during the War Between the States. Thompson later served as an aide to General P.G.T. Beauregard at the Battle of Shiloh, and was present at several other battles in the Western Theater of the war, including Vicksburg, Corinth, and Tupelo. He later was the leader of the Confederate Secret Service in Canada in 1864 and 1865. From there, he directed a failed plot to free Confederate prisoners of war on Johnson's Island, off Sandusky, Ohio. He also arranged the purchase of a steamer, with the intention of arming it to harass shipping in the Great Lakes. Regarded in the North as a schemer and conspirator, many devious plots were associated with his name. On June 13, 1864, Thompson met with former New York governor Washington Hunt at Niagara Falls. According to the testimony of Peace Democrat Clement Vallandigham, Hunt met Thompson, talked to him about creating a Northwestern Confederacy, and obtained money for arms, which was routed to a subordinate. Thompson gave Ben Woods, the owner of the New York Daily News, money to purchase arms. One plot was a planned burning of New York City on November 25, 1864, in retaliation for Union Generals' Philip H. Sheridan and William Tecumseh Sherman's scorched-earth tactics in the south. Some speculate that John Wilkes Booth, who assassinated President Abraham Lincoln, met with Thompson, but this has not been proven. Thompson worked hard to clear his name of involvement in the assassination in the years after the war. His manor, called "Home Place," in Oxford, Mississippi was burned down by Union troops in 1864. After the war, Thompson fled to England and later returned to Canada as he waited for passions to cool in the United States. He eventually came home and settled in Memphis, Tennessee, to manage his extensive holdings. Thompson was later appointed to the board of the University of the South at Sewanee and was a great benefactor of the school. He died in Memphis in 1885 and is buried in Elmwood Cemetery.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 4 3/4 x 1, in ink, J. Thompson, Oxford, Miss. Cut irregular at the top which does not affect any of his handwriting. Very desirable Confederate secret agent's autograph.  


Criswell #75. Vignette of Confederate cabinet member Judah P. Benjamin at center with dog and chest at the bottom. Lithographed by B. Duncan, Richmond, Va. Eight per cent coupon bond. Authorized By The Act Of Congress, C.S.A. Of August 18, 1861. 2,621 issued. Comes with 30 coupons still attached. Rarity 5. This bond was issued at Richmond on the 8th day of Jan. 1863. Very fine. The bond with the remaining coupons measures 16 1/2 x 16 which is much larger than our scanner bed.  H 110in. x W 196in. x D 22in.  H 54in. X D 14in.

Autograph, Jacob Thompson $125.00

 

$500 Confederate Bond With Judah P. Benj

 

H 110in. x W 196in. x D 22in. $0.00

 

H 54in. X D 14in. $0.00




<b>U.S. Congressman & Senator from Mississippi


Governor of Mississippi


Confederate Captain


Confederate Senator</b>


(1813-80) Attended Mississippi College, and Jefferson College, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1833, and practiced law in Gallatin, Miss. Served as a member of the Mississippi state house of representatives, 1835-39; U.S. Congressman, 1839-41; Governor of Mississippi, 1844-48; U.S. Congressman, 1847-53; U.S. Senator, 1854-61. During the Civil War he served as captain, in the 18th Mississippi Infantry, and as Confederate Senator, 1862-65.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 4 3/4 x 1 1/4, in ink. A.G. Brown, Gallatin, Missi.

 


7 3/4 x 2 3/8, in ink, written by William G. Broadfoot, a Confederate Treasury Official, to his son Charles who later in the war would be a Confederate colonel.


The combat deepens- Be Brave, vigilant & sober- After we have suffered a while, deliverance will come at the Grace of God- May his shield be over my boy- 


Yr. af[fectionate],


F.[ather]


Excellent patriotic content.


This undated note was written by William Giles Broadfoot, (1806-72), the father of Confederate soldiers Charles W. Broadfoot and George B. Broadfoot, (1844-85) (5th North Carolina Cavalry). The elder Broadfoot was a Confederate official in the C.S.A. Depository at Fayetteville, North Carolina. 


The recipient of this note, Charles Wetmore Broadfoot, (1842-1919), was an 18 year old student at the University of North Carolina when he enlisted as a private on July 15, 1861, and was mustered into Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He was mustered out of this regiment on November 12, 1861. He then served in Company D, 43rd North Carolina Infantry, also known as the "Cumberland Plough Boys," and was discharged for promotion on September 7, 1862, being commissioned 1st Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp, on the staff of General Theophilus H. Holmes, who was his uncle.** On July 1, 1864, he was commissioned into the Field & Staff of the 1st North Carolina Reserve Infantry, with rank of lieutenant colonel and colonel. His date and method of discharge are unknown. After the war, in 1870, Charles was elected to the state legislature. He served as Dean of the Cumberland County Bar, and was elected as a trustee of the University of North Carolina in 1911. 


*This note came out of a small grouping of Broadfoot family letters and documents that I acquired a couple of years ago. It was oftentimes the habit of Mr. Broadfoot to include a note to Charles in the same letter that his mother wrote to him.


** Frances "Fannie" Rebecca Wetmore Broadfoot (1825-92), was the wife of William G. Broadfoot, and the mother of Charles W. Broadfoot. Fannie's older sister, Laura Jane Wetmore, was married to Confederate General Theophilus H. Holmes.  

 


Antique color lithograph of the famous surrender scene of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant in the parlor of the Wilmer McLean house at Appomattox Court House, Va. Caption: The Surrender Of General Robert E. Lee To General U.S. Grant At Appomattox Courthouse, Va., April 9, 1865. 7 1/4 x 10 1/2. Sketched by Alex O. Levy. Circa 1912.  


Antique color lithograph showing the gallant Union General "Little Phil" Sheridan leading his cavalrymen on their charge at Five Forks, Va. General Sheridan jumps over the Confederate breastworks on his favorite mount, "Rienzi" while holding his major general's guidon. Caption: General Philip H. Sheridan Mounted On His Famous Horse, Rienzi, Turning An Impending Rout To Victory At The Battle Of Five Forks, April 1, 1865. 10 1/2 x 7. Sketched by Thure de Thulstrup. Circa 1912.


WBTS Trivia: Thure de Thulstrup, born Bror Thure Thulstrup in Sweden, was a leading American illustrator with contributions for numerous magazines, including three decades of work for Harper's Weekly.

Autograph, Albert Gallatin Brown $45.00

 

Patriotic Note Written to Confederate No $65.00

 

The Surrender of General Robert E. Lee a

 

General Philip H. Sheridan at Five Forks




(1818-80) Born in Iberville Parish, Louisiana, he had a brilliant scholastic career graduating #1 in his class at Jefferson College in 1836, and he held the same distinction at the U.S. Military Academy four years later where two of his classmates were future Union Generals William T. Sherman and George H. Thomas. He fought in the Mexican War with great distinction earning the brevet rank of colonel for his gallantry in the battle of Molino del Rey. He was elected governor of Louisiana in 1852, and was said to have been the youngest governor ever elected in Louisiana. A Democrat, he supported railroad construction, public education, and the improvement of navigable waterways. Hebert helped get his former West Point classmate William T. Sherman appointed superintendent of the Louisiana Seminary of Learning and Military Academy. During the 1860 secession crisis, Hebert was appointed to the military board responsible for preparing Louisiana's defenses if war broke out. At the commencement of hostilities in 1861, he was appointed colonel of the 1st Louisiana Artillery, but soon afterwards was promoted to brigadier general of Louisiana State Troops. Then on August 17, 1861, he was commissioned brigadier general and given command successively of the Department of Texas, the Galveston defenses, and the Sub-district of North Louisiana. He supposedly saw action at the battle of Milliken's Bend, La., on June 7, 1863, but some historians disagree that he was actually engaged. In August 1864, Hebert replaced General John B. Magruder as commander of the District of Texas, and in 1865 he was given command of the Trans-Mississippi Department. He surrendered to General Gordon Granger on May 26, 1865. After the surrender Hebert returned to his plantation in Louisiana, took the oath of allegiance, and through an endorsement by his old West Point friend William T. Sherman received a presidential pardon from Andrew Johnson. He became a Liberal Republican during Reconstruction which angered many of his fellow Louisianans, and he supported the carpetbagger governor Henry Clay Warmouth. Later President Ulysses S. Grant appointed him to various engineering boards, and Hebert worked as a state and federal engineer in postwar Louisiana.


Antique silver print photograph in uniform wearing a hat with artillery insignia and plume. This pose is the only known image of Hebert in uniform and is thought to have been taken early in the war while he served as colonel of the 1st Louisiana Artillery. No imprint. 2 3/8 x 3 1/2. Circa early 1900's. Hebert is very scarce to find in an original war date image.       


Antique color lithograph of Union troops storming the Confederate breastworks at the top of Missionary Ridge, Tenn. Caption: The Storming Of Missionary Ridge, November 25, 1863. 10 1/2 x 7 1/8. Sketched by Alex O. Levy. Circa 1912.


WBTS Trivia: The battle of Missionary Ridge was part of the Chattanooga, Tenn. campaign. The victorious Union troops were commanded by General Ulysses S. Grant, while the Confederates were commanded by General Braxton Bragg.  

 


Antique color lithograph showing the fierce battle action at Atlanta, Ga. Caption: Battle Of Atlanta, July 22, 1864. 10 1/2 x 7 1/4. Sketched by Alex O. Levy. Circa 1912.  

 


Antique engraving that has been hand tinted in color showing negro soldiers bringing in captured Confederate cannon. Caption: Hinks's Division Of Negro Infantry Bringing In The Guns Captured From The Confederates At Baylor's Farm, Near Petersburg, Va., June 15th, 1864. From a Sketch by E.F. Mullen. 10 x 9 3/4. From "The Soldier In Our Civil War." Circa 1880's-1890's.


There is another partial illustration on the reverse which is a battle scene that has also been hand tinted in color. Caption: The Battle Of Cold Harbor, Va., June 1st, 1864. The Eighteenth Corps.


Anything related to negro troops in the Civil War is highly desirable and hard to find.

Photograph, General Paul O. Hebert $20.00

 

The Storming of Missionary Ridge

 

The Battle of Atlanta, Georgia

 

Hinks's Division of Negro Infantry Bring




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color letters, "U.S.A." in stars and stripes design at left with a large spread winged eagle in flight carrying an American flag at top center. Light discoloration. Published by Car Bell, Hartford, Conn. with their imprint at the left edge.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  

 


Antique engraving that has been hand tinted in color showing a Union line of battle advancing towards Confederate troops posted behind a rail fence. Caption: First Line Of Rifle Pits. From a Sketch by Edwin Forbes. 10 x 7 1/4. From "The Soldier In Our Civil War." Circa 1880's-1890's.  

 


War Between the States envelope addressed to Mrs. D.S. Stocking, Charleston, S.C., with C.D.S., Richmond, Va., Oct. 17, 1861, and hand stamped Due 5. Endorsed at the upper left, Priv. Jno. D. Munnerlyn, Georgia Hussars, Capt. J.F. Waring. Scarce and very desirable war date cover from the elite "Georgia Hussars."



The Georgia Hussars. Organized 13 February 1736. This troop of Mounted Rangers was raised by General Oglethorpe to patrol and protect the Colony of Georgia from the Spaniards and Indians. It fought at Bloody Marsh in 1742 and at the Siege of Savannah in 1779. Its record during The War 1861-1865 is unsurpassed as was its service in Mexico, World War I, World War II and Korea. It remained Horse Cavalry until October 1940. From Colonial times to Vietnam, Hussars have represented Savannah in all our Wars. It is still an active unit in the Georgia Army National Guard. [Inscription on The Georgia Hussars Marker located in Savannah, Georgia].


During The War Between the States, The Georgia Hussars, raised two companies to fight for the Confederacy; Company A, became Company F of the Jeff Davis Legion, and Company B, served as Company D, 2nd Battalion Georgia Cavalry.


Private John D. Munnerlyn, served in Captain Joseph Frederick Waring's company in the Jeff Davis Legion. Munnerlyn enlisted as a private on September 17, 1861, and served with the unit until being discharged on December 26, 1862, by reason of physical disability.


Captain Joseph Frederick Waring, was born in Savannah, Ga., on February 13, 1832. He graduated from Yale in 1852, studied law, and became a successful planter in Georgia, as well as being an Alderman in Savannah. When the war commenced in 1861, Waring was a Captain in the Georgia Hussars, and he took his company to Richmond, Virginia to report for duty. Originally assigned to the 6th Virginia Cavalry, this assignment did not last long. Captain Waring was seriously wounded in the face on December 4, 1861, near Annandale, Va., when he led a night raid in an attempt to capture a Union picket post. He received a gunshot wound to his right cheek, another bullet grazed his head, and he had a dozen holes shot through his cape and uniform coat, but he managed to survive. A few days later, Waring's company was assigned as Company F, of the Jeff Davis Legion. He was promoted to major in early 1862, and after seeing action in both the Virginia Peninsular campaign and the Maryland campaign, he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel of the Jeff Davis Legion, on December 2, 1862. When Colonel William F. Martin, the original commander of the Legion was promoted to brigadier general, and transferred to the western theatre of the war, Waring was appointed commander of the Jeff Davis Legion. His unit then served in General Wade Hampton's command where Waring led his troops through all of the major cavalry battles of the eastern theater of the war, including Brandy Station, Gettysburg, where he was wounded for the second time, and Trevilian Station. He was promoted to colonel in July 1864, and when General Hampton was ordered to South Carolina in February 1865, the Jeff Davis Legion commanded by Colonel Waring accompanied them south. They participated in the 1865 Carolinas campaign against General William T. Sherman, and Waring and his remaining troops surrendered at Bennett's Place, on April 26, 1865, with the army of General Joseph E. Johnston.              

 




 


  H 8in. X W 36in. X D 19in.

U. S. A. with Eagle and American Flag

 

First Line Of Rifle Pits

 

1861 Confederate Cover From The Elite Ge $150.00

 

H 8in. X W 36in. X D 19in. $0.00

H 8in. x W 36in. x D 19in.  


Antique engraving that has been hand tinted in color showing battle action at Bethesda Church, Virginia. Caption: Bethesda Church, Va., May 30th, 1864. From a Sketch by Edwin Forbes. 10 x 7 1/2. From "The Soldier In Our Civil War." Circa 1880's-1890's.  


Antique color lithograph of the 3rd day's battle at Gettysburg. Caption: Battle Of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. 10 1/2 x 7 1/4. Sketched by Alex O. Levy. Circa 1912.  


Antique color lithograph of the battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia. Caption: Battle Of Fredericksburg, Va. Throwing The Pontoons Across The Rappahannock In The Face Of The Confederate Sharpshooters, Dec. 11, 1862. Sketched by Alex O. Levy. 10 1/2 x 7 1/4. Circa 1912.

H 8in. x W 36in. x D 19in. $0.00

 

Bethesda Church, Va. , May 30, 1864

 

The Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

 

The Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia




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