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By Champ Clark and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1985. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of Confederate General Lewis A. Armistead, waving his hat on the tip of his sword as he spearheads the charge of General George Pickett's division on the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg. Armistead was fatally wounded at the peak of the advance up Cemetery Ridge, known thereafter as the "High Water Mark of the Confederacy." Also has U.S. and C.S. belt plates, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title printed in blue. Title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition. Excellent book on the epic 1863 battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  


<b>With scarce Yankee counter stamp</b>


State of South Carolina, Columbia, June 28, 1861. Vignette of Palmetto tree at center, farmer holding wheat at left, and dog at right. Counter stamped in red at upper center, "Sample of Old Jeff Lucifer's Bonds." This is a really scarce Yankee counter stamp on this early war Confederate South Carolina note. The note was probably captured at the fall of Columbia and stamped as a patriotic collectible. Fine. The note shows circulation with some folds and a very tiny hole at the center where two folds intersect. Bright, attractive note that will display well. Very desirable Confederate note.     


By Ronald H. Bailey and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1984. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with photograph of Confederate dead lying beside an abandoned limber on the Antietam battlefield east of the Dunker Church. The men were killed during the early morning fighting on September 17, 1862, as this position was being defended by the Confederate artillery battalion led by Colonel Stephen D. Lee. Also has U.S. and C.S. belt plates, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title printed in blue. Title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition. Excellent book on the 1862 battle of Antietam, Maryland.  Nice early wick trimmer shears.  Unmarked as to maker, as is most commonly the case in American country made products, these iron trimmers remain in excellent condition and are the style of the 2nd quarter of the 19th century.  A nice companion item for the 1812 through Civil War eras. please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  If you are new to our catalog and wish additional ordering information or just to learn who we are, please check out our home page.  Thanks for visiting our catalog!!

Gettysburg, The Confederate High Tide $35.00

 

1861 Corporation of Columbia, South Caro

 

The Bloodiest Day, The Battle of Antieta $35.00

 

Early iron WICK TRIMMER $45.00

A nice solid Civil War issue percussion cap box, this offering remains solid with <U>sound stitching and no breaks or weak spots</U> in the belt loops or closure tab.  Some age crackling to the surface as you can see but with no flaking, this box is untouched and as found with telltale green verdigris at the rivets and finial.  The box retains its original wool linger. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !



 A nice Civil War vintage crochet cotton misers purse.  Narrow in the middle and closed at both ends, miser's purses ranged in the course of their history from 8 to 10 inches long.  A knitted or crocheted <I>tube</I> with short slit in the narrow midsection to let the carrier drop coins or other small objects into either end of the tube.  The purse was closed by moving the rings, or sliders toward the ends, gathering the fabric snugly around the contents. The <I>toes</I>or ends were usually tasseled, one end was generally square the other rounded.  Frequently categorized by collectors as being exclusively for ladies use, the misers purse was an equally popular personal item of both sexes.  All in excellent original condition, this classic example of period ladies or men’s fare remains solid and suitable for careful use or will fit well in any period accessory or personal item collection.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  A handwritten document ( 7 3/4 X 6 ½ inch. ) executed in Charleston, South Carolina August 24,1861 by <B>Capt. Wm. K. Bachman</B>  as commander of <B> BACHMAN'S Company of GERMAN LIGHT ARTILLERY, HAMPTON'S LEGIONS</B> and bears two signatures of Bachman.  This original Confederate document remains in excellent condition without tears or repairs, and is complete and with two examples of the hard fighting Confederate Commander's signature.   Before the close of the Civil War this battery commander would lead his South Carolina company as Hampton’s Legions left their mark on such battlegrounds as the Seven Days Battles, Second Manassas, South Mountain, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg and at <FONT COLOR=#FF0000 ><I><B> GETTYSBURG</B></I></FONT> where as part of Hood’s Division 1st Corps, Capt. Bachman’s battery fought gallantly firing toward Meade's Union center in support of Pickett and Pettigrew.  A desirable Confederate document with a hard to find autograph.  (see: Confederate Military History, The Official Records, The Confederate Veteran, Time / Life’s – The Civil War, Sifakis’ Compendium of the Confederate Armies and more.) <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  


By Champ Clark and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1987. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with photograph of President Lincoln, U.S. and C.S. belt plates, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title printed in blue. Title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition. Excellent book on the 1865 assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

Civil War - Ordinance Department Inspect $165.00

 

CIVIL WAR era MISER’S PURSE $75.00

 

Hampton's Legions - CONFEDERATE SUBSISTE $225.00

 

The Assassination, Death of the Presiden $35.00




(1824-1881) Graduated in the West Point class of 1847. Mexican War veteran. Serving on the western frontier, he was wounded in a skirmish with Apaches in 1849. He resigned his commission in 1853, invented a breech loading rifle, was appointed a Major General of the Rhode Island State Militia and was elected to Congress as a Democrat. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he organized the 1st Rhode Island Infantry, becoming their Colonel. He was in command of a brigade at 1st Bull Run. Having become a Lincoln favorite, he was given command of the expedition against the coast of North Carolina, fought at Antietam, and in December of 1862 commanded the Army of the Potomac during their bitter defeat at Fredericksburg. Burnside also saw action at Knoxville, the Overland Campaign, and Petersburg. In his post war career he was elected Governor of Rhode Island three times, and later a U. S. Senator.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Very fine view in uniform with rank of major general. No imprint. Light wear and age toning.  


New Orleans, Jan. 1, 1862. Vignette of dog and safe at center, Indian maiden at right. 25 CENTS in red over print at center. VG.  


<b>"The Little Giant"</b>


Civil War patriotic imprint with black mourning borders and illustration of Senator Stephen A. Douglas with quotes below. "Tell them to obey the Laws and support the Constitution." "There are no longer any parties, save these two- Patriots and Traitors." "The slavery question is a mere excuse. The election of Mr. Lincoln is a mere pretext! The present Secession movement is the result of an enormous conspiracy formed more than a year since." Very desirable imprint circa 1861.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.


<u>Stephen A. Douglas:</u> (1813-1861) Known as "The Little Giant," Douglas was an outstanding legislator, and orator, and was one of the founders of the Democratic Party in Illinois. Served as U.S. Senator, 1843-61. He is best known for his debates in 1858 against Abraham Lincoln. He was narrowly defeated for the Democratic nomination for president by Franklin Buchanan in 1856. He did gain the Democratic nomination in 1860, but was defeated for the presidency by his old friend and rival Abraham Lincoln. Upon secession, and the outbreak of the Civil War, he supported Lincoln and his policies. He died of typhoid fever in 1861.  


Grayson Co., Va., June 28, 1862. The County of Grayson Will Pay FIFTEEN CENTS. Very fine. This is one of the scarcest of all Virginia county Civil War date notes to obtain. Very desirable.

CDV General Ambrose E. Burnside $65.00

 

1862 New Orleans 25 Cents Merchant Scrip $50.00

 

United States Senator, Stephen A. Dougla $25.00

 

1862 Grayson County, Virginia 15 Cents N $95.00

Packed away since we acquired them years ago when Maine country attics held a myriad of such 19th century remnants of everyday use, we have uncovered a small lot of earlier through mid 1800s clothes pins and are offering them here <U>priced by the pair</U> for the collector who would like a couple for display.  These antique clothes pins were hand cut from a sapling or small tree branch which was split then bound with a strip of tinned iron to form what must have been a very effective clothes pin.  We have seen this style in years past but like most everyday utilitarian items of the period, they seem to have mostly vanished. With pleasing age and originality, a pair of these original will go well with other period country items or in any grouping of Civil War vintage personal things. <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  This attractive sheet brass embroidery stencil remains in fine original condition untouched and retaining that rich patina that comes to this material only with decades of age.  Hand cut, measuring 8 ¾ X 2 7/8 inches the delicate brass sheet remains in pleasing condition untouched condition and the finely cut patriotic design is without flaws of any kind.  A beautiful piece to lay in with period sewing material or textiles, from the War of 1812 through the Mexican War and Civil War. 

An exceptional piece of Americana! <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>


 Some years ago we acquired a small group of things emanating from the <B>Vincent Mountfort Post 22</B> Department of Maine, Grand Army of the Republic.  A special acquisition to us as this was the Brunswick, Maine based home post of General Joshua L. Chamberlain who commanded the 20th Maine at Gettysburg.  Nestled in among the grouping of remnants of the long defunct G. A. R. Post 22 were the remains of the painted silk post flag which we have maintained in our personal collection.  One of the more charming relics was the large brass cuspidor or <I>spittoon</I> offered here.  One of our favorite GAR relics for years it is now time to make some room and move it along.  Larger than the usually encountered example, this cuspidor measures 11 ¼ inches across the upper rim and stands 8 ¼ inches high and was clearly sized to meet the demands of public gathering.  Offered here just as it came to us with some surface corrosion on its rim and an attractive rich patina over all, both serving as good evidence of period use and age, one can only imagine the stories and war reminisce the old GAR hall spittoon has been exposed to.  (Enter <I>Mountfort</I> in our search feature to see other related material.)  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>


 As seen in the Illinois Lincoln Museum collection this inkwell will beust as at home with goose quill or early steel nib dipping pen, this circa 1700s, early to mid 1800s turned wood inkwell remains in pleasing condition, ready for display.  Measuring 3 7/8 in diameter this classic old inkwell was fashioned with a blown glass ink reservoir which remains sound and ready for use.  Complete with ink staining from period use and remnants of original paint finish over a naturally age patinated surface, this all original writing desk or (with a natural cork stopper in place) <I>traveling </I> inkwell will set well in any period grouping.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!

hand crafted Civil War vintage CLOTHES P $35.00

 

Civil War vintage Patriotic Embroidery S $225.00

 

antique CUSPIDOR from Chamberlain’s home $225.00

 

antique TREEN INKWELL as used by Abraham $95.00




Confederate patriotic cover with vignette of the South Carolina flag with palmetto tree and moon and slogan below, "We Are Seven." Light wear. "Necessity" cover which looks like it was made out of a piece of stationary. Very fine.  Based on the French 1862 fire helmet but with considerable redesign, this fire helmet style was first used by the London Metropolitan Fire Brigade in 1868 the design was quickly adopted by the vast majority of London fire brigades then by nearly all British fire brigades to become an iconic symbol of the later half, 19th century fire fighter.  With good evidence of period use, yet remaining in pleasing original condition with a soft natural age patina and its rarely found original split leather sweat band, this classic fire helmet with its high relief fire breathing dragons and torch crest of crossed fire axes with entwined hose, this impressive brass fire helmet will display well by itself or set in any firefighting collection.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!



 


The Battle of Shiloh, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing, was fought April 6-7, 1862, in southwestern Tennessee. A Union army under Major General Ulysses S. Grant had moved via the Tennessee River deep into Tennessee and was encamped principally at Pittsburg Landing on the west bank of the river. Confederate forces under Generals' Albert Sidney Johnston and P.G.T. Beauregard launched a surprise attack on Grant there. On the first day of the battle, the Confederates struck with the intention of driving the Union defenders away from the river and into the swamps of Owl Creek to the west, hoping to defeat Grant's Army of the Tennessee before the anticipated arrival of Major General Don Carlos Buell's Army of the Ohio. The Confederate battle lines became confused during the fierce fighting, and Grant's men instead fell back to the northeast, in the direction of Pittsburg Landing. A position on a slightly sunken road, nicknamed the "Hornet's Nest," defended by the men of Brigadier Generals' Benjamin M. Prentiss's and W. H. L. Wallace's divisions provided critical time for the rest of the Union line to stabilize under the protection of numerous artillery batteries. The Confederates were forced to retreat form the bloodiest battle in United States history up to that time. 


Handsome 11 x 14 display, double matted, in gray and red, and ready to put in a frame. Includes a small remnant of a captured Confederate flag with white and red cloth visible. A rare relic from the Battle of Shiloh. Comes with COA and copy of the original note found with the flag fragment.  


<b>Published by Alexander Gardner</b>


Libby Prison, established March 26, 1862, was situated on the corner of Cary and 20th streets, on the James River in Richmond, Virginia. The building was the warehouse of Libby and Sons, ship chandlers, before the Civil War. Outside of Andersonville Prison, Libby Prison was perhaps the most notorious Confederate Prison.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. This is a wartime view of the famous Confederate prison originally taken by Rees of Richmond in 1863. Tents, Confederate soldiers and a horse are visible in the foreground. This particular image was published by Alexander Gardner and the card has his imprint on the reverse: Gardner, Corner 7th & D Strs., Washington, D.C. Light age toning and wear. Very scarce.

Confederate Patriotic Cover, South Carol $50.00

 

Antique LONDON FIRE BRIGADE HELMET $425.00

 

Battle of Shiloh Captured Confederate Fl $295.00

 

CDV Libby Prison, Richmond, Virginia $250.00




Includes a 3 3/4 x 3 inch piece of tide water cypress which originated from a beam from Libby Prison. Handsomely displayed within double mat boards of cream and red, and highlighted with two modern copy photographs, and descriptive text. The photo at the top of the display is a Civil War period view showing Libby as a Confederate prison. Captain Turner, the commandant of Libby Prison, is one of the men standing in front of the tents in the foreground. The bottom photograph is a view of the reconstructed interior of Libby Prison as it appeared on display in Chicago in the late 1800's showing the cypress beams. Overall size is 11 x 14. Comes with documentation. Very neat original Civil War relic from one of the war's most infamous prisons! 


Libby Prison, established March 26, 1862, was situated on the corner of Cary and 20th streets, on the James River in Richmond, Virginia. The building was the warehouse of Libby and Sons, ship chandlers, before the Civil War. Outside of Andersonville Prison, Libby Prison was perhaps the most notorious Confederate Prison. 


*Please note that our scan is cropped as the display is too large to fit it in entirely on our scanner. The original display has nice full borders.   


Authentic, original piece of the Confederate battle flag that flew over Fort Morgan, Alabama, when it was captured by Admiral David G. Farragut in 1864. Handsomely displayed within cream and red, double mat board design. Includes a copy vignette of the naval battle of Mobile Bay, in the upper window opening, while the original Confederate battle flag remnant is prominently shown at the center of the display. The following descriptive text highlights the display at the bottom: Confederate Battle Flag of Fort Morgan, Battle of Mobile Bay. The Battle of Mobile Bay was a naval battle fought on August 5, 1864. Commanding the Union forces was Admiral David Farragut, while Admiral Franklin Buchanan led the Confederate fleet. The battle took place off the coast of Alabama, at the mouth of Mobile Bay, which was defended by two Confederate forts, Fort Morgan and Fort Gaines, and by a torpedo field (in modern terms, a minefield) that created a single narrow channel for blockade runners to enter and exit the bay. The biggest challenge for Farragut was entering the bay. With eighteen vessels, he commanded far greater firepower than the Confederate fleet of four. The Union fleet suffered the first major loss when the U.S.S. Tecumseh was critically damaged by an exploding torpedo after it wandered into the field. Within three minutes, the vessel was completely submerged. 94 men went down with the ship. Under fire from both the Confederate fleet and Fort Morgan, Farragut had to choose between retreating or risking the minefield. He then issued his famous order, "Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!" Farragut took his flagship through the minefield safely, followed by the rest of the fleet. When Union fleet reached the bay, they defeated the Confederate flotilla led by the giant ironclad, C.S.S. Tennessee. Buchanan surrendered to Farragut aboard the U.S.S. Hartford. After several weeks of bombardment from land and sea resulting in severe damage to Fort Morgan with the citadel being burned and the walls severely damaged by shot and shells, the Confederate Commander, General Page surrendered Fort Morgan on August 23, 1864 to Federal forces. This flag relic came from a small section of the Confederate flag shot down over Fort Morgan and retrieved by Fleet Surgeon James C. Palmer upon entry into the fort by Union forces and is authenticated by his note (a copy of which is) seen on the accompanying certificate. Included with the display is certificate of authenticity which incorporates a computer copy of Surgeon Palmer's original note which was pinned to the original flag relic. Overall size of the display is 11 x 14. Rare and very desirable Confederate flag relic from this famous fort! Please note that our scan is cropped because the display is larger than our scanner. The original display has nice full borders.  


<b>Third President of the United States</b>


(1743-1826) Among the many highlights of "Founding Father" Thomas Jefferson's political career were; principal author of the Declaration of Independence, a representative of Virginia in the Continental Congress, 2nd Governor of Virginia, United States Minister to France, 2nd Vice President of the United States, and 3rd President of the United States.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view portrait. No imprint. Very fine, and a desirable card of one of our "Founding Fathers."  


<b>First President of the United States


1862 Civil War dated card</b>


(1732-99) "The Father of Our Country." George Washington was the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, and served as the first president of the United States.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 1/4 card. Bust view portrait. Backmark: Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1862, by David Nichols, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court, of the District of Massachusetts. Printed legend on the reverse: "G. Washington. This was done in New York 1790 and is acknowledged by all to be a very strong likeness. B. Goodhue." Some surface scratching to the front of the card none of which touch the subject. Light age toning. Uncommon to find with this 1862 imprint. Very desirable. No doubt some proud American, North or South, displayed this image of George Washington in a parlor album or possibly on a mantle in plain view to show their patriotism!

Libby Prison Display $125.00

 

Fort Morgan, Alabama, Confederate Battle $295.00

 

CDV President Thomas Jefferson $15.00

 

CDV General George Washington $20.00

A bit late for the Civil War collector but of special interest to the early post war Western frontier, Americana and Indian Wars era enthusiast, will be this attractive <B>GOODELL’S</B><I>Star Butcher</B> marked knife.  Included with the knife is its period hand crafted heavy leather sheath attesting to the popular period use of the stout bladed style <I>butcher</I> as a belt or boot knife.  Measuring 10 5/8 inches in total length, the 5 7/8 inch blade retains its maker marking though the <I>Pat.1868</I> marking one usually sees on these blades is not visible.  The blade shows good evidence of age, period use and honing yet is in overall pleasing condition with no dings or chips in the edge.  The cocobolo grip with its heavy pewter bolster and decorative acorn and star inlay offers good evidence of age yet remains in excellent condition with no dings, splits or other condition issues.    

     As an aside the Goodell Co. was founded by David Goodell a New Hampshire native who patented a host of gadgets including apple slices and corers, cherry pitters, cutlery and a machine to aid farmers in planting seeds. His first and likely best known invention (c. 1864), was an apple peeler he called the <I>Lightning.</I> <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

 Illustrated here with a U.S. quarter for size comparison, this neat little period pewter whistle remains in excellent working condition with no flaws or repairs, just natural age patina that comes to this material with decades of age.  Difficult to find nowadays, Civil War site digger/historians have well documented examples of the period style and material. Will lay in well in any period personal grouping. (see: <I>Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War</I> by Phillips)  As with all direct sales, we are pleased to offer a no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased! Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !    With lots of charm that comes to an antique pipe only with good evidence of the rigors of period use and carrying, this old gutta-percha tobacco pipe bears the figure of George Washington and offers the historic appeal of personalization by its owner.  With a hand cut cross on one side panel and the initials <B>C W D</B> carved into the other, this old Washington pipe clearly was a favorite of C.W.D’s who carried it and smoked it with a vengeance as testified to by its period <I>make do</I> string repair and reed stem in combination with the sound but well used condition of the gutta-percha bowel.  An attractive piece of antique Americana.  please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!


 Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison, this commercially prepared ink well remains in pleasing original condition.  Fashioned from soldered sheet iron around a plaster encased glass bottle with a natural cork stopper, the piece retains its period label on the bottom.  Couldn’t make it show in the illustrations but under proper light the print <I> Improved Non-Conducting Metallic Ink - Patent ??</I>.

Will go well with a period quill, dipping pen or  traveling writing desk. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

Goodell’s Pat. 1868 ‘Star Butcher’ BELT $125.00

 

Civil War vintage PEWTER WHISTLE $55.00

 

well smoked antique - gutta-percha Georg $75.00

 

earlier to mid 1800’s Ink Well $65.00




Austin, June 26, 1862. Vignette of a large sailing ship at left. "TEN DOLLARS" in red over print at center. Red lace network background. Choice uncirculated condition. Bright and attractive note that is scarce to find in this condition.  


8 pages. Front page illustration of Brigadier-General Michael Corcoran. Arrival of General Corcoran. His Reception in Philadelphia. One Continued Ovation From Washington to This City. Full Account of Incidents on the Route. Speeches, etc., etc. The Latest News. Affairs at the Federal Capital. Important Southern News. List of Union Citizens in Prison at Salisbury, N.C. Their Arrest and Confinement by the Rebels for Loyalty to the United States. [Long List of these citizens by name and their respective states of residence]. The War in Missouri. Retreat of the Rebels. Union Troops in Hot Pursuit. Movements of the Rebel Col. Coffey. Guerrilla Band Broken up at Montevallo. Rebel Rout Near Forsythe. Major Hubbard Surrounded at Newtonia. Union Convention at New Jersey. New Jersey Politics. Marcus L. Ward of Essex Co. Nominated for Governor of New Jersey. The War in the West. News From General Curtis' Army. Capture of Clarksburg. The Coming Draft. General Lew Wallace. Latest News From the South. The Fight at Cedar Run. Dash Into Front Royal. Official Dispatch of Stonewall Jackson. McClellan Evacuating Harrison's Landing. A Tennessee Soldier Shot by the Rebels. Interesting Letter From a National Officer; a Prisoner of War, and much more war news. Repair in the upper left margin with some light staining, edge chipping with some paper loss, and the folds and edge tears have been repaired with archival tape. This 1862 Philadelphia newspaper with its very desirable front page woodcut engraving of General Michael Corcoran, [the engraving itself is in very nice condition] commander of "Corcoran's Irish Legion," who died in 1863, would easily sell for $75.00 if it were in excellent condition. I have priced it very fairly.     


8 pages. Important From New Orleans. Capture of Alexandria by Admiral Porter. General Banks' Forces in Possession. Previous Bombardment and Capture of Fort De Russy. The Great Cavalry Raid Through Mississippi. Safe Arrival of Col. Grierson's Command at Baton Rouge. Detailed Account of Their Exploits. Immense and Irreparable Damage Inflicted Upon the Enemy. Only One of Our Men Killed and Six Wounded. Proposed Organization of a Corps D'Afrique by Gen. Banks. The Great Raid in Mississippi. A Detailed Narrative of the Exploits of Our Cavalry. Wonderful Cavalry Exploit. Important From General Grant. The Rebels Report That he Has Captured Jackson, Miss. The Cavalry Raid in Virginia. Operations by the Force Under Command of Lieut. Col. Davis. From the Army of the Potomac. Visit of Senators Wade and Chandler to Falmouth, and much more. Nice 1863 issue with exciting news of Colonel Benjamin H. Grierson's cavalry raid.  <b>of the Gulf to be Paid</b>


5 x 7 3/4, imprint.


Headquarters Department of the Gulf

New Orleans, August 27, 1862


General Orders No. 65


Commanders of Brigades in this Department will have their respective commands mustered for pay on the last day of this month.


By command of

MAJOR-GENERAL BUTLER


WM. H. WEIGEL, 1st Lieut. And A.A.A.G.


Excellent. Scarce Department of the Gulf imprint.

1862 State of Texas $10 Treasury Warrant

 

The Philadelphia Inquirer, August 22, 18

 

The New York Times, New York, May 18, 18 $35.00

 

General Ben Butler Orders Soldiers in th $15.00




8 pages. IMPORTANT REBEL NEWS. Progress of the Siege of Charleston. Cummings Point Severely Bombarded by the Ironsides and Two Monitors. Fort Sumter and Two Rebel Batteries Engaged. A Counter Bombardment of Our Works on Morris Island. The Expedition in North Carolina. The War in Tennessee. An Expedition Into the Enemy's Country. The War in Indian Territory. Movements of the Blockade Runners. Arrival of the Florida. Quarrelling Over a Wrecked Rebel Prize. The Doings of the Rebel Pirates. The Law of the Blockade. Liability of Vessels Proceeding to Neutral Ports to Load for Blockaded Ports. Opinion of the Attorney General. Ship Building for the Rebels. Views of a Southern Paper on the Negro Question. The Negroes and Colonization. The Metropolitan Police. Their Services During the Riot Week. Their Honorable Record, and more news. Age toning and light wear.     


8 pages. IMPORTANT FROM WASHINGTON. The Harper's Ferry Investigation. Stampede of Abolition Witnesses. Army Intelligence. Bill to Prevent Invasion. The Mississippi Commission to Virginia. Supreme Court of the United States. Proceedings of the Louisiana House of Representatives and the Senate. Detection of Counterfeiters. Valuable Slaves at Auction. Choice Plantation Slaves For Sale. Sale of Real Estate and Slaves. Runaway Slave Ads, and much more. Typical light wear and age toning. This New Orleans newspaper was issued less than two months after the hanging of John Brown for his Harper's Ferry Raid, and less than 15 months before the commencement of the War Between the States.  


WBTS Trivia: The Harper's Ferry Raid, led by the abolitionist John Brown,  took place October 16-18, 1859. Brown was tried for murder, conspiring with slaves to rebel, and treason, at the old Court House in Charles Town, Va. Found guilty on all charges, he was hung at Charles Town on December 2, 1859.  


To Lieutenant Charles W. Broadfoot, from his mother.


4 pages, 6 5/8 x 8, in ink. 


May 14th [1863]


My Dear Son,


I received your letter about an hour since, your father having received one a few days ago.  Your letters were always a pleasure but now doubly so.  You do not seem to get mine very well for I have been right particular in writing.  I did not mean to draw such a picture of high prices as to make you gloomy, but I always write just as things are & you must not deprive yourself of any of the comforts you need to send means home.  Your Father does not yet know what his Gov’t Depository [job]* will be worth, but he is very bright & cheerful tho kept right busily employed.  The press of work will soon be over.  He is now cancelling notes.  The price of provisions has come down some.  I wish you could be with us now.  Uncle Will is here with his bride.  It is convention or rather council time tho there are so few delegates that there is some doubt whether there will be any convention.  Uncle George & Grandma are in Raleigh.  The former will come down tomorrow if he can get a seat in the stage.  For fear he should not, he sent his trunk down to me containing 3 hams, a peck of wheat (for coffee) 2 bottles homemade syrup- shoes, leather, thread, pins & linen coats.  He is indefatigable in his efforts to serve us.  I am quite anxious to see him.  Grandma will make a visit to Raleigh & sends word if we do not, some of us, go for her with gentle horses she will go back to Rowan.  She prefers riding in the cars to George’s horse & buggy.  I am trying to entertain Will & his wife in comfortable style.  We have some vegetables & plenty of strawberries, some cake, today I had a present, some new fresh butter from Mrs. Tom Hall & Mrs. Worth sent me some fresh meat so it is not like hard times here & the children are enjoying it.  We are all much pleased with our sister Mary.  She is just the wife for a poor clergyman & Uncle Will is very poor & needs a wife.  She is very plain looking but improves on acquaintance.  You will have learned by this time that there was no attack on Newbern & the one on Washington was abandoned.  I have received several letters from George** in the last fortnight also your gun & his flannel shirts & understand he has sent a blanket home.  His Regt. has been sent to Va.  There are a good many of his company here & it is gratifying to know that they all speak well of him.  He was one of 5 or 6 that got an old mule & young horse while on a scout.  [The] Government will buy the mule, [and] his horses back.  I spent the last money G[eorge] sent me for sugar & tho I have used a good deal of it have kept some to make wine.  I do not object to the smuggling if it is necessary for army supplies, but I hope it is not for ladies adornment at all.  Laura Ann was up to see us today.  She has heard from Jo who is all safe, only one man in his company wounded, 10 made prisoners.  I am glad you visit the ladies.  I know you can enjoy their company without being as susceptible as John & Theo.  We hear here that the Gen. is going to marry a widow Wright.  He deserves a good wife & if he wants to I hope will get one. W. Geer is staying with Aunt E- he has doubled in size almost since he was here before & I tell you what if he should stay long the horse & rockaway would give out.  William is still with James but I think is a little homesick tho he is enjoying fishing.  May is teething & today a little feverish which makes her right frightful.  You will say she was always so.  Andrew’s collar bone is well tho still quite a knot on it which will be absolved after a while.  Aunty’s family are all well except George’s wife who is still in bed under the Dr’s hands.  Mr. Watson gave us a first rate sermon today.  I got a ride down, cannot undertake to walk much.  The rest have gone down tonight & do not know that I am writing.  Frank will only be too glad to write.  I sent Peter Hale a mess of asparagus on your account.  Good night & God bless you. 


Very fine letter with some nice military content.


The recipient of this letter, Charles W. Broadfoot, was an 18 year old student when he enlisted as a private on July 15, 1861, and was mustered into Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He was mustered out of this regiment on November 12, 1861. He then served in Company D, 43rd North Carolina Infantry, and was discharged for promotion on September 7, 1862, being commissioned 1st Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp, on the staff of General Theophilus H. Holmes. On July 1, 1864, he was commissioned into the Field & Staff of the 1st North Carolina Reserve Infantry, with rank of lieutenant colonel and colonel. His date and method of discharge are unknown.    


*The father of Charles and George Broadfoot was W.G. Broadfoot, a Confederate official in the C.S.A. Depository at Fayetteville, North Carolina.


**The George that Mrs. Broadfoot is referring to in her letter was George B. Broadfoot, her other son in the Confederate army, and the brother of Charles. George was a 17 year old student when he enlisted on June 19, 1862, and was mustered into the Confederate army as a private in Company A, 5th North Carolina Cavalry. He was transferred out of this regiment on May 4, 1864, and was mustered into Company B, 13th Battalion North Carolina Light Artillery. He was paroled on April 29, 1865 at Greensboro, N.C.  


Unabridged reprint of the 1866 edition. Published by Dover Publications, Inc., New York. 100 photographs, all original size, with lengthy descriptive text for each photo, also includes an index. Introduction by E.F. Bleiler. Paperback, 10 5/8 x 8 1/4. New condition. A must have book for every Civil War photograph collector and library.


Second only to Mathew Brady as the foremost early American photographer was Alexander Gardner, the one time manager of Brady's Washington salon and Brady's chief photographer in the field during the early days of the Civil War. Indeed, Gardner- who later photographed the War independently- often managed the famous horse-drawn photographic laboratory and took many of the pictures that used to be attributed to Brady. He accompanied the Union troops on their marches, their camps and bivouacs, their battles, and on their many hasty retreats and routs during the early days of the War.


In 1866 Alexander Gardner published a very ambitious two volume work which contained prints of some 100 photographs which he had taken in the field. A list of them reads like a roster of great events and great men; Antietam Bridge under Travel, President Lincoln and General McClellan at Antietam, Pinkerton and His Agents in the Field, Ruins of Richmond, Libby Prison, McLean's House Where Lee's Surrender Was Signed, Meade's Headquarters at Gettysburg, Battery D, Second U.S. Artillery in Action at Fredericksburg, the Slaughter Pen at Gettysburg, and many others. This publication is now among the rarest American books, and is here for the first time republished inexpensively.


Gardner's photographs are among the greatest war pictures ever taken and are also among the most prized records of American history. Gardner was quite conscious of recording history, and spared himself no pains or risk to achieve the finest results. His work indicates a technical mastery that now seems incredible when one bears in mind the vicissitudes of collodion applications in the field, wet plates, long exposures, long drying times, imperfect chemicals- plus enemy bullets around the photographer's ears. It has been said of these photographs; photography today, one hundred years later, is far easier, but it is no better.

The New York Times, August 4, 1863 $25.00

 

The Daily True Delta, New Orleans, Louis $35.00

 

Letter to a North Carolina Officer in th

 

Gardner's Photographic Sketch Book Of Th $25.00




<b>With blind stamp imprint of Cook [Charleston, South Carolina]</b>


(1832-1913) The 29 year old Prince de Polignac came to the Confederacy with a distinguished record in the Crimean War, and was named Lieutenant Colonel and Chief of Staff to General P.G.T. Beauregard on July 16, 1861. After fighting at Corinth, he was named brigadier general on January 10, 1863 and served under General Richard Taylor in the Red River campaign of 1864. Put in command of a Texas Brigade, he met with disapproval, hostility and the nickname, "Polecat." He soon won their respect and admiration as a combat leader moving up to division command at Sabine Cross Roads, and on June 13, 1864 was appointed major general. About 6 foot 4 inches tall, and thin, he was a gallant and talented soldier as well as one of the war's most romantic figures. His statue is on the Sabine Cross Roads battlefield.


Antique photograph, 7 3/4 x 9 7/8. Chest up portrait in uniform with 3 stars on his collar and wearing kepi. Blind stamp imprint of "Cook" [Charleston, South Carolina] at bottom right corner. Circa early 1900's silver print. Excellent portrait. Scarce.  

 


<b>Plus Reward Imprint


STOLEN! One Bright Bay Horse- A reward of $25 will be given for the capture of the man or horse!</b>


Formed in 1863, in Luray and Millport, Missouri. Shortly after the commencement of the Civil War, lawless men in the border states- that is the states lying between the loyal and seceded states- banded themselves together for the purpose of plundering honest citizens. Missouri especially was subject to the depredations of these gangs, and in time the conditions became so bad that the law-abiding people found it necessary to take some action for defense. The first organization of this character was proposed at a meeting held at Luray, Mo., in September, 1863. At a second meeting held at Millport, Mo., about a month later, a constitution and by-laws were adopted, and as horses seemed to be the principal objects of theft, the society took the name of the "Anti-Horse Thief Association." The effectiveness of such an organization quickly became apparent, the order spread to other states, and in time covered a large expanse of territory. After the war was over, when the conditions that called the association into existence no longer existed, its scope was widened to include all kinds of thefts and a national organization was incorporated under the laws of Kansas. This national order is composed of officers and delegates from the state associations and meets annually on the first Wednesday in October. Next in importance is the state division, which is made up of representatives of the local organizations, and meets annually to elect officers and delegates to the national order. The sub-orders or local associations are composed of individual members and usually meet monthly.


Wall and McCarty, in their history of the association, say, "The A.H.T.A. uses only strictly honorable, legal methods. It opposes lawlessness in any and all forms, yet does its work so systematically and efficiently that few criminals are able to escape when it takes the trail...The centralization of "Many in One" has many advantages not possessed by even an independent association, for while it might encompass a neighborhood, the A.T.H.A. covers many states...The value of an article stolen is rarely taken into consideration. The order decrees that the laws of the land must be obeyed; though it costs many times the value of the property to capture the thief. An individual could not spend $50 to $100 to recover a $25 horse and capture the thief. The A.T.H.A. would, because of the effect it would have in the future...Thieves have learned these facts and do less stealing from our members, hence the preventative protection."  Thieves thought twice!


This lot includes the following two items:


1: 4 x 5 3/4, string-bound imprint, 12 pages. Constitution of the State Grand Orders of the Anti-Horse Thief Association. Articles include- Name and Jurisdiction; Sessions and Locations; Officers and Elections; Duties of Officers; Offences; Revenue; Charters; Obligation; Fees For Services; Officers' Salaries; Standing Committees; Black Book; Description of Stock; the Constitution of Subordinate Orders; the By-Laws, and much more. Light age toning and wear. 


#2: 5 1/8 x 3, imprinted card. STOLEN! July 7, 1887. One Bright Bay Horse, eight years old, fifteen hands high, black mane and tail (hair thin in both), one white hind foot. The thief is a man about thirty-four years old, 5 feet, ten or eleven inches high, heavy black moustache and chin whiskers, rather fair skin, large round dark eyes, and black hair, high forehead, small bald spot on back of head, weighs about 180 to 190 pounds, and wore a black suit of cloth clothes somewhat worn, and a light straw hat. A reward of $25 will be given for the capture of the man or horse. Address all information to J.B. ELLIS, Altomont, Kansas. The card was mailed to a person in Kansas as is evident by the address on the reverse. Imprinted Thomas Jefferson one cent postage stamp and C.D.S., Osage Mission, Kan., Jul. 12. Light wear and staining.


Very interesting, desirable, and uncommon 19th century Anti-Horse Thief imprints.    


A strand of General Robert E. Lee's hair in a very handsome historical display. The hair's provenance came from a small lock given to Laura Thomas on April 19th, 1869, by General Lee himself [a copy of the note is provided in the certificate of authenticity] and was separated by noted antiquarian Charles Hamilton in 1992. This 8 x 10 display includes a copy photograph of Lee in his Confederate uniform taken by Mathew Brady, at Lee's East Franklin Street home, in Richmond, Va., in 1865. The strand of hair is housed within a small magnified box for better viewing. The custom matting was done with an attractive scarlet suede outer mat, and gold Florentine trim. Comes shrink wrapped and ready to display in a frame of your choice.  


Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1997. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 167 pages, illustrated, index. Some thin scratches to the back of the dust jacket. The book itself is in brand new condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who experienced the Battle of Chickamauga. Through their words and images you can relieve the emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the human comedy- of the Civil War's bloodiest two days. Thus you hold in your hands an album of personal recollections from letters, diaries, photographs, sketches, and artifacts.


To compile this special volume, we combed hundreds of sources, both published and unpublished.  We had invaluable help from an extensive network of consultants. Using our own diverse resources and historical materials in libraries and archives around the United States, we were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives: manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories and privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of these soldiers and townsfolk to accompany their personal accounts.


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail systems set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. Private William J. Oliphant of the 6th Texas Infantry remembered the horror of fighting at night at Chickamauga; "It was now quite dark but just ahead of us was a brilliant light. A field was burning and we were ordered to charge through it...The fence was on fire and the tall dead trees in the field were blazing high in the air. Dead and wounded men were lying there in great danger of being consumed." 


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the army to depict events for readers. These correspondents drew virtually everything of possible interest: battles, lounging soldiers, the odd piece of equipment. Sketches dashed off in a few minutes during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication, where they were transformed into woodblock engravings suitable for printing. 


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the fledgling craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and equipment and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are well chronicled, thanks to the efforts of men who endured great hardship. Photographers like Mathew Brady and his assistants spent months following the army, etching with light the brave faces of the soldiers, as well as the bodies stiffened on the field. When Brady's stark photographs of the dead were first exhibited in New York City in 1862, the public thought, albeit briefly, that such horrific images could actually bring the war to an end. 


So here you find living testimony from the battlefield of Chickamauga. As you look into the eyes of these soldiers and civilians, as you read the words of those dazed by the violence around them or by the grief that follows the fighting, perhaps it will be possible to perceive more clearly the shattering experience that was Chickamauga. 


Cover Photograph: Lee and Gordon's Mills, about 12 miles south of Chattanooga, was the scene of some of the early skirmishes that started the two day Battle of Chickamauga. 


Cover quotation: "We must drop a soldier's tear upon the graves of the noble men who have fallen by our sides." General Braxton Bragg.

Photograph General Camille Armand Jules $35.00

 

Anti-Horse Thief Association Constitutio $75.00

 

General Robert E. Lee Hair Display $325.00

 

Voices of the Civil War, Chickamauga $35.00




<b>Fought in the War of 1812


Fought in the Mexican War in a Kentucky Cavalry Brigade and was captured in 1847


United States Congressman from Kentucky


Governor of Oregon</b>


(1795-1857) Born in Augusta, Va. (now West Virginia), he moved to Boone County, Ky., studied law, was admitted to the bar, and practiced in Walton, Ky. He was a member of the Kentucky State House of Representatives for many years. Fought in the Mexican War as a major in the cavalry brigade of General Thomas Marshall. He also served as aide-de-camp to General Winfield Scott. He was captured at Incarnacion in January 1847, and spent several months as a prisoner in Mexico City. He served as U.S. Congressman, 1847-49, and was the Governor of Oregon, 1850-53.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 4 1/4 x 1, in ink, Jno. P. Gaines, Kent[uck]y.    


<b>United States Congressman from Kentucky</b>


(1792-1854) Born near Boonesborough, Madison County, Ky., he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1820, and practiced in Winchester, Ky. Served as a member of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1820-26. Was Judge of the Circuit Court in 1829. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1835-37, 1843-45 and 1847-49.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 6 1/8 x 1 1/2, in ink, Richard French, Mount Sterling, Ky.  


To Lieutenant Charles W. Broadfoot of North Carolina</b>


4 pages, 4 3/4 x 7 1/4, in ink, written by Lieutenant Broadfoot's mother. Comes with the original envelope which is addressed to Lieut. Gen. T.H. Holmes, Little Rock, Arkansas, for Lieut. C.W. Broadfoot. The postage stamp has been cut off.


For Lieut. C.W. Broadfoot


June 2d [1863]


My Dear Son,


I received your letter last evening & feel quite put out that you have received none of my letters.  I have written regularly & for the future will direct them to Gen. [Theophilus H.] Holmes, heretofore they have been directed to his care. At the same time your letter came, one from George* & one from Grandma [came].  George was at Culpepper C.[ourt] H.[ouse], Va. where all the cavalry had collected & expected to leave in a very short time for a raid in Pa.**  He writes in good health & spirits, begs me not to be uneasy (which I can’t help being).  He had seen Joe Baker which was some relief to me.  George’s horse is in very good condition & in a fine grazing country so he will not suffer as I supposed he did.  Our army is I believe no longer on short rations & I hope they will not be again.  There is plenty of provisions in the country & prices are falling some.  You must not get uneasy about us.  You can judge by the paper pretty well how things are with us generally.  Grandma is still in Raleigh & not yet ready to come home.  She mentions you in all her letters.  I had an old ladies dinner company on Saturday.  Aunty, cousin M. Hooper, Miss Sally Mallett & Aunt E- Aunty brought Mrs. Pipkin with her.  She was a Miss Colton, sister to James & Henry Colton.  I was very glad to see her as her mother used to be a kind neighbor to me when you were quite small.  Laura Ann came up yesterday & staid until this morning & tomorrow evening I am to have a family tea drinking for George Baker & his wife.  He has come down to see her but she is not able to travel yet.  You will think we are entertaining a good deal of company.  It is so once in a while & I believe I am glad to have an excuse to make a little cake or dessert for your Father*** enjoys anything of the sort more than ever.  Willie is still with James Baker in Bladen but I am expecting him home soon.  I hear of a good many weddings but none among your acquaintances.  I wrote you that Florrie was thought to be engaged to Dr. S- but she is not & I understand she looked rather favorably on Jarvis.  She is quite attentive to Fanny since his death.  The children all want me to write to you for them & I will do so before long.  I hope we will send them to school this fall.  Tom is quite fond of reading & promises to be something of a book worm.  May is just the sweetest thing in the world.  I try to think with you that the war will not last long.  If I thought with some that it was to be for years, I could not stand it.  I trust the climate of Ark.[ansas] will agree with you & that you will escape chills this spring.  How I wish I could send you a box.  Well one of these days I trust you & George will both be home together & such a great time we will have.  I see the girls right often.  I had had a beautiful homespun dress worn for myself & have been fortunate in purchases for the boys.  Your letters are treasures.


Your aff. Mother


Very fine condition. Well written letter with excellent content.


*The George that Mrs. Broadfoot is referring to in her letter was George B. Broadfoot, her other son in the Confederate army, and the brother of Charles. George was a 17 year old student when he enlisted on June 19, 1862, and was mustered into the Confederate army as a private in Company A, 5th North Carolina Cavalry. He was transferred out of this regiment on May 4, 1864, and was mustered into Company B, 13th Battalion North Carolina Light Artillery. He was paroled on April 29, 1865 at Greensboro, N.C.


**At the time this letter was written, in early June [1863], the 5th North Carolina Cavalry served in the brigade of General Beverly H. Robertson, in General J.E.B. Stuart's Cavalry, Army of Northern Virginia. Stationed at Culpeper Court House, Virginia, they were preparing for their invasion of the North which resulted in the epic Gettysburg campaign.


***The father of Charles and George Broadfoot was W.G. Broadfoot, a Confederate official in the C.S.A. Depository at Fayetteville, North Carolina. 


The recipient of this letter, Charles W. Broadfoot, was an 18 year old student when he enlisted as a private on July 15, 1861, and was mustered into Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He was mustered out of this regiment on November 12, 1861. He then served in Company D, 43rd North Carolina Infantry, and was discharged for promotion on September 7, 1862, being commissioned 1st Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp, on the staff of General Theophilus H. Holmes. On July 1, 1864, he was commissioned into the Field & Staff of the 1st North Carolina Reserve Infantry, with rank of lieutenant colonel and colonel. His date and method of discharge are unknown.    


    

 


<b>U.S. Congressman & Senator from Ohio


Governor of Ohio


U.S. Secretary of the Treasury


U.S. Minister to Mexico during the War Between The States</b>


(1794-1865) Studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1817, and practiced in Lebanon, Ohio. Served as a member of the Ohio State House, 1822-23, 1829; U.S. Congressman, 1831-40; Governor of Ohio, 1840-42; U.S. Senator, 1845-50; appointed Secretary of the Treasury, by President Millard Fillmore, serving 1850-53; U.S. Congressman, 1850-61; appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as Minister to Mexico, serving 1861-64.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/4 x 1, in ink, Thos. Corwin.

Autograph, John P. Gaines $35.00

 

Autograph, Richard French

 

Letter to Aide-de-Camp of Confederate Ge

 

Autograph, Thomas Corwin $25.00




<b>Fought in the War of 1812 as a lieutenant in the 13th Kentucky Infantry


United States Congressman and Senator from Kentucky


Member of the Kentucky State House of Representatives during the Civil War</b>


Born in Goochland County, Va., he graduated from Transylvania College, in Lexington, Ky., in 1811, studied law, was admitted to the bar, and practiced in Glasgow, Ky. He fought in the War of 1812 as a lieutenant in the 13th Regiment Kentucky Infantry. Served as a member of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1816-19, and 1825-26. He was Judge of the Kentucky Court of Appeals, from 1828-35. Served as a U.S. Congressman, 1835-43. Was Chairman of the Committee on the District of Columbia. Served as a Presidential elector on the Whig ticket in 1844. He returned to the Kentucky State House serving as a representative in 1846, also holding the position of Speaker of the House. He was a U.S. Senator from 1847-53. Once again he returned to Kentucky where he served as a member of their State House of Representatives during the Civil War years of 1861-62-63. Afterwards he returned to his law practice while also engaging himself in agricultural endeavors. He died near Bowling Green, Ky., on August 23, 1876, and is interred in Fairview Cemetery, in Bowling Green.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 6 1/2 x 2 1/4, in ink, J.R. Underwood, Bowling Green, Ky.  


<b>United States Congressman from Kentucky


Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives</b>


(1800-59) Born in Nashville, Tenn., he moved with his parents to Trigg County, Ky., where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits. He served as a member of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1827-32. Was a U.S. Congressman, from 1835-37, and 1839-55, serving as Speaker of the House for the 32nd and 33rd Congresses. Served as Chairman, of the Committee on Accounts, and he also served on the Committee on Territories. He was elected Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky in 1859, but was too ill to serve and died in Paducah, on December 17, 1859.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 3/4 x 1 3/8, in ink, Linn Boyd, Trigg Co., Ky. Light age toning.    


5 x 7 3/4, imprint


Headquarters Department of the Gulf

New Orleans, Sept. 10, 1862


General Orders No. 68


From and after this date, all applications for discharged soldiers, or furloughs for soldiers or officers, or resignations of officers, will be forwarded to the Medical Director, Dr. Chas. McCormick.


By command of

MAJOR-GENERAL BUTLER


R.S. DAVIS, Capt. And A.A.A.G.


Scarce Department of the Gulf imprint. Excellent.  <b>Society of the Nineteenth Army Corps</b>


St. Denis Hotel, October 20, 1906. 4 pages printed on extremely thick card stock. 7 x 9 1/2. Tied together by red, white and blue ribbon. Photograph of General Nathaniel P. Banks on the front cover with the following caption: As He Was In 1862. Our First Commander. Major-General Nathaniel Prentiss Banks. Died September 1, 1894. Photographed by Mr. Brady, New York City. Page 2: 1864-1906. Twentieth Annual Meeting And Dinner. Society of the Nineteenth Army Corps. St. Denis Hotel. Cor. Of Broadway And Eleventh St., New York City. Saturday Evening, the 20th day of October, 1906, at 8 o'clock sharp. Forty-second anniversary of the Battle of Cedar Creek, Va., October 19, 1864. Illustration of flag. Lists the various officers of the society for 1906, the Reception Committee, the Floor Committee, and the Committee of Arrangements listing them with their names, rank and positions.  Page 3: Includes the Menu, Grace by Rev. Joshua Kimber, Music by Professor Edwin D. Lewis, No. 54 Gardner Avenue, Jersey City Heights, New Jersey, and the program will close with "Auld Lang Syne" and a Hope to meet again in 1907. The back cover has a photograph of General Philip H. Sheridan with the following caption: As He Was in 1864. Our Second Commander. Major-General Philip Henry Sheridan. Appointed Lieutenant-General U.S. Army, March 4, 1869; appointed General June 6, 1888; died August 5, 1888. Photographed by Mr. Brady, New York City. There is a small chip at the lower edge of the front cover with some paper loss. This is in a border area so it does not affect any of the content on any of the pages. There is also a one inch edge tear just below this paper chip. It does not touch upon any of the content. Otherwise the program is very clean and bright. Desirable 1906 Nineteenth Army Corps program.

Autograph, Joseph R. Underwood $25.00

 

Autograph, Linn Boyd $20.00

 

1862 Special Orders From General Butler, $15.00

 

1906 Program Twentieth Annual Meeting An $25.00

<b>Stores, New Orleans</b>


7 3/4 x 9 3/4, in ink, signed by Captain Andrew Jackson McCoy.


Office Chief C.S.

New Orleans, Jany. 27, 1864


Captain Jacob Mahler,

A.Q.M.


The barque Hazeltine failed to deliver and should be charged of her Commissary Stores as follows:


36 lbs. soap 8 1/4 [$]2.97

5 [lbs] candles 23 1/2 [$] 1.18

$4.15


Very resply.,

Your obt. Servt.

A.J. McCoy

Capt & C.S.


Very fine.


Andrew Jackson McCoy, who signed this document, was a resident of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, when he enlisted on June 3, 1861, as a 1st lieutenant, and was commissioned into the Field and Staff of the 4th Wisconsin Cavalry. He was discharged for promotion on May 20, 1863, and commissioned captain, U.S. Vols. Commissary Dept. He was promoted to the ranks of brevet major, lieutenant colonel and colonel, on March 13, 1865. He was mustered out of the service on August 3, 1865.


Jacob Mahler, the recipient of this letter, enlisted on July 21, 1862, as a captain, and was commissioned assistant quartermaster, in the U.S. Vols. Q.M. Dept. He was mustered out of service on June 29, 1865.



 


16 x 9 3/4, two sided, imprinted form, filled out in ink. Return of Captain Chas. W. Boothby, Company D of the First Regiment of New Orleans Vols., Army of the United States, Colonel C.W. Kilborn, for the month of April 1864. Gives an itemized account of the soldiers present and absent for duty. Also includes the names of three enlisted men who are on extra duty, two who are absent without leave and one who is in the hospital. The reverse of the document lists the names and rank of two officers, one who is serving as post adjutant by Special Orders No. 21, and another who is on recruitment service for the regiment. Signed by H.F. Hatch, 2d Lt., 1st N.O. Vols., Commanding the Company. Station: New Orleans. Date: April 30th, 1864. Light age toning and wear. Very fine. Uncommon New Orleans Civil War unit.


WBTS Trivia: The 1st Regiment New Orleans Infantry Volunteers were organized at New Orleans, Louisiana, and served from 1864-66. Attached to the Department of the Gulf, they were part of the garrison that defended the city of New Orleans and the District of La Fourche.  


U.C.V. Reunion, Memphis, Tenn., June 8-9-10th, 1909. 25 pages, 4 x 9, several illustrations, and with multiple maps. Issued by the Rock Island-Frisco Lines and Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad.  Includes numerous photos of historic locations in Memphis, a map of Memphis, Tenn., and a partial map of the United States showing the various rail lines of the above named roads. Well worn with edge chipping and small edge tears, and some scattered paper lift off including on the covers. The pages are unnumbered and are in a scattered order. Interesting United Confederate Veterans program apparently carried to Memphis by a Confederate veteran.  This hand wrought belt knife is in a style and size commonly referred to in the 18th and early 19th century as a <I>rifleman</I> knife as its large size and stout construction served the bearer well both as a military or frontier sidearm.  The knife measures 15 ¾ inches in total length with a stout 10 ½ inch long, 1 ½ inch wide spear point blade.  The iron ferruled grip is of dark green horn.  With lots of evidence of age, period use and originality, the knife remains solid with no loose components and is pleasing to the eye.  Housed in its scabbard of heavy leather with typical pressed geometric design of the period, the scabbard is fitted with a stitched on, studded frog for carrying with waist belt.  The scabbard, like the knife, offers good evidence of age with period use and carrying yet remains in solid and pleasing condition with good seams.  The belt stud appears to be from the tip of a deer antler. With all this said, a good look at our illustrations will serve best in describing this attractive old knife.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

1864 Letter From the Office of the Chief $25.00

 

Return of the 1st Regiment of New Orlean $35.00

 

United Confederate Veterans Reunion Prog $10.00

 

Revolutionary War / Frontiersman - Rifle $650.00

Except that it came to us in a lot of circa 1860s / 1870s <I>cultch</I> can’t say much about this neat patriotic <I>stars & bars</I> paper hat except that with the exception of the folds it remains in fine unused condition with bright colors and no rips, tears or repairs.  Whether intended for political or patriotic purpose, this piece of 19th century ephemera will set in well with any period Americana grouping.  A good look at the printing and paper will satisfy as to age and originality.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Measuring just over 15 inches in length, these slender black iron tongs should not be confused with later copies but are original and of the period.  We have left them just as they came to us after decades of storage offering a pleasing natural age patina and a bit of carbon <I>crust</I> on the jaws from period use.  Frequently referred to as <I>pipe tongs</I> this early utility was indeed popular among period smokers and are a favorite of modern day tobacciana collectors.  A more appropriate term though may be <I>ember tongs</I> as the tool was in fact used in retrieving a hot ember from the hearth not only to light ones pipe but to light a candle, lamp or for any use requiring additional fire. A nice companion item on the hearth in the kitchen or on the smoking table.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!



 An outstanding piece of Americana, this original <B>Boston Theater</B> broadside measures an easily displayable 21 ¾ X 8 inches wide and remains solid and in pleasing condition with no rips tears or stains and only some chipping at the edges.  This wonderful old entertainment broadside announces the <B>GLORIOUS ANNIVERSARY OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE - JULY 4TH 1850 </B> celebrated with the appearance of the famed <B> RAVEL FAMILY</B>of gymnasts, tight rope performers, skaters, ballet dancers and pantomimists.   First appearing in the U. S. in 1832, theater critics and even rival theater managers held the Ravels as unsurpassed variety performers.  Renowned the world over Boston quickly became one of their most successful venues. In 1850 the Ravel Family brought a troop of in excess of forty performers appearing at both the Boston Theater on Federal Street and the Boston Anthenaeum.   An outstanding piece of Americana!  Our illustrations will do best to describe this nice old Civil War period oil tin except to advise that it stands 8 inches high and retains an unusual brass caped, slip on spout to aid in fueling smaller lighting utensils.  All original, period and remaining in pleasing condition, this piece of 19th century tinsmith work will display well.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

19th century Patriotic Paper Hat $65.00

 

18th / mid 19th Century hand forged PIPE T $85.00

 

July 4th 1850 - BOSTON THEATER BROADSIDE $195.00

 

Civil War era LAMP OIL TIN $75.00

A bit of a departure from our usual Civil War era fare but we have a particular appreciation for vintage labels and nothing sets off a saloon display, poker grouping or good old Americana hunting or fishing display like a vintage whiskey bottle.   Standing approximately 10 ¼ inches, embossed <B>THE DUFFY MALT WHISKEY COMPANY, ROCHESTER, N. Y. U. S. A.</B> and dated both on the label and on the bottle, both the original label and bottle remain in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, dings or tears.  A good cork stopper and it would make a neat carafe for your own favorite adult beverage.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


<b>The Photographic History of a Confederate and American Icon


Autographed by the author</b>


By Donald A. Hopkins. Published by Savas Beatie, El Dorado Hills, California, 2013. Hard cover, 7 x 10 1/4, with dust jacket, 195 pages, index, illustrated & autographed by the author. New condition.


Robert E. Lee is well known as a Confederate general and as an educator later in life, but most people are exposed to the same handful of images of one of America's most famous sons. It has been almost seven decades since anyone has attempted a serious study of Lee in photographs, and with Don Hopkins's painstakingly researched and lavishly illustrated Robert E. Lee in War and Peace, the wait is finally over.


Dr. Hopkins, a Mississippi surgeon and lifelong student of the Civil War and Southern history with a recent interest in Robert E. Lee's "from life" photographs, scoured manuscript repositories and private collections across the country to locate every known Lee image (61 in all) in existence today. The detailed text accompanying these images provides a sweeping history of Lee's life and a compelling discussion of antique photography, with biographical sketches of all of Lee's known photographers. The importance of information within the photographer's imprint or backmark is emphasized throughout the book. Hopkins offers a substantial amount of previously unknown information about these images, how each came to be, and the mistakes in fact and attributions other authors and writers have made describing photographs of Lee to the reading public. Many of the images in this book are being published for the first time.


In addition to a few rare photographs and formats that were uncovered during the research phase, the author offers- for the first time- definitive and conclusive attribution of the identity of the photographer of the well-known Lee "in the field" images, and reproduces a startling imperial size photograph of Lee made by Alexander Gardner of Washington, D.C.


Students of American history in general and the Civil War in particular, as well as collectors and dealers who deal with Civil War era photography, will find Hopkins's outstanding book a true contribution to the growing literature on the Civil War.



"This is an iconic revalation. In decades of photographic research, I have never seen several of these Lee images. Equally impressive is the background research that Hopkins employs to provide context and enriched meaning to each image. His work deserves to be acclaimed a milestone in Lee biography as well as in the broader field of Civil War photographic history." William C. Davis, award winning Civil War author, Virginia Center for Civil War Studies, Virginia Tech



"With the publication of Robert E. Lee in War and Peace: The Photographic History of a Confederate and American Icon, Donald Hopkins has accomplished an unprecedented and noteworthy feat: he has published every known photograph of Robert E. Lee in a single volume. It's a terrific browsing book, but for those who want more, Hopkins provides an exhaustive examination of each image and where it came from, and identifies the photographer, and everything known about the image. Being able to examine the full visual array of known images of Lee in a single fascinating volume, history students and Lee devotees alike will gain a better sense of one of the most idolized men in American history." Bob Zeller, President and Co-Founder of The Center for Civil War Photography

 


<b>With imprint of Vannerson & Jones, Richmond, Va.</b>


(1818-93) The 4th highest ranking officer in the Confederacy. Graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1838. Brevetted captain and major for gallantry in the Mexican War. He was in command at Charleston, S.C., in April 1861, during the bombardment and capture of Fort Sumter and rose to instant fame in the Confederacy. He also saw action at 1st Manassas, Shiloh, the 1863-64 Charleston, S.C. campaign, Bermuda Hundred and Petersburg. Beauregard was a railroad executive in the 1860's and early 1870's and later served as Commissioner of public works in New Orleans and Adjutant General of Louisiana.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform. Backmark: Vannerson & Jones, Richmond, Va., with 2 cents orange George Washington tax stamp. Light age toning and wear.  


<b>To the Chief Quartermaster, Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, La.</b>


7 1/2 x 9 3/4, in ink, on imprinted letter sheet, signed by Captain William McKim.


Assistant Quartermaster's Office

Boston, Mass., December 17th, 1863


Col. S.B. Holabird, U.S.A.

Chief Qr. Mr. Dept of the Gulf

New Orleans, La.


Colonel,


I have forwarded to you per Bark "P.R. Hazeltine" the Commissary stores described in the enclosed Invoice and Bill of Lading, which please deliver as addressed and advise me of their receipt.


I am Colonel

Very Respectfully

Your Obt S[v]t.

Wm. McKim

Capt. & A.Q.M.


Very fine.


William McKim, was commissioned captain, A.Q.M., August 3, 1861; promoted to colonel & quartermaster, August 2, 1864. He resigned from the U.S. Army on March 8, 1866.

Pat. 1886 dated – DUFFY’S PURE MALT WHIS

 

Robert E. Lee in War and Peace $45.00

 

CDV General P. G. T. Beauregard $150.00

 

1863 Letter From Assistant Quartermaster $25.00




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