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Antique color lithograph of Admiral Porter's Flotilla arriving below Vicksburg, Mississippi. Caption: Rear Admiral Porter's Flotilla Arriving Below Vicksburg Night Of April 16, 1863. 10 1/2 x 7 1/4. Circa 1912.  


Antique color lithograph of General George B. McClellan on horseback bidding adieu to his Army of the Potomac, while General Ambrose E. Burnside, the new commander, is at his side. Caption: General George B. McClellan Taking Leave Of The Army Of The Potomac, Nov. 10, 1862. 10 1/2 x 7 1/4. Sketched by A.R. Ward. Circa 1912.  


Antique color lithograph of the historic bombardment of Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina; the shots that started the American Civil War, the bloody conflict that would last four long years and cost over 622,000 American lives. Caption: The Bombardment Of Fort Sumter, April 12-13, 1862. 10 1/2 x 7 1/4. Executed by Alex O. Levy. Circa 1912.  


<b>Future Confederate Colonel of the 41st Virginia Infantry, and commander of General William Mahone's Brigade during the 1862 Maryland Campaign


He was severely wounded in action at the battle of Malvern Hill, Va., and was wounded again at the battle of Sharpsburg, Md.</b>


7 3/4 x 7 3/4, manuscript in ink, written by William A. Parham, while serving at the time as Provost Marshal at Norfolk, Va. in 1862. The recipient, Captain Archibald Campbell Godwin, was a fellow Confederate Provost Marshal stationed at Richmond, Va., and who would later be promoted to the rank of Brigadier General.


<b><u>Norfolk, Va., Apr. 28/62</b></u>


Capt. Godwin

Pro. Marshal, Richmond


Capt.


You will please inform me what pay the different grades of employees in y[ou]r  office receive (passport clerks & detectives) & oblige.


Very Respy

Yr. obt. Svt


W.A. Parham

Pro. Marshal


Bold and neatly written letter. Light wear and a tiny paper chip at lower right edge which does not affect any of the content. Very interesting and scarce content referring to the pay for Confederate detectives in Virginia. With his gallant Confederate war record, Colonel William Allen Parham is an extremely desirable Confederate officer to have an A.L.S. [autograph letter signed] from.




William Allen Parham was a prominent planter in Sussex County, Va., when the War Between the States commenced. He soon organized the "Sussex Sharpshooters," an elite unit which eventually became Co. A, of the 41st Virginia Infantry, and was elected their first lieutenant on May 24, 1861. Having been ordered to Norfolk he was soon assigned to duty as Provost Marshal of that city, and discharged the duties of that post with conspicuous effectiveness, moderation and good sense. During the reorganization of the army he was elected lieutenant colonel of the 41st Virginia Infantry, on May 3, 1862. He was severely wounded at the battle of Malvern Hill, Va., a wound which was thought to be fatal. Shortly thereafter he was promoted to the rank of colonel, on July 25, 1862, and he returned to the army in time to command his regiment at the battle of 2nd Manassas. After General William Mahone was wounded at 2nd Manassas, Colonel Parham took over command of Mahone's brigade, and he  participated in all of the marches and battles of the 1862 Maryland campaign leading them into the battle at Sharpsburg. Colonel Parham was known to be a glorious, brave man, a good fellow and the best curser when he chose to be. Even before reaching Sharpsburg, the brigade under Colonel Parham was fighting doggedly. General Stuart described Parham's role at Crampton's Gap on September 14th in his official report as follows: "Colonel Parham, commanding Mahone's brigade, soon after arrived with the Sixth and Twelfth Virginia Infantry, scarcely numbering in all 300 men, and this small force for at least three hours maintained their position and held the enemy in check without assistance of any description from General Semmes, who (Colonel Munford reports) held the next gap below and witnessed all that took place. General Cobb finally came with two regiments to the support of the force holding the gap. At his request Colonel Munford posted the new regiment, when the infantry which had been engaged, having exhausted their ammunition, fell back from their position. The enemy took advantage of this circumstance and suddenly advanced, and the fresh regiments broke before they were well in position. General Cobb made great efforts to rally them, but without the least effect, and it was evident that the gap could no longer be held." Parham, now serving as Brigadier, was wounded again at the battle of Sharpsburg. Here he commanded Mahoneís Brigade, consisting of the 6th, 12th, 16th, 41st, and 61st Virginia. Arriving on the battlefield at 9 A.M. the morning of the battle, September 17, 1862, he filed his men into the sunken road where they fought off successive attacks all morning. When it was over, there were only 15 men present for duty. Still suffering from the wounds he received at Malvern Hill, and Sharpsburg, Colonel Parham was compelled to return home to convalesce, but by the time of the battle of Fredericksburg General "Little Billy" Mahone was back in command and Colonel Parham was again in command of the 41st Virginia. Parham still suffering from his earlier wounds, continued in command of his regiment during the glorious Confederate victory at the battle of Chancellorsville where on May 1st Yankee cavalrymen moved through the underbrush, their footfalls muffled by rain and matted leaves.  Confederate pickets peered into the forest, waiting for something to happen. Suddenly, Federals surged out of the bushes. A quick exchange of fire rent the air, and then, "utter silence".  Confederate Brigadier General William Mahone "was puzzled to understand this," and sent an orderly to investigate. The mounted soldier ventured into the woods without spotting friend or foe. Upon returning to Mahone, the general "made some impatient exclamation" that caught the ear of Colonel Parham, of the 41st Virginia Infantry. The Colonel dashed into the woods to reevaluate the picket line. He had barely entered the trees when he was greeted with a volley from the Federal cavalry. The Colonel miraculously avoided being hit, but his horse bolted, almost leaving the rider behind. At the same time, a low tree limb swept Parhamís kepi from his head.  Galloping up to General Mahone, Parham unleashed a slew of curses on "the damn Yankees".  According to General Mahone, Colonel Parham was everywhere, and performed bravely. The 41st advanced to Chambersburg, Pennsylvania and then fought at Gettysburg, Bristoe, and in the Mine Run campaign. Parham was still listed in command as of August 1864, but was assigned duties as Provost Marshal at Richmond, in October and as commandant of a post at Hicksford, Va., on November 30th.  He had returned to command of his regiment by the end of January 1865, but was retired to the invalid corps and put in charge at Weldon, N.C.  He officially retired on March 31. 1865, but he continued to serve and surrendered at Raleigh, North Carolina on May 29, 1865. He then returned to his wifeís home in Warrenton, North Carolina, where he died on July 2, 1866, his death distinctly traceable to the ball that shattered his side on the 1st day of July 1862 during the battle of Malvern Hill. He was known as a generous, brave, high spirited gentleman, a good citizen, a faithful soldier, and an honest man. [Sources: The New York Times, July 7, 1866, and Old South Military Antiques, who owns Colonel Parham's original Confederate officer's frock coat].

Admiral Porter's Flotilla Arriving Below

 

General George B. McClellan Taking Leave

 

The Bombardment Of Fort Sumter

 

1862 Autograph Letter Signed From Willia




<b>The celebrated and most collected sketch ever done by the famous artist Winslow Homer!</b>


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published in the November 15, 1862 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: The Army Of The Potomac- A Sharpshooter On Picket Duty. From a Painting by W. Homer, Esq. 16 x 11. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin. There is a small stain in the left margin area near the outer edge of the border which does not even come close to  touching upon any of the content and can be easily matted out. Minor age toning in the border area and minor edge wear. EXTREMELY DESIRABLE!! Winslow Homer at his best!


This celebrated Winslow Homer illustration is the most sought after and most difficult to locate of all the Homer Civil War prints. He is probably best known for this image more than any other one that he ever sketched. A Union sharpshooter sits perched on a tree limb with his telescopic rifle in place as he takes aim on his next Confederate victim. The soldier is wearing a kepi with his Company letter "A" on top of his hat as he is locked in intense concentration as he draws a bead on his target. His canteen is hanging on a nearby branch. Homer's details are flawless as you can see the concentration in the soldier's face as well as the needles, pine cones and bark of the tree he sits atop. I have seen this same print selling in other shops for $750.   


<b>Murdered at his headquarters in 1863 by a jealous husband!


With imprint of Vannerson & Jones, Richmond, Va.</b>


 (1820-63) Graduated in the West Point class of 1842 with James Longstreet. He saw service in the Indian campaigns and was brevetted captain and major for gallantry in the Mexican War. He resigned from the U.S. Army on Jan. 31, 1861, in order to join the Confederacy. Commissioned brigadier general on June 5, 1861, he was assigned to Texas where some of the Union forces there surrendered to him. Promoted to major general on Sept. 19, 1861. The following January he was appointed commander of the Army of the West in the Trans-Mississippi theater where he fought at Elkhorn Tavern. Transferred to the Army of Mississippi, he served at Corinth and Vicksburg. Placed in charge of General John C. Pemberton's cavalry, he destroyed General Grant's supply depots at Holly Springs, Miss., an important achievement in disrupting Grant's Vicksburg operations. He was murdered in his headquarters on May 7, 1863 by Doctor James B. Peters, who alleged Van Dorn had violated the sanctity of his home! While stationed at Spring Hill, General Van Dorn was often seen in the company of Jessie McKissack Peters, the young wife of Doctor Peters who was in his late forties. The dashing Van Dorn was considered to be a ladies' man and Mrs. Peters was frequently seen as the general's riding partner. The jealous Doctor Peters decided to pay a call on General Van Dorn at his headquarters in the Martin Cheairs home and shot the general dead as he sat behind his desk. Peters immediately fled the area and found sanctuary within the Union lines at Franklin, Tennessee, and justified the murder of General Van Dorn for violating the sanctity of his home. The general was originally buried at Spring Hill in the family plot of his wife, but his remains were later sent to Port Gibson in 1902 and he was re-interred in Wintergreen Cemetery.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 13/16 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. Bottom of the mount is slightly trimmed. Light age toning and minor wear. Backmark: Vannerson & Jones, Photographic Artists, No. 77 Main St., Richmond, Va., with a pair of 1 cent, U.S. Inter. Rev. Proprietary tax stamps with bust view of George Washington and 1865 date handwritten in ink on both stamps.  Scarce and very desirable with the Vannerson & Jones, Richmond, Va. imprint. This is probably the best known portrait in uniform of General Van Dorn, and most likely the last photograph he ever had taken!   


 Once one of the most common of Grand Army of the Republic relics, as aside from the membership medal, the gold wash GAR belt plate and white cotton web waist belt, was the most commonly used G. A. R. accoutrement.  Like everything in the Civil War veteran collectors field though, complete waist belt rigs, particularly rigs in nice condition, are becoming difficult to find.  This set remains in excellent original condition with 100% of the bright plating on the plate and a white web belt that while showing good evidence of originality remains in excellent condition.  A good opportunity for the GAR collector who hasnít set one of these aside. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!



 Not a big deal but worthy of appreciation, these late 18th through mid 19th century US print blocks were fashioned in rock maple offering a bold 3 5/16 high <B>US</U> in classic period font.  Will go nicely in a display or on the wall. <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!

A Sharpshooter on Picket Duty, 1862 $395.00

 

CDV, General Earl Van Dorn $395.00

 

original Civil War veteran Ė G. A. R. WA $135.00

 

late 1700s to mid 1800 U S Print Blocks $35.00




Antique color lithograph of the battle of Antietam, Maryland, the single bloodiest day in American history. Caption: Battle Of Antietam, September 17, 1862. 7 1/4 x 10 1/2. Executed by Alex O. Levy. Circa 1912.  


Antique color lithograph of the famous first battle between ironclad warships, The Monitor (Union) and The Merrimac (Confederate). 10 1/2 x 7 1/4. Caption: Battle Between The Monitor And Merrimac. Hampton Roads, March 9, 1862. Very minor age toning in the border area. Circa 1912.    


<b>Sent to Major in the 11th New York Cavalry</b>


Stamped Civil War envelope addressed to Maj. G.W. Richardson, Box 420, New Orleans, La., with 3 cents George Washington postage stamp (Scott #64) with C.D.S., Aurora, N.Y., Feb. 28.


George W. Richardson, age 36 years; enrolled on December 16, 1861, at New York City, to serve 3 years; mustered in as Captain, Co. K, 11th New York Cavalry, March 19, 1862;  as Major, November 1, 1862; mustered out, July 21, 1865, at Memphis, Tennessee; not commissioned Captain; commissioned Major, March 1, 1864, with rank from November 1, 1862, original. [Source: New York in the War of the Rebellion, 1861 to 1865, Compiled by Frederick Phisterer].   


<b>Commander of the Atlantic Destroyer Flotilla in 1913


First Captain of the Battleship U.S.S. Nevada, the most powerful ship in the U.S. Navy in 1916


President of the U.S. Naval War College


Senior U.S. Naval Representative in London during World War I


Vice Admiral in command of all U.S. Naval forces operating in Europe in 1917-1918


Pulitzer Prize Winner for his book, "Victory at Sea"</b>


(1858-1936) Born to American parents in Port Hope, Canada, he graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1880.  In March 1897, he was promoted to rank of lieutenant and assigned as military attachť to Paris and Saint Petersburg.  It was during this assignment that the Spanish American War was fought and he was able to use his diplomatic contacts to gather intelligence on Spain and their high ranking commanders.  As a young U.S. naval officer he tried to reform naval gunnery by improving its target practice, but ran into resistance by his superior officers.  Not taking no for an answer, Sims who was unfazed wrote directly to President Theodore Roosevelt, the former Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Navy, who was intrigued by the young officerís ideas and assigned him to the position of Inspector of Naval Gunnery.  He was promoted to rank of lieutenant commander on November 5, 1902, and commander on July 1, 1907.  He then attended the Naval War College in 1911-1912, being promoted to the rank of captain on March 4, 1911.  He was appointed Commander of the Atlantic Destroyer Flotilla in July 1913, and on March 11, 1916, he became the first captain of the battleship U.S.S. Nevada, the largest, most modern, and most powerful ship in the entire U.S. Navy.  His selection as the shipís captain showed the great esteem in which he was held by the brass of the U.S. Navy.  Shortly before the commencement of World War I, then Rear Admiral Sims was assigned as the president of the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, and then was sent to London by President Woodrow Wilson where he served as the senior naval representative of the United States.  In April 1917, Sims was promoted to command over the U.S. naval forces operating in Britain and a promotion to the rank of Vice Admiral.  The biggest threat he faced was a very strong and effective German submarine campaign against freighters bringing in vital supplies, food and ammunition to the Allies.  The combined Anglo-American naval war against the German u-boats in the western approach to the British Isles in 1917-1918 was a success due to the ability of Sims to work smoothly with his British counterpart, Admiral Sir Lewis Bayly.  He ended the war as vice admiral in command of all U.S. naval forces operating in Europe.  After the war he served a second tour of duty as president of the Naval War College, 1919-1922.  While holding this position Sims wrote and published his book, "The Victory at Sea," which describes his experiences in World War I.  In 1921, "Victory at Sea" won the Pulitzer Prize for History.  Admiral Sims retired from the navy on October 1922 having reached the retirement age of 64.  He was promoted to full admiral on the retired list in 1930.  Admiral Sims died in Boston in 1936 at the age of 77.  He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


9 x 12, color lithographic portrait of Sims in naval uniform wearing naval cap with insignia and braiding. Imprint on the front at bottom right, Western Newspaper Union Photo Service, Pub. Taber Prang Art Co. Stamped on the reverse, No. 2118, Admiral Sims, Published by Taber Prang Art Co., Springfield, Massachusetts. Bottom right corner is worn and there are light surface tears at upper corners and edges.  None of these flaws touch upon the subject which would look nice matted and framed. Desirable portrait of this United States naval hero.


WBTS Trivia: 


<u>Military Awards Earned by Admiral Sims</u>:


Distinguished Service Medal

Spanish Campaign Medal

Philippine Campaign Medal

Mexican Service Medal

Victory Service Medal

Honorary Knight Grand Cross of the Order of St. Michael & St. George

Grand Officer of the Legion of Honor

Grand Officer of the Order of the Crown of Italy


<u>Civilian Medals</u>:


Pulitzer Prize For History

Theodore Roosevelt Association's Distinguished Service Medal

American Legion's Distinguished Service Medal

The Battle of Antietam

 

The Battle Between The Monitor And Merri

 

Cover Addressed to Yankee Major in New O $15.00

 

Photograph, Admiral William H. Sims, U. S $48.00




4 pages, 7 3/4 x 9 1/2, in ink, written to Lieutenant Mathew S. Teller, by his mother. Comes with the original envelope which is nicely addressed to Lieut. M.S. Teller, 22nd Regt., Co. H, N.Y.S.V., Washington, D.C., 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps. Indistinct postmark with 3 cents rose George Washington postage stamp [Scott #64]. 


<b><u>Sandy Hill, [N.Y.], March 25th/63</b></u>


My Dear Boy,


Your letter of the 19th came to hand on Monday (the 23).  We have enjoyed your frequent letters of late very much as we have felt so anxious about you as well as uneasy and are thankful to know that you were getting used to camp life again without severe and long sickness as we had feared.  We have I think recd. all your letters.  I wrote you a week ago.  I have nothing very new to say today but Father has urged me to write for the past two days and says to you that you must not be prevailed upon by your Capt. to accept the position of Adjt. and thereby lose the Captaincy in case Strong* is promoted.  We think that he and Ri are both working for Hall in that as much as for Strong.  Ri went to Albany again yesterday, recd. a letter from Strong the night before as well as two others before it in the past week.  If he, Strong, wants Hall for Capt. he will try to have you accept the position you now have which is no better than your present Com.[mission].  Ri seems very cautious and tells nothing relating to himself or Strong.  He told Father last night when he returned from Albany that Clendon** had come up on the cars with him and told him he had resigned so there will be a vacancy in the regt. of two high positions.  Fassett*** is at the Falls I hear.  Dob and I rode up last evening.  I had some business there, the first I have been up since I rode there with you.  I called on Wm. and we of course had a talk about the boys- he feels that Henry has not been well treated by his Capt. as he promised him a promotion when he left home and has done nothing.  He said he could have obtained one for him through the influence of his business friends.  If it had not been for that I think he would like to have Henry come home.  He said he was about sick of the whole thing.  I never knew him to speak or act so before.  He thinks Henry has deserved something better than he has recvd. as he has had such good accounts from him.  I wrote to Uncle Henry last week and have just received an answer written by Mrs. James DuBais.  She writes a stylish letter and says all are well at Hudson and that Barret had written since his promotion.  They were gratified to hear of it.  She also spoke of George Tellerís death.  All of the Hudson cousins went down to the funeral.  She spoke of it being so very hard to lose such an affectionate son and brother, but they did not mourn, as those without hope as he gave a strong evidence of a change just before his death and said, "O that glorious redemption."  She said she wrote me this thinking it would gladden my heart to know he was conscious and prepared for the great change, but these death bed repetitions I have little confidence in but hope it was genuine with him.  I think Mary Teller is quite a favorite with the Hudson cousins as she has been with them most of the winter.  Perhaps all are trying to make a match between her & John.  We are all in usual health- it is a real rainy day and the snow is leaving us very fast.  The sleighing was bad last evening when we went to the Falls.  I am glad of warmer weather.  The first three weeks in March was bitter cold.  I am glad you enjoy yourself so much at the Regt. and have something to do at present which pleases you and does not require much exposure, but canít see how you could want the position and act as aid if Strong had the Comm.[ission] that would put you out of your Co. entirely wouldnít it?  Or do you mean if there is no change of commission with him; if he leaves the Co. you ought to apply for a promotion as soon as he resigns and perhaps before.  You must find out if it can be done.  Ri will do it for Hall and pretend he thought you were, or wished to be Adjt.  Be sure and tell Strong that if he is promoted you want to be Capt., but not Adjt. or he may make the same excuse and tell you he wants you for Adjt., or aide or something else for an excuse.  You say in a former letter that you hope Father nor I think you have been extravagant the past winter- we did not, but wanted you to have every comfort and think you have got along with as little as possible considering the amount of your board.  Wished you had bought an india rubber coat at any price & have thought of buying one at Albany and sending it by the first chance.  Perhaps you have one by this time.  Write whether we shall send you one or not?  You canít tell how gratified we felt when we read what you wrote about your being disgusted with all sorts of drinking and your having used so little the past winter.  Father said at once (before I finished the letter) Mattie could not please me better than by giving it up entirely.  He spoke of it since and said I hope Mattie will not be influenced by any of his friends at the Regt., but swear off entirely- he has as great a horror of the habit as I have and you well know how great that is.  Different ones have said to Father through the winter I guess Matt is living pretty fast at Wash.[ington], and others would say, "Matt is a great boy for the girls."  That kept him sick.  It often made us both feel unhappy but your Father would say donít write to him about it.  It will only provoke him, and so I hoped and prayed and trusted for the best, but Oh what a world this is for making one feel unpleasant and unhappy.  I would like my children to live above reproach, and then if needs be it seems that I could die for them.  You wrote that Father should take $20 for his present.  He seemed pleased and said I believe I will take it & send for another of Mathewís large photographs for myself for I do not want to part with the painting, and I want a plain one too as he means to give one of them away.  No more news that I can think of.  I hope you will continue to write often.  Praying that God will continue to protect and bless you.  I remain yours affectionately with many kisses.


Mother 


P.S. Mamie says, "tell Mattie I send my love to him," and goes out singing. Did you receive my last letter with stamps?


Much more news in this very neat and well written 1863 letter from a mother to her lieutenant son of the 22nd New York Infantry.



* Thomas Jefferson Strong, was 36 years old, when he enlisted on May 9, 1861, at Sandy Hill, N.Y., as captain, and was commissioned into Co. H, 22nd New York Infantry. He was promoted to major on March 23, 1863, as news of his promotion had not been received at home yet as it was being discussed by Mrs. Teller in her letter. On April 29, 1863, Strong was promoted to lieutenant colonel of the regiment. He was mustered out of the regiment on June 19, 1863, at Albany, N.Y., by reason of the end of the term of service for the 22nd New York Infantry. On January 19, 1864, he was commissioned major of the 16th New York Heavy Artillery. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on September 14, 1864, and colonel and brevet brigadier general on March 13, 1865. He was discharged for wounds on May 15, 1865.


** George Clendon, Jr., was 34 years old, when he enlisted on May 7, 1861, at Glen Falls, N.Y., as captain, and was commissioned into Co. E, 22nd New York Infantry. He was wounded in action on August 29, 1862, at the 2nd battle of Bull Run, Va. He was promoted to major on September 3, 1862, and was discharged from his wounds on March 20, 1863.


*** John S. Fassett, was 28 years old, when he enlisted on May 7, 1861, at Glen Falls, N.Y., as a private, and was mustered into Co. E, 22nd New York Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant & adjutant on January 19, 1862. He was discharged for disability on March 1, 1863. After a period of convalescence at home he was commissioned captain, on September 3, 1863, of the 2nd New York Veteran Cavalry. He was promoted to major on December 5, 1863, and mustered out of the service on November 8, 1865, at Talladega, Alabama.



The 22nd New York Infantry was also known as the 2nd Northern New York Regiment. They were mustered into the U.S. service on June 6, 1861, to serve for 2 years. The regiment was mustered out of the service on June 19, 1863, at Albany, N.Y., after having fulfilled their term of service.


During the Civil War the regiment fought in the battles of 2nd Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg. 


WBTS Trivia: The 22nd New York Infantry lost 180 men killed, wounded or missing out of the 379 engaged in the 2nd battle of Bull Run, Virginia, with 46 of them killed or mortally wounded. Out of the 24 officers who were present for duty in this battle, 19 were killed or wounded.                     

 


<b>Colonel of the 35th Ohio Infantry


War Date Envelope Signed With Rank as Colonel and Brigade Commander</b>


(1823-92) Born in Middletown, Butler County, Ohio, he was educated at Farmer's College, studied law, and had begun a law practice when he enlisted to fight in the Mexican War. On May 31, 1846, he was mustered in as first sergeant in the 1st Ohio Infantry and served with this regiment until being mustered out on June 12, 1847, having been promoted to first lieutenant on Sept. 2, 1846, and to captain on Oct. 5th of the same year. During the war he was cited for gallantry when he commanded an assaulting column at the Battle of Monterrey. When the war ended he returned to Ohio and continued to practice law, and also served as Sheriff of Butler County. At the commencement of the Civil War, he was commissioned colonel of the 35th Ohio Infantry, which was organized at Hamilton, Ohio, to serve three years. Two days later the regiment moved to Covington, Ky., and on the same night took a train on the Kentucky Central Railroad. Colonel Van Derveer then placed sentries at all the bridges along the road and made his head  quarters at Cynthiana. With his regiment he participated in some of the skirmishes during the siege of Corinth and was among the first to enter the works at that place. In the movement against General Braxton Bragg, the fight at Perryville and the pursuit to Crab Orchard, he bore an honorable part, and for a time he commanded a brigade in the Army of the Ohio. All through the ensuing campaign, which began at Murfreesboro and ended at Chattanooga, with his regiment he was in the front of the marching and fighting. On the first day of the fight at Chickamauga, the 35th Ohio and the other regiments composing the brigade were stationed on the extreme left of the Federal line, where they engaged and, after several hours of a fair, stand-up fight, repulsed and beat back  several attacks of the elite troops of the Confederate army. On the next day Colonel Van Derveer again brought his regiment early into action, and it fought all day, firing the last shots that were fired by friend or foe on the battlefield of Chickamauga. The regiment with its gallant colonel in the lead was on the front line at Missionary Ridge, and was among the first to reach the enemy's works on the crest, from which it drove the Confederate force and captured three pieces of artillery. Van Derveer was engaged at the first battle at Buzzard's Roost, after which his regiment was stationed at Ringgold until the beginning of the Atlanta campaign. He saw action at Dalton, Resaca, Pine Mountain, Kennesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, and several other fights in the bloody Atlanta campaign, and he was mustered out of the service with his regiment on Aug. 26, 1864. He was commissioned brigadier general of volunteers on Oct. 4, 1864, and served in that capacity until June 15, 1865, when he resigned. General Van Derveer then returned to his home in Butler County, and served as a judge until his death, on Nov. 5, 1892. He is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Hamilton, Ohio.


<u>War Date Cover Endorsed</u>: Addressed to Mrs. Marsh Wms. D. Camp, Sommerville, Butler County, Ohio. Docket at corner edge: Soldier's Letter, and endorsed, "F. Van Derveer, Col. Comdg 3 Brig." Partial C.D.S., Nashville, Ten., Jul 30, 1863. Stamped Due 3. Light stain. Desirable Union commander who gallantly fought with the western army throughout the Civil War.


WBTS Trivia: The hard fought 35th Ohio Infantry originally consisted of 921 men, 750 of whom came from Butler County, including Colonel Ferdinand Van Derveer. During the war the regiment lost nearly half of its men who were either killed or wounded.  


<b>Signed and presented photograph</b>


(1831-1916) Organized a militia company called the "Council Bluffs Guards" in 1856. On July 6, 1861, he was mustered in as colonel of the 4th Iowa Infantry. He served in Missouri under General John C. Fremont; commanded a brigade in the Army of the Southwest; and took part in the battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas, where he had 3 horses shot from under him and he was severely wounded. Promoted brigadier general in 1862, and major general in 1864, Dodge was given steadily increasing responsibilities, first as commander of the District of the Mississippi and later as leader of the XVI Corps during the Atlanta campaign, where he was again wounded. In December 1864, U.S. Grant put him in command of the Department of Missouri and in February 1865, of the Department of Kansas. In these areas he operated against bands of guerrillas and hostile Indians with success.


Excellent chest up view photogravure of a determined looking General Grenville M. Dodge in civilian attire. Imprint Henry M. Taylor, Jr., Chicago. Overall size is 8 x 10 1/2, image area is 5 x 7 1/2. Small tear at the upper right corner, repaired on the reverse with archival document tape. The tear is well away from the subject and can be easily matted out if framed. Large signature, "Grenville M. Dodge" below his portrait. There is also a beautiful presentation added  above the signature, "To my friend Miss Ada Tanner with compliments of." Dodge apparently added the inscription at another time as it is in a much bolder hand. Desirable Union general with an excellent Civil War fighting record while serving with the western Union armies.    


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient


War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1824-1905) Graduated in the West Point class of 1849. He fought against the Seminoles in Florida, instructed for six years at West Point, and served on the Texas frontier. He was under the command of General Daniel Tyler at 1st Bull Run, and later took part in the 1862 Peninsular campaign at Yorktown and Williamsburg. Appointed a brigadier general on April 28, 1862, his subsequent career was in the western theater, as a division commander under Generals' Rosecrans, G.H. Thomas and W.T. Sherman. He played a prominent role in all the operations of the forces which swept Braxton Bragg out of Tennessee, held the famous Horseshoe Ridge at Chickamauga, maneuvered Joseph E. Johnston from Dalton to Atlanta, and moved through Georgia to Savannah on Sherman's march to the sea, and then up the coast until the final surrender in North Carolina. Baird was awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantry at Jonesboro, Ga.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 2 1/2 x 7/8, in ink, A. Baird, Brig. Gen. Comdg., Maj. Genl. Vols., 1st Div., 14th A.C.

Letter to Lieutenant in the 22nd New Yor

 

Autograph, General Ferdinand Van Derveer $50.00

 

Autograph, General Grenville M. Dodge $150.00

 

Autograph, General Absalom Baird $95.00

Not to be confused with the later flannel stripes, a good look at our illustrations will establish these as the earlier and more desirable type.  Wish we had the pair but this <U>single example</U> will display well when set in with period material.  A nice display item at less than half the price of a pair. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!



 We will let our photo illustrations do the talking for this offering.  A common American worker of the mid 1800s, this early 6th plate ambrotype remains in pleasing condition and comes in its original case which is solid with no splits at the hinge.  A classic occupational. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>



 A classic 18th century / early 19th century personal item referred to by collectors as salt or snuff horns in line with their most frequent use. As a small screw top container measuring approximately 3 inches long, these little traveling containers of natural cow horn with turned bone cap would have served well to carry the usual personal bit of salt or other food seasoning, snuff, herbs or other medical preparations.  Practical use would have been limited only by imagination. This scarce original example remains in excellent condition with no cracks or splits as usually found in existing period examples.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Bearing an escutcheon with a nicely hand engraved <I>H F R</I> monogram, we acquired this period mother of pearl and ivory note calendar with a family history of having been carried by <B>Lt. Henry F. Reynolds</B> in the Civil War.  Part of a <I>winter cleanout</I> set aside in our fifty year accumulation of <I>stuff</I> gleaned from estate sales, antique shows and all manner of Maine through East of the Mississippi <I>hunting grounds</I>, it is time to move some of our treasures along.  Measuring approximately 3 1/8 X 1 5/8 inches this pocket note calendar shows good age and originality while remaining in excellent original condition with no splits, chips, stains or missing pages.  Our research advises that Henry F. Reynolds was a resident of Ulysses Township, Penn. when he enlisted and was mustered in as Sergeant, Co. K <B>149th Pennsylvania Infantry</B>.  Reynolds was promoted to 2nd Lt. on 8/29/1862 then 1st Lt. on 5/1/1863.  <U>Lt. Reynolds suffered a gunshot wound of the right foot at the</U><B> Battle of Gettysburg </B> on July 1, 1863.  He was discharged for disability on 3/13/1864.  Reynolds was a member of the Orange A. Lewis G. A. R. Post  # 279 in Ulysses, PA.  He died 12/16/1901.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

original - Civil War era Cavalry Sargent

 

Occupational AMBROTYPE $275.00

 

original 18th early 19th century Condime $95.00

 

149th Pennsylvania Infantry officers - P

A rare companion piece to a nice 18th early 19th century apothecary flask or bottle, we have three original cast lead caps and are selling them <U>individually priced</U> for the collector who would like an example for display or to complete a nice period medical bottle or flask.  Seldom seen today except in the oldest collections, the shaft of the cap fit loosely into the neck of the bottle with the weight and flat surface of the rounded cap providing a seal against the lip of the bottle.  Easily removed for dispensing and quickly dropped back in place to make the seal, these cast lead caps were a handy utility in the 1700s early 1800s apothecary.   Seldom surviving, I suppose to some extent, because of the multiplicity of lead use and the common re-purposing of the material by virtue of a simple charcoal fire and casting ladle original period examples are rarely seen today.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  


<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!


From Libby Prison, Richmond, Virginia</b>


2 pages, 7 1/4 x 9 1/2, in pencil, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Libby Prison, Sept. 11th, 1863</b></u>


Dear wife,


After my love to you and the Children I will inform you that I recíd two letters from you today dated on the 22nd of August and the other on the 28th.  I was very glad to hear from you, but sorry to hear that the babe was sick and Margy so poorly, but I trust the Good Lord will spare you all until I shall get home.  This is my daily prayer and I try to exercise faith that it will be answered, but how soon I donít know for we cannot know anything about it until the time comes, but I trust the Lord will answer the fervent prayers that ascend here daily for deliverance.  Dear am quite well and have plenty to eat though I have to buy some things.  I want you and my friends to send me a small box of rations.  You may make some preparations for it but donít send it until you get another letter from me for I may be at home pretty soon.  You can [get] J.F. Hanson [and] Wm. Laurence to fix it up for you.  If I stay here much longer I shall want 2 cotton shirts either check or calico, 2 pr. socks is all the clothing I shall need.  Make the shirts without buttons.  Tiptonís girls will help you if you need help.  Dear please send me the following articles, 3 lbs. coffee scorched and ground, 4 lbs. sugar, extract of coffee, 1 lb. tea, 1 qt. pepper, 1 qt. spice, ground cinnamon, 1 bottle catsup, 1 small can apple butter, 1 small can peach or cherry butter, 1 bottle stomach bitter, 4 dozen sheets paper, 2 dozen envelopes is all.  Do not send until you hear from me.


Your loving husband,


Lieut. L. Lupton


[To:] Mrs. E.H. Lupton

Jerusalem

Monroe Co.

Ohio


Staining and fold wear. Some of the words on page two are light and illegible. Officer's letter written from the notorious Libby Prison by one of "the boys in blue" who would not survive the war!


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.  


<b>United States Congressman from South Carolina


1861 South Carolina Commissioner who conferred with the Federal Government to try and prevent hostilities</b>


(1796-1867) Born in Charleston, S.C., he graduated from Yale College in 1815, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1818 and commenced practice in Charleston. Served as a member of the Charleston city council. Was a member of the South Carolina State House of Representatives, 1826-29, and 1832-33. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1839-51, was chairman of the Committee on Commerce and also served on the Committee on Naval Affairs. In 1861, he was appointed a commissioner of the State of South Carolina to confer with the Federal Government in an attempt to prevent hostilities. He died in Charleston in 1867 and is interred in Circular Church Yard.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 x 1, in ink, I.E. Holmes, Charleston, So. Ca.   


<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!


From Libby Prison, Richmond, Virginia


Officer writes to his commanding officer in the field!</b>


2 pages, 7 3/4 x 9 3/4, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to Captain James P. Mann, 116th Ohio Infantry.


<b><u>Libby Prison, Jan. 21st/64</b></u>


Capt. J.P. Mann,


Dear Sir,


Your favor of the 21st Dec. was recd. yesterday and you can hardly imagine the good it done me to hear from you and to hear that you were all in good health.  My health has not been very good for the last month but I think if I could get out of this place I would soon be all right again.  No person can imagine the anxiety that we have for an exchange unless they have tried it.  Two days more will make seven months that I have been shut up in this place and I think if I ever get out they will never get me back here with whole bones for I would almost as soon be blotted out of existence as to be confined here.  What would I not give to be at once more with my company and I do hope and pray that it may not be long before I get back again.  I was sorry to hear of the death of so many of our brave boys by disease, but it canít be helped.  Well in regard to the money that you say you sent to me I have never heard of it.  It is probable that the authorities here have it and if so I may get it yet.  I guess I can get along well enough without those things that I sent for although they would have been very acceptable, but I recd. a nice box of things from home which has kept me going.  Give my love and best wishes to all the boys and remember me in your prayers and may we soon meet again is the prayer of your good old friend Lt. Levi Lupton.


From Lt. Lupton

To Capt. J.P. Mann

Comp. C, 116th Regt.

O.V.I.


Light age toning and wear. Archival tape repairs on the folds. Very scarce and desirable Libby Prison officer's letter written to his captain and commanding officer in the field. Since prisoner of war letters were highly regulated you seldom find them written to other officers.  


1st Lieutenant James P. Mann, served in Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to captain, June 13, 1863, and was mustered out of service at Richmond, Va., on June 14, 1865.


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.

earlier through mid 1800s cast lead APOT $45.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

Autograph, Isaac E. Holmes $25.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter




(1801-1870) He entered the navy as Midshipman in 1810 after having been virtually adopted by Commodore David Porter. The friendship between the two families began when Porter's father was buried on the same day as Farragut's mother in New Orleans. He fought in the Mexican War and was awaiting orders at his Norfolk, Va. home when the Civil War broke out. Told that a person with Union sentiments could not live in Virginia, he packed up his family and Virginian wife and moved north. He was given command of the New Orleans expedition in December 1861, and helped capture the city in the spring of 1862. Promoted Rear Admiral in July 1862 for his success in opening up the Mississippi River to Vicksburg, he spent the next year in operations against Port Hudson, La., and returned to NYC in August 1863 to a hero's welcome. He returned to the Gulf in January 1864 to prepare for the assault on Mobile Bay, taking the port on August 5th. It was during this attack that Farragut was to have coined the famous expression, "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead." He again returned to NYC, this time in failing health. The city gave him a public reception and $50,000 to purchase a home there, and on Dec. 23, 1864, he was promoted to Vice Admiral, the rank just having been established. He was one of the first to enter Richmond after it's capture. On July 25, 1866, he was promoted to full Admiral, the first in the U. S. Navy to ever hold that rank!


Wet plate, albumen photograph, mounted to 4 1/4 x 6 1/2 card. Standing view wearing his naval uniform, cap, 2 piece belt plate, with sword attached to belt. Backmark: Sarony & Co., N.Y. Light age toning and edge wear with a tiny thumbtack hole in the extreme upper border edge. Always a very desirable Union naval hero.  


(1821-75) The son of an advisor to presidents and the brother of Montgomery Blair, Abraham Lincoln's first postmaster general. From secession to reconstruction, Francis P. Blair, Jr. made a series of major contributions to the Union cause. No man did more to block Missouri's joining the Confederacy in 1861; as a U.S. Congressman he battled for Lincoln's early war programs; he was a distinguished divisional and corps commander in the Vicksburg and Atlanta campaigns; and as a post war senator battled the Radical Republicans in an attempt to bring reconstruction to a shattered nation. Blair also saw service during the Civil War in the Yazoo expedition, at Chattanooga, Sherman's March to the Sea and the Carolina's campaign. Both Grant and Sherman who were highly critical of most "political generals" rated Blair as one of the most competent military leaders of the war. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in civilian attire. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very sharp and desirable image. 

 


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of an eagle with an American flag, and the names of all of the states of the United States printed around the edges of the oval design. Motto below: "One Flag, One Country, One Government." Light age toning.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


<b>Alexander Gardner's Antietam Photographs</b>


Selections From The Collection Of Bob Zeller. Southeast Museum of Photography. January 17- March 16, 1995. Autographed and dated on the title page, Bob Zeller, 3/16/95. 8 1/2 x 8 1/2, soft covers. 28 pages which includes related text and Alexander Gardner illustrations. Footnotes and Exhibition Checklist. Photograph of "The Burnside Bridge Over the Antietam" overlaps on the front and back covers. New condition. Very desirable Antietam, Md. [Sharpsburg] related item. My friend and colleague Bob Zeller is the President of The Center for Civil War Photography, and he is also the author of several excellent books on Civil War photography.

Photograph, Admiral David G. Farragut $75.00

 

CDV, General Francis P. Blair, Jr. $75.00

 

One Flag, One Country, One Government $5.00

 

Incidents Of The War




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a U.S. flag on top of a globe surrounded by ocean's waves and "Our Country" imprinted on it. Motto above, "One Flag!" and below, "One Country." 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color illustration with a Liberty holding a pike with liberty cap on top of it, wearing an American flag dress, sitting on a globe with United States of America printed on it and holding a book with The Union Forever And Ever on the front of it. Archival tape repairs on the reverse.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


   A bit apart from our usual period but worthy of a place on any military site, we are pleased to offer this outstanding relic of the WWII Army Air Corps. <U>Brigadier General, United States Army Air Forces</U>, <B>Frederick Walker Castle</B> (U. S. Military Academy class of 1930)  was posthumous recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor for actions in aerial combat while leading a bombing mission over Belgium, December 24, 1944.  Castle was co-pilot aboard the lead aircraft of the 487th Bomb Groupís 30th combat mission when aircraft was attacked by a German ME- 109 fighter. Castle's bomber fell away from the formation almost immediately as the B-17 struggled with control and moved some distance away from the protection of the bomber force, where it was again attacked. A third attack set both engines on the right wing on fire. As Castle ordered the bomber abandoned it spun into a dive. As control was recovered seven of the nine crewmen parachuted. The pilot was observed in the nose of the airplane hooking on his parachute, <U>with Castle still at the controls</U>, when the fuel tank in the burning right wing exploded, and the B-17 went into a spin from which it did not recover, crashing near Hods, Belgium. Of the nine crewmen, five survived the crash.  In addition to the CMOH Castle was the recipient of the Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal and the Croix deGuerre, Legion of Honor Order of Kutuzov.

    We will rely on our photo illustrations to describe this historic tail coat except to reassure the viewer that the garment remains in pleasing condition with good evidence of age and originality.  An exceptional acquisition for the WWII vintage Army Air Corps enthusiast.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 An outstanding pair of blacksmith forged telegraph climbing irons, all original with classic period construction even to the forged on spurs and original harness leather foot straps complete with original iron roller buckles.  A desirable companion item to set with any early Civil War Signal Corps, frontier West, telegraph or Railroad grouping. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

One Flag! One Country

 

The Union Forever And Ever

 

West Point tail coat of WWII Army Air Co $1895.00

 

Civil War era TELEGRAPH CLIMBING IRONS $275.00

Acquired several years ago from among a number of 19th century apothecary instruments and equipment, this <B>U. S. MEDICAL DEPARTMENT</B> marked Civil War era hour glass stands approximately 7 ĺ inches and  demonstrates good evidence of age, originality and period use while remaining in excellent condition.  An essential of any well-equipped 18th and early through mid 19th century apothecary, this classic early time piece will set in nicely with earlier through Civil War era medical or scientific material.  Original, period examples like this one are extremely difficult to come by.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  This eye appealing old iron padlock is just as you might expect to unearth at a Civil War camp site (see: Howard Crouchís (Excavated) <I>Civil War Artifacts - A Guide for the Historian</I>) except this one, while it shows good evidence of age and period use, remains in excellent smoothly functioning condition and retains its original key.  Difficult to find in any condition and virtually always missing the key when you do see one, this offering will make a nice addition to any Civil War period grouping and will go especially well with a period chest or lock box. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 


<b>United States Congressman from South Carolina</b>


(1802-83) Born at Clouds Creek, near Edgefield, S.C., he completed preparatory studies, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1823, and practiced in Pendleton, and Abbeville, S.C. Served as a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives, 1834-35, and 1838-41. Elected as a Democrat to the U.S. Congress, he served from 1843-53. He was chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs, and was Speaker pro tempore of the House of Representatives in 1848. Served as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention of 1868.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 x 1/2, in ink, Armistead Burt.  


7 3/4 x 9 3/4, imprinted letter sheet, filled out in ink.


Office Quartermaster of Cavalry,

Department of the Gulf,

New Orleans, La., April 1st, 1865


Colonel,


I take pleasure in recommending to your favorable consideration the bearer Mr. John Dickie, who applies for a position in your office.


Mr. D will I feel confident fill to your entire satisfaction any position with which he may be entrusted. 


I have the honor to be Colonel,

Very Respectfully,

Your Obt. Servt.,

C.B. Chittenden

Capt., A.Q.M. Vols.


[To] Col. S.H. Pierce

Qr. Mr. Dept.

Present

186 Julia St.


Very fine. Uncommon imprinted cavalry letter head.


Charles B. Chittenden, was 26 years old, when he enlisted on August 25, 1862, at Hudson, N.Y., as a 1st lieutenant, and was commissioned into Co. G, 128th New York Infantry. He was discharged for promotion on July 10, 1863, when he was commissioned captain in the U.S. Volunteers Quartermaster's Department. He was promoted to brevet major and lieutenant colonel, on March 13, 1865. He was mustered out of the service on May 11, 1866, and died on September 18, 1867.

Civil War era USMD marked HOUR GLASS

 

Original Civil War era ĎPat. Applied For $85.00

 

Autograph, Armistead Burt $10.00

 

Letter From Office Q. M. Cavalry, Departm $35.00

H 70in. X W 60in. X D 2in.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color American shield at upper left. Imprint below: "Knoxville, April 22, 1861. Gen. Gideon J. Pillow- I have just received your message through Mr. Sale, requesting me to serve as Chaplain to your Brigade in the Southern Army; and in the spirit of kindness in which this request is made; but in all candor, I return for an answer, that when I shall have made up my mind to go to Hell, I will cut my throat and go direct, and not travel round by way of the Southern Confederacy. I am very respectfully, &c, W.G. Brownlow." Published by Young, Lockwood & Co., 165 Main St., Buffalo. Light age toning.


<u>William G. Brownlow</u>: (1805-77) A leading Tennessee Unionist during the Civil War. He was originally a Methodist minister, thus earning the lifelong nickname of "Parson." He became editor of the Knoxville Whig in 1849. Although a strong pro-slavery man, he violently opposed secession in 1861 and soon became a leader of Unionist elements in east Tennessee. Confederate authorities suppressed his newspaper and later imprisoned him for several months during the winter of 1861-62 on suspicion of complicity in the bridge burning that so incensed Jefferson Davis. Later released, he became a firm advocate of a hard war against the South. He was elected governor of Tennessee on the Republican ticket in 1865, and again in 1867. In 1869, he became a U.S. Senator.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


(1834-1913) Born on May 10, 1834, in Norridgewock, Maine, he graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1854. During the Civil War he served as Chief Quartermaster respectively on the staffs of General Edwin V. Sumner; for the Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac; for the Cavalry Bureau, Washington, D.C.; and on the staff of General Edward R. S. Canby. He was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on March 13, 1865 for faithful and meritorious service during the Civil War. He remained in the Regular U.S. Army after the war and served until his retirement in 1897. He died on January 4, 1913, in Washington, D.C., and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, in Section 2, Lot #1191.


<u>Check Signed</u>: 7 3/4 x 2 7/8, printed document, filled out in ink with an illustration of the front of the bank at left. Washington, D.C., Nov. 22, 1909. The Riggs National Bank. Pay to the order of the Union Trust Co. of D.C. Twenty five 00/100 Dollars. Chas. G. Sawtelle, U.S. Army. Punch hole cancellation spells out the word "PAID" at lower right. Stamped endorsement on the reverse.  


<b>The legendary Confederate Partisan Ranger</b>


(1833-1916) A lawyer by occupation before the War Between the States, he became a private in the 1st Virginia Cavalry and fought at 1st Manassas in 1861. Commissioned a 1st lieutenant in February 1862, he began scouting for General J.E.B. Stuart shortly afterwards, guiding him on his famous ride around Union General George B. McClellan in June. In January 1863 he organized his "Partisan Rangers" and engaged in guerrilla warfare around the Loudon Valley of northern Virginia, an area that became known as "Mosby's Confederacy." In March 1863, he captured Union General Edward H. Stoughton from his bed. Uncovering the sleeping general he slapped him on his behind. A great deal of energy was spent by the Union army trying to track the elusive Mosby down, and many historians credit him for helping to prolong the life of the Confederacy. By war's end Mosby had attained the rank of colonel. Wearing a gray cape lined with scarlet, and a ostrich plume in his hat, he became one of the legendary figures of the Confederacy. After the war he returned to his law practice and became involved in Reconstruction politics.


<u>Signature</u>: 2 3/4 x 1 3/4, on thick card mount, in ink, Jno. S. Mosby. Extremely desirable Confederate autograph.

H 70in. X W 60in. X D 2in. $0.00

 

W. G. Brownlow's Letter to C. S. A. General

 

Autograph, General Charles G. Sawtelle

 

Autograph, Colonel John S. Mosby $495.00




<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!


From Libby Prison, Richmond, Virginia</b>


2 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Libby Prison, Jan. 4th, 1864</b></u>


Dear wife,


After my love to you and well wishes for your welfare I will inform you that I have just recíd a letter from you dated on the 14th of Dec.in which you stated that you were all well which I was truly glad to hear, but sorry to have you fret yourself on my account for I tell you truly we have plenty to eat and that which is good and wholesome.  Our coffee and tea we get from home as they are very scarce here and as for suffering with cold I have got along fine.  Last Saturday was the coldest day known here for years yet I was very comfortable.  My partner Lieut. Manning* and me have five blankets and three comforters between us so you see we have enough of bedding to keep us warm sure.  You state that Father wanted to sell his farm which I was sorry to hear.  Unless I was able to buy it for I do not like it to go to strangers.  If I had the means I would buy it mighty quick.  Tell him I think he had better hold on to it a while yet, at any rate to consider the matter.  Well in regard to exchange I donít know what to think, but I hope it will be soon, so good-by Dear.  May the Lord help you in this your time is the prayer of your loving husband.


Lieut. L. Lupton


[To:] Mrs. E.H. Lupton

Jerusalem

Monroe Co.

Ohio


Staining and light wear. Desirable Yankee officer's P.O.W.  letter written from the notorious Libby Prison by one of "the boys in blue" who would not survive the war!


* Lieutenant John S. Manning, was 19 years old when he enlisted on August 15, 1862, as 1st sergeant, and was mustered into Co. A, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to 2nd lieutenant, on November 19, 1862; he was captured on June 15, 1863, at Winchester, Va.; promoted to 1st lieutenant, September 8, 1864; he was exchanged on March 5, 1865; and mustered out of the service on June 14, 1865, at Richmond, Va.


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.  


<b>United States Congressman and Senator from Connecticut


Governor of Connecticut


Attorney General of the United States


United States Secretary of the Navy</b>


(1792-1869) Born in Newtown, Conn., he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1818, and commenced practice in Hartford, Conn. He was the prosecuting attorney of Hartford Co., 1822-35, and 1842-44; served as U.S. Congressman, 1835-39; elected Governor of Connecticut by the legislature in 1846; appointed U.S. Attorney General, in the Cabinet of President James K. Polk, 1848-49; served as U.S. Senator, 1852-57; appointed U.S. Secretary of the Navy, in the Cabinet of President James Buchanan, 1857-61.


<u>Signature With Sentiment</u>: 4 1/2 x 2 1/4, in ink. </u>: Very respectfully, y[ou]r. ob[edien]t. s[ervan]t., I. Toucey.      


Unused, 7 3/4 x 10 3/4, illustrated letter sheet with an excellent, large panoramic view of the city of Washington, D.C. Published by Charles Magnus & Co., 12 Frankfort St., N.Y. Light age toning and wear. A very desirable Magnus Civil War era letter sheet featuring our nation's capitol city.  


<b>Commanded the 32nd Missouri Infantry during the Civil War and was wounded at Vicksburg


Governor of Louisiana


Louisiana State Congressman</b>


(1842-1931) He studied law, was admitted to the Missouri bar in 1860, and established his legal career while serving as a district attorney in Missouri. During the Civil War he was lieutenant colonel of the 32nd Missouri Infantry seeing action with them at the capture of Arkansas Post, and at Vicksburg where he was wounded. He was dishonorably discharged from the army for allegedly exaggerating the number of Union casualties, but after his personal appeal to President Abraham Lincoln he was reinstated to his former military status. After rejoining the army he commanded the regiment at the battle of Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, took part in the Atlanta campaign, and reinforced General N.P. Banks at the Red Cedar retreat. He was later commissioned as judge of the Department of the Gulf Provost Court. Henry C. Warmoth was the 23rd Governor of Louisiana, from 1868 to 1872.** Facing criticism from some Republican leaders for supporting weakened civil rights legislation and for endorsing a Democratic/Fusionist ticket in the 1872 election, Warmoth's term culminated in impeachment proceedings and suspension from office. Lieutenant Governor P.B.S. Pinchback assumed office during Warmoth's absence, becoming the first African-American governor in the United States. The impeachment charges against Warmoth were dropped after his term of office ended. He was the first elected Reconstruction Governor of Louisiana; later, he was elected as a Louisiana State Representative, serving one term from 1876 to 1878 while Reconstruction ended and the federal government withdrew its troops from the state. In 1888, Warmoth challenged former governor and ex-Confederate General Francis T. Nicholls in a gubernatorial contest and narrowly lost to the Democrat in an election noted for widespread voter fraud. In 1890, Warmoth was appointed U.S. Collector of Customs in New Orleans and served in that capacity for several years. He published his memoirs, "War, Politics and Reconstruction," in 1930. It is well regarded and considered a classic of the genre. Warmoth died in New Orleans in 1931, at the age of 89.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/4 x 1, in ink, H.C. Warmoth.



** WBTS Trivia: Henry C. Warmoth was sworn into office as Governor of Louisiana on July 13, 1868. Elected at the age of 26, he was one of the youngest governors in United States history. Stevens T. Mason, the first governor of Michigan, was the youngest state governor, elected at age 24.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

Autograph, Isaac Toucey $25.00

 

City of Washington, D. C. Illustrated Let

 

Autograph, Lieutenant Colonel Henry C. W $45.00




<b>Military Division of West Mississippi


Signed by John F. Lacey, A.A.G.</b>


4 3/4 x 7 7/8, imprint.


Headquarters,

Military Division of West Mississippi,

New Orleans, La., January 8th, 1864


General Orders,

No. 4


1. A draft of one in seven, based upon the enrollment directed in General Orders, No. 30, of 1864, will be made in the Department of Arkansas, Mississippi and the Gulf, on the 15th of February, proximo, unless the quotas to be assigned to the several Departments named, shall previously have been filled by volunteer enlistments.


2. The Commanders of the Departments named will fix the quotas for the several districts within the limits of their commands, and take the necessary measures for the prompt execution of this order.


3. The draft and enlistment of volunteers will be conducted in strict accordance with the regulations established by the War Department.


4. Volunteers that may be raised under this order, will be assigned to organizations already in the service of the United States, and no new organizations will be commenced until after these have been filled, unless specially authorized by the Secretary of War.


5. The troops to be raised under this order will not be credited to the quota of any State, included in the President's Proclamation of December 15th, 1864.


6. All persons who have, or may hereafter, come into the Departments above named, from the States or districts included in the President's Proclamation, will be added to the enrollment, and included in the draft, unless they furnish satisfactory evidence that they have fulfilled their obligations in relation to the draft in the district of their permanent residence.


7. Deserters from the enemy will not be drafted, and if enlisted, will not be assigned to local organizations, but will be sent in detachments of suitable strength to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to be assigned to regiments serving on the Indian frontier.


BY ORDER OF MAJOR GENERAL E.R.S. CANBY:

C.T. CHRISTENSEN

Lt. Colonel, Ass't Adjutant General


OFFICIAL: John F. Lacey, A.A. Genl. 


The Lacey autograph is signed in ink. There are 3 very tiny punch holes in the left border area where this order was once bound in an officer's order book. They do not affect any of the content. 


John Fletcher Lacey, a native of Virginia, was a 20 year old resident of Oskaloosa, Iowa, when he enlisted as a corporal in the Union Army on June 1, 1861, and was mustered into Co. H, 3rd Iowa Infantry. He was discharged from this regiment on November 1, 1861. He was promoted to sergeant major on August 23, 1862, and mustered into the 33rd Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant, April 16, 1864. On June 30, 1864, he was promoted to captain, and on March 26, 1865, he was promoted to brevet major. Having been transferred to the U.S. Volunteers Adjutant General's Department, he was mustered out of the army on September 19, 1865.     


<b>Commanding 9th Vermont Infantry


1864 Endorsement Signed with rank</b>


Valentine G. Barney, was a resident of Swanton, Vermont, when he enlisted as a sergeant, on May 2, 1861, and was mustered into the 1st Vermont Infantry, a three months regiment. He was mustered out of this regiment at Brattleboro, Vt., on August 15, 1861. On June 14, 1862, he was commissioned captain, and mustered into Co. A, 9th Vermont Infantry. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel, on May 24, 1863, and was mustered out of the Union Army on June 13, 1865. While serving with the 9th Vermont, Barney's regiment saw action at Winchester, Va.; Harpers Ferry, W.V.; Bogue Sound, N.C., where on Feb. 2, 1864, they had 3 men killed, 14 wounded, and 49 captured; Chaffin's Farm, Va., where on Sept. 9, 1864, the regiment had 7 men killed, and 45 wounded; and at Fair Oaks, Va., where they had 1 man killed, 5 wounded, and 6 captured, on Oct. 27-28, 1864.


<u>Endorsement Signed</u>: 6 1/4 x 3 1/2, in ink, I hereby certify that the position of Capt. in Co. G is vacant caused by resignation of Capt. E.A. Kilbourne to date Sept. 22d, 1864. "V.G. Barney, Lt. Col." signed above his printed title of Commanding.           <b>to the Gulf of Mexico</b>


7 3/4 x 10 3/4, imprint. Entered according to act of Congress A.D. 1866 by Virtue, Yorston & Co. in the clerk's office of the district court of the United States for the southern district of N. York. Very fine.  


Antique portrait engravings. Composite view of the following Confederate Generals: General Edmund Kirby Smith, General John Bell Hood, General Nathan Bedford Forrest, General Leonidas Polk, General John Hunt Morgan, General William J. Hardee and General Braxton Bragg. The name of each general is printed below their portrait. Engraved by H.B. Hall, N.Y. Engraved expressly for the Lost Cause by E.A. Pollard. 6 x 9 1/4. Generals' Morgan and Polk were killed in action during the war. Very desirable.

Orders Issued by General E. R. S. Canby Re

 

Autograph, Lieutenant Colonel Valentine $10.00

 

Chart of the Mississippi River From the

 

Generals of the Confederacy




8 x 10 1/4, imprinted form filled out in ink. The United States To W.W. Sherman, Pay Master, U.S.A. 1863. For Transportation as per appended statement. $119.50. 


I certify that the above account is correct and just, that the services were rendered as stated; and that they were necessary for the public service; and that the services have been reported by me, according to the Army Regulations. W.W. Sherman, Paymaster.


Received at New Orleans, La. the 22 of June 1863 of Capt. J.W. McClure, Ast. Qr. Mr. United States Army, the sum of One hundred nineteen dollars and Fifty cents, in full of the above account. W.W. Sherman, Paymaster.


Light age toning and wear with a small riveted hole at the upper center which does not affect any of the content.


William W. Sherman, a native of New Jersey, twice penned his large and bold signature to this document. Sherman enlisted on June 1, 1861, as a major, and was commissioned into the U.S. Volunteers Paymaster Department. He was dismissed on January 4. 1864.   


Antique portrait engraving. Composite view of the following Union Generals: General O.O. Howard, General Lovell H. Rousseau, General Benjamin H. Grierson, General Henry W. Slocum and General Jefferson C. Davis. The name of each general is printed below their portrait. Adorned with spread winged eagle, flourishes, and title, "Union Generals, Department Of The Mississippi." Engraved by J. Rogers from photographs by M.B. Brady. Published by Virtue & Yorston, New York, 1866. 8 x 11. Scarce. 

   


<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!


From Libby Prison, Richmond, Virginia</b>


2 plus pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife and children. 


<b><u>Libby Prison, Dec. 12th, 1863</b></u>


My Dear wife and Children,


After my love to you and well wishes for your welfare I will inform you that I am in good health with the exception of a little cold and I hope these few lines may find you all well, but oh it is a sad and lonesome place here for me although we have so much company, but there is nothing to cheer a person here, only when I get a letter from home and that does me a heap of good.  Dear you canít imagine how good those fruits and butters taste to me after being without anything of the kind so long and besides that they were made at home  and how I wish I were there for it is a long while since I was at home.  You stated in your letter of the 25th of last month that it was one year since we lost Dear little Irene.  It does not seem like it has been that long.  It seems so fresh in my memory.  Well Dear I donít know when I shall get out of this, but I hope that Congress will do something to help us in our extremity.  I do not think our government has done the fair thing with us by leaving us here so long, but maybe it is for the best and I must try and be resigned and do the best I can.  Dear try and bear up as best you can through these sore trials and pray for unworthy me and may the good Lord bless you all and keep you safe until I get home is the prayer of your Loving husband.


Lt. Levi Lupton


Give my love to Mother and all the rest.  I wrote to Father on the 10th.  You need put but one envelope on each letter in the ordinary way.


[To:] Mrs. E.H. Lupton

Jerusalem

Monroe Co.

Ohio


Minor staining and light wear. Excellent content including Lupton's criticism of the U.S. Congress regarding Union prisoners of war.  Desirable Yankee officer's P.O.W.  letter written from the notorious Libby Prison by one of "the boys in blue" who would not survive the war!


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color illustration of Columbia holding an American flag and a cornucopia, with spread winged eagle at lower left. Verse above, "We must keep that Flag where it e'er has stood, In front of the Free, the Wise, and the Good!! And fight and fall, at our Country's call, To defend the Flag of the People!" Light age toning.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

1863 Transportation Payment to U. S. Paym $25.00

 

Union Generals, Department of the Missis

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

We Must Keep That Flag $5.00




(1831-88) A prominent Civil War commander, he graduated in the West Point class of 1853. Appointed brigadier general of volunteers, Sept. 13, 1862, and major general, March 16, 1863. Fought in the battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, the Shenandoah Valley and Appomattox campaigns, to name but a few. Sheridan also saw action against the Plains Indians in the 1870's.


Antique portrait engraving of "Little Phil" Sheridan in uniform with rank of major general. Engraved by R. Whitechurch from a photograph. Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1866 by Rice, Rutter & Co. in the clerk's office of the district court of the United States in and for the eastern district of Pennsylvania. Printed facsimile autograph below the portrait. 5 3/4 x 9 1/4.  


1862 dated portrait engraving. Composite view of the following Union Generals: General Ambrose E. Burnside, General Franz Sigel, General Irvin McDowell, General Benjamin F. Butler, General Henry W. Halleck, General John E. Wool, General Daniel Hunter and General Ulysses S. Grant. The name of each general is printed below their portrait. Adorned with spread winged eagle on shield, etc. Engraved by Geo. E. Perine, New York. Published by Hurlbut, Williams & Co., Connecticut, 1862. 5 3/8 x 8 3/4.  

 


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color illustration of a Revolutionary War officer resembling George Washington holding his sword aloft in one hand and an American flag in the other. Motto above, "Death To Traitors. Light age toning. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  

 


1865 dated portrait engraving. Composite view of the following Union Generals: General John C. Fremont, General John Pope, General Joseph Hooker, General George G. Meade, General Ormsby M. Mitchel, General William S. Rosecrans and General Nathaniel P. Banks. The name of each general is printed below their portrait. Published by The American Publishing Co., Connecticut, 1865. 5 1/4 x 8 3/4.

General Philip H. Sheridan

 

Union Generals of the Civil War

 

Death to Traitors $5.00

 

Union Generals




1862 dated engraving, 8 3/4 x 5 1/2. Engraved by George. E. Perine. Caption: Landing Of Troops On Roanoke Island. Burnside Expedition. A.D. 1862. Entered according to act of Congress A.D. 1862 by Hurlbut, Williams Co. in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Connecticut. Light age toning in the margin.  


<b>Killed at the battle of the Little Big Horn</b>


(1839-1876) Graduated from West Point in 1861. He was destined to become one of the most celebrated, yet controversial figures in all of American military history. Custer was brave, dashing and enterprising. He served on the staffs of Generals George B. McClellan and Alfred Pleasanton until the spring of 1863, distinguishing himself on dozens of occasions. On June 29, 1863, he jumped rank from 1st Lieutenant to Brigadier General and was assigned command of a cavalry brigade under Gen. H. Judson Kilpatrick which he led with distinction in the Gettysburg campaign. From then until the end of the war he fought with the utmost distinction in all of the cavalry battles of the Army of the Potomac. Custer became a famous Indian fighter in the post war U. S. Army and was massacred with his entire command of the 7th U.S. Cavalry on June 25, 1876, at the battle of the Little Big Horn.


Antique portrait engraving of Custer in uniform with rank of major general with one arm resting on the barrel of a cannon, while the other is holding the hilt of a sword. Printed facsimile autograph below his portrait. Engraved by J. Rogers from a photograph by M.B. Brady. Entered according to Act of Congress A.D. 1866 by Virtue & Yorston in the clerks office of the district court of the United States for the southern district of New York. Scarce. Extremely desirable.  <b>to U.S. Officer Stationed in New York City Harbor</b>


Civil War date envelope with C.D.S. New Orleans, Sep. 4, 1862, with 3 cents George Washington postage stamp [Scott #64] with bulls eye cancellation. Addressed to Lieut. M.H. Stacey, Fort Hamilton, New York. The envelope is torn along the upper edges where it was opened. Red wax seal on the back flap. 


May Humphreys Stacey, a Pennsylvania native, enlisted on May 14, 1861, as a 1st lieutenant, and was commissioned into the 12th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to captain on August 18, 1864, for gallantry in action on the Weldon Railroad, Va.; brevet major, and brevet lieutenant colonel, April 9, 1865, for gallantry in the campaign that resulted in the surrender of the insurgent army under General Robert E. Lee. 


WBTS Trivia: During the Civil War, Fort Hamilton's garrison protected the New York City harbor against the possibility of Confederate raiders. It also provided troops to help put down the 1863 New York City Draft Riots, and served as a prisoner-of-war camp.    


This is a 5 x 4 1/2 piece of an album page with two Civil War date autographs of Union nurses neatly written in ink that came out of a soldier autograph album that was long ago broken up. #1: Clara Norris, Fortress Monroe, Va., January 1, 1865. #2: Nellie Norris, Washington, D.C., August 15, 1864. Very fine.

Landing of Troops on Roanoke Island, N. C

 

General George A. Custer

 

1862 Cover Sent From New Orleans, La. $10.00

 

Autographs, Union Civil War Nurses, 1864 $35.00




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