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<b>Written by Clark S. Edwards, Colonel of the regiment


He commanded the 5th Maine during the battle of Gettysburg!


Promoted to Brevet Brigadier General


"We have not heard any more about going South and I think we shall not go at present.  If we do not leave here I shall intend to have a good time here as it is not far from Washington.  I intend to go to Washington on Monday and be there when Congress convenes and hear the President.  John and I are planning to go."</b>  


(1824-1903) Edwards was 37 years old when the news of the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter reached the small town of Bethel, Maine.  He was high on a ladder shingling his roof and he immediately climbed down, obtained permission from the appropriate authorities to form a company of volunteers, and set out to gather recruits from Bethel and the surrounding towns.  This group of men became Company I, of the 5th Maine Volunteer Infantry, with Edwards commissioned as their captain on June 24, 1861.  He rose through the ranks and was appointed colonel of the regiment, on January 8, 1863, commanding the 5th Maine Infantry from that date forward. He was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on March 13, 1865, for his gallant and meritorious Civil War service record.


The 5th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was one of the first Maine regiments to be mustered into the Union Army.  They fought in many battles from 1st Bull Run to Petersburg.  During the battle of Rappahannock Station the regiment is credited with capturing 4 Confederate battle flags and 1,200 prisoners.  Known as one of Maine's best fighting regiments, it captured more prisoners than the entire number of men who served in the regiment, and three times the number of battle flags than any other Maine regiment.  After three long years of hard fought service only 193 men were mustered out of the regiment when their term of service expired.  Among their battle honors are written the names of 1st Bull Run, Gaines' Mill, 2nd Bull Run, Crampton's Gap, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Rapidan Crossing, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor and Petersburg.


5 pages, 5 x 8, in ink. Comes with cover addressed in the hand of Edwards to his wife Mrs. C.S. Edwards, Bethel, Maine, [thus autographed] with Washington, D.C.  postmark, and 3 cents rose George Washington postage stamp. 


<b><u>Wednesday Eve, [November]* 27/61</b></u>


Dear wife,


I thought I would write you a line, but have but little to write as it is dull in camp.  We are getting along in the same old way.  It has been a long dreary day, rained a little and the mud is knee deep.  6 companies of our Regt. are out on picket.  I for the first time am out of it.  Major Scamman [1]  had to take charge of them but it went rather hard with him.  He will have rather a hard time as it is a cold rain.  I have just been to supper.  We had bread, butter, tea, pie & cranberries.  [?] is here with us.  Tell his folks he is well.  The boys are all about well.  Dolloff [2] is a good deal better.  I hope he will get into camp in a few days as we need him in camp.  He is a first rate man.  Our company is in the best condition it has been since we left Me., but it is far too small, but if I go to Me. I shall try to get some recruits, but I shall not write anymore about going home till I get ready to go.  I have not got any letters from you this week but expect to get one tonight.  We have not heard any more about going South and I think we shall not go at present.  If we do not leave here I shall intend to have a good time here as it is not far from Washington.  I intend to go to Washington on Monday and be there when Congress convenes and hear the President.  John and I are planning to go.  I [have] not been to Washington for the last three months or near that, and but a few times to Alexandria.  I intend to have gone tonight and went to the Union meeting, but it is such bad travelling.  I have nothing to write as I have no letters to answer.  The mail has just come in and no letter, but I presume one will come tomorrow.  I am expecting [?] here this week.  I hope he will come so to be here at the meeting of Congress as it would pay him well to be there at that time.  I want you to write me if you have received the money I sent you.  I sent one hundred & fifty dollars and if I do not go home I [will send] some more if Oliver comes here, but if I go home I shall buy me a hat that will cost twelve dollars and a coat that will cost thirty dollars more.  It cost a great deal to dress here in the army.  Some does not lay up a cent that get more pay than I do.  They lay it out for dress, liquor and some other things.  [?] lays down on the floor asleep and is a snoring.  John is playing chess with Lieut. Packard of Co. K. [3].  Jimmy [his servant] is looking on to see them play so you can imagine how we look tonight.  I presume you are now writing me.  It is half past eight o’clock.  If so write me.  I shall send some of you a paper tomorrow and perhaps a book.  I wish I could send you something more.  I have not [?] yet but shall if I go to Washington on Monday and will send it by Oliver if he comes.

  

C.S. Edwards


Thursday morn: All well in camp this morning.  John & [?] are playing chess.  I am in command of the Regt., have been for the last few days.  Lieut. [Col.] Heath [4] has gone home on a leave of absence, the Col. is detailed for other business and the Major is on picket, so I am in command.  Feel pretty lazy I will assure you.  I cannot tell you when I shall be at Bethel, but think I shall be there in a week or two, but nothing certain.  Write me how you are getting along and if you have received the money.   



Light age staining and wear. 


* I consulted a Civil War calendar and Wednesday the 27th was in November 1861.


[1] Edward A. Scamman, was a resident of Portland, Maine, when he enlisted on September 24, 1861, as major, and was commissioned into the field and staff of the 5th Maine Infantry. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel, and colonel in 1862, and resigned on January 7, 1863.


[2] Levi W. Dolloff, was a 27 year old resident of Bethel, Maine, when he enlisted as a corporal on June 24, 1861, and was mustered into Co. I, 5th Maine Infantry. He was hospitalized on September 2, 1861, with typhoid fever, at Alexandria, Va., and returned to duty on December 14, 1861. He died of disease on January 16, 1862, at Camp Franklin, Va.


[3] Charles K. Packard, was a 21 year old resident of Hebron, Maine, when he enlisted as a sergeant on June 24, 1861, and was mustered into Co. K, 5th Maine Infantry. He was promoted to 2nd lieutenant, on September 23, 1861; 1st lieutenant, on February 15, 1862; and he resigned on June 13, 1862.


[4] William S. Heath, was a resident of Waterville, Maine, when he enlisted as lieutenant colonel, on September 24, 1861, and was commissioned into the field and staff of the 5th Maine Infantry. He was killed in action on June 27, 1862, at the battle of Gaines' Mill, Va.   


By Andrew J. Russell. With a Preface by Joe Buberger and Matthew Isenberg. Published by Dover Publications, Inc., 1992. Soft covers, large 9 1/4 x 12 1/4 format, with 116 full page historic prints. New condition. 


Captain Andrew J. Russell did not photograph celebrities, run a fashionable photographic gallery or publish collections of his views, however his peers and superiors recognized the quality of his work. He was unquestionably a major figure in 19th century American photography, a pioneer in every sense; he was one of only two or three official photographers, perhaps the only one who was also a soldier. Here, reproduced from one of his surviving scrapbooks of his photographs are 116 prints, many never before published, restoring a largely forgotten artist to an audience ready to appreciate him. 


Russell's duty included recording the activities of the crucial Railroad Corps as it helped move the Union Army through Virginia. At the same time, he witnessed and chronicled the campaigns of Fredericksburg, Petersburg, Brandy Station and Alexandria, and was there to photograph Richmond in ruins. He also documents Bull Run, Meade's headquarters at Culpeper, burying the dead after the battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, Lee's residence at Arlington, Fort Hell and Fort Damnation, Libby Prison in Richmond, the Capitol, and a heretofore unseen photograph of Lincoln's funeral car.


This collection of views by a professional military photographer, perhaps the first in his profession, is an archive of engineering triumphs and human loss and students of the Civil War will discover views unseen in the standard works, while lovers of photography will rediscover in Captain Russell's works an early master of the art.



  <b>and Jars</b>


By Mike Russell. Second Edition, With revised prices, more than 190 new listings, improved graphics, and supporting photographs. Published by Professional Press, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1992. Soft covers, 8 1/2 x 11, 96 pages, glossary of terms, and bibliography. Excellent condition.   


8 pages. THE GREAT REBELLION. Important News from the National Capital. A Chain Stretched by the Rebels Across the Lower Potomac. Stoppage of the Resolute with two Schooners in Tow. One of the Schooners Captured. Tremendous Cannonade of the Vessels. Reconnaissances Towards Occoquan and Leesburgh, News Direct From the Rebel Army, Important Correspondence between Lord Lyons and Secretary Seward, The Rights of British Subjects Discussed, Important from Missouri, The Rebels to Make a Stand at Carthage, Arrest of Secessionists, Protest About Buying Army Clothing in England, Proclamation by General Nelson, The Reported Removal of General Fremont, Affairs in Kentucky, Affairs at Annapolis, and much more early Civil War news. Edge chip, minor holes at centerfold, light age toning and general wear.

5th Maine Infantry Letter $125.00

 

Russell's Civil War Photographs

 

The Collector's Guide to Civil War Perio $25.00

 

The New York Times, October 20, 1861 $25.00




<b>The Confederate Dead at Gettysburg</b>


Compiled by Robert K. Krick, Press of Morningside Bookshop, Dayton, Ohio, 1993. Hard cover, blue and gray cloth edition with full color embossed Confederate flags on the front cover. 134 pages, appendix. Mint condition. A must for any serious Gettysburg reference library.  H 19in. D 16in.  H 13in. x W 13in. x D 42in.  H 36in. x D 20in.

2 available

The Gettysburg Death Roster

 

H 19in. D 16in. $0.00

 

H 13in. x W 13in. x D 42in. $0.00

 

H 36in. x D 20in.
2 available $4800.00

H 25in. x D 14in.  H 19in. x D 7in.  H 11in. x W 8in. x D 10in.  H 9in. x W 46in. x D 11in.

H 25in. x D 14in. $800.00

 

H 19in. x D 7in. $275.00

 

H 11in. x W 8in. x D 10in. $0.00

 

H 9in. x W 46in. x D 11in. $0.00

H 28in. x D 14in.  H 30in. x D 18in.  H 54in. x D 12in.  H 14in. x D 16in.

H 28in. x D 14in. $0.00

 

H 30in. x D 18in. $1150.00

 

H 54in. x D 12in. $0.00

 

H 14in. x D 16in. $0.00

H 38in. x D 15in.  H 26in. x D 10in.


price per pair  H 20in. x W 14in. x D 21in.  H 5in. x W 7in. x D 16in.

H 38in. x D 15in. $0.00

 

H 26in. x D 10in.

price per pair $650.00

 

H 20in. x W 14in. x D 21in. $0.00

 

H 5in. x W 7in. x D 16in. $0.00

H 34in. x D 12in.


price per item....2 available  H 46in. x D 20in.  H 40in. x D 21in.

 H 34in. x D 24in.

H 34in. x D 12in.

price per item. $1800.00

 

H 46in. x D 20in. $0.00

 

H 40in. x D 21in.
$1200.00

 

H 34in. x D 24in.
$4500.00

H 21in. x D 12in.

 H 34in. x D 17in.

 H 50in. x D 11in.

 H 26in. x D 14in.

H 21in. x D 12in.
$1450.00

 

H 34in. x D 17in.
$2650.00

 

H 50in. x D 11in.
$1600.00

 

H 26in. x D 14in.
$750.00

H 12in. x D 14in.

 H 5in. x D 10in.

 


Eighth plate ambrotype of a full standing Union private wearing a 4 button sack coat, military vest and holding his slouch hat while posing with the other hand resting on the back of a wooden studio chair. Comes in half case with brass mat, keeper and glass. Comes with an old piece of paper that was found in the case behind the image with ink ID: Joseph McCuskey, Carl & Berl's Father, sometime in 1860's. Nice image in a rare size. 


Joseph McCuskey, was 18 years old when he enlisted as a private on February 18, 1864, and was mustered into Co. K, 62nd Ohio Infantry. He served with this regiment until September 1, 1865, when he was transferred into the 67th Ohio Infantry, and was mustered out of the Union army on December 7, 1865, at City Point, Va.   


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"We had a terrible accident happened today in our Company.  Our men had just come in off of picket and in putting away their guns one of them was discharged, the ball struck Amos S. Byers just behind the right ear making a terrible wound and killing him instantly.  His brother is going to start home with his corpse tomorrow morning."</b>


3 3/4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Romney, Va., Feb. 17th, 1863</b></u> 


My ever Dear and loving wife,


With my love to you and the children, I will inform you that I am well and hearty and hope these few lines may fine you enjoying the same blessing.  I wrote one letter to you today and sent it by mail, but as Gib Carlton [1] is going to start for home in the morning I thought I would write another one and send it by him.  Well Dear, I often see you in dreams and night before last I dreamed of seeing my dear little Irena and oh how bad I felt when I woke up and found it was a dream.  I do wish that things would turn out so that I could get home again, but I don’t know when that will be.  We had a terrible accident happened today in our Company.  Our men had just come in off of picket and in putting away their guns one of them was discharged, the ball struck Amos S. Byers [2] just behind the right ear making a terrible wound and killing him instantly.  His brother is going to start home with his corpse tomorrow morning.  It has cast a gloom over our company.  We met with quite a loss yesterday.  There was about 28 wagons went out after forage.  About 48 men out of Comp.[any] F, Capt. Brown and Lieut. Martin went along as guards.  They had got their hay load and started back when they were over taken by the rebels variously estimated at from 30 to 200 men, and were all taken prisoners.  They were so completely surprised that they did not pretend to fight, but surrendered at once.  They took about 100 men, wagoner’s and all.  They burned all but 7 wagons and took all the horses.  It was a complete surprise.  There is great blame attached to Capt. Brown for the way the matter terminated.  Well Dear, by the bearer I send you three rings, one for you, one for each of the girls.  M.W. Maris [3] made the one for you and Jimmy Preshaw [4] made those for the girls, and also a little bible that Sam Stonebraker [5] made for Willey.  They are all made of laurel.  Well dear, I have not much more to say, only if Gib can bring me some paper and envelopes I would like for you to send them, so hoping to hear from you soon, I remain your ever loving husband and Father, and may the Lord bless you.


Farewell,

Lieut. L. Lupton


18th: Good morning Dear, I thought I would tell you that I was well.  This morning we had a little disturbance in camp.  Last night we thought that the enemy were shooting at our pickets, but it turned out to be nothing but horses kicking in the stables so we had no fight at all.  So good by my Dear.


From your loving,

L.L.


Light age toning and wear. The last few lines of his postscript are written in pencil. 


[1] Abner Gibson Carlton, was 24 years old, when he enlisted as a private, on August 16, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was wounded in action at Petersburg, Va., on March 31, 1865, and was mustered out of the service on June 2, 1865, at Fort Monroe, Va.


[2] Amos S. Byers, was 27 years old, when he enlisted as a private, on August 15, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was accidentally killed on February 17, 1863, at Romney, Va. His corpse never made it home as Lieutenant Lupton thought it would.  Instead Private Byers was buried in the Winchester National Cemetery, Winchester, Va.


[3] Matthew W. Maris, was 27 years old, when he enlisted as a corporal, on August 8, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to sergeant on June 15, 1863, and was wounded in action at Piedmont, Va., on June 5, 1864, and was discharged for disability at Camp Dennison, Ohio, on June 2, 1865.


[4] James H. Preshaw, was 18 years old, when he enlisted as a private, on August 16, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was captured at Winchester, Va., on June 15, 1865, and was exchanged on November 2, 1863. He was captured a second time, and wounded, on June 5, 1864, at Piedmont, Va., and was confined at the notorious Confederate prison, Andersonville, in Georgia, where he died on November 3, 1864. He is buried in the Andersonville National Cemetery, in grave site #11779.


[5] Samuel M. Stonebraker, was 24 years old, when he enlisted as a private on August 15, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was captured on June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He was transferred into the 118th Co., Veteran Reserve Corps, 2nd Battalion, on January 1, 1865, and was mustered out of the service on September 18, 1865, at Baltimore, Md.


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.

H 12in. x D 14in.
$1800.00

 

H 5in. x D 10in.
$600.00

 

Ambrotype, Private Joseph McCuskey, 62nd $250.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

Beautiful and in Original Condition Eastlake Dining Chairs, executed in walnut and currently upholstered in Purple velvet upholstery.  6 side chairs and 2 armchairs complete this highly detailed set.


Dimensions

Arm Chairs (2): 38.5"H x 22.5"W x 24"D

Side Chairs (8): 36"H x 16.5"W x 21"D  Colonel Jeremiah Palmer,an  Oriskany New York native organized the 2nd New York Artillery in 1861 which fought as Infantry much of the War, seeing heavy combat at  2nd Bull Run,  Knoxville, Tennessee, Petersburg, Farmville & High Bridge, Virginia, 1865. Colonel Palmer was severely wounded by shrapnel during the June 19, 1864 attack at Petersburg. An original Civil War CDV photo of a Colonel Palmer wearing oak leaf rank straps denoting his previous lt colonel rank. A pleasing  chestview with photographer imprints, front & back, by WJ Baker's Studio, Utica, New York. Small crease on reverse and age spots on margins, image Exc. Comes w service info.  General William Passmore Carlin of Illinois was a notable West Pointer, Indian Fighter, Civil War commander of the 38th Illinois, cited for bravery at Perryville, Kentucky, and as brigadier general ably commanded  forces at Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, The Atlanta Campaign, Savanna Georgia & Bentoville, North Carolina. An original Civil War era CDV photo of Carlin wearing major general  rank straps, circa 1865. The photo reverse bears the imprint of John Goldin & Co, Washington, DC, and a US revenue stamp with Goldin's stamped 1865 cancellation. Age stains, edge wear, 2 pinholes in mat, overall VG. The first Carlin image I have seen for sale in a while.  An original Pair of Civil War Veteran  Reunion Ribbons 1) 49th Massachusetts Volunteers, Pittsfield, Massachusetts  1915,  w large illus of  unit commdr, William F Bartlett, Army Potomac brigadier general , 2) 10th Massachusetts Infantry Regimental Reunion Ribbon, 1903,  Springfield, mass, w illus of a veteran. The reverse has a long list of the unit's battles incl Yorktown, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Antietam, Gettysburg, Fredericksburg, Wilderness. Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor,  etc    Both VG, each approx 7-8" overall. The pair

7226 Set of 8 Antique Eastlake Walnut Di $4000.00

 

COLONEL JEREMIAH PALMER UTICA NEW NEW Y $225.00

 

GENERAL WILLIAM P CARLIN CIVIL WAR CDV P $250.00

 

MASSACHUSETTS CIVIL WAR GAR VETERAN REUN $95.00

An original pair of massive wrought iron fireplace andirons or fire dogs, I got from the ruins of a slave cabin in Rapides Parish Louisiana 50 years ago. The irons are approximately  17 x 17 x 5", and are sturdy and still functional despite heavy rust and pitting. The cabin was near the Bayou and located between Cheneyville and Lecompte, Louisiana, the same area where Solomon Northup spent his early years as described in "12 Years a Slave".  Shipping will be by UPS Ground Insured, weight is approx 26 pounds. Shipping is $45.  


By George N. Barnard. Published by Dover Publications, Inc., New York. Soft cover, large 9 x 12 format featuring 61 full page photographs taken by Barnard of Sherman's campaign, plus 7 additional photographs by Barnard. Brand new condition.


George N. Barnard was a veteran photographer when he joined General Sherman on his decisive campaign through Georgia and the Carolinas during the Civil War. Barnard, a master of the daguerreotype, had worked for Mathew Brady earlier in the war, and Barnard and his assistants were as far as we know the only photographers to accompany General Sherman as he carried out one of the most brilliant and devastating military operations in history. This volume reproduces Barnard's complete portfolio of 61 photographs relating to Sherman's campaign, showing key battle sites and landmarks, with identifying captions, a corresponding map and Barnard's original commentary.


Tracing Sherman's movements eastward to the sea, the photographs record views of Sherman and his generals; the Capitol at Nashville, then under construction; Orchard Knob and Missionary Ridge; Chattanooga Valley from Lookout Mountain; the battleground of Resaca, Ga.; Etawah Bridge and Allatoona; the battlefield of Peachtree Creek, Ga.; the scene of General McPherson's death; the battlefield of Atlanta and the rebel works in front of Atlanta; the destruction left from Hood's Ordnance Train; the ruins in Columbia, S.C.; interior and exterior views of Fort Sumter; ruins of the Pinckney mansion, Charleston; and several others.


These pictures provide us with the most detailed visual source we have on the actual settings and terrain of Sherman's campaign, in many cases recording the bridges and battlements and the extent of the destruction as seen soon after the fighting. Several of the pictures are also quite remarkable as photographic art. The photographs of Savannah, which Sherman left intact, show us how this splendid port city once looked; the neo-classical ruins seen in several pictures suggest an ironic commentary on the South's fate during and after the war.


Barnard's photographs were originally published in a very small collectors edition now exceedingly rare, and have not been otherwise available before the present republication. Beaumont Newhall, the leading contemporary historian of photography, has written the Preface to the Dover edition, to which has been added seven other photographs by George Barnard. This is a book of extreme value and importance to Civil War buffs, military historians and to those interested in the early history of photography.


   Not like the usual find of a very delicate condition lady's fan of the period, this example was clearly intended for practical everyday use as opposed to a fashion statement.  It remains in fine durable condition and is, after decades of attic storage, ready for display with other period lady's finery or even for use and carrying should the lady desire.  Sturdily and yet attractively and delicately made of stained hardwood slats and that classic brown polished cotton that connoisseurs of period textile will recognize, this fan remains in fine original condition in every respect. No splits tears or repairs!   The piece measures just under 11 inches in length when folded (not counting the finger loop).  A common fashion statement and practical ladies utility of the Civil War period.  A fine all original accessory.

As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

  Our photos will offer the best description of this little pasteboard percussion cap box.  All in pleasing original condition this commercial cap box will fit in well with any proper period cased pistol set or will display nicely with period ammunition or with your favorite 1800s side arm.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

SLAVE ANDIRONS BAYOU BOEUF LOUISIANA SOL $350.00

 

Photographic Views of Sherman's March

 

Civil War era LADY'S FAN $95.00

 

Civil War vintage Percussion Cap Box

Though it appears to have been smoked at some time, this attractive carved bone tobacco pipe remains in excellent condition with that rich age color that comes to bone only with decades of age and careful handling.  Totally unmarked as to maker, the stem is of natural horn and the quality of work in the eagle claw body will best be described here by our illustrations.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I> All direct sales are backed by </I> <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased !</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item is being returned per these previsions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !       Identified to a <B>2nd Maine Infantry</B>  transferee to the hard fought <B>20th Maine Infantry</B> troop, this well worn soldier’s music book is none the less complete with no torn pages and is solid with the exception of the back cover which is there but separated.  This rarely seen original 1863 publication of <I>The Bugle Call</I> by Root & Candy of Chicago measures approximately 9 ˝ X 6 ˝ inches with 60 pages of <I>war songs</I> and patriotic music with lyrics.  (An interesting variation to the American music collector is the oddity of having a section of the book, pages 15 through 30, bound in upside down.) The book’s patriotic offerings include: <I>The bugle-call -- Stand up for Uncle Sam, my boys -- The harp of the Union band -- The Union League -- America -- Clear the way -- God save the nation -- The skedaddle rangers -- The ship of Union -- Gone to the war -- Flag of the fearless free -- Call 'em names Jeff -- Stand by the president -- The battle-cry of freedom -- O, wrap the flag around me, boys -- Our soldiers stand upon the field -- Hail, Columbia -- The star-spangled banner</I> (lyrics only) --<I> What's the cause of this commotion -- After the battle -- Uncle Sam's funeral -- Ho! for the gun-boats -- The battle-call -- Brave boys are they -- Jefferson D., Sir -- Come rouse up! brave boys -- Grafted into the army -- English neutrality -- Fine old Union gentleman</I> (lyrics only) --<I> Freedom and Union</I> (lyrics only) and more.

     A period pencil identification on the front cover offers <I>G. S. Gould – Maine</I> while on the first page in the top margin we see: <I>Bangor Me. – Gilman S. Gould – Maine</I> in period script.

     <B>Gilman S. Gould</B> gave his residence as Muscle Rig Place, when he enlisted as a 24 year old <I>Down East</I>Mainer and mustered in on October 17, 1862 as a Private of Co. G <B>2nd Maine Infantry</B> A list of the important battles in which the 2nd Maine participated during Gould’s tenure with the regiment would include,  Yorktown, Hanover Court House, Gaines' Mill, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville.  On May 20, 1863 the hardened veteran transferred to Co. H of the <B>20th Maine Infantry</B>.  Here the record becomes a bit foggy as while the Maine Adjutant Report lists a Gilman S. Gold as a transfer from the 2nd Maine to the 20th Maine, the early reference <I><B>Maine at Gettysburg</I></B> lists only a single <I>Gould</I> in the regiment, <I>William F. Gould</I> (a transferee from the 2nd Maine) serving as a <B>musician</B> in Capt. Walter Morrill’s Co. B of the 20th Maine. Some further research will likely unravel this all too common records puzzle.  The Maine Adjutant Report has our man transferring to the <B>Veteran Reserve Corps</B> on March 15 1865 with no method or date of discharge given?  As we have advised, this piece is offered as found with some folds at the corners and lots of evidence of period use but as we say, complete with no major page tears, stains or other issues save separation of the back cover.  A scarce Civil War collectable with a desirable <B>2nd Maine Infantry</B> and <B>20th Maine Volunteers</B> connection. 

     <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  




 


Wreath design at center of the cross with Deo Vindice 1861-1865 within and Southern Cross Of Honor around the edges. The opposite side has a wreath design at center with a Confederate battle flag within and United Daughters Confederacy To The U.C.V. around the edges. Has the hook on top but is missing the hanger bar. An excellent example as it is.


WBTS Trivia: The idea of a Southern Cross of Honor was conceived in 1898 by Mrs. Alexander S. Erwin, the daughter of Confederate General Howell Cobb, and it was to be bestowed upon Confederate Veterans for the valor and patriotism they exhibited during the War Between the States. The resolution adopted by the Laura Rutherford Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy in Athens, Ga., read in part, "every veteran...in times that tried men's souls, gave an exhibition of dauntless and unyielding courage in the face of overwhelming odds, such as has never been known in the history of the world."    


<b>12th Battalion Georgia Light Artillery</b>


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Oval view in civilian attire displayed within an ornate medallion frame on card. No imprint. Comes with original Confederate Veteran Magazine, Vol. XVI, June 1908, (missing front cover), with biographical articles about Lieutenant Colonel Henry D. Capers, one which includes a photograph of him with his granddaughter. Capers began his distinguished service with the Confederacy as Chief Clerk and Disbursing Agent in the Department of the Treasury, serving under Secretary C.G. Memminger. But in 1862, the gallant Capers left the comfort of civil service and joined the Confederate army, raising the 12th Battalion Georgia Light Artillery, becoming its lieutenant colonel, and being severely wounded in battle.


One of the articles reads in part:


<u>Tribute From Secretary Memminger</u>


"I am in receipt of your resignation as chief clerk and disbursing officer, an office you have filled from the initial day of the Confederate government. In season and out of season the faithful manner in which you have discharged the laborious and responsible duties incumbent upon you have not escaped my notice, and have greatly aided me. While I and the government lose the services of an efficient officer, I cannot but commend the spirit which prompts you to enter the army of our struggling country. My well wishes go with you."


The military career of Colonel Capers is well known to his living comrades. Leaving the security of a high office in the civil service, he was appointed by President Davis a captain in the regular army of the Confederacy, and in March, 1862, was assigned to the staff of General Magruder, then at Yorktown, Va. At the request of General Magruder, Captain Capers was promoted to the rank of major by the Secretary of War and ordered to organize a battalion of light artillery for service on the Peninsula of Virginia. This battalion he organized at Augusta, Ga., from four companies of the 1st Georgia Regiment of Infantry, whose term of enlistment had expired as twelve months troops- the first enlistment called for by the Confederate government. No command in the Confederate armies was more distinguished for its gallant, soldierly bearing on the march, in the camp, or on the field of battle than this, the 12th Georgia Battalion of Artillery.


In the Western Army, under the immediate command of General E. Kirby Smith; at Charleston, S.C., in the defense of Forts Sumter and Wagner; later in the ever memorable campaign of General Lee in 1864, and to the end at Appomattox; the 12th Georgia Battalion was noted for all that made the Confederate soldier the pride of Southern men and women.


In October, 1862, Major Capers, on the recommendation of General E. Kirby Smith and approved by General Bragg, was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel of artillery for "gallant and meritorious service."


In the battle of Cold Harbor, Virginia, June 2, 1864, Colonel Capers was severely wounded. Incapacitated for field service, he was assigned to duty by the Secretary of War with General J.A. Gorgas in the ordnance department and placed in charge of the bureau of field artillery. He held this official position until the end of the war. 


Returning to his home, in Georgia, Colonel Capers has devoted his remarkable energies in the most unselfish manner to advance the best interest of his people. With the last farewell order of General Lee to his immortal veterans as his guide, the Colonel has been untiring in his efforts to restore the peace and prosperity of his loved Southland. Well advanced in age, he is still in the vigor of manly strength. No one is better known and none more beloved by those who know him best. As an author his "Life and Times of C.G. Memminger, Secretary of the Confederate Treasury," is regarded as a standard work of reference, and has been so reported on by the American Historical Society.


It is really delightful to converse with this accomplished gentleman. He lives in Atlanta, and is actively engaged in the practice of law.


Since the death of Mr. Davis and Mr. Memminger, Colonel Capers by date of commission is the oldest Confederate official living. Source: Confederate Veteran, June, 1908

vintage carved bone – Eagle Claw Pipe

 

2nd & 20th Maine - identified - Bugle Ca $275.00

 

Southern Cross of Honor

 

CDV, Lieutenant Colonel Henry D. Capers $150.00




<b>Memoirs of an African American Seamstress</b>


By Elizabeth Keckley. Dover Publications, Mineola, New York, 2006. Soft cover, 156 pages, illustrated front piece of Elizabeth Keckley. Brand new condition.


Born a slave in Virginia, Elizabeth Keckley (1824-1907) went on to become a talented dressmaker and designer, with some twenty employees of her own. Catering to the wives, daughters, and sisters of Washington's political elite, she included among her clientele Mary Todd Lincoln, who became her close friend and confidante.


Keckley's behind the scenes view of wartime Washington not only provides fascinating glimpses of nineteenth century America, but also offers candid observations on interracial relationships and the free black middle class. Here also are absorbing details of life in the Lincoln White House, as well as an insider's perspective on the men who made Civil War politics and the women who influenced them. A touching and revelatory work, filled with incisive social commentary, this inspiring narrative will be an important addition to the library of anyone interested in African-American and Civil War history.  An original CDV photo of Lt Allen Hoar, Warren Rhode Island officer in the 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery. The chestview shows Lt Hoar wearing his rank bars, reverse is pencil inscribed "Lt Allen Hoar 1st RI Art". Reverse w photo imprint by J Trott, Bristol, RI. Age stain on lower mat, overall VG. Comes w service info 1861-1865 incl wounded 1862.  An original Civil War photo bustview of a soldier,  ink inscr on front mat "Yours, JMR Story"  with the reverse ink inscribed "Hyde Park, Mass", w photographer  imprint by NS Bennett, 69 King St, Alexandria, Va" . (The Gilder  Lehrman Collection, NYC has a full view image of Russell w bio info).  Corners clipped, image VG overall. Comes w service info.  


1824-90) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846. His record in the Mexican War was most gallant, and he received the brevet of 1st lieutenant at Chapultepec. He published "Rifles and Rifle Practice" in 1859. On June 8, 1861, he resigned from the U.S. Army, and fought at 1st Manassas as colonel of the 9th Alabama Infantry. He was promoted to brigadier general on Oct. 21, 1861. From then until the surrender at Appomattox, Wilcox was present with the Army of Northern Virginia in virtually all of its major battles. He was promoted to rank of major general after the Gettysburg campaign, and assumed command of Dorsey Pender's old division. Always reliable and dependable, his last ditch effort in defense of Fort Gregg on the Petersburg lines, on April 2, 1865, was one of his most noteworthy contributions.


Authentic, portrait engraving, in Confederate uniform, with printed facsimile autograph below. Etched by Charles B. Hall, New York. 12 x 16. Comes with printed biographical record outlining the military career of General Wilcox. Scarce.

Behind The Scenes in The Lincoln White H

 

RHODE ISLAND CIVIL WAR SOLDIER IDENTIFI $125.00

 

CIVIL WAR HOSPITAL STEWARD CDV IDD JMR R $135.00

 

Confederate General Cadmus M. Wilcox $35.00

Antique 19th C. Oak Victorian writing table with brown leather top.

Country of Origin: USA

Style: Victorian

Condition: Restored  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"I think if the weather would clear up and we could get out and drill or do something in the scouting line it would help to pass the time away, but the weather is so cold and there is so much snow on the ground that we cannot do anything in that line.  We had a very heavy sleet here last night.  It was very bad on the boys who had to stand guard, in fact it is a very hard time on the poor privates they have so much guarding to do."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Romney, Va., Feb. 6th, 1863</b></u> 


My ever Dear and Loving wife,


After my love to you I will inform you that I am still in the enjoyment of good health and hope these few lines may find you enjoying the same blessing.  Well Dear, I have not much to write this afternoon, but I felt so lonesome that I thought I would talk to you a little on this paper.  The Captain is going to see a horse race and Lieut. Mann [1] is officer of the guard and so I am left alone, but it makes but little difference to me for with all the company that surrounds me I still feel that loneliness, that aching void which nothing but the presence of my little family can ever full, and the longer I remain away from home the more lonesome and miserable I feel.  I think if the weather would clear up and we could get out and drill or do something in the scouting line it would help to pass the time away, but the weather is so cold and there is so much snow on the ground that we cannot do anything in that line.  We had a very heavy sleet here last night.  It was very bad on the boys who had to stand guard, in fact it is a very [hard] time on the poor privates they have so much guarding to do.  We have to send some wagons out every day for hay or corn and we always have to send a guard along with them of from 24 to 30 men, and they have to go from 8 to 14 miles after hay which makes a pretty hard day’s march of it, and it takes about three men every day to go to the woods to cut wood for our Company, and it takes John Sill [2] about one half of his time to haul the wood.  We have to bring it about two miles and a bad road at that.  Well dear, I got that money and the shirt all safe.  I could have got along very well without the money, but still I am very thankful for it, and will not use it without I have need to do so.  Tell Margy I thank her for that little song she sent me for it does me good for my little to write to me, and I wish that Mag and Laura would write to me often, and you my dear whenever you can for it makes my heart glad to get a letter from home.  I have been up to the hospital today to see John Walters [3] and B. Coffield. [4]  They have both been in there about 7 weeks.  Walters has had the typhoid fever.  He has been very low, but is mending pretty fast now, but is still very weak.  Coffield got his back strained and I don’t think he will be fit for duty for some time, yet the rest of our boys are generally well.  I think if T.L. Tipton [5] is as well as I understand he is, he ought to come and join the Regiment as soon as possible as I think he has as good a right to be here as the rest of us.  Well dear this is the third letter I have written to you this week and I thought I had not much to say today and I don’t know whether you will have patience to read all this or not as it is not very interesting, but I will quit any how so good by my Dear and loving wife, and may the Lord bless you all and hasten the time when I shall get home again.  Kiss little Seigel for me.


From your ever loving and true husband,


Lieut. L. Lupton


To E.H. Lupton


[1] James P. Mann, was 23 years old, when he enlisted as a 1st lieutenant, on August 16, 1862, and was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was mustered out of the service on June 13, 1865, at Richmond, Va.


[2] John Sill, was 36 years old, when he enlisted as a wagoner, on July 31, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was mustered out of service on June 14, 1865, at Richmond, Va.


[3] John Walters, was 30 years old, when he enlisted as a private, on August 13, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was captured at High Bridge, Va., on April 6, 1865, and mustered out of service at Camp Chase, on June 13, 1865.


[4] Benjamin Coffield, was 19 years old, when he enlisted as a private, on August 12, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was captured at High Bridge, Va., on April 6, 1865, and mustered out of service at Camp Chase on June 10, 1865.


[5] Thomas L. Tipton, was 18 years old, when he enlisted as a private on August 11, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was discharged for disability at Cumberland, Md., on February 23, 1863.


Light staining and wear. Very fine letter.


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a Zouave holding an American flag and pointing ahead. A sign post in the ground reads, "To Washington Through Baltimore." Verse below: "Jeff Davis boasts that "cotton's king," Upon his throne so rotten- But he'll soon find, amid his swing, That HEMP is king of cotton." 5 1/2 x 3.    


(1829-1902) Born in Lincolnton, North Carolina, he was educated at the United States Military Academy and graduated in the class of 1852. When the War Between the States broke out Forney was living in Alabama where he enlisted in the Confederate army and was commissioned colonel of the 10th Alabama Infantry. He was promoted to brigadier general on March 10, 1862, and major general on October 27th of that same year. He saw action in the battle of 1st Manassas, and was wounded in action at the battle of Dranesville in December 1861. He held departmental command in Alabama and Florida and directed a division of General John Pemberton's army at Vicksburg where he was captured. His subsequent service was in the Trans-Mississippi Department, where he succeeded to the command of John G. Walker's division. Source: Generals in Gray


Authentic, portrait engraving, in Confederate uniform, with printed facsimile autograph below. 12 x 16. Scarce.

Antique 19th C. Oak Writing Table w / Brow $4000.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

To Washington Through Baltimore $15.00

 

Confederate General John H. Forney $25.00




12 x 17, imprint. 1861-1864. Co. G, 17th Mo. Vol. Inf., or Western Turner Rifle Regiment. Mustered Sept. 25, 1861, Discharged Sept. 27, 1864. Lists Franz Wilhelme as Captain, Edward Schueller as 1st Lieutenant, and August Spinner as 2nd Lieutenant, and also includes the names of all the Non-Commissioned Officers and Privates of Co. G, 17th Mo. Vol. Inf. by rank. Below that it lists 23 battles in which Co. G participated in including the dates of each battle. Among them are Pea Ridge, Ark.; Chickasaw Bayou, Miss.; Arkansas Post, Ark.; Vicksburg, Miss.; Lookout Mountain, Tenn.; Missionary Ridge, Ga.; Ringgold, Ga.; Resaca, Ga.; Dallas, Ga.; Big Shanty, Ga.; Kennesaw Mountain, Ga.; Chattahoochie River, Ga.; Atlanta, Ga.; Jonesboro, Ga.; and Lovejoy Station, Ga. Below the battle honors is a section titled "Statistics" which breaks down the number of men killed, wounded, taken prisoner, etc., and at the bottom is a section titled, "Following are the Names and Condition of Co. G when Mustered Out of U.S. Service at St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 27th, 1864." Publisher and publication date are unknown.

 

Light wear and age toning. There are a few very tiny holes, and some small archival tape repairs on the folds on the reverse. Very fine. Rare Missouri broadside for the "Western Turner Rifle Regiment."       American quarter sawn oak figural carved throne chair with lady and lion heads C. 1890.  


Compiled and edited by Harold Holzer. Published by Addison-Wesley Publishing Company. Soft cover, 380 pages, index, illustrations. Excellent condition. A great addition to any Lincoln library.


Among the many credentials of Harold Holzer are Chief Communications Officer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, chairman of the Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation, and he is the author of many books on the Civil War and Abraham Lincoln. For "Dear Mr. Lincoln" Mr. Holzer won the Barondess/Lincoln Award of the Civil War Round Table of New York and the Award of Achievement of the Lincoln Group of New York. He has received numerous other awards for his work including the Lincoln Prize and the National Humanities Medal, and is one of the leading authorities in the world on Abraham Lincoln.  


The letters sent to Abraham Lincoln at the White House contained praise and damnation, advice and job requests, battlefield reports, family nagging, and more. Readers and historians welcomed this first major compilation of these documents for offering a unique picture of Lincoln as President and of life during the Civil War.


<u>Reviews of Dear Mr. Lincoln</u>


"A fascinating new compilation." Geoffrey C. Ward, American Heritage


"Fascinating...the letters offer further proof of the degree to which many Americans saw Lincoln more as an amiable neighbor than as an unapproachable head of state. They also offer a rough, vigorous glimpse of the North in wartime." Richard E. Nichols, The New York Times Book Review


"A fascinating look at a cross section of letters from the high and mighty and from the lowliest of common soldiers, dirt farmers and struggling widows. Holzer's introduction to the book itself gives a good view of the operations of Lincoln's personal office during his presidency...all in all, Holzer's latest Lincoln  offering is an informative look at the life and times of the sixteenth president from an unusual and rewarding perspective." Doug Pokorski, Springfield State Journal Register


"Harold Holzer, a Lincoln authority, says the President received between 200 and 300 letters a day, some praising him, some assailing him, many seeking jobs or favors. Holzer had the clever idea of compiling a varied and stimulating selection. Holzer also includes a substantial character study of the two secretaries [Nicolay & Hay] who actually opened  the mail. This book provides an illuminating sidelight on what America was really like as it underwent its greatest crisis." Herbert Kupferberg, Parade Magazine  


"A fascinating account of the thoughts of a nation." Library Journal




 Beautiful antique 19th C. walnut and burl wall clock in perfect working order.

17th Missouri Infantry Memorial Broadsid $150.00

 

American Quarter Sawn Oak Figural carved $3250.00

 

Dear Mr. Lincoln; Letters to the Preside

 

Walnut & Burl Antique Wall Clock $1250.00

Magnificent R.J. Horner walnut grandfather clock in mint condition. The clock is a Herschede Movement piece composed of nine tubes and three weights. The face is in mint condition and is signed Tiffany. It has been professionally serviced on a regular basis and is in perfect working condition. 8'3"H x 28"W at the base.Fine antique grandfather clock.


Herschede Serial #42401  3 white ironstone plates in the Corn + Oats shape. All made by Davenport. Ca. 1863. 5 1/4 inches D. Mint condition with great color and detail. Price is for all 3.  Fourteen(14) white ironstone plates in the Corn + Oats shape. 5 are made by Wedgwood, 9 made by Davenport. 8 3/4 inches D. Ca. 1863. Excellent condition with 2 with spots and minor chiggers on rims(pictured). Price is for all 14.  Six(6) white ironstone plates in the Corn + Oats shape. 5 made by Wedgwood, 1 made by Davenport. Ca. 1863. Excellent condition except one has a rim hairline(pictured). Minor roughness on a couple of rims. Price is for all 6.

Monumental R. J. Horner Walnut Grandfathe $52000.00

 

3 WHITE IRONSTONE PLATES, CORN + OATS $30.00

 

14 WHITE IRONSTONE PLATES, CORN + OATS $280.00

 

6 IRONSTONE PLATES, CORN + OATS $90.00




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