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Unused, Confederate patriotic envelope with full color illustration of the Confederate "Stars and Bars," the First National Flag, with C.S.A. printed below.  A Shaker oval Finger Box. This box came out of a FL. that was inherited from her grandmother who was an antique dealer in NH. Measuring 7 1/2 x 5 inches, 4 inches H. with 3 fingers.  Excellent condition with no breaks. Oxidation difference on the top where it has been stacked for decades.  Three(3) white ironstone salad plates in the Corn + Oats shape. Measuring 7 1/2 inches D. Two are marked Davenport, one Wedgwood. Ca. 1863. Mint condition with no chips or hairlines. Excellent color and detail. Price is for all 3.  


<b>Assistant Secretary of the Treasury in the President Abraham Lincoln Administration


Acting Secretary of the Treasury in 1864


United State Minister to Switzerland


War Date Free Frank Signature With Title</b>


(1815-92) A native of Georgia, he served in the United States Treasury Department under President Abraham Lincoln, as well as in other preceding administrations. He was a delegate from the District of Columbia at the Republican National Convention of 1860 that nominated Abraham Lincoln for president. He served as Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Treasury during the Civil War, and was appointed Acting Secretary of the Treasury Department in 1864 by President Lincoln when Secretary Salmon P. Chase left office. He was authorized by Lincoln to perform all of the duties as head of the Treasury Department until a successor was chosen. He served as U.S. Minister to Switzerland, 1865-69. He was the partner of the famous inventor, Thomas A. Edison, in the American Telegraph Works in Newark, N.J., 1870-73.


<u>War Date Free Frank Signature With Title</u>: 3 1/2 x 1 1/2, in ink, with partial imprint, Treasury Department, Geo. Harrington, Asst. Secretary. Partial Washington, D.C. postmark with [18]65 date visible. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.



<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: President Lincoln invested virtually all of his presidential salary in governmental bonds and relied on Treasury officials to take care of the transactions. Treasury official Levi Gould recalled that "After the seven-thirty bonds were offered for subscription, he came over, I should think, about once a month, sat down beside me, counted out what money he was able to spare from his salary, and invested the same in these bonds, while they lasted, or in a second issue of similar character. He waited until they were duly issued to his order, and then took them away."


Mr. Lincoln paid little attention to these investments, however, until he visited the Treasury Department on June 10,1864 to straighten out his finances. "By this time, Lincoln's purchases of government securities had become confusing to him. With problems of the war occupying his every waking minute, he had not time for personal affairs. Therefore he asked Salmon P. Chase to have his purchases consolidated into one type of government bonds. Chase promised to have this done. Lincoln made a list of his holdings, pocketed everything at hand, walked over to the Treasury Department and emptied the contents of his pockets on Chase's desk," according to Harry E. Pratt, author of The Personal Finances of Abraham Lincoln. 


Maunsell B. Field, of the Treasury Department, described Lincoln's arrival:


"I happened once to be with the Secretary when the President, without knocking, and unannounced, as was his habit, entered the room. His rusty black hat was on the back of his head, and he wore, as was his custom, an old gray shawl across his shoulders...I said good morning to Mr. Lincoln, and then, as was the established etiquette when the President called, withdrew...In less than five minutes I was summoned to return to the Secretary. Mr Schuckers, his private secretary entered the room at the same time that I did. The President was gone, and there was lying upon one end of Mr. Chase's desk a confused mass of Treasury notes, Demand notes, Seven-thirty notes, and other representatives of value. Mr. Chase told us that this lot of money had just been brought by Mr. Lincoln, who desired to have it converted into bonds."


Lincoln's holdings in government obligations totaled $54,515.07, and he brought along a bag of gold amounting to $883.30. Chase turned the securities over to <b>George Harrington, Assistant Secretary, for investment. In addition to the gold Harrington found five different kinds of assets: $16,000 of 7-30 notes; $26,181.40 of Certificates of Deposit; $8,000 of 5-20 bonds; $4,044.67 in salary warrants, and $489 in greenbacks.</b> Field noted that the President's assets totaled "$68,000", which was certainly a large sum for Mr. Lincoln to have saved from his salary in three years. Possibly a good deal of this money may have been anonymous gifts. However, it may be said that there was very clever financiering done in the White House in those days, about which the President was supposed to have little or no knowledge. He only knew that the establishment was conducted in a marvelously economical manner."  Source: Mr. Lincoln's White House

Confederate Patriotic Cover, C. S. A. Firs

 

SHAKER OVAL FINGER BOX $225.00

 

3 IRONSTONE PLATES, CORN + OATS $50.00

 

Autograph, George Harrington $25.00




<b>Civil War Congressman from New York


Civil War Governor of New York


United States Senator from New York


War Period Signature</b>


(1819-85) A powerful New York politician, he served as a Democratic U.S. Congressman, 1853-55, and quit his party over the issue of slavery. In 1855, he presided over the first Republican state convention. Served as Republican U.S. Congressman, 1857-64, Governor of New York, 1864-68 and U.S. Senator, 1869-75.


<u>War Period Signature</u>: 3 1/2 x 2 1/4, in ink, R.E. Fenton. Beautiful, large autograph. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.   


<b>Civil War Governor of Pennsylvania


United States Congressman


1865 Signature as Governor of Pennsylvania</b>


(1817-94) A lawyer by occupation, he was active in Whig politics before the Civil War. In 1860, he was the Republican nomination for Governor of Pennsylvania, the hope being that his election would help carry the state for Abraham Lincoln. An active supporter of the Federal government, he supplied many troops and much material for the Union war effort. Re-elected in 1863, Curtin was well known for the exceptional care he took of the dependents of his Pennsylvania troops. Unlike most Northern governors, he also faced the trauma of a Confederate invasion of his state, this occurring during the 1863 Gettysburg campaign. Curtin's decisive action called "Emergency Troops" into active service to defend Pennsylvania soil! He served as Minister to Russia in the President U.S. Grant administration and later served 3 terms as a United States Congressman, 1881-87. He served as Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and was a member of the Committee on Banking and Currency.


<u>1865 Signature as Governor of Pennsylvania</u>: 4 1/2 x 2 1/2, in ink, A.G. Curtin, Govnr. Penna, June 17, 1865. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.


Comes with an authentic, original woodcut engraving (4 3/4 x 6 1/4) of Governor Curtin, circa 1863.   


<b>War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1819-1873) From the age of 16 he had been a militia lieutenant and with the outbreak of war with Mexico, he was elected Lieutenant Colonel of the 2nd Pennsylvania Infantry, and took part in General Winfield Scott's advance from Vera Cruz to Mexico City. In the interval between the close of the Mexican War and start of the Civil War, Geary organized the post office system in California, served as the 1st mayor of San Francisco, and for several months was the territorial Governor of Kansas. On June 28, 1861, he was appointed Colonel of the 28th Pennsylvania Infantry and joined the command of General N. P. Banks at Harpers Ferry. He distinguished himself in several engagements and was wounded at Bolivar Heights, captured Leesburg in March 1862, was twice wounded at Cedar Mountain, and returned to action in time to command a division of the 12th Corps at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. Later transferred to the western army, he fought at Chattanooga, the Atlanta campaign and took part in General Sherman's celebrated March to the Sea. After the capture of Savannah, Ga., Geary was appointed it's military governor. His post war career saw him elected Governor of Pennsylvania in 1866, serving two terms.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 4 3/4 x 2 3/8, in ink, Jno. W. Geary, Bvt. Maj. Genl., U.S. Vols. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.   


<b>War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1824-1903) Known in the army as "Baldy," he graduated in the West Point class of 1845 ranking #4. As an engineer officer he spent his years before the Civil War in a variety of surveys and exploration duties, as an instructor at the Military Academy, and as a member and secretary of the lighthouse board. In July 1861, he was appointed colonel of the 3rd Vermont Infantry and saw action at the 1st battle of Bull Run. On August 13th of that year he was promoted to brigadier general. He commanded a division of the 6th Corps in the Peninsular and Antietam campaigns, and commanded the corps in the battle of Fredericksburg. Sent to the western theatre, he was chief engineer of the Department of the Cumberland and later held the same position in the Military Division of the Mississippi. Praised by Grant, Sherman and Thomas, he made a valuable contribution to the assault on Missionary Ridge. Grant brought him east in 1864 and gave him command of the 18th Corps of Butler's Army of the James. His corps was later attached to the Army of the Potomac in time to take part in the bloody battle at Cold Harbor, and in the Petersburg campaign.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 2 3/4 x 2 1/8, in ink, I remain Your Obt. Servt., Wm. F. Smith, Maj. Gen., U.S.V. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.

Autograph, Reuben E. Fenton $35.00

 

Autograph, Andrew G. Curtin $50.00

 

Autograph, General John W. Geary

 

Autograph, General William F. Smith




<b>War Period Signature With Rank


Medal of Honor Recipient


Presided over the hanging of the Lincoln conspirators!


Governor of Pennsylvania</b>


(1830-89) A lawyer by profession, at the beginning of the Civil War he was colonel of the 4th Pennsylvania Infantry. Hartranft was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for gallantry at the 1st battle of Bull Run. He then undertook the organization of the 51st Pennsylvania Infantry, and was commissioned their colonel on November 16, 1861, and led them in General Ambrose E. Burnside's expedition to the North Carolina coast in 1862. He was promoted to brigadier general on May 12, 1864, for gallant services rendered at the battle of Spotsylvania, and commanded a division during the Petersburg campaign. He was appointed special provost marshal for the trial of the Lincoln conspirators, and presided over their hanging on July 7, 1865. It was General Hartranft who led Mary Surratt, Lewis Thornton Powell, a.k.a. Paine, David Herold, and George Atzerodt to the gallows to be hung. He served as Governor of Pennsylvania, 1873-79.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 3 1/2 x 2 1/4 card, signed in in ink, J.F. Hartranft, Bvt. Maj. Genl., U.S.V. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.   


<b>War Period Autograph Note Signed With Rank</b>


(1811-87) His grandfather was a veteran of the American Revolution, and his father a veteran of the War of 1812. Emory graduated from West Point in 1831 and later distinguished himself in the Mexican War earning two brevets for gallantry. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Emory was stationed in Indian Territory and is said to have been the only officer in Confederate territory who brought out all his troops without the loss of a single man. Commissioned brigadier general on March 17, 1862, he took part in McClellan's Virginia Peninsular campaign; commanded a division under General N.P. Banks in 1863; commanded the 19th Corps during the Red River campaign of 1864; and was transferred to Virginia where the 19th Corps served under General Phil Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley campaign. In 1865, he commanded the Department of West Virginia. He married the great-granddaughter of Benjamin Franklin.


<u>War Period Autograph Note Signed With Rank</u>: 4 1/4 x 2 1/8, in ink, Wishing the Sisters of the Poor all success in their noble charity, I am Madam with high regard, Yr. obt. S[ervan]t., W.H. Emory, B.[revet] Major General. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.  


<b>War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1818-93) Graduated in the West Point class of 1843 and won the brevet of 1st lieutenant during the Mexican War. At the beginning of the Civil War, Ingalls was appointed Chief Quarter Master of the Army of the Potomac. He served successively under Generals' McClellan, Burnside, Hooker and Meade, rendering outstanding service to each of them in this position of great importance, a task which must be highly praised. In 1864, his intimate friend and classmate, General U.S. Grant, appointed him chief quartermaster of all Union armies operating against Richmond. He remained in the U.S. Army after the Civil War retiring in 1883 after 40 years of service to his country.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 4 3/4 x 3 1/4, in ink, on a partial piece of his personal imprinted stationary with is intertwined initials, "R I" at the top, Rufus Ingalls, Brig. Genl., Chief Qr. Master, Armies op.[erating] ag.[ainst] Richmond. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.  


<b>Severely wounded at the battle of Antietam!


War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1830-74) Graduated in the West Point class of 1852. He fought against the Florida Seminoles and was severely wounded in a skirmish near Fort Drane, Florida. In 1861, he went with the expedition which secretly reenforced Fort Pickens, Fla. During the fall and winter of 1861-62, he was chief of staff to General William S. Rosecrans in West Virginia, and on April 15, 1862, was appointed brigadier general. He fought gallantly at 2nd Bull Run, and was severely wounded at the battle of Antietam. He was promoted to rank of major general to rank from Nov. 19, 1862, and then commanded the 23rd Corps until being incapacitated again by his wounds. In March 1865, he took command of the Bermuda Hundred front for the siege of Petersburg, between the James and Appomattox rivers. After the evacuation by the Confederates he commanded the District of Nottaway with headquarters in Petersburg.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 3 3/4 x 1 3/4, in ink, Geo. L. Hartsuff, Maj. Genl. Vols. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.

Autograph, General John F. Hartranft

 

Autograph, General William H. Emory

 

Autograph, General Rufus Ingalls

 

Autograph, General George L. Hartsuff




<b>War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1803-65) Appointed a midshipman in 1815. He fought prominently during the Mexican War, operating on the Pacific coast where he quickly showed his skill as a naval combat commander, taking or destroying thirty enemy ships and clearing the Gulf of California in the process. Du Pont transported Major John Fremont’s troops to San Diego, where they captured the city. Du Pont then continued operations along the Baja coast, including the capture of La Paz, and burnt two enemy gunboats in the harbor of Guaymas under heavy fire. He led the main line of ships that took Mazatlán on November 11, 1847, and on February 15, 1848, launched an amphibious assault on San José del Cabo that managed to strike three miles inland and relieve a besieged squadron, despite heavy resistance. He was given command of the California naval blockade in the last months of the war and, after taking part in further land maneuvers, was ordered home. Du Pont served most of the next decade on shore assignment, and his efforts during this period are credited with helping to modernize the U.S. Navy. He studied the possibilities of steam power, and emphasized engineering and mathematics in the curriculum that he established for the new United States Naval Academy which he was appointed superintendent of. He was an advocate for a more mobile and offensive Navy, rather than the harbor defense function that much of it was then relegated to, and worked on revising naval rules and regulations. After being appointed to the board of the United States Lighthouse Service, his recommendations for upgrading the antiquated system were largely adopted by Congress in a lighthouse bill. Du Pont was appointed commandant of the Philadelphia Naval Yard in 1860, and expected to retire in this post, but the outbreak of the Civil War altered not only his plans but the course of history. When communication was cut off with Washington at the start of the Civil War, Du Pont took the initiative of sending a fleet to the Chesapeake Bay to protect the landing of Union troops at Annapolis, Maryland. In June 1861, he was made president of a board in Washington formed to develop a plan of naval operations against the Confederacy. He was appointed flag officer serving aboard the steam frigate Wabash as commander of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, leading from Norfolk, Virginia the largest fleet ever commanded by an American officer at that time. On November 7th, Du Pont led a successful attack on the fortifications at Port Royal harbor in South Carolina. This victory enabled Union naval forces to secure the southern waters of Georgia and the entire eastern coast of Florida, and an effective blockade was established. Du Pont received commendations from U.S. Congress for his brilliant tactical success, and was appointed rear admiral on July 16, 1862. Towards the end of 1862, Du Pont became the first U.S. naval officer to be assigned command over armored "ironclad" warships. Though he commanded them ably in engagements with other ships, they performed poorly in an attack on Fort McAllister, due to their small number of guns and slow rate of fire. Du Pont was then given direct orders from the Navy Department to launch an attack on Charleston, South Carolina which was the site of the first shots fired in the Civil War with the fall of Fort Sumter and the main area in which the Union blockade had been unsuccessful. Though Du Pont believed that Charleston could not be taken without significant land troop support, he nevertheless attacked with nine ironclads on April 7, 1863. Unable to navigate properly in the obstructed channels leading to the harbor, his ships were caught in a blistering crossfire, and he withdrew them before nightfall. Five of his nine ironclads were disabled in the failed attack, and one more subsequently sank. The Secretary of the Navy, Gideon Welles, blamed Du Pont for the highly publicized failure at Charleston, and made him the scapegoat. Du Pont himself anguished over it and, despite an engagement in which vessels under his command defeated and captured a Confederate ironclad, he was relieved of command on July 5, 1863, at his own request. Though he received the help of Henry W. Davis, a U.S. Congressman from Maryland, to get his official report of the incident published by the Navy, an ultimately inconclusive congressional investigation into the failure essentially turned into a trial of whether Du Pont had misused his ships and misled his superiors. Du Pont's attempt to garner the support of President Lincoln was ignored. However, subsequent events vindicated Du Pont's judgment and capabilities. A later U.S. naval attack on the city failed, despite being launched with a significantly larger fleet of armored ships. Charleston was finally taken only by the invasion of General Sherman's army in 1865. Du Pont died on June 23, 1865.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 4 1/2 x 2 3/4, in ink, Respectfully Yrs., S.F. Du Pont, Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor. 

 


<b>War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1805-1871) Graduated in the West Point class of 1825. He participated in the Black Hawk, Florida and Mexican Wars and was twice brevetted for gallantry. In November 1860, he was ordered to Charleston Harbor to command the three United States forts there; Castle Pickney, Fort Moultrie, and Fort Sumter, in the face of South Carolina's imminent secession. Anderson refused a formal demand for his surrender and in the early morning hours of April 12, 1861, Fort Sumter was bombarded, and the Civil War began. His small garrison withstood 36 hours under fire before being compelled to surrender. Anderson became a national hero for his gallant actions. He personally raised the U.S. flag over Fort Sumter on April 14, 1865, exactly four years after he had hauled it down.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 3 x 1 1/2, in ink, Very Sincerely, Your obt. Servt., Robert Anderson, Maj. Gen., U.S.A. Cut on an angle at lower left corner not affecting any of the writing. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.   


<b>Wounded twice during the Civil War!


War Period Autograph With Rank</b> 


(1818-1883) Graduated in the West Point class of 1839. In 1859, he participated in the expedition which suppressed John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry. He was severely wounded at Corinth, Mississippi, in 1862, fought in the Vicksburg campaign, and subsequently had commands in Louisiana and in the Shenandoah Valley. In the operations before Richmond, Ord was again seriously wounded during the successful attack on Fort Harrison. He recovered in time to accompany General Ulysses S. Grant during the Appomattox campaign and was at the official surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee at the McLean House, Appomattox Court House, Va.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 4 1/2 x 2 1/4, in ink, E.O.C. Ord, M[ajo]r. Genl. Vols. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.   


<b>War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1835-84) Graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1855. In the spring of 1862, he was appointed as the chief engineer of Gen. Butler's expedition against New Orleans. After the occupation, Weitzel became 2nd in command and acting mayor, and was promoted to brigadier general. He commanded a division under Gen. Banks at Port Hudson and then returned east to become chief engineer of Butler's Army of the James operating against Petersburg. In 1864, now promoted to major general, he successively commanded the 18th and 25th Corps, the latter composed entirely of negro troops. In early 1865, he served under Butler in the attacks on Fort Fisher and in April commanded in the Appomattox campaign.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 4 3/4 x 2, in ink, G. Weitzel, Maj. Genl., U.S. Vols. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.

Autograph, Admiral Samuel F. Du Pont $95.00

 

Autograph, General Robert Anderson

 

Autograph, General Edward O. C. Ord

 

Autograph, General Godfrey Weitzel $75.00




<b>President Lincoln's Secretary of the Navy</b>


(1802-78) A former newspaper editor, he held various minor political offices and had been in the Navy Department before joining the Republican party in 1855. Named Secretary of the Navy by President Lincoln, he served with great efficiency. Completely loyal to Lincoln, his support of Andrew Johnson as well made him a steadying influence in the presidential cabinet. Resigning in 1869, he later wrote "Lincoln & Seward" and published his own, "Diary of Gideon Welles."


<u>Signature With Sentiment</u>: 4 1/2 x 2 3/4, in ink, Respectfully, Gideon Welles. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.  


<b>War Period Autograph With Rank</b>


(1823-1903) Graduated #1 in the West Point class of 1843. He won a brevet for gallantry in the Mexican War at Buena Vista. As an engineer officer, he was in charge of the construction of the new Capitol dome in Washington, D.C. He commanded a brigade at the 1st Battle of Bull Run, and led a division, and subsequently the 6th Corps, with distinction in the Virginia Peninsular campaign. During the Maryland campaign, he commanded the forces which penetrated Crampton's Gap at South Mountain, and his corps at Antietam. At the battle of Fredericksburg, he commanded the "Left Grand Division." He later commanded the 19th Corps in the expedition to Sabine Pass and in the ill fated Red River campaign in which he was wounded.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 4 x 2, in ink, W.B. Franklin, Maj. Gen. U.S. Vols. Excellent. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.  


<b>War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1822-92) He was a collateral descendant of George Washington and was connected by marriage to Mary Todd Lincoln. Graduated in the West Point class of 1842 which furnished 17 full rank generals in the Civil War. Won two brevets in the Mexican War. Appointed brigadier general, June 14, 1861, he captured New Madrid and Island No. 10 on the Mississippi River in a series of well executed movements. Promoted to major general March 22, 1862, he saw action in the Corinth campaign. Ordered east, he took command of the Army of Virginia and fought the battle of 2nd Bull Run. He later went to the Department of the Northwest and served creditably during the Sioux uprising in Minnesota.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 3 5/8 x 1 1/2, in ink, Jno. Pope, Maj. Genl., U.S.A. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.  


<b>War Date Autograph Letter Signed


Written to Colonel William Birney praising him for his gallantry at the battle of Fredericksburg, Va.!</b>

 

(1823-1903) At the age of 18 he enlisted in the U.S Army. From 1842-47, he served successively as private, corporal, sergeant, and sergeant major in the 7th U.S. Infantry, taking part in the siege of Fort Brown, was wounded at Monterey, and was present at the capture of Vera Cruz, where he subsequently was wed to one of the belles of the town. When the Civil War broke out he was commissioned colonel of the 38th New York Infantry, which he led at 1st Bull Run, and in all of the battles of the Virginia Peninsular campaign, and at 2nd Bull Run and Chantilly. On October 4, 1862, he was promoted to brigadier general and placed in command of a brigade in the 3rd Corps, Army of the Potomac. He fought at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg (where he was wounded) and in the Wilderness and Spotsylvania (where he was also wounded). He was universally eulogized by his superiors for bravery and ability. He met a tragic death in 1903 when he was run over by a train while vacationing in Monroe, N.Y.


<u>War Date Autograph Letter Signed</u>: 2 plus pages, 7 x 9, in ink.


Head Quarters, 2nd Brigade,


1st Division, 3rd Corps,


Centre Grand Division,


Camp near Falmouth, 


Dec. 19th, 1862


Lieut. Col. Wm. Birney,


Dear Sir,


As you are about to leave my command where you have been so favorably known, I cannot permit you to depart without expressing my sentiments towards you as a soldier and a gentleman.


When I first took command of the Brigade, I found you in command of the 57th Penn. Vols. having been assigned to it in consequence of the absence of field officers from a state of demoralization in that regiment, you brought order out of chaos.  An order from the War Department had directed its disbandment, but your untiring energy induced the authorities to reconsider their determination, and the benefit they derived from your teaching was made manifest on the field in front of Fredericksburg where the regiment behaved so gallantly. When I was promoted to the command of this Brigade I asked and obtained an order assigning you to the command of the 38th N.Y.V. and I am free to say that its discipline and effectiveness is still the same.  Your constant, untiring devotion to the regiment is deserving of all praise.  You had prepared them for their brilliant deeds in front of Fredericksburg and led by yourself performed prodigies of valor.

  

Colonel, I cannot express to you in language sufficiently strong my admiration of your conduct on that occasion, and although wounded in the outset, you disdained the thought of leaving the field while your regiment was engaged although I had directed you to do so.  Would that the service had many such officers.


That circumstances require our separation, I sincerely regret and in this sentiment I am joined by the whole command.


I am Sir, your obedient Servt.,


J.H. Hobart Ward


Brig. Gen.


Light age toning and wear. Very fine. Superb content. This letter came out of the Birney family archives. Scarce and extremely desirable. 


<u>General William Birney</u>: (1819-1907) He was the elder brother of Union General David B. Birney, and the son of antislavery leader, James G. Birney. He was commissioned Captain, of the 1st New Jersey Infantry, on May 22, 1861; Major of the 4th New Jersey Infantry, in September 1861; and subsequently Colonel of the regiment, on Jan. 13, 1863. Birney took part with these two New Jersey regiments in all of the battles and campaigns of the Army of the Potomac through Chancellorsville. On May 22, 1863, he was simultaneously appointed Colonel of the 22nd U.S. Colored Troops, and Brigadier General of Volunteers. In this dual capacity he enlisted seven Negro regiments, freed the inmates of the Baltimore slave prisons, expedited emancipation in Maryland, and served in Florida. During the latter part of the war he commanded a division of Negro Troops in the 10th Corps, and during the Appomattox campaign he commanded a division of the 25th Corps, and was present at the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. After the war, he served as U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia.

Autograph, Gideon Welles $75.00

 

Autograph, General William B. Franklin $75.00

 

Autograph, General John Pope

 

Autograph, General John Henry Hobart War




<b>War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1824-1881) Graduated in the West Point class of 1847. Mexican War veteran. Serving on the western frontier, he was wounded in a skirmish with Apaches in 1849. He resigned his commission in 1853, invented a breech loading rifle, was appointed a Major General of the Rhode Island State Militia and was elected to Congress as a Democrat. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he organized the 1st Rhode Island Infantry, becoming their Colonel. He was in command of a brigade at 1st Bull Run. Having become a Lincoln favorite, he was given command of the expedition against the coast of North Carolina, fought at Antietam, and in December of 1862 commanded the Army of the Potomac during their bitter defeat at Fredericksburg. Burnside also saw action at Knoxville, the Overland Campaign, and Petersburg. In his post war career he was elected Governor of Rhode Island three times, and later a U. S. Senator. 


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 4 1/2 x 2 3/8, in ink, Yours truly, A.E. Burnside, Maj. Genl. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.   

 


<b>Montgomery, Alabama issue</b>


Criswell #7. Montgomery, May 1, 1861. Arabic "500" in ornate green scroll at center. With 10 coupons attached. Very fine.


Please note that the bond is larger than our scanner so we have illustrated it here in sections.   


Unused, Confederate patriotic envelope with full color illustration of a Confederate States of American shield with the motto, "The Emblem Of The South." Very desirable.   A Yellow ware Pie Plate with Rockingham decoration. It is 9 1/2 inches D., 1 inch H. Beautiful coloration. Excellent condition with no chips or hairlines. Wear on the inside as expected. Ca. 1800s.

Autograph, General Ambrose E. Burnside

 

1861 Confederate $500 Bond $125.00

 

Confederate Patriotic Cover, The Emblem

 

YELLOW WARE PIE PLATE , ROCKINGHAM GLAZE $75.00

A Plain white ironstone Mug. Measuring 4 1/4 inches D., 4 inches H. Great color and condition, no chips or hairlines. Made by Alfred Meakin. Ca. late 1800s. Nice detail on handle.  A Yellowware bowl decorated with 2 white and 2 rust slip bands. Ca. 1880. It is 8 inches D., 4 inches H. near mint condition with a chigger on the foot(pictured) and the normal stilt marks on the interior. Great mellow coloration. We have graduated sizes of these.  


<b>War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1815-1872) Graduated 3rd in the West Point class of 1839. An assistant professor while still an undergraduate at the Military Academy, he first worked upon the fortifications of New York Harbor, and in 1844 inspected those of France. Upon his return to the U.S., he wrote a Report on the Means of National Defense, which was published by Congress and won him an invitation from the Lowell Institute of Boston to deliver a series of lectures. These were published as Elements of Military Art and Science, a work which enjoyed wide circulation among soldiers for many years. He received a brevet as captain in the Mexican War. At the beginning of the Civil War, General Winfield Scott recommended to Abraham Lincoln that Halleck be appointed major general in the regular service. In November 1861, Halleck relieved General Fremont at St. Louis and in a demonstration of his talents as an administrator quickly brought order out of the chaos in which his predecessor had plunged the Department of the Missouri. A series of successes by his subordinates at Forts Henry & Donelson, Pea Ridge, Island No. 10 and Shiloh, caused Halleck to shine in reflective glory, and his domain enlarged to include Ohio and Kansas. President Lincoln later recalled him to Washington to serve as general in chief of the U.S. Armies. 


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 4 1/2 x 2, in ink, H.W. Halleck, Major Genl. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a soldier wearing a kepi and holding his musket while bidding farewell to his sweetheart, their town visible in the background. Published by Waters Son. Light staining at the corners. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8.

PLAIN WHITE IRONSTONE MUG, LARGE $30.00

 

YELLOWWARE BOWL, RUST + WHITE SLIP $75.00

 

Autograph, General Henry W. Halleck

 

Soldier Saying Farewell to His Sweethear




Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a soldier kneeling over a fire with an angel rising up above him. Titled, The Soldier's Guardian Angel, with verse below, Times of joy, and times of woe, Each an Angel's presence know, Guardian Angels hover round, Peaceful Home, and Battle Ground. Published by Frank Beard. Light staining at the corners. 5 1/4 x 3.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a Union soldier waving an American flag with a cannon behind him and the slogan below, "The Loyal States will have no Compromise with Traitors, Treason, and Treachery." Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. Light staining at the corners. 5 1/2 x 3.   


<b>War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1813-91) He sailed with his father, Commodore David Porter, to the West Indies to suppress piracy in 1824, and joined the U.S. Navy in 1829. He served in the Gulf during the Mexican War. On April 22, 1861, he was named commander, and with his mortar fleet joined his foster brother, David G. Farragut, in March 1862 for the capture of New Orleans. He took command of the Mississippi River Squadron in Sept. 1862 with rank of Acting Rear Admiral and in cooperation with Gen. W.T. Sherman captured Arkansas Post in Jan. 1863. He was present during the Vicksburg surrender and served in General N. P. Banks's Red River campaign of 1864. Sent east, he commanded the North Atlantic Squadron and fought at Fort Fisher for which he received his fourth Thanks of Congress. Promoted Vice Admiral in 1866, he was superintendent of the Naval Academy and appointed Admiral of the Navy in 1870. He was the brother of Commodore William D. "Dirty Bill" Porter and the cousin of General Fitz John Porter.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 5 x 2 1/4, large ink autograph, David D. Porter, Rear Admiral. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. Light staining.  This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a well dressed Southern plantation owner wearing a straw hat and smoking a cigar with one arm resting on a table with a liquor bottle and glass and a tea pot and cup. Imprint below the illustration, The Southerner as He Was. Light staining. 5 1/4 x 3 1/8.

The Soldier's Guardian Angel

 

The Loyal States Will Have No Compromise

 

Autograph, Admiral David D. Porter

 

The Southerner as He Was




Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of Civil War soldiers running. A sergeant can be seen in foreground. Slogan reads, The First Step In The Art Of War, How To Run. Light staining and wear. 5 3/8 x 3 1/8.  


<b>Provost Marshal General of the Army of the Potomac


War Date Signature With Rank</b>


(1811-1888) Graduated in the West Point class of 1835. Patrick served for 5 years in the Florida War against the Seminole Indians and for 2 years in the Mexican War, where he was promoted to rank of brevet major. During the next decade he was instrumental in the promotion of the New York State Agricultural College. At the outbreak of the Civil War he became inspector general of the state of New York; and was later commissioned a brigadier general of U.S. Volunteers at the specific request of General George B. McClellan. He commanded a brigade of the 3rd Corps during the 2nd Bull Run campaign, and when his brigade was transferred to the 1st Corps, he saw action at South Mountain and Antietam. Patrick's outstanding ability as a disciplinarian got him appointed as provost marshal general of the Army of the Potomac, a position he held under all it's successive army commanders; Burnside, Hooker, Meade and Grant.


<u>War Date Signature With Rank</u>: 5 x 3, in ink, on partially imprinted sheet, Head Quarters Army of Potomac, Office Provost Marshal General, 17 March 1865. Respectfully, M.R. Patrick, Prov. Mar. Gen'l, Army of Potomac. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor. Excellent item! Very desirable in this format.  


<b>Wounded during Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg


War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1824-1886) Graduated in the West Point class of 1844. He won a brevet for gallantry in the Mexican War. Played a gallant role in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and in the 1862 Maryland campaign which climaxed into the battle of Antietam. He greatly distinguished himself in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. During the battle of Gettysburg, Hancock commanded the 2nd Corps, Army of the Potomac. His decisive actions on July 1, 1863 helped to save the strategic Culp's Hill for General Meade's army. On July 3rd, his corps became the focal point for the celebrated Pickett's Charge in which he was seriously wounded. After his recovery, he went on to fight in the bloody battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania and Cold Harbor, and earned the sobriquet "Hancock The Superb." In 1880, he was the Democratic nominee for the Presidency of the United States. He was narrowly defeated by another ex Civil War General, the soon to be assassinated, James A. Garfield. 


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 3 3/4 x 2 1/4 card, beautifully signed in ink, Winfd. S. Hancock, Major Genl. U.S.V., Comg. M.[iddle] M.[ilitary] Department. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor. Very desirable.  


Unused, Confederate patriotic envelope with full color illustration of Liberty wearing a Liberty cap and holding the Confederate States of American First National Flag. Motto in French above, "Dieu Et Mon Droit" which means "God and my Right." Very desirable.

The First Step In The Art Of War, How To

 

Autograph, General Marsena R. Patrick

 

Autograph, General Winfield S. Hancock

 

Confederate Patriotic Cover, Liberty Wit




Unused patriotic envelope with vignette of Confederate General Gideon Pillow with two soldiers charging him with their muskets and fixed bayonets. The slogan reads, Gen. Pillow on the wrong side of the Ditch. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut Street, Philad'a. This is a satirical theme based on General Pillow's escape from Fort Donelson, Tenn. before the fort surrendered in 1862. Excellent.  


Unused, patriotic envelope with vignette of negro slave carrying a basket of cotton with cotton plants around him. Titled, "COTTON IS KING," with imprint below the illustration, "But de crop's small dis year- dat's sure." Published by Young, Lockwood & Co., Buffalo. Scarce.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of President Abraham Lincoln and American shield with slogan, Secession! non est. Published by E.K. Kimmel, 59 Nassau St., N.Y. Light staining. 5 3/4 x 3 1/4. 


Translated from the Latin, "non est" means to escape performance of an agreement. In this case it means that the Lincoln Government will not agree to the Southern States seceding from the Union.  


<b>Judge Advocate General


He tried the Lincoln assassination conspirators, and Andersonville commandant, Captain Henry Wirz


War Period Signature With Rank</b> 


(1807-94) A renowned lawyer and Democratic orator in Kentucky, he was President Buchanan's Commissioner of Patents (1857), Postmaster General (1859), and Secretary of War (1861). When President Lincoln was inaugurated, he returned to Kentucky to try to turn that state from a policy of neutrality. He then was named colonel and the first Judge Advocate General on September 3, 1862, holding the prerogative of certain civil powers of arrest and of holding persons in arrest without writ of habeas corpus. Promoted Brigadier General U.S.V., Judge Advocate General, June 22, 1864 upon the establishment of the Bureau of Military Justice, he tried General Fitz John Porter as well as the Lincoln assassination conspirators, and Andersonville commandant, Captain Henry Wirz. He was severely criticized for obtaining Mrs. Suratt's death warrant by keeping the military commissioners plea of clemency for her from President Andrew Johnson.


<u>Card Signature With Rank</u>: 3 1/4 x 2, in ink, nicely signed, J. Holt, Judge Adv.[ocate] General. Affixed to a 5 x 7 1/2 album page. This came directly out of an 1865 dated autograph album whereby prominent Union generals, admirals and politicians sent their autographs to be sold for charity for widows, orphans and the poor. Very desirable Lincoln related autograph.

Patriotic Cover, General Pillow on the W $20.00

 

Patriotic Cover, Cotton Is King

 

President Abraham Lincoln, Secession! no

 

Autograph, General Joseph Holt




<b>War Date Autograph Note Signed With Rank</b> 


(1807-83) The half brother of Union cavalry general John Buford of Gettysburg fame. After receiving an education in the plantation schools of Kentucky, he was appointed to the West Point class of 1827. His most distinguished classmate was Confederate General Leonidas Polk who wrote of him, "[Buford] is as good a fellow as ever lived, and most devotedly my friend; a true Christian, a true soldier, and a gentleman, every inch of him." In 1861, Buford recruited the 27th Illinois Infantry and became their colonel. He was promoted to brigadier general on April 15, 1862, and saw action in the battles of Belmont, Island No. 10, Corinth, Vicksburg and he later commanded the district of Arkansas.


<u>War Date Autograph Note Signed With Rank</u>: 7 3/4 x 5, in ink, on imprinted letter head. Head Quarters, District of Eastern Arkansas, Helena, Arkansas, Jany. 20th, 1865. Geo. W. Read, Esq. I have the honor to be Your obt. Servt., N.B. Buford, Brig. Genl. Comdg. Excellent condition. Scarce.  


<b>Confederate Senator


U.S. Congressman and Senator from Arkansas</b>


(1814-79) Born in Scott County, Ky., he moved with his father to Arkansas in 1821. He attended the Choctaw Academy and St. Joseph's College, in Bardstown, Ky., studied law, was admitted to the bar and started a practice in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1835. He served as prosecuting attorney for the Little Rock circuit, 1840-42, and was State Attorney General; he served as a U.S. Congressman, 1847-53, and was the Chairman of the Committee on Indian Affairs; served as U.S. Senator, 1853-61, and was the Chairman of the Committee on Printing, he also served on the Committee on Public Lands, and the Committee on Military Affairs and Militia; he served as a delegate to the Provisional Government of the Confederate States of America in 1862; and was a member of the Confederate Senate, 1862-65.


<u>Signature with Place</u>: 6 x 2 1/2, in ink, R.W. Johnson, Little Rock, Arks. Light age toning.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"I am afraid some times that I have not done right in leaving you but I pray God to forgive me for what I have done amiss and also that he may take care of you and finally make you all well, and that we may once more be permitted to meet again in peace and happiness for it is not much happiness that I can enjoy separate as I am from all I hold dear to me on this earth, but I try and put my trust in my heavenly Father knowing that he does all things well.  Good by Dear and may God in his infinite goodness have you in his holy keeping and if we meet no more on earth we will meet in Heaven."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife and children.


<b><u>Camp near Gallipolis, Oct. 9th, 1862</b></u>


My Dear wife,


I recd. your very acceptable letter of the 7th this morning which found me in the enjoyment of good health and oh how I wish that this might find you all enjoying the same blessing.  Mr. Booth gave me a letter last night from you and I was in hopes from what you stated in it that Margy would not be very bad, but your letter of the 7th destroyed that hope.  It does seem too hard to think of your troubles and I cannot help you any.  I would give almost anything in reason if I could get off and come home and stay with you until you all got well again.  I lay and study about you at night and during the day I do not think that there is one hour but that I think of my little family.  I am afraid some times that I have not done right in leaving you but I pray God to forgive me for what I have done amiss and also that he may take care of you and finally make you all well, and that we may once more be permitted to meet again in peace and happiness for it is not much happiness that I can enjoy separate as I am from all I hold dear to me on this earth, but I try and put my trust in my heavenly Father knowing that he does all things well.  Good by Dear and may God in his infinite goodness have you in his holy keeping and if we meet no more on earth we will meet in Heaven.


My Dear Daughter Margy,


It makes me sick at heart to think of you being so sick and me not there to help your poor Mother take care of you for it is so hard for her having so much to do, but I hope the good Lord will take care of you all.  Sis I want you to pray for yourself and for your poor Father for the Lord will hear and answer the prayers of his children, so good by my dear sick child, hoping to hear that you are better soon for which I will pray.


From your loving Father,


Levi Lupton


Willy Dear, I want you to be a good boy and not say bad words and mind your Mother and help her all you can and you too Laura, try and help Mother and take care and not expose yourself and get sick, so good by my Dear children and may God bless you all.

  

Dear Libby, about those pigs, I think you had better get John or someone to fix a pen and put the sow by herself and I think they would fatten.  I think you had better kill the pigs this fall if they get in order as it will not pay to keep them over winter and do dear try and get a girl to help you no odds what it costs until the children get better, and then if you can get one to stay the winter, it will be better as I do not want you to stay by yourself, so farewell Dear.


From your loving husband,


Lieut. L. Lupton


P.S. Just state in your next what you think of the way J.L.H. is doing and get board at the girls for that man if he comes.


Scattered staining and light wear. Fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a soldier standing at attention in a doorway with his musket with fixed bayonet. Imprint below, J.D.'s body guard. 5 1/2 x 3.

Autograph, General Napoleon B. Buford

 

Autograph, Robert W. Johnson $35.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

Jeff Davis's Body Guard




Unused, 5 3/4 x 3 3/8, imprinted envelope from the 1864 presidential election campaign. Imprint on the front, For President, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Of Illinois, For Vice President, ANDREW JOHNSON, Of Tennessee. Key Note-- "UNION & LIBERTY." 


UNION PARTY PLATFORM is imprinted on the reverse. Integrity of the Union to be maintained at all hazards; Paramount authority of the Constitution and Laws; Suppression of the Rebellion by Force of Arms; Unconditional Surrender the only Terms; Condign punishment of Rebels and Traitors; Gratitude to our patriotic soldiers and sailors; and permanent provision for benefit of survivors. 


Admiration of President Lincoln's practical wisdom- his unselfish patriotism- his unswerving fidelity- his singular fitness for responsibilities of the Presidential office- his determination to carry out all Constitutional Measures.


Complete extirpation of Slavery; Approval of the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Employment of Negro Soldiers; and of Amendment of the Constitution to Annihilate Slavery.


Vigorous and just Taxation, Faith to be maintained with Creditors; Encouragement to Foreign Immigration; Speedy construction of Railroad to the Pacific; Prudent Economy-- Rigid responsibility of officials; Countenance and support of the National Currency; Fidelity and Protection to all Union Soldiers alike; Endorsement of the Monroe Doctrine.


Copyright secured by Wm. P. Lyon & Whittemore.


Excellent condition. Rare. Extremely desirable.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a Union vivandiere pouring water from a wooden canteen to a wounded Zouave with bandaged head who is lying on the ground with his musket. Battle scene in the background. Light staining at the corners. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8.     


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"my little son try and be good to your sisters and Mother as they have nobody, also to be man for them."</b>


2 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his son.


<b><u>Oct. 4th/62</b></u>


To my Dear little sick boy,


Well Willy, Mother said in her letter that you were not much better.  I was in hopes that I would have heard that you were well, but you must try and be good and [take] your medicine like a little man and I think that if you are a good boy the good Lord will soon make you well and [I] think you can help Mother take care of the rest.  Do my little son try and be good to your sisters and Mother as they have nobody, also to be man for them, but you, and when poor Margy is sick, and Mother has so much to do you must try and not fret.  Remember the Lord loves good little boys.  Be very good to your little sisters and to Little Levi and all the rest, and I want you all to be good to each other.  Well bub, I must conclude.  Kiss Mother and the baby for me and may the good Lord bless you all and keep you safe until I return.  Farewell one and all.


From your loving Father,


Levi Lupton


To Willy O. Lupton  


Light age toning and wear. Fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


<b>Montgomery, Alabama issue</b>


Criswell #6. Montgomery, May 1, 1861. Vignette of Commerce and Agriculture. Printed on thick paper, with 8 coupons attached. Very fine.


Please note that the bond is larger than our scanner so we have illustrated it here in four sections.

Abraham Lincoln & Andrew Johnson 1864 El $250.00

 

Vivandiere Comforting Wounded Zouave Sol

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

1861 Confederate $100 Bond $125.00

Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison, this neat little pipe is maker marked C. P. F. for the Colossus Pipe Factory, sometimes erroneously  referred to as <I>Consolidated</I> Pipe Factory. The pipe bowl is of hard rubber and sports its original turned bone stem. All in as new and unsmoked condition yet with subtle but all important age patina as evidence of vintage originality. Tobacciana collectors particularly pipe and cigar holder enthusiasts will recognize the distinct C. P. F. in oval as the logo of the New York maker, established in 1851.  (We’ll let the experts hassle over weather this is intended as a pipe or cigarillo holder.)  With its early hard rubber bowl of classic Civil War era design and bone stem this piece will lay nicely in any period personal item or tobacco related collection.   (A number of hard rubber tobacco pipe variations may be found in <I>India-Rubber & Gutta-Percha In The Civil War Era</I> by Mike Woshner )  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques and remember as with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>




 Our photo illustrations will best describe this beautiful early spoon except to advise that the bowl measures approximately 2 3/16 inches in width.     This spoon is finely handcrafted with a rich natural color and raised grain over fine line engraved decorative design.  Untouched natural features that come only with time.    It bears a deep maker brand in a style that will be familiar to collectors of early American woodwork. (see: <I>EARLY AMERICAN ANTIQUE COUNTRY FURNISHINGS</I> by Neumann also Valley Forge Museum collection) .   <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>


 All original and in pleasing condition, our photographs will do best to describe this nice old dental instrument.  Two extra claws for the extraction of varying size molars remain with the antique extractor.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Those who remember us from the major Civil War shows in years past can attest to how partial we are to personal items and our reputation as likely buyers in those days.  Though most interested in Maine items, our passion for neat personal items brought lots of treasures to our display and sales tables over the years and many of these purchases got set aside as a <I>rainy day</I> research project only to lay in a storage tub mix of relics waiting to be rediscovered.  The nice thing is that now days the internet cuts the time and effort of research to the point that we are encouraged to dig some of this <I>stuff</I> out and properly discover what we have. 

This little marking kit is a prime example of the frequency of nice things showing up at the old shows as it was the second stencil outfit to come to us over the years at the old Wheaton, Illinois Civil War show.   Offered here in its original untouched tin pocket case with dabbing brush and ink vile is a personal marking stencil cut to identify the original owner simply as <B>L. A. Brown</B>.  Our purchase notes of family verbal history was simply that the kit <I> Len</I>Brown an <I>Ohioan who died in the Civil War and was buried in Georgia</I>.   Not much to go on in the pre internet days (no wonder we chose to set it back for that <I>rainy day</I>.)  but by the magic of HDS and a search for L. Brown from Ohio who didn’t survive the war, up pops <B>Leonard A. J. Brown Co. D 97th Ohio</B> .  Enlisting as a Private on August 12, 1862, Brown served with the hard fought 97th   until June 22, 1864 when he was killed at Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia.   Under <I>other information</I> he is recorded as <B>Buried: Marietta National Cemetery, Marietta, Georgia</B>.  (Just to be sure and because of the J. as a second middle initial, we checked the National Park Service and Broadfoot’s databases.)  Our Leonard A. J. Brown is the only Civil War, Ohio, L. A. Brown to match the descendant history of having been buried in Georgia.   In a quick review of the 97th Ohio we found that at Kennesaw on June 22 when 153 men of the regiment was ordered forward against Confederate outposts 112 were either killed or wounded in the space of 30 minutes.   A lot to say about so little a history provided by the folks we got the stencil kit from but we feel an obligation to preserve such and will pass our letter to the new owner to preserve the above. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>

mid 1800s pocket TOBACCO PIPE or CIGARI $75.00

 

c. 1700s early 1800s antique carved DECO $145.00

 

18th century early 19th century TOOTH KE

 

Civil War STENCIL KIT with family histo $235.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color battle vignette of U.S. soldiers with muskets and a flag bearer leading the charge with the enemy visible on top of the parapet and a cannon has just been fired through the embrasure. 5 3/8 x 3 1/8.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"We have to drill about 4 hours every day.  Our men are learning very fast and we have a fine looking regiment of men.  "</b>


3 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Camp Near Gallipolis, Oct. 3d, 1862</b></u>


My Dear wife,


I recd. your letter of the 30th this morning, I was glad to hear from you but very sorry to hear that poor little Irena had that terrible disease, but I trust that the good Lord will hear and answer my prayers for my little family for I do try and pray for their welfare.  Well as to myself I got down here safe.  I got to Marietta the evening I left home and staid there all night.  I started the next morning and got into camp about eleven o’clock Tuesday night.  I met Eli Evens and John Egger on the road home.  I was pretty tired, when I got here I found the boys generally well.  They had got their clothing and it had changed their appearance so that I hardly knew them.  It had changed their appearance a powerful sight.  Some of our men have been drinking cider and eating apples and pies and other good things until several of them are sick, and I think that was the cause.  Henry Cline and David Truax are pretty bad but the Doctor thinks he will have them all right before long.  I am trying to take care of myself as best I can and be sure I will not expose myself any more than I can help, and I think if a person tried he can get along very well.  Well dear, I must conclude as it is so hot in our tent that I will have to go out and cool off  and it is nearly time to go on drill.  We have to drill about 4 hours every day.  Our men are learning very fast and we have a fine looking regiment of men.  Well good by dear.  Kiss the children for me and may God bless you and give you health and strength.


Your ever loving husband,


Levi Lupton


Lieut. Levi Lupton


Camp Gallipolis, Gallia Co., Ohio


Co. C, 116

  

Light age toning and wear. Very fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with map of the scene of operations at Corinth, Miss., and the great battle at Pittsburgh, Tenn. (Also known as the Battle of Shiloh). Light staining. 5 3/8 x 3 1/8.  <b>Shoot Him on the Spot</b>


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a man wearing a top hat being blown away by a cannon ball to the stomach, the barrel of the gun at right. The quote was taken from General John A. Dix's 1861 American Flag Dispatch, "If any one attempts to haul down the American Flag, shoot him on the spot." 5 1/2 x 3.

U. S. Troops Charging a Fort

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

The Great Battle at Pittsburgh Landing,

 

If Any One Attempts to Haul Down the Ame




<b>Mayor of Jersey City, New Jersey during the Civil War


United States Congressman from New Jersey</b>


(1829-96) Was a member of the board of aldermen of Jersey City in 1861-62, serving as its president in 1862; served as mayor of Jersey City, 1864-66; was a U.S. Congressman, 1869-71; was an unsuccessful candidate for the nomination for Governor of New Jersey on the Democratic ticket in 1880; served again as mayor of Jersey City, 1886-91; and was one of the organizers of the board of trade of Jersey City in 1888, and its first president.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 4 1/2, in ink, O. Cleveland, N.J.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of the Battle Monument at Baltimore. Published by J.W. Bond & Co. Light staining at the corners. 5 1/2 x 3 1/4. Located in Battle Monument Square, on North Calvert Street, this handsome monument commemorates the Battle of Baltimore with the British fleet's bombardment of Fort McHenry, the Battle of North Point, southeast of the city in Baltimore County on the Patapsco Neck peninsula, and the stand-off on the eastern siege fortifications along Loudenschlager's Hill (later Hampstead Hill, in what is now Patterson Park, east of town. It honors those who died during the month of September 1814 during the War of 1812.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of an officer standing on a rock while holding an American flag and sword. Imprint below, "Strike- till the last armed foe expires. Strike- for your altars and your fires. Strike- for the green graves of your sires, God- and your native land!" Sold by Mumford & Co., 38 & 40 W. 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio. Light staining. 5 3/4 x 3 1/4.   


 


Civil War patriotic imprint titled "Thoughts of Home" with vignette of a Zouave soldier seated with his musket and smoking a pipe. Small corner repair. Light staining at the corners. 5 3/8 x 3.

Autograph, Orestes Cleveland $10.00

 

Battle Monument, Baltimore

 

Union Officer Holding American Flag and

 

Thoughts of Home




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