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5 x 7 3/4, imprint.


Headquarters Department of the Gulf

New Orleans, Sept. 6, 1862


General Orders No. 67


All commanders of Regiments, Batteries and detached Companies, in this Department, having discharged soldiers or men entitled to go home, will repor[t] the same to the Quartermaster immediately, so that they may be sent by the first transport.


By command of

MAJOR GENERAL BUTLER


R.S. DAVIS, Capt. & A.A.A.G.


Scarce Department of the Gulf imprint. Excellent.  


<b>8th Mississippi Infantry Regiment


Also includes doctor's letter</b>


8 1/2 x 14, two sided imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Application For Pension


How Made; What to Contain; Description of Disabilities; Oath Prescribed


Form No. 6


General Prorate Class 


Application for Indigent Widow of Soldier or Sailor of the late Confederacy, Under Chapter 102, Code of 1906, as amended by Laws of April 5th, 1910 and Laws March 24th, 1916. Sec. 1 of Laws 1916 being as follows: "Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Mississippi that all applications for pensions heretofore made and filed, be and same are hereby declared void, and any person desiring to share in the future distribution of the pension fund, shall on or before the first Monday in September 1916, file a new application, using blanks to be furnished by the Auditor of Public Accounts through the Chancery Clerks of the various counties."


Applications must be filed with the Chancery Clerk on or before the first Monday in September 1916, and no application will be entertained not on the printed form. 


This application is for Matilda Long, age 67, a resident of Jasper County, Miss., and the widow of James C. Long who enlisted in the service of the Confederate States in Jasper County, Mississippi in the Fall of 1863, and served in Company E, 8th Mississippi, commanded by Captain B.F. Moss, and that he was honorably discharged in 1865. Much more information. The document has been signed by numerous people and witnessed and is dated July 20, 1916. Embossed seal at the top of the Chancery Court of Jasper County, Miss. 


Included with this application is a manuscript doctor's letter, 5 x 7 3/4, written in ink as follows:  To the Honorable pension board Jasper Co., Miss. This is to certify that I am the family physician of Mrs. Matilda Long and that she is totally unable to do any thing to earn a support. W.C. Lamb, M.D. Aug. 6, 1915. Light age toning and wear. Archival tape repair on the reverse.


The 8th Mississippi Infantry Regiment was organized during the spring of 1861. The unit served in Florida and Mississippi, then was assigned to General J.K. Jackson's, Gist's and Lowery's Brigades respectively, in the Army of Tennessee. They participated in the campaigns of the army from Murfreesboro to Atlanta, were with Hood in Tennessee, and saw action in 1865 in North Carolina. The regiment lost 47 per cent of the 282 that participated in the battle of Murfreesboro, and 23 per cent of the 375 engaged at Chickamauga. In December 1863, it totaled 287 men and 169 arms. Their casualties in the battle of Atlanta were 13 killed, 71 wounded, and 3 missing, and very few were still in the ranks at the surrender of the regiment in 1865.      


HT-33. The obverse has a vignette of a tortoise with the year 1837 and "Federal Agent" below it. On the back of the tortoise is a treasure chest with "S.B. Treasury" on it. This refers to the "Sub Treasury" which the U.S. government established. The legend around the outer edges of the token is "Executive Experiment." The reverse has a vignette of what is known as "Jackass Running." This is one of the first instances of the use of this symbol to represent the Democratic Party of President Andrew Jackson whose veto of the bill to continue the existence of the Bank of the United States began the controversy that eventually led to the economic depression that started in 1837. The issuer of this "hard times token" was very critical of President Jackson's policy. The legend on the reverse is "I Follow In The Steps Of My Illustrious Predecessor." Very fine.



Andrew Jackson served as the 7th President of the United States from 1829-37. 


"Hard Times" tokens were issued privately when banks suspended payments and would no longer issue coins in change.  


<b>45th Pennsylvania Infantry


Twice Wounded; at the battle of Jackson, Mississippi, in 1863, and at the battle of the Wilderness, Virginia, in 1864</b>


7 1/2 x 6 1/4, manuscript in ink.


Seminary U.S.A. Hospital

Georgetown, D.C.

June 3, 1864


Major,


Will you please pay the Bearer Chas. H. Coombs, Hospl. Steward, the pay due me on the Company rolls for the Months of March & April as I am in want of it and am unable to leave my room on account of wounds.


Very respectfully,

William Chase

Capt. Co. I, 45 Pa. Vol.


Light age toning. Very fine.


William Chase, was a resident of Tioga County, Pa., when he enlisted as a sergeant, on September 21, 1861, and was mustered into Co. I, of the 45th Pennsylvania Infantry. He was promoted to 2nd lieutenant, September 14, 1862; and captain, April 1, 1863. He was wounded in action on July 11, 1863, at Jackson, Miss.; and wounded again on May 6, 1864, in the battle of the Wilderness, Va. He was discharged on January 18, 1865.


The 45th Pennsylvania Infantry saw action on James Island, S.C., South Mountain and Antietam, Md., Jackson, Miss., Blue Springs, and Knoxville, Tenn., the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and Poplar Springs Church, Va., to name a few of the battles they participated in.

1862 Orders Issued by General Benjamin F $15.00

 

Application of Widow of Deceased Confede

 

1837 Hard Times Token, Executive Experim

 

1864 Hospital Letter From Wounded Yankee $50.00




<b>The first Governor of West Virginia 


Elected during the War Between The States in 1863!


Later served as United States Senator from West Virginia</b>


(1823-96) Studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1843, and commenced a practice in Parkersburg, Va. He served as a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, 1855-61, and presided over the convention of Union supporters from the counties of northwestern Virginia, held at Wheeling, on June 19, 1861, to form the new state of West Virginia. Elected judge of the circuit court of the 19th circuit of Virginia, serving 1861-63. Served as the first Governor of West Virginia, from 1863-69, when he resigned to accept the nomination as U.S. Senator, serving 1869-75.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 3/8 x 2 3/4, in ink, Arthur I. Boreman, West Virginia. Very desirable autograph.

 


<b>Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court</b>


(1819-91) American lawyer and jurist who served as Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court. Born in Taunton, Mass., he was the son of Massachusetts Governor Marcus Morton. He graduated from Brown University in 1838, and from the Harvard Law School in 1840. He was admitted to the bar in 1841 and practiced in Boston for 17 years. He was a member of the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention in 1853. He served in the Massachusetts State House of Representatives in 1858 where he was chairman of the committee on elections and rendered reports on important questions regarding election law, which the House came to follow. His judicial service began with his appointment in 1858 to the superior court of Suffolk County and continued unbroken for over 32 years. During these years he was one of the original ten members of the state superior court, organized in 1859; Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts from April 15, 1869; and Chief Justice from January 16, 1882 to August 27, 1890, at which time he resigned because of ill health.


Antique portrait, steel engraving. Imprint of J.A.J. Wilcox, Boston. Printed facsimile autograph under his likeness. 6 x 9 1/4. Circa 1860's.        


Thomas Porter slave button. 3/4 inches in diameter with "T.Porter" on the face. Excavated example with shank. This button dates from the early 1800's and is a relic from the slavery trade era. It was manufactured for the slave trader Thomas Porter who sold slaves in the Caribbean area during the turn of the 19th Century. This button originated in Antigua, British West Indies and was produced in London. The name Porter may have been an Anglo version of Porteous as there was a French family who ran slave ships during that era. These buttons were reportedly found off the Georgia coast and were worn by his slaves for advertising purposes when sold at auction.

 


Numbered limited deluxe edition. By Hubert C. Skinner, Erin R. Gunter and Warren H. Sanders. Published by Bogg & Laurence Publishing Co., Inc., Miami, Florida, 1986. Autographed by the three authors, Hubert C. Skinner, Erin R. Gunter and Warren H. Sanders. Also autographed by publishers William G. Bogg and Kenneth R. Laurence. This is book #188 out of a limited edition of only 300 published. Blue padded leatherette covers with gold gilt imprint on front cover and spine. Printed on high quality gloss paper. Comes in its original hard card board slip case. 270 pages, profusely illustrated. New condition. Includes chapters on United States Postal Issues Used After Secession. Provisional Adhesives and Postal Stationary. Hand stamped Provisionals and Other Markings. Confederate Regular Issues. Color Plate Section. Essays and Proofs. Fakes and Counterfeits. Official Envelopes. Imprinted Envelopes. Blockade Run and Express Mails. Prisoner of War and Flag of Truce Covers. Postmarks and Cancellations. Confederate Patriotic Covers. College Covers and Postmarks. Packets and Steamboats. Confederate Stamp Money and Related Currency. Miscellaneous. Register of Historical Data. Superb reference book on Confederate Postal History. A must have for any serious collector or library.


Few areas of philatelic endeavor inspire as much dedicated interest, affection, and passionate devotion as does the collecting of stamps and postal history of the Confederate States of America.

Autograph, Arthur I. Boreman $50.00

 

Marcus Morton

 

Thomas Porter Slave Merchant Button $60.00

 

The New Dietz Confederate States Catalog




Antique 19th century fleam which was a bloodletting medical device. The brass case contains three foldable hinged steel blades. When closed the brass case or handle measures 3 1/2 inches in length. When the blades are fully opened the device measures about 6 1/2 inches in length. All three blades are stamped with the makers name which I can't make out. Very fine.    


(1783-1853) American lawyer, jurist and professor, born in Newburyport, Massachusetts. In 1801, he joined the law office of Ezekiel Whitman who was later the Chief Justice of Maine, and in 1806 he was admitted to the Cumberland County, Maine bar, commencing a practice at Standish. He later relocated to Gray where he practiced law for 12 years, and then moved on to Portland. He was reporter of the Supreme Court of Maine from 1820-32, and published nine volumes of Reports of Cases in the Supreme Court of Maine. In 1833, he was named to the Royall professorship, and in 1846 was named Dane professor of law at Harvard. Greenleaf contributed extensively to the development of Harvard Law School, including the expansion of the Harvard Law Library. He tried cases in the U.S. Supreme Court. His well known work, "A Treatise on the Law of Evidence," is considered a classic of American jurisprudence. Greenleaf prepared the original constitution of the Colony of Liberia. Greenleaf served as President of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and is an important figure in the development of that Christian school of thought known as legal or juridical apologetics. This school of thought is typified by legally trained scholars applying the canons of proof and argument to the defense of Christian belief. Greenleaf's Testimony of the Evangelists set the model for many subsequent works by legal apologists. He is distinguished as one who applied the canons of the ancient document rule to establish the authenticity of the gospel accounts, as well as cross examination principles in assessing the testimony of those who bore witness to the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ.


Antique portrait engraving with printed facsimile autograph below his likeness. Imprint of A. Trochsler, 116 Washington St., Boston. 6 x 9 1/4. Circa mid 1860's.    


<b>The Cradle of Liberty</b>


In 1740, at a meeting held in Boston, merchant Peter Faneuil offered to build a public market house at his own expense and donate it as a gift to the city. His offer was accepted and the building which was partly funded by profits from slave trading was begun in Dock Square in September 1740, and completed in 1742. Built in the style of an English country market by artist John Smibert, the ground floor served as a market house with an assembly room above. Faneuil Hall was the site of several important speeches by Sam Adams, James Otis and other patriots encouraging independence from England thus earning the nickname, "the Cradle of Liberty." Through its illustrious 275 year history many other famous orators have spoken here among them Daniel Webster, Edward Everett, Wendell Phillips, Charles Francis Adams, and Oliver Wendell Holmes. In 1806, the hall was expanded by Charles Bulfinch which included the addition of a third floor.  


Antique steel engraving of the famous market house and meeting hall in Boston. Executed by W.H. Bartlett & H. Griffiths. Overall size is 9 1/4 x 6. Circa mid 1800's. Excellent.  


Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1997. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 168 pages, illustrated, index. New condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who experienced the Charleston campaign. Through their words and images you can relieve the emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the human comedy- of one of the Civil War's longest and most excruciating campaigns. Thus you hold in your hands an album of personal recollections from letters, diaries, photographs, sketches, and artifacts. 


To compile this special volume, we combed hundreds of sources, published and unpublished.  We had invaluable help from an extensive network of consultants. Using our own diverse resources and historical materials in libraries and archives around the United States, we were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives: manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories and privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of these soldiers and townsfolk to accompany their accounts.


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail systems set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. Mail packets were even exchanged across enemy lines. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. Luther G. Billings, paymaster of the U.S.S. Waterwitch, described a Union naval bombardment of Battery Wagner, a Rebel island bastion outside Charleston: "It was a magnificent sight to behold the black threatening hulls of the ships moving into position, to the thunder of hundreds of Rebel cannon, and still more stirring to hear the roar of the immense fifteen inch guns with witch the monitors were armed, and to watch the huge missils go hurtling through the air until, burying themselves deep in the sand around the doomed fort they would explode and tear enormous pits."


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the army to depict events for readers. These correspondents, or "specials," drew virtually everything of possible interest: pitched battles, lounging soldiers, the odd piece of military equipment. Sketches dashed off in a few moments during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication; where they were transferred into woodblock engravings suitable for printing.


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are extensively chronicled, thanks to the efforts of men who endured great hardship. Travel was tedious with cumbersome equipment and portable darkrooms mounted on wagon beds. But photographers like Mathew Brady and his assistants spent months following the army, etching with light the brave faces of the soldiers, as well as the bodies stiffened on the field. When Brady's stark photographs of the dead were first exhibited in New York City in 1862, the public thought, albeit briefly, that such horrific images could actually bring the war to an end.

 

So here you find living testimony of the struggle to possess Charleston, birthplace of secession. As you look into the eyes and read the words of soldiers and civilians dazed by the violence around them, perhaps it will be possible to perceive more clearly the shattering experience that was the Charleston campaign.


Cover photograph: Mammoth coastal guns, situated in White Point Gardens at Charleston's East Battery, are trained on the harbor entrance. A ring of forts around the harbor made Charleston the Confederacy's strongest coastal city.

Civil War Era Brass Medical Bleeder $150.00

 

Simon Greenleaf

 

Faneuil Hall, Boston, Massachusetts $15.00

 

Voices of the Civil War, Charleston




<b>United States Senator from Indiana


Commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service</b>


(1813-77) Studied law, was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Logansport, Indiana in 1836. Served as a member of the Indiana State House of Representatives 1851-1853. He was elected in 1868 as a U.S. Congressman, but resigned on January 27, 1869, before the beginning of the congressional term, having been elected to the United States Senate. Served as a Republican U.S. Senator from Indiana, 1869-1875. He was chairman of the Committee on Pensions. In 1875, President Ulysses S. Grant appointed him Commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 3/8 x 2 1/2, in ink, D.D. Pratt, Indiana.    


<b>United States Senator from New Jersey</b>


(1826-1900) Born in Princeton, N.J., he graduated from the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University, in 1843, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1846, and practiced in Princeton and Trenton, N.J. He served as U.S. Minister to Italy, 1858-1861. He served as a Democratic Senator-elect to the United States Senate from March 15, 1865 to March 27, 1866, when, the election being in dispute, the Senate declared his seat vacant. He was elected again and served in the U.S. Senate from 1869-1875. He was the Attorney General of New Jersey, from 1877-1897.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 3/8 x 3 1/8, in ink, John P. Stockton, New Jersey.   Here is a heavy and large white ironstone pitcher measuring 12 inches tall.  It was once paired with a large basin and could be found in the bed chamber before the proliferation of indoor plumbing.  It is unmarked, but by its shape and feel we would think this was American made.  It is not as stark white as Staffordshire (antique English) pitchers of the same era.  We have added a picture  that shows it with a very white antique ewer to show its tone.


The jug is in great condition with no chips or cracks.  



Be it vintage ironstone or its elder, antique ironstone, these relics add charm to country home or farmhouse chic décor.  Creating a vintage kitchen, vintage dining room, or other room calls for authentic vintage china rather than modern day pieces that try to look old.  Antique French ironstone and antique English ironstone both do the trick.  Actually, many English pieces are misidentified as French in antique style offerings. 


Décor suggestion:  try adding a high shelf with ironstone pitchers on top and ironstone sauceboats on the pegs to ramp up an antique kitchen. The possibilities are vast.  


<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!


"We have had very good news from Vicksburg for two or three days and I hope by this time that our men have taken that place and if that is the case I think it won’t be long until the war will be over and that would be a joyful time for all the soldiers and especially for me.


"the doctor was telling us this morning about a distressed little slave that came to our old camp yesterday. Her mistress has struck her with a poker and broke her arm and then sent her to the poor house where she had been some time. She said she was almost starved and her arm was in an awful condition and almost rotten and he thought it would have to be taken off. He said it was the hardest job he ever done to dress it.""</b>


6 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, on regimental patriotic stationary, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Head Quarters, 116th Reg't Ohio Inf., Co. C, Camp Fort Acknoe, May 29th, 1863</b></u>


My Dear and loving wife, 


For two days I have been looking for a letter, but as there has none come I thought I would write you a few lines.  I wrote to you on Sunday and to the girls on Tuesday.  I recd. your letter of last Sunday sent by L.J. Morris and answered it on Wednesday so that I have kept it up pretty well this week for it is the most of my enjoyment either to read your letters or to write to you.  I keep your letters in my pocket and read it over and over until I get another and then I lay the old one away for future use.  You can’t think what good it does me to look at your likeness although it would do me a heap more good to look at you, but I go out of sight of the men and sit and look at that picture and wish it was you and kiss it and sometimes cry over it and wish I was at home with you for I feel very lonesome here while the boys are enjoying themselves dancing and playing football.  I feel that I would give something pretty to be at home with my quiet little family for I cannot enjoy their sports although I like to see them enjoying themselves so well for I would much rather see them lively than to see them sitting around stupid and lifeless.  Well Dear, I have not got much to write about at this time for there is not much going on at present.  We are still making more fortifications around here and there has two more Regts. of troops came in and two more coming.  The 87th Pennsylvania and the 18th Connecticut are here and the 106th New York and 151st Pennsylvania are on their way and things look like we were going to spend the summer here.  We have had very good news from Vicksburg for two or three days and I hope by this time that our men have taken that place and if that is the case I think it won’t be long until the war will be over and that would be a joyful time for all the soldiers and especially for me.  Well our Captain over staid his time by two days and Gen. Elliott placed him under arrest out of spite for he could have been here in time if the cars had made the connection, but the fact was Gen. Elliott was not willing for him to go home but Gen. Milroy sent him.  Elliott’s signing the _____ makes him _____ the meanest trick that he could have done and he has made a great many enemies both amongst the officers and privates.  The chaps has nothing to do but lay around the camp and eat, drink and sleep.  Well the doctor was telling us this morning about a distressed little slave that came to our old camp yesterday.  Her mistress has struck her with a poker and broke her arm and then sent her to the poor house where she had been some time.  She said she was almost starved and her arm was in an awful condition and almost rotten and he thought it would have to be taken off.  He said it was the hardest job he ever done to dress it.  Well I must close this letter.  I have got some memorials to send home but I have been expecting that George Mitchell would go home soon and I would send them.


3 1/2 o’clock, Silence


Well Dear, keep this to yourself, as the other sheet would not hold all I had to say, I thought I would write a few lines more on this.  You wanted to know when I would be at home.  Well it is hard for me to tell for I cannot get off yet without doing something that is dishonorable to myself.  There is some that resign because they are afraid of their men but it is not that way with me for I would be almost afraid of them if I should resign, but that is not the reason that I do not do it, it is just this, I cannot get off at this time without feigning to be sick and my looks would give that the lie, but I think if they go on promoting officers as they have done that I will have a good excuse before long and then I will pitch in.  I don’t want you to say anything about what I am going to tell you in regard to J.J. Blower, is the way he got off was this, he complained of his health and sent in his resignation, but the Colonel would not sign it so one day he was on duty and he went to town and got as drunk as a fool and was put under arrest and then the Colonel was so mad that to save trouble and get him out of the way he signed his papers for him.  The 2d Lieut. told me this and he swears that if he ever sees him again he will whip him half to death for he went off and did not pay his debts as common and he sneaked off without waiting to bid them good by.  I don’t think he has a friend in the company and Dear I don’t want to leave that way, so good by my loving wife.


Lieut. L. Lupton           


Light age toning and scattered light staining. There is a piece of the stationary torn off at the bottom of what is pages 3 and 4 of the letter. This causes the loss of a few words on both pages. Very interesting slave related content! Scarce regimental letter sheet. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.

Autograph, Daniel D. Pratt

 

Autograph, John P. Stockton

 

Large American White Ironstone Water Pit $100.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $125.00




HT-70. Vignette of Andrew Jackson in uniform holding a sword in one hand and a money bag in the other, while coming out of a money chest. "I Take The Responsibility" is printed around the edges of the obverse. The reverse has a vignette of a jackass at the center with "The Constitution As I Understand It," printed around the edges and "Roman Firmness Veto" above the jackass and "Veto" below it. Circa 1833-34. Very fine.


Footnotes: Andrew Jackson served as the 7th President of the United States from 1829-37. 


This "Hard Times token" mocked President Andrew Jackson for his economic policies.


"Hard Times" tokens were issued privately when banks suspended payments and would no longer issue coins in change. 


The theme of this token was to express the idea that it is bad for the executive to control both the treasury and the army. Because Andrew Jackson was not a good speaker and poorly educated, he was sometimes portrayed as a jackass especially when Harvard gave him an honorary LL.D degree. "I Take Responsibility" is what Jackson said after he put the funds of the Bank of the United States into twenty-five state "pet banks." His explanation was, "The Constitution As I Understand It." "Roman Firmness" was a taunt of the day to describe him. The word "Veto" below the jackass referred to Jackson's veto of the Third Bank of the United States.  


7 1/2 x 3, imprinted form, filled out in ink. $19.00. Received of R.H. Whittaker, Estate. Nineteen Dollars and __ cents Tax for the year 1841. His taxable property consisted of 275 acres of land, valued at $1100; and 9 slaves. Signed by the Warren County Tax Collector. Very fine.   


<b>United States Senator from Vermont


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress


1880 United States Presidential Candidate</b>


(1828-1919) Born in Richmond, Vermont. Studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1849, and commenced practice in Burlington. Served as a member of the Vermont House of Representatives, 1854-59, being Speaker of the House for 3 of those years. Served in the Vermont State Senate, 1861-62, as President pro tempore. Served as United States Senator, 1866-91. He took an active part in the attempt to impeach President Andrew Johnson, was influential as a member of the electoral committee that decided the disputed presidential election of 1876, was a candidate for president at the Republican National Conventions of 1880 and 1884, served as President pro tempore of the U.S. Senate, 1883-85, was chairman of the Republican Conference of the Senate, 1885-91, was chairman of the Senate Committee on Pensions, 1869-73, chairman of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, 1872-79, and 1881-91, chairman of the Senate Committee on Private Land Claims, 1879-81, and chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations in 1881.


<u>Signature</u>: 5 1/4 x 3, in ink, Geo. F. Edmunds. 

 


<b>Colonel of the 7th New Hampshire Infantry during the Civil War


United States Senator from North Carolina


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1825-81) Born in Concord, New Hampshire, he graduated from Phillips Academy in 1846 and was a lawyer, businessman, and newspaper editor. He served as Adjutant General of New Hampshire, 1856-61. He began his Civil War career on December 13, 1861, when he was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 7th New Hampshire Infantry. Promoted to colonel on November 17, 1863, he commanded the 2nd Brigade, 24th Corps. He later commanded Abbott's Brigade, Terry's Provisional District, and the 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 10th Army Corps. Abbott was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on January 15, 1865, for gallantry in the capture of Fort Fisher, N.C., and for a time was the commandant of the city. He was a delegate to the North Carolina State constitutional convention in 1868, and upon the readmission of the State of North Carolina to the Union was elected U.S. Senator serving from 1868-71. He served as collector of the port of Wilmington under President Ulysses S. Grant, and was inspector of posts along the eastern line of the southern coast under President Rutherford B. Hayes. He established the town of Abbottsville, in Bladen County, N.C. He was employed as a special agent in the United States Treasury Department. Served as the editor of the Wilmington Post newspaper. 


<u>Signature With States</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 3/4, in ink, Joseph C. Abbott, N.C.

President Andrew Jackson Hard Times Poli

 

1841 Mississippi Tax Receipt Listing Sla $75.00

 

Autograph, George F. Edmunds

 

Autograph, General Joseph C. Abbott $45.00




<b>United States Congressman & Senator from Vermont


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1810-98) Born in Strafford, Vermont. Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, 1854, as an antislavery Whig, he began an unbroken service of 12 years in the House and almost 32 years in the U.S. Senate, to which he was first elected in 1866. In the House he became an important member of the Ways and Means Committee of which he served as chairman, 1865-67; in the Senate he served as a member of the Committee on Finance, of which he was chairman, 1877-79, 1881-93, and 1895-98. He also served on the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds. A conscientious and fair minded protectionist and an authority on finance, he was very influential throughout his congressional career in tariff legislation, especially in the acts of 1861 and 1883; he consistently opposed inconvertible money and financial inflation. He made his greatest contribution in the Morrill Act, for the creation of land grant colleges, first introduced in 1857 and vetoed by President Buchanan, but signed in a similar form by President Abraham Lincoln, in 1862. He served as regent of the Smithsonian Institute, 1883-98, and was a trustee of the University of Vermont, 1865-98.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 3/4, in ink, J.S. Morrill, Vt.  Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison, this natural horn ladies comb sports a period <I>LADY LIBERTY</I> embellishment that we’d guess was added in the patriotic furor of the period.  (Upon close examination the red and blue, two color printing, period typically poor indexing of the colors, one running over the other, and the figure its self is clearly reminiscent of the work seen on Civil War patriotic mailing envelopes so popular all during the war.)  All in wonderful as found condition, this piece offers good evidence of age and originality by virtue of its period construction methods, material used and eye appealing natural gage patina.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!



 This neat little traveling <I>field</I>microscope is entirely complete and functional while at the same time offering good evidence of age and period use.  This offering will set in well with any period scientific or medical grouping.  please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  Measuring approximately 9 ½ inches in length, this slender hand forged curling iron remains in eye pleasing original condition and will set in nicely in any quality colonial Americana or Revolutionary War personal grouping.   <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!

Autograph, Justin S. Morrill $20.00

 

Civil War vintage ladies - PATRIOTIC HOR $95.00

 

turn of the century antique Pocket or Fi $65.00

 

1700s early 1800s CURLING IRON $65.00

Best described and appreciated by virtue of our illustrations we can add only that this piece should not be confused with more common later 1800s versions or even later signal cannons which were turned rather than cast.  The tube of this earlier to mid 1800s cannon is just under a foot in total length and a .60 caliber ball with patch would fit the bore nicely.   Nicely hand cast of bronze in the form of the period with trunnions cast integral with the tube as one would expect of earlier examples. Untouched and not polished after decades of storage, a thin coat of period <I>bug</I> lacquer has preserved much of the rich contemporary luster of the bronze barrel. The carriage shows good age commensurate with the tube.  An extremely nice antique signal cannon with exceptional eye appeal, guaranteed to please.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

  

<U>A note about firearms:</U>   WE SUPPORT RESPONSIBLE CONTROL OF MODERN FIREARMS AND EMPHASIZE HERE THAT THIS PIECE IS CONSIDERED AN ANTIQUE / COLLECTABLE AND IS THEREFORE OUTSIDE  RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO COVERED (MODERN) FIREARMS. THE PIECE IS OFFERED AS A HISTORICAL COLLECTABLE ONLY AND THOUGH MECHANICALLY OPERABLE, IS NOT TO BE CONSIDERED  FIREABLE UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES.  <U>PURCHASE OF THIS ITEM WILL CONSTITUTE A FULL UNDERSTANDING OF AND AGREEMENT WITH  THE ABOVE. </U>



 <b>at Weehawken, New Jersey</b>


Authentic, original hand tinted color woodcut engravings that were published in the August 24, 1861 issue of Harper's Weekly. #1- Colonel Berdan, of the Berdan Sharpshooters, Practicing at a Target at Weehawken, New Jersey. 14 3/4 x 6 1/4. Harper's Weekly is printed in the margin. #2- Colonel Berdan's Rifle, and Target "Jeff Davis" after Half an Hour's Firing. The date August 24, 1861 is printed in the margin. 3 x 5 1/2. Tear at upper right edge. Mounted to mat board. Includes a lengthy printed article titled, "Colonel Berdan And His Sharpshooters." This article accompanied the above listed illustrations in the August 24, 1861 issue of Harper's Weekly.  


Large two piece iron backed coat size Confederate artillery uniform button with shank. No back mark. Good sharp face with large "A" and no indentations.  A 800 yard unopened, original label, turn of the century, spool of 8oz. <I>CARPET WARP FOR WEAVING</I> from the January & Woods Inc. <I> Maysville Cotton Mills </I> in Kentucky.  A bit apart from our usual fare but when we had an opportunity to acquire a few spools of this wonderful old cord from turn of the century American grown and milled cotton we could not resist.  Besides those textile collector / historians who would enjoy an early unopened display spool from the historic old Maysville, Kentucky cotton mill, there are other <I>Antiquers</I> who will recognize the practical use potential of 800 yards of turn of the century Kentucky milled, 8oz cotton warp. (Easily distinguishable from <I>modern</I> spun cotton twine, this material will do well in any number of antique applications.)  

      Prior to its recent demolition the historic old Maysville Cotton Mill had been a leading producer of carpet warp, rug yarns, cotton twine, twisted cord and tent rope.  It had been in continuous operation since the first building was erected about 1834 with the exception of several months during the Civil War, when due to the inability to secure cotton, the mill closed from November, 1861 to March, 1862. J&W was one of only a few cotton mills in the country that continued operations throughout the Civil War.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

antique cast bronze SIGNAL CANNON $675.00

 

Colonel Berdan of Berdan's Sharpshooters

 

Confederate Artillery Uniform Button $225.00

 

vintage -Maysville, Kentucky – Cotton Mi $20.00

A 800 yard unopened, original label, turn of the century, spool of 8oz. <I>CARPET WARP FOR WEAVING</I> from the <I> LILY MILLS - SHELBY, N. Carolina</I> cotton mill.  A bit apart from our usual fare but when we had an opportunity to acquire a few spools of this wonderful old cord from early 1900s North Carolina grown and milled cotton we could not resist.  Besides those textile collector / historians who would enjoy an early unopened display spool from the old Shelby, North Carolina cotton mill, there are other <I>Antiquers</I> who will recognize the practical use potential of 800 yards of turn of the century Southern milled, 8oz cotton warp. (Easily distinguishable from <I>modern</I> spun cotton twine, this material will do well in any number of antique applications.)  Lily Mills located in Shelby, on the edge of cotton country in North Carolina was founded in 1903 as part of growing industry in the post- Civil War, Reconstruction South. It was one of several mills which began to flourish in the region as they processed locally grown cotton in local mills.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

 


Very rare historical display which includes strands of President Abraham Lincoln's hair, wood from the gallows where the Lincoln conspirators were hung, a piece of the cloth that bound the arms of Mrs. Mary Surratt during her execution and a strand of Mrs. Surratt's hair. 


On July 7, 1865, Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, David Herold and George Atzerodt were hanged from a wooden scaffold in the yard of the Old Arsenal Penitentiary in Washington, D.C. They had been tried and found guilty as conspirators in the plot to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln, and U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward, on April 14, 1865. 


14 x 11, with burgundy suede outer mat and a gold Florentine inner mat, with four separate windows displaying the artifacts. The photographs in the display are high quality modern copies of original Civil War period images. Please note that the illustration of the display on my website is cropped as it is larger than my scanner.


This very rare historical display highlights Mary Surratt who was one of the four conspirators executed on July 7, 1865. The strand of Lincoln's hair originated from a well documented lock given to Mrs. Caroline Wright, the wife of the Governor of Indiana by Mary Lincoln. The documented wood fragments originated from relics obtained by a soldier stationed as a guard in the prison yard. Mary Surratt's hair was included in the effects of Samuel Curtis another guard at the prison and found in his 1865 diary. The remnant of cloth was included with a period note attesting that the wood came from the gallows and the cloth originated from the bindings that held her arms during the execution. These bindings had been made from material from a shelter tent at the same time the executioner, Christian Rath, made hoods from the same material. The latter is an incredibly rare relic of that faithful 1865 summer day, an extremely important day in American history! Mrs. Mary Surratt was the first woman ever executed by the United States Government! Provenance papers on all artifacts are included with the display.        


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color and was published in the September 6, 1862 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: The Army of the Potomac Arriving at Yorktown From Williamsburg. 15 3/4 x 10 1/2. Minor stain at lower left edge which does not affect any of the content. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin.  


<b>United States Congressman from Pennsylvania


Civil War Governor of Minnesota


United States Senator from Minnesota


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress


United States Secretary of War</b>


(1815-1903) Born near Harrisburg, Pa., he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1839, and began practice in Harrisburg. Served as U.S. Congressman from Pennsylvania, 1843-47, and as the first Territorial Governor of Minnesota, 1849-53. He was elected as the second Governor of Minnesota after statehood and served from January 2, 1860 to July 10, 1863. Ramsey is credited with being the first Union governor to commit troops to the war effort during the Civil War. He resigned the governorship to become a U.S. Senator, having been elected to that post in 1863, and served until 1875. He served as Chairman of the Committee on Post Office and Post Roads. Was Secretary of War from 1879 to 1881, under President Rutherford B. Hayes. He was the Chairman of the Edmunds Committee dealing with the question of Mormonism and polygamy in Utah, 1882-86. He was a delegate to the centennial celebration of the adoption of the Federal Constitution in 1887. 


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 3 1/8, in ink, Alex. Ramsey, Minn.

vintage LILY MILLS - Shelby, N. Carolina $20.00

 

The Execution of Lincoln Conspirator Mar $595.00

 

The Army of the Potomac Arriving at York

 

Autograph, Alexander Ramsey $35.00




<b>United States Senator from Wisconsin</b>


(1824-81) He entered the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1843, and remained there for two years. He then studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1847, and practiced in Boston, Mass. He moved to Beloit, Wisconsin in 1848, and served as the district attorney of Rock County, 1850-54. He belonged to the Stephen A. Douglas wing of the Democratic Party until the start of the Civil War. He served as a Republican U.S. Senator, from 1869-75, and 1879-81, and was president pro tempore during the 43rd U.S. Congress. Served as  chairman, of the  Committee on Enrolled Bills.


<u>Signature</u>: 5 1/4 x 1 1/2, in ink, Matt. H. Carpenter. 


 


<b>Written by a private wounded in Virginia in 1864</b>


3 1/3 pages, 5 x 8, in pencil, on full color patriotic letter sheet with American flags, cannons, muskets with bayonets and the motto, The Flag Of Liberty, 1776-1861, The Father Of His Country Left This To His Children. 


1861 letter written by Jerome Evans, Co. E, 8th Connecticut Infantry from Annapolis, Maryland to a friend. Evans writes that he now takes the opportunity to write a few lines to let his friend know that we are well, and that they have had a hard time since they left Hartford. Says they stayed at Long Island for two weeks before they went to Annapolis and he expects they will stay there for two weeks before they go to Beaufort, South Carolina. Says they "have rather hard keeping. We have salt beef 3 times a day" and if his friend could see them he would think them a "hard looking set of boys." The regiment has not had "a very good time since we left Long Island. We went to Amboy [N.J.] and from there to Philadelphia where we had a good dinner and from there to Annapolis where we are yet." Wants his friend to tell Dan & the boys to write to him as soon as they can and he sends his love to all of them. He signs his letter, "Please direct to Camp Buckingham, Co. E, 8th Regiment, Annapolis, Md., Capt. W.C. Smith." More content. Light age toning and staining. 


Jerome Evans was a resident of Rocky Hill, Conn., when he enlisted on September 23, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into Co. E, 8th Connecticut Infantry. He was wounded in action on May 7, 1864, at Walthall Junction, Va., and was discharged for disability on February 20, 1865.

 


The 8th Connecticut Infantry saw action in the following battles: 


Newbern, N.C., March 14, 1862 


Siege of Fort Macon, N.C., April, 1862


Antietam, Md., Sep. 17, 1862


Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862

 

Fort Huger, Va., April 19, 1863


Walthall Junction, Va., May 7, 1864


Fort Darling, Va., May 16, 1864


Petersburg, Va., August 25, 1864


Fort Harrison, Va., Sep. 29, 1864        Dated May 1867 this check is drawn on the account of the state of Wisconsin in the amount of $100.00 and is signed by then Wisconsin Secretary of State <B>Bvt. Brig. General Thomas S. Allen</B> who served in the <B>2nd Wisconsin Infantry</B> then as Colonel in command of the <B>5th Wisconsin Infantry</B>.  The check is made to Allen’s clerk <I>Richard Lester</I> who served as <U>1st Sgt.- 2nd Wis.</U> (Sgt. Lester was wounded at Bull Run, Virginia)      

      Though Thomas S. Allen entered the Civil War in April 1861 as a private in the Governor’s Guards (Co. K, 1st Wis. Inf.)  by the end of June he was serving as Captain of Co. I, 2nd Wisconsin which he had raised at the request of the Governor.  A month later Allen led his troops at the <B>Battle of Bull Run</B>, then over the next several months was promoted through the ranks to Lt. Colonel.  Allen led his troops into the <B>Battle of Gainesville</B>, where he was <U>wounded in the neck and the wrist</U>, but refused to leave the field. He was again wounded at the <B>Battle of South Mountain</B>.  In January 1863 Allen was promoted to colonel of the <B>5th Infantry</B>. On May 3, he commanded the regiment at the bloody attack on <B>Marye's Heights</B>, during the <B>2nd Battle of Fredericksburg</B>. On November 7 he was <U>wounded</U> again, during the <B>Battle of Rappahannock Station</B>. When the 5th Infantry’s term of service was up in the summer of 1864, Allen volunteered to reorganize it with new recruits, and served through the end of the war.  He was brevetted <B>Brig. Gen. U.S. Volunteers</B>. In the post-Civil War years Gen. Allen served as Wisconsin’s Secretary of State, was a driving force in the organizing of the <B>Grand Army of the Republic</B> in Wisconsin, and <U>served as its commander, 1869-1870</U>.   A nice item for the autograph enthusiast or Wisconsin in the Civil War items. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 Acquired as a pair and so offered here together are these all original examples of enlisted insignia.  Fashioned of die struck, lead soldered sheet brass with loop retainers, both remain in exceptional condition worthy of the finest period insignia collection.  The early engineers castle is especially difficult to acquire on today’s market, in this condition.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

Autograph, Matthew H. Carpenter

 

8th Connecticut Infantry Letter

 

Gen. Thomas S. Allen 2nd & 5th Wisconsin $65.00

 

exceptional! Civil War vintage enlisted $350.00

This outstanding Civil War era advertising game board was put out by <B> SNOW & BROWN, 29 Dauphin Street, Mobile, Alabama</B>.  The board measures 12 inches square when open and remains in excellent condition, strong at the hinge with a game surface that remains bright and nearly as new.  The back which is exposed when closed, remains in pleasing condition while offering wear as good evidence of age, originality and period use and carrying.  While we have not been able to date the establishment of the partnership of Snow & Brown at 29 Dauphin, Street, we found that Snow (J. H. Snow) commenced business at that address in 1855 and that the partnership business of Snow & Brown at the same location burned in 1874.   One period description advised that the Dauphin Street establishment <I>’was an elegantly arranged and handsomely fitted up temple of music filled with pianos, organs, and musical instruments’</I>.  Equally well known in Mobile as a music teacher, Snow was a prolific publisher of popular Confederate sheet music from this same address on Deuphin, Street.  (see: <I>CONFEDERATE SHEET MUSIC</I> by E. Lawrence Able)   Among the several such was the <B>JEFFERSON DAVIS GRAND MARCH</B> published in 1861.  An exceptionally nice item to set in with any Civil War era gaming or personal grouping, this neat old advertising game board will be of special interest to the collector of period Southern items.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 

 


<b>United States Congressman and Senator from Ohio</b>


(1813-95) He attended the Chillicothe Academy, served as private secretary to the Governor of Ohio in 1834, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1835, and practiced in Ross County, Ohio. He served as a U.S. Congressman, 1845-47. Was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Ohio, 1851-54, and was the Chief Justice of the court, 1854-56. Served as U.S. Senator from 1869-81. He was President pro tempore of the senate during the 46th Congress, and served as Chairman of the Committee on Private Land Claims. He also served as a member of the Committee on the Judiciary. He was appointed a member of the Electoral Commission to decide the contests in various States in the presidential election of 1876. He was appointed as a member of the International Money Conference in Paris in 1881 by President James A. Garfield. Was an unsuccessful candidate for Vice President of the United States on the Democratic Ticket in the presidential election of 1888.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 1 3/8, in ink, A.G. Thurman, Ohio.  This gorgeous and classic Staffordshire platter measures 15 1/2 by 12 inches. It is a heavy octagonal platter with a slight curve to the slanted sides. That little feature makes it particularly attractive on a wall. The pattern, done in purple and lilac transferware hues, is Corrella, made in the Baker and Son pottery which started production in 1839. It is in fine condition, free of chips and cracks.


Let me share two tidbits about this offering. First, all of my references spell the design "Corella;" however, the backstamp quite clearly disagrees with this spelling: Corrella. 


The second is harder to explain quickly but here goes: back in its day, transferware was thus called because of the process. One by one, a person, often an illiterate woman or even a child, performed this process by first placing an inked tissue onto an incised plate to pick up the pattern. The tissue was then applied to the earthenware body. I am sure it took time and experience to develop skill at this transfer process. Now for the tidbit - the back edge shows that the person doing the transferring had ink on his or her hand. The top two sections of the pointer, middle, and ring fingers are immortalized under the glaze on the back edge of the platter. They are much smaller than my digits. This was a child. For some, this might seem morbid. For me, it's history.


The lovely, classic design of the pattern also features a child, specifically  a statue of mother and child in a formal garden setting. The surround adds to the beauty by framing the scene with alternating areas of linear patterning and classic urn reserves. 


This early ironstone platter is particularly dense and heavy, by itself without any packing - over 4 pounds. Perhaps its sturdiness relates to its survival unscathed these many years.

 


Thomas Porter slave button. 3/4 inches in diameter with the initials "T.P." on the face. Excavated example. This button dates from the early 1800's and is a relic from the slavery trade era. It was manufactured for the slave trader Thomas Porter who sold slaves in the Caribbean area during the turn of the 19th Century. This button originated in Antigua, British West Indies and was produced in London. The name Porter may have been an Anglo version of Porteous as there was a French family who ran slave ships during that era. These buttons were reportedly found off the Georgia coast and were worn by his slaves for advertising purposes when sold at auction.

mid 1800s advertising checkerboard – SNO $295.00

 

Autograph, Allen G. Thurman

 

English Cottage PURPLE Lilac TRANSFERWAR $175.00

 

Slave Merchant Button $60.00

The plain shape white ironstone sauce tureen lid presented measures 7 inches long by 5 1/4 inches wide.  The inner parts would fit into a tureen opening 6 inches by 4 1/3 inches.


It is in fine shape with no flaws except rubbing to the tip of the finial as shown in the second picture.  The final picture shows the lid atop an appropriate sauce tureen.


I hope to find someone who has a tureen missing its lid or another who might want to use this pretty lid as part of a wall display.  Here is a plain shaped white ironstone undertray measuring 8 1/2 by 6 1/4 inches. The inner ridge, designed to hold the oval base of a sauce tureen, is raised - elegant.  It was made in the Clementson Brothers pottery


It is in fine shape, free of all flaws.  This underplate would work with many different sauce tureens. It is particularly appropriate for the plain shapes that were produced during the 1870 to 1900 period.  The last picture shows it with such a sauce tureen which is offered separately.  


<b>"The President directs that, as recommended by the Department Commander, he be dismissed the service."</b>


2 pages, 4 1/8 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, July 23, 1863


General Orders

No. 229


I..Before a General Court Martial, which convened in the city of Washington, D.C., March 27, 1863, pursuant to General Orders, No. 20, dated Headquarters Cavalry, Defences of Washington, near Fort Scott, Virginia, February 2, 1863......


Major Joseph Gilmer, 18th Pennsylvania Cavalry, was tried......


Charge I- Drunkenness


Specification- In this, that Joseph Gilmer, a Major of the 18th Pennsylvania Cavalry, he then being in the service of the United States, and while in command of a reconnoitering party, on the second day of March 1863, was so intoxicated from the effects of spirituous liquors as to be incapacitated to perform his duties in an officer like manner. This at or near the village of Aldie, in the State of Virginia.


Charge II- Cowardice


Specifications- In this; that Joseph Gilmer, a Major in the 18th Pennsylvania Cavalry...upon the second day of March 1863, did permit and encourage a detachment of cavalry, in the service of the United States, and under his command, to fly from a small body of the 1st Vermont Cavalry, who were mistaken for the enemy, without sending out any person or persons to ascertain who they were, or what were their numbers; and that the said cavalry under his command, as above stated, were much demoralized, and fled many miles through the country in great confusion and disorder. This near Aldie, in the State of Virginia.


Includes the details of the findings and sentence of the court.


Sentence- And the Court does therefore sentence him, Major Joseph Gilmer, 18th Pennsylvania Cavalry, "To be cashiered."


II..The proceedings of the Court in the above case were disapproved by the Major General commanding the Department of Washington, on account of fatal defects and irregularities in the record. But the testimony shows that the accused was drunk on duty, and brought disgrace upon himself and the service. The President directs that, as recommended by the Department Commander, he be dismissed the service; and Major Joseph Gilmer, 18th Pennsylvania Cavalry, accordingly ceases to be an officer in the United States service since the 20th day of July 1863.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Trimmed at edge which does not affect any of the content.  


<b>One of the most desirable flags in War Between The States history!</b>


A fragment of the 2nd National Confederate flag that flew over Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, South Carolina until it was evacuated by the Rebels on February 17th, 1865, once owned by General Thomas Abram Huguenin. He was present at the capture of Fort Sumter on April 12th & 13th, 1861 and commanded the rear guard at the evacuation of Morris Island. He was in command of Fort Sumter from July of 1864 to February 17, 1865 and was the last to leave the fort. Two months after the evacuation of Fort Sumter Huguenin surrendered at Greensboro and would later be paroled at the end of the war. During the war he was wounded on four occasions never incapacitating him from performing his duties. The Second National Flag of the Confederacy, also known as the "Stainless Banner," was adopted on May 1, 1863. This flag caused confusion because its long white field often made it look like a surrender flag while lying limp. It was replaced with the Third National Confederate Flag on March 1st, 1865. The 2nd National flag was the type that was removed from the fort by General Huguenin when he evacuated the fort. An example of that style of flag is shown above. This small remnant was part of the entire remnant that is accompanied by a note attesting that the remnant was once part of the last Confederate flag that flew over Fort Sumter that was given to the previous owner by General Thomas Abram Huguenin. This very handsome 11 x 14 display is double matted in Confederate gray and trimmed in red. The cloth remnant of this famous Confederate flag in the display measures approximately 3/4 x 3/4. A letter of provenance and authenticity is included. Shrink wrapped and ready to frame. Rare and very desirable Fort Sumter relic.

White Ironstone Sauce Tureen Lid $25.00

 

Clementson White Ironstone Sauce Tureen $40.00

 

Court Martial of Major in 18th Pennsylva

 

The Last Confederate Flag That Flew Over




6 x 1 3/4, red and black imprint. Lottery of the State of Kentucky. Covington, Ky. May 19, 1863. The winning numbers on this ticket were 14, 48 and 74. Choice condition. Uncommon.   


<b>United States Senator from Missouri


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1811-92) Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, he attended St. Joseph's College, Bardstown, Ky., in 1823-24, and Patridge's Military Academy, Middletown, Conn., 1824-25, and was appointed a midshipman in the U.S. Navy, in 1825 and served four years. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in Cincinnati in 1833, moved to St. Louis, Mo., in 1834, where he continued the practice of law. Served in the Missouri State House of Representatives, 1859-60. Was a member of the State constitutional convention in 1865. He served as U.S. Senator from Missouri from 1867-70, which included the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. He was the chairman of the Committee on Education. Appointed Chief Justice of the Court of Claims, serving 1870-75.


<u>Signature With Title and State</u>: 5 3/8 x 2, in ink, C.D. Drake, U.[nited] S.[tates] S.[enate] Mo. [Missouri].    The sauce ladle presented measures 2 1/4 inches across.  The handle is 5 inches long.


This unmarked ladle dates to the 1870s period.  During this time, white ironstone shapes became smoother with less embossing.  Because of this, it would work well, particularly with a plain shaped sauce tureen.  The last picture shows it with many other ladles I have. This is the smallest in the picture.  This pretty sauce tureen ladle measures just shy of 3 inches across the bowl.  The handle is 6 inches long. It's in good condition, free cracks.  The edge has the tiniest of flea bites


It would work well with any white ironstone sauce tureen, but it would particularly nice with one with lots of foliate, fruit, or floral embossing because its handle shows draped leaves, a grape-type tendril, and an oval bud or fruit - can't tell which it is.

1863 State of Kentucky Lottery Ticket $45.00

 

Autograph, Charles D. Drake $15.00

 

Small White Ironstone Sauce Tureen Ladle $65.00

 

White Ironstone Sauce Tureen Ladle, Foli $62.00

Presented white ironstone ladle measuring 4 inches across the bowl.  The handle is 10 inches long.


The embossing on the top of the handle is that of a draped leaf with three berries centered in a row.  It is in fine antique condition - no chips or cracks.


At the time of this writing, I am offering two large ladles with the same embossing.  I purchased them together, so I think they were part of the same white ironstone dinnerware service, purchased over 150 years ago. This one is slightly smaller than its mate.  The other is very large.  Both are appropriate for a soup or stew tureen. The last picture shows several ladles I have at this time.  This one is second from the right.  This offering is a large white ironstone soup or stew ladle.  The bowl of the ladle is quite capacious.   It measures 4 1/2 inches wide by 2 inches deep.  The handle is 11 inches long.  


As is usually the case, this one is unmarked.  By its characteristics, I would date it to the 1850 - 1870 period.


The embossing on the end of the handle is a large draped leaf with three berries down the center of it.


Condition is good - no chips or cracks.


The last picture shows several ladles we are currently offering.  This one is the largest.  


<b>Colonel of the 7th Illinois Cavalry during the Civil War


U.S. Senator from Louisiana


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress


Governor of Louisiana</b>


(1830-1918) Presidential elector on the Republican ticket in 1860. Appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the Territory of Nebraska in 1861. Served as Colonel of the 7th Illinois Cavalry during the Civil War until ill health forced his resignation. Appointed by President Lincoln as collector of the port of New Orleans in 1865. This launched Kellogg's notable 20 year political career in Louisiana. Served as United States Senator, from Louisiana, 1867-72. Served as Governor of Louisiana, 1873-74. Re-elected as U.S. Senator, serving, 1877-83.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 3 7/8, in ink, Wm. P. Kellogg, Louisiana.  The blue and white Staffordshire platter presented is octagonal in shape.  The pattern is Corinthia, a design with a classic romantic scene involving a formal garden, a statue, castle, framing elms, an urn and several figures in the foreground with their attending whippets. About the only thing that is missing is a river.  The surround has scenic reserves of a repeating different romantic scene separated by scrolls and linear patterning.  


It measure 14 by 10 1/2 inches.  It is in good condition with shiny glaze  and two issues to declare - an in-the-making pit on the left elm in the central display and a  glaze chip on the rim as pictured.


My references show this pattern to be made in the Wedgwood and Company and dating to 1860,  but this is clearly marked with the E. Challinor backstamp.  It was not uncommon for the same pattern to be produced by multiple potters. Design plates were sometimes sold from one to another. 


This remains a great piece for display or use.  The price takes the little issues into consideration.

Antique White Ironstone Soup Ladle $100.00

 

Large Staffordshire White Ironstone Soup $110.00

 

Autograph, William P. Kellogg $35.00

 

Staffordshire Romantic Blue Transferware $125.00

This a an octagonal pink transferware Staffordshire platter measuring 14 by 10 inches.  The pattern is Mesina, a design featuring a perky stylized floral surround and a central scene of eastern buildings - minaret in different heights on a river.  The foreground depicts a lady seated with her whippet as a servant attends.  Garden images on their left included thin, tall trees and stylized flowers.


It was made in the Wood and Challinor pottery which operated from 1828 to 1843.


It is a pretty platter, free of chips and cracks.  This impressive white ironstone vegetable server is best known for its dramatic ribbed design and dense earthenware body.  It was made in the pottery of  J. W Pankhurst which registered the shape in 1855. 


Bulging ribs decorate all aspects of this tureen, both on the pedestaled base and the domed lid. The finial is a large bud with foliate embossing below - spectacular! 


There is a difference of opinion among collectors regarding whether Full Ribbed Shape and another by the same pottery, Ribbed Bud Shape, are really one shape.  The difference focuses on two types of finials one finds on  pieces - this great bud finial with elaborate embossing below; and a symmetrical, open-petaled finial that looks like a daisy.  I side with the one-shape school.


It measures 11 inches long by 8 inches tall. It is in great condition. 

 


Gold bullion crossed cavalry sabers affixed to 2 3/4 x 2 piece of cloth with backing. Civil War period hat device. Very fine.  


(1807-1870) Born at Stratford, in Westmoreland County, Va. Son of the legendary Revolutionary War hero, "Lighthorse Harry" Lee. Graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1829 without a single demerit to his name in 4 years! He emerged from the Mexican War with one wound, three brevets for gallantry, a brilliant reputation, and the ever lasting esteem of the commanding General of the U.S.A., Winfield Scott, who said Lee was "the very best soldier that I ever saw in the field." Served as Superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy, 1852-55, and commanded the detachment that captured John Brown at Harper's Ferry in 1859. Turned down the command of the Union Army in 1861, as he said he could never raise his sword against his native Virginia. Instead he was appointed commander of all military forces of Virginia, and soon after general in the Regular Army of the Confederate States of America. During the War Between The States, he commanded the Army of Northern Virginia at such battlefields as 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Petersburg, Richmond and Appomattox. His reputation became legendary and he might very well be the most famous soldier in American history! In the last years of his life, he served as president of Washington College at Lexington, Va. (now Washington & Lee Univ.) where he is buried in the chapel.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph. Oval view of General Lee in Confederate uniform displayed in a window opening of a 2 3/8 x 4 embossed card. No imprint. Label affixed to the reverse of the card with the following pencil inscription: Lee taken by Vannerson in Richmond, Va., 1864. See Hopkins pg. "49." Rare profile left in uniform. Light age toning and wear. 


The mention of "Hopkins" in the inscription on the reverse of this card refers to the excellent book done by Donald A. Hopkins that was published in 2013 titled, "Robert E. Lee in War and Peace. The Photographic History of a Confederate and American Icon." This view of General Lee is illustrated and described on page 49 of the Hopkins book.

Wood & Challinor Pink Transferware Octag $165.00

 

Pankhurst White Ironstone Vegetable Serv $140.00

 

Union Cavalry Officer's Hat Insignia

 

CDV General Robert E. Lee

I love this elaborate transferware design.  This is Corsica; it was made in the Wood and Challinor pottery which operated fro 1828 to 1843. Condition is excellent - no chips, cracks, stains, or restoration.


The feature that makes it particularly nice is the surround design rather than the central image, which is rather typical of romantic Staffordshire. It depicts a young woman in a garden setting with minarets and mountains in the background. In contrast, the surround is memorable.  Scenic reserves of alternating floral baskets and garden cottage images are unusually enclosed within a stylized trapezoidal frame.  Between the reserves are several bands of contrasting linear patterns.  As I inspect it to describe this design to you, it strikes me that these are the aspects that make this pattern stand apart from the hundreds of other romantic patterns.  An irregular scallop on the edge aligns with the different images on the surround.


It measures 7 1/4 inches wide. The back provides the pattern name and pottery initials.  Measuring 16 ½ inches in length, 9 ¾ inches wide and 12 3/8 from floor to top of the uprights.  This period handmade <I>hospital bed</I> model offers demonstration of design and functionality.  We acquired this <I>invalid- bed</I> model a number of years ago from among a large grouping of U. S. Patent models of the 1850s and 1860 that had been deassessed from the U. S. Patent office collection.  (Veterans of the <I>good old days</I> of picking the Brimfield Spring Outdoor Antique Market may remember a vendor showing up one spring with a truck load of Patent Models.  More than one of our acquisitions was passed to our friend Mike Woshner and ended up in his reference <I>India-Rubber & Gutta-Percha In The Civil War Era</I> )  One of the many items we kept simply because we liked it, we have never been successful in referencing an exact design but uncovered more than one period patent drawing (see illustrations) of hospital bed designs which incorporated the same or similar features.  The remains of a period label is dated <B>1863</B> and identifies the model simply as an <B>IMPROVED INVALID BED</B>.  A quality piece yet not demonstrating the level of craftsmanship we are accustom to seeing in models submitted to the Patent office, we are baffled as to the precise intent of this model.  Was it a self made first attempt at a design model or, given its inclusion among official Patent Office models, was it indeed submitted for consideration where it remained among the vast holdings of the Office until deaccession?  An interesting treasure for the Civil War era medical collector or Patent Office enthusiast, variations of these heavy wood framed hospital beds, some with their ropes and pulleys for patient traction, are visible in hospital ward scenes in the new PBS Civil War series <I><B> MARCY STREET</I></B>.     <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  


Silver coin with the Roman numeral III with stars around the edges and an olive branch above and a bundle of 3 arrows beneath is on one side, and on the opposite side is a six pointed star with an American shield inside of it and United States of America around the edges. The year, which is at the bottom center, has faded. It looks to me like it might be 1857. Very good.

 

Footnote: This was the smallest of United States silver coins, called the "trime" by the Treasury Department, and it was authorized by Congress, on March 3, 1851.  


Excavated, State Seal of Virginia, Civil War, coat size uniform button with Virtus' spear resting on Tyranny. Missing shank. Backmark: Canfield Bro. & Co., Baltimore. Excavated in Virginia.

Wood & Challinor Blue Transferware Plate $65.00

 

‘1863 INVALID BED’ Civil War HOSPITAL B $625.00

 

United States 3 Cents Piece $20.00

 

State of Virginia Button $65.00




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