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This vase stands 7 1/4 inches tall and is 2 5/8 inches wide at the mouth. It is done in the brutalist manner of the late 1960s-early 1970s. The surface of the terra cotta vase is covered with a spattered base over which the colors have been applied. thick black lines outline the colored sections. A bland band is at the bottom and the top Above the bottom black band there is a band of black diagonal lines. A very abstract bird with orange eye and tail circles the vase.  The vase is in excellent condition.    The piece is signed simply in capital leters MADE IN ITALY. 


This is most likely from the studio of Bruno Bagnoli, who worked for Bitossi at Montelupo. Perhaps lesser known here in the United States than Aldo Londi, he nonetheless is well represented in Italy. His work can be seen on pages 160-161 in the book titled Novecento Ceramiche Italiane, Volume 2, by Emanuele Gaudenzi.


Add it to your Midcentury Pottery collection today. This would look stunning on a McCobb, Parzinger or Eames piece.  Designed for Hall China by celebrated Hungarian designer extraordinaire Eva Zeisel, this 40 oz 5 3/4 inch tall jug in the #1881 Bouquet pattern is part of the Hallcraft Classic line.  It features sprays of 5 different flowers on its body and a green leaf on its handle.  It is in excellent condition and ready to grace your Mid-century table today.  It would look stunning on a Paul McCobb or other Eames era designer credenza or buffet.  Or simply use it on your breakfast table!  Nortwood Glass Works holder:  clear opal Chrysanthemum Base Swirl.


The pattern is also shown on page 161 of the Bredehoft Second Edition book and listed there as having a value of $190. I have priced this toothpick holder considerably under that price as I bought it very reasonably. 


It stands 2 1/8 inches tall x 2 inches wides.  This holder is in excellent condition, with what we toothpick collectors consider normal rim roughness. It is unreasonable to expect a piece of glass which was made in 1893 and had household use to be exactly as it left the factory.  The top rim has never been ground down on this one. 


I am a long time member and past President (1988) of the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Club. I guarantee the authenticity of this TP. For more info on toothpick holders as a great collectible, visit the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Society web page at (www.nthcs.org)  Made by the Consolidated Company at their Fostoria Ohio plant in the 1890s, this Consolidated Pansy toothpick holder is unusual in that it is cased white inside but the outside pink layer has an opaque quality to it, almost like the later Consolidated ceramic finishes. It is in great shape. 


It stands 2 inches tall x 2 3/4 inches wide.


I am a long time member of the Phoenix & Consolidated Glass Collectors Club and past President (1988) of the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Club. I guarantee the authenticity of this TP. For more info on toothpick holders as a great collectible, visit the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Society web page at (www.nthcs.org)

Bitossi Bagnoli Brutalist Bird vase

 

Eva Zeisel Hallcraft 40 oz. Bouquet jug

 

Northwood Chrysanthemum Base Swirl TP

 

toothpick holder: Consolidated pink Pans

Annemarie Davidson learned her enameling craft first from the great Doris Hall (1907-2001) in Cambridge, MA in 1957. In California she continued her studies with Curtis Tann. Her combination of geometric and organic form in her designs culminated in her most celebrated abstract designs, her Jewel line which features pieces of glass used to create free-form organic shapes which she calls Jewels. She also uses a sgraffito technique, incising straight lines from the center of her plate with the sharp point of a dart. 


This 11 1/4 inch plate, most likely from the 1961-1962 time period, is unusual for its size. It is scarce to find plates larger than her more standard 6-7 inches. This plate features 5 large light blue jewels, 12 smaller cobalt blue jewels . The underlying copper color can be seen near the edges. A prominent Palm Springs CA dealer James Elliot-Bishop on his website has named this pattern as Grooveline.


What is interesting about this particular plate is the asymmetric placement of the jewels. Davidson was usually quite symmetric in her placement.  There are few pieces where the smaller jewels appear singly as on this large plate.

The back of the plate is signed with her charcteristic AD interwined intiails and her paper label which reads Annemarie Davidson handcrafted enamels Sierra Madre California. Every piece was handcrafted by her alone, from start to finish. Excellent condition. 


The work of Annemarie Davidson was included in the seminal exhibit titled Painting with Fire which opened in Jan 2007 at the Long Beach Museum of Art. She was one of 30 enamelists included with a one page entry on her life and work. Her page is page 266 of the catalogue.  This particular tumbler is from the Spanish Knobs line of glass produced by the Consolidated Glass Company of Coraopolis Pennsylvania, makers of the iconic Ruba Rombic glass.  In the original 1929 catalog for the Catalonian line, there were three items having the raised knobs on them. Consolidated expanded this variation of the Catalonian line into a complete line of tableware as there are fifteen different shapes of tumblers and goblets alone.


This tumbler has a square base and a round top and holds 12 ounces. It is in excellent shape and a good example of this American Art Deco line.


Add it to your Art Deco or Consolidated glass collection today.  Come learn more about this glass at the Phoenix & Consolidated Glass Collectors Club website:  www.pcgcc.org  Shown on page 79 of Jack Wilson's 1989 book, this is the #1174 4 1/8 inch tall Spanish Knobs fan vase in emerald green. What is interesting is that you can see on the rim where the glassworker ended his working of the rim as this piece was made from a tumbler mold.  It is brilliant clear emerald green glass and is in excellent condition. Add it to your Art Deco or Consolidated glass collection today.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 


Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this early studio vase is what would later be marked as a #20 shape.  This vase has the early recessed base which is present only in his 1945-1948 work.  It is his early mustard yellow glaze over the standard chocolate brown underglaze.  What is unusual about this piece is that it is not marked with his inscribed mark, though it should be.  It is in excellent condition. 


Add it to your American Art Pottery or Stanley Ballard collection today.

Annemarie Davidson 11 inch Grooveline pl

 

Spanish Knobs honey square base tumbler

 

Consolidated Catalonian 1174 green fan v

 

Ballard early studio #20 shape yellow va

Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard who worked in the Burlington area, this early #9 shape vase stands 5 inches tall and is 5 1/4 inches in diameter. It is thin walled and has an earlier yellow glaze. The shape is basically square but each corner has a concave panel on it, making the shape octagonal. It is signed #9, which is a shape number used for other shapes as well.. Excellent condition.  Signed Royal Hickman #516 and the word Florida, this 9 inch long x 5 1/2 inch tall pillow form vase is simple but striking. Unlike his better known Petty Crystal pieces, his Florida pieces use a darker palette. This high glass glaze vase shows a chocolate brown underglaze covered by a drip deep olive green overglaze, created a blended effect much like the work of Vermont studio potter Stanley Ballard. 


Condition is excellent -- no chips, cracks, nicks, flakes, stains or other damage / problems.  Add it to your Royal Haeger or Royal Hickman or American Studio Art Pottery collection today  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. It is from the 1960's. Bennington by Gil started in 1948. They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. They made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.


This is the #1365 B cup and the #1365C saucer in what has been called the vertebral shape. It stands 3 1/3 inches tall when the cup is on the saucer and is in excellent shape with no chips, cracks or structural damage. This coffee cups and saucer is ready to be used for your next retro inspired dinner party. Imagine bringing your coffee to the table in this stylish and graceful vessel.


The shape was designed by David Gil himself in 1946/47 while he was still at Alfred University as an attempt to make a more efficient cup, in terms of heat loss, while maintaining a balanced feel when being used.

It is part of what is being called the Old Bennington line whose pieces are all numbered 1635 with a letter after the number.  It was Bennington Potters first full dinnerware line.  It is thought that after the Yusuke Aida Classic Line (whose over 40 shapes all bear numbers in the 1620 - 1688 range) was put into production after his arrival in 1961 that the Old Bennington Line was not expanded. Research continues.


David Gil and his work were featured in the Winter 1961 issue of Vermont Life.



It is in great shape and a very good example of Gil's design aesthetic. Add it to your MidCentury American Art pottery or Vermont Art Pottery collection today. A great piece of early American Studio Art pottery from a pre-eminent Mid Century designer.  These funky and highly collectibles mixing bowls were sold as a set in three sizes. They were made in Dallas, Texas by the Texas Ware Plastics & Manufacturing Company and are so marked in embossed letters on the bottom of each bowl. 


This is the Texas Ware #118 light green speckled mixing bowl in very good vintage condition. Its main shade is a light almost celadon green with chunky inclusions of teal green, chocolate brown, white, turquoise, and chartreuse. It has normal vintage wear of some light knife marks in its center but retains 80 percent of the original interior glossy finish. Gorgeous glossy finish on the outside. FREE of chips, cracks, burns OR discoloration. You will NOT be disappointed!!


Background on the line:


The largest bowl, the #125 measures 11 1/4 inches across and stands 5 1/4 inches tall. The middle bowl #118 measures 9 3/4 inches across and stands 4 1/2 inches tall. The smallest bowl #111 measures 8 inches across and stands 4 inches tall.


Recently one has seen a Texas Ware vintage speckled Melmac bowl on the counter of Rachael Ray's TV kitchen. In fact, in late 2007, Food Network is now having produced and marketing a "Garbage Bowl" in a deep pumpkin color under the Rachael Ray name.

Ballard #9 early yellow octagonal vase

 

Royal Hickman Florida #516 pillow vase

 

Bennington Potters #1635B / C cup saucer

 

Texas Ware #118 vintage light green bowl

Annemarie Davidson learned her enameling craft first from the great Doris Hall (1907-2001) in Cambridge, MA in 1957. In California she continued her studies with Curtis Tann. Her combination of geometric and organic form in her designs culminated in her most celebrated abstract designs, her Jewel line which features pieces of glass used to create free-form organic shapes which she calls Jewels. She also uses a sgraffito technique, incising straight lines from the center of her plate with the sharp point of a dart. Now in her late 80s, she no longer produces work today as of 2010 I have been told.


This 7 inch plate, most likely from the 1961-1962 time period, is a good example of an earlier Ghostline piece. This plate features 3 large turquoise blue jewels and 6 smaller cobalt blue jewels, all symmetrically arranged, yet asymmetrically placed on the plate as the whole design is off center. The lines are under the Jewels. A prominent Palm Springs CA dealer James Elliot-Bishop on his website has named this pattern as Ghostline.


The back of the plate still has the three large brown felt pads, the full gold paper label and is signed with her charcteristic AD interwined intiail. Her paper label reads Annemarie Davidson handcrafted enamels Sierra Madre California. Every piece was handcrafted by her alone, from start to finish. There are two tiny areas of some enamel loss to the rim.They are hard to see. One has to look hard to find them. It is in good vintage but not excellent condition, but it sure still looks great on a wall!


The work of Annemarie Davidson was included in the seminal exhibit titled Painting with Fire which opened in Jan 2007 at the Long Beach Museum of Art. She was one of 30 enamelists included with a one page entry on her life and work. Her page is page 266 of the catalogue.  Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960), a student of Glidden Parker at Alfred University in the 1940s who worked in the Burlington area, this is one of the scarce figural pieces made by Ballard.


This cute figural elephant bank stands 5 inches tall and is 5 inches wide across the back.  The glaze is a very early foamy white glaze over the early chocolate brown underglaze. Strongly modeled, this bank features a circle on the bottom where one would need to break it to get to the saved money.  Also, on the bottom one sees the early inscribed S. Ballard signature and the word Vermont.  I think this was made in the 1945-1946 time period. It is one of the earliest with the word VERMONT on it. Later pieces had the word Vermont as part of the molded signature but this VERMONT is hand inscribed.


I know of only 5 of these, one of which was done in a yellow glaze and is owned by Ballard's niece.  


A great example of modeling and glazing, this is a prime example of Stanley Ballard's work.  Done by Lincoln Vermont potter Marcy Mayforth, this is a 1988 dated 10 1/2 inch wide x 4 3/4 inch deep mixing bowl. The design is done in the sgraffito technique, then filled in as in an enamel piece. There are five light and dark blue hanging hearts with the leaves forming a band around the top of the outside neck on the piece, which is signed Mayforth 88 on the bottom. It is in excellent shape. It is a big and practical piece of Vermont Art Pottery by a well-known and well-respected Vermont potter.


Add it to your Vermont Art Pottery or American Studio Pottery collection today.  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. It is from the the post-1960 time period when Gil began to use the words Bennington Potters on pieces after having used a transition mark which included both the words Design Cooperative and Bennington Vermont.


This fluted 9 5/8 inch diameter plate was advertised in the 1964 catalogue as B 1654, an ashtray which could also be hung on the wall as a plaque as it had a built-in wire on the back. This piece is shown in the 1964 catalogue as and is titled there "La Belle Chat". Its original 1964 price was $5.00.


It  features one of the harder to find members of his Animal Line, a tiger.  Done in an abstract stylized manner, this big cat in molded in relief and is glazed in green, but not too precisely. 


The back of the plate/plaque has a wire hanger which was embedded in the pottery.  It is signed 1654 and has the spark mark on the forearm.  I would guess it is from the 1960-1962 period. It is in excellent condition.


Bennington Potters are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.

Annemarie Davidson 7 inch Ghostline dish

 

Ballard early figural sitting elephant b

 

Marcy Mayforth 1988 large mixing bowl

 

Bennington Potters 1654 fluted Tiger pla

Shown in the 1929 catalog reprint on page 32 of Jack Wilson's 1989 book, this is the #1119 2 5/8 inch tall tumbler shape of the whiskey or shot glass in the jade green color. It was also sold as part of a six shot glass, decanter and tray shown on that same page as the 1162 decanter set. It is in excellent condition.  Shown in the 1929 catalog reprint on page 32 of Jack Wilson's 1989 book, this is the #1119 2 5/8 inch tall tumbler shape of the whiskey or shot glass in the jade green color. It was also sold as part of a six shot glass, decanter and tray shown on that same page as the 1162 decanter set. It is in excellent condition.  This signed CZECHOSLOVAKIA glass fan vase stands 8 1/2 inches tall. The base glass is a vibrant orange. It is cased in the overlay technique with yellow glass which was pulled up into vertical bands on the vase. It has a very nice polished pontil and has an acid etched signature on the base which was almost impossible to show on the yellow glass on the base.


This straight line CZECHOSLOVAKIA signature I believe denotes the vase was made by the Kralik company.  


Add it to your Art Deco glass or Czech Art Glass collection today.  Stamped with the Green Wreath mark indicating the Noritake China Company, this well executed scenic vase stands 4 1/2 inches tall at the top of the two brown enameled dot decorated handles.  


What is unusual about this Nippon vase is that in order to view the complete scene depicted, one needs to have the vase with one corner toward oneself.  I think it was decorated this way as to better look like a painting on a canvas. The foreground features a blue and pink prunus flower and the background features a lake scene with a tree in the middle ground. The matte finish gives it a soft romantic quality.


It is in excellent condition and was made between the 1891 - 1921 period.  Add it to your Nippon or Noritake collection today.

Catalonian jade green wash #1119 shot gl

 

Catalonian jade green wash #1119 shot gl

 

Czech yellow overlay on orange fan vase

 

Nippon 2 handled scenic 4. 5" matte

Made by the Homer Laughlin Company only from February 1936 to 1959 with a producation period of only 3 years, this Harlequin gray deep plate is in excellent shape. The plate measures 8 7/16 inches across and stands 1 5/8 inches high. It has great Deco styling and is a pratical and stylish piece today. I use a set of yellow deep plates as my everyday dishes, great for salad, soups, pasta.


It is shown on page 256 of book titled Fiesta, Harlequin, Kitchen Kraft Dinnerware produced the the Homer Laughlin China Collectors Associatiion and published by Schiffer in 2000. The valuation at that time was $29-$33. My price is less because I bought it very reasonably.


It is in excellent condition with no perceptible scratches or knife marks, hard to find in this great condition.


Add it to your Homer Laughlin Art Deco Harlequin collection or American Art Deco era dinnerware collection today.  This Consolidated blue opaque Panelled Shell salt shaker was made between 1894 - 1898.  This pattern is among those started while Consolidated was still in Fostoria, Ohio prior to their move to Pennsylvania. As Lechner states in his Salt Shaker book (second edition) on page 48, this motif consists of four large, embossed shells completely covering the shaker. He rates it as very scarce. Excellent overall condition. 



It stands 3 inches tall and is considered by Lechner as very scarce.  It is very scarce as well in the cased colors.


Find out more about collecting Phoenix and Consolidated Glass at our club website: www.pcgcc.org



I am a long time member of the Phoenix & Consolidated Glass Collectors Club and past President (1988) of the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Club. I guarantee the authenticity of this piece of Consolidated Glass. For more info on toothpick holders as a great collectible, visit the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Society web page at (www.nthcs.org)  Made between 1894 - 1900, this Guttate pattern is among those started while Consolidated was still in Fostoria, Ohio prior to their move to Pennsylvania. Excellent overall condition. 


This pattern was made in the 1896-1900 era. It is shown on page 46 of the Lechner Volume 2 book. It is in excellent condition. Standard roughness on the neck under the original metal lid. 


Buy it for your antique glass salt shaker or early Consolidated collection today.


Find out more about collecting Phoenix and Consolidated Glass at our club website: www.pcgcc.org



I am a long time member of the Phoenix & Consolidated Glass Collectors Club and past President (1988) of the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Club. I guarantee the authenticity of this piece of Consolidated Glass. For more info on toothpick holders as a great collectible, visit the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Society web page at (www.nthcs.org)  Made between 1894 - 1898, this pattern is among those started while Consolidated was still in Fostoria, Ohio prior to their move to Pennsylvania. As Lechner states in his Salt Shaker book (second edition) on page 42, this motif consists of four rows of small bulging petals. Excellent overall condition. 


This pattern is also known as Quilt or Florette.


It stands 2 1/8 inches tall and is considered by Lechner as very scarce.  It is very scarce as well in the cased colors.


Find out more about collecting Phoenix and Consolidated Glass at our club website: www.pcgcc.org



I am a long time member of the Phoenix & Consolidated Glass Collectors Club and past President (1988) of the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Club. I guarantee the authenticity of this piece of Consolidated Glass. For more info on toothpick holders as a great collectible, visit the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Society web page at (www.nthcs.org)

Harlequin gray / grey deep plate excelle

 

Consolidated blue Panelled Shell salt sh

 

Consolidated Guttate blue opaque salt sh

 

Consolidated green satin Quilt salt shak

Standing 6 1/4 inches tall and holding 12 oz liquid, this 1950s American glass tumbler was known as a zombie in the catalogue: fill it up with enough liquoir,drain it and become a zombie?..<grin>


It is a playful go along to any cocktail shaker collection or barware. The screened decorations are in excellent shape. The top orange row has Aquarius, Pisces, Aries, and Capricornus. The middle yellow row has Taurus, Scorpio, Cancer, and Leo.   The bottom green row has Sagittarius, Virgo, Libra, and Gemini.  The bottom has the embossed numbers a 18. Whimsical and fun, they would look great full of ice tea or something witha little more zip!  This collectable line was produced by the Corning Glass Company as part of their Corning Ware line, starting in 1983 produced at first at a Corning subsidiary in Avon, France then in Martinsburg, West Virginia.   From  1983-1989?, this line of completely transparent glass ceramic cookware was called Visions and by the mid 1980s, it is estimated that it was found in 30% of American homes. In 1989, a non-stick surface was added to certain pieces and in 1992 Corning introduced a new Cranberry color.


This Pyrex Visions 7 inch wide Open Skillet has the numbers 26 placed vertically on the underside of the handle.  It features the original 1983-1989 waffled glass surface on the inside.  It is shown on page 123 of the 2006 book titled Corning Ware & Visions Cookware by Kyle Coroneos. According to Coroneos, it was produced from 1985-1989.  The stovetop and dinnerware product lines were halted in the year 2000. The original pyroceramic glass version of CorningWare is no longer sold in the US market. it is only available on the secondary market. 


It is in excellent condition and looks unused.  Add it to your 20th century American glass kitchenware collection today.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this unusual promotional 6 rest ashtray features a man in a tophat playing a standing bass, done in a medium blue shade which Ballard also used to highlight the rim of the piece. It measures 6 1/2 inches long x 4 1/8 inches wide and stands 1 1/8 inches tall.


In relief on one side it reads WCAX Radio and on the other side WCAX TELEVISION. WCAX is the local Burlington CBS channel founded in the 1950s by the Martin family and still in business today.


It is signed with an incised S. Ballard signature only. I have seen a few of these but no more than 6. It is in excellent condition and a good example of a Ballard production advertising piece.  Terry Crider started his glasswork in 1976. He is self taught. This studio glass artist has put out a limited amount of work over the past 32 years. He uses NO MOLDS and his only help has been his wife Donna who did all the finish work on the pieces. I had an email from Terry and Donna a few years ago stating that he doesn't think it would be fair to the collectors to make any of the same things again. They have decided, if they do make glass again, they are not going to make anything that they have made in the past. He made glass part time from 1988-2000. In 2005, he began again to produce a limited amount of glass. He's a great artist with VERY few early pieces out there. This toothpick or rose bowl is in mint condition and is signed Crider and dated 1985 on the base. 


This Crider 1985 amethyst base glass with white applied Kint Tut decoration is in a bulbous base  shape  with the rim pushed into the glass creating a sort of classic Victorian rose bowl effect. Though it is a little wide to be a classic toothpick holder, it certainly could have been as it is the right height.  It's hard to imagine the amount of work that went into this beautiful, hand made toothpick holder. 


This little toothpick holder and or rose bowl stands about 2 1/4 inches high and is three inches wide. The opening of the mouth is 1 3/8 inches wide. It is a fantastic piece of American art glass! It is in perfect condition.


I am a long time member and past President (1988) of the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Club. I guarantee the authenticity of this TP. For more info on toothpick holders as a great collectible, visit the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Society web page at (www.nthcs.org)

Zodiac signs zombie cocktail glass

 

Pyrex Visions France 7 inch Skillet #26

 

Ballard WCAX Radio TV silhouette ashtray

 

Crider 1985 bulbous Tut TP or rose bowl

Done by Lincoln Vermont potter Marcy Mayforth, this is an undated 4 inch tall vase/lamp. The design is done in the sgraffito technique revealing the brown underglaze. There are four purpleand seafoam green swirls on the piece, which is signed Mayforth on the bottom not with her name as the earlier 1980s pieces but with a stylized MM signature. It is in excellent shape. It came with a wick attached to a ceramic ball stopper to be used as a lamp I guess.


A beautiful piece by a well-respected Vermont potter whose work has been seen at Frog Hollow Crafts gallery in Burlington Vermont and Middlebury Vermont for many years.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this signed #19 vase in a turquoise with green overtones is the most common of his shapes available to collectors. It stands 5.5 inches tall and is 5 inches wide at the top. This is from the middle period of production as it has the chocolate brown underglaze bottom rim band. Excellent condition.  James Deponceau was born in Brockway Pennsylvania, the orignal home of the Wendell August Forge. His original name was Deponcean, one of the many Italian families in Brockway. Starting with Wendell August Forge in 1929, he left to work with Arthur Armour in 1934. He remained there until WW II. He produced his own work in Grove City, PA until 1952 when he relocated to Chautauqua New York. His work is carried on by his son Joseph and grandson Robert. He is profiled on page 82 of the book Wendell August Forge, 75 Years of Artistry in Metal written by Bonita Campbell in 1998.


This  3 1/4 inch wide hammered aluminum coaster is from the Mid-Century Eames period, the 1950s when most people has wood surfaces in their homes which had to be protected. Every home has multiple sets of coasters for special or everyday use. This single coaster by James Deponceau features one of his popular florals designs, The French Dancing Couple design. It is signed DePonceau, Chautauqua, N.Y. 100% Handmade, dating it to the 1952-1955 period. It is in excellent shape and ready to protect your Paul McCobb or Heywood-Wakefield table. Add it to your hammered aluminum collection or Mid-Century home today.  James Deponceau was born in Brockway Pennsylvania, the orignal home of the Wendell August Forge. His original name was Deponcean, one of the many Italian families in Brockway. Starting with Wendell August Forge in 1929, he left to work with Arthur Armour in 1934. He remained there until WW II. He produced his own work in Grove City, PA until 1952 when he relocated to Chautauqua New York. His work is carried on by his son Joseph and grandson Robert. He is profiled on page 82 of the book Wendell August Forge, 75 Years of Artistry in Metal written by Bonita Campbell in 1998.


This pair of 3 1/4 inch wide hammered aluminum coasters is from the Mid-Century Eames period, the 1950s when most people has wood surfaces in their homes which had to be protected. Every home has multiple sets of coasters for special or everyday use. This particular set by James Deponceau features one of his popular florals designs,Clipper Ship Design.  Each one is signed DePonceau, Chautauqua, N.Y. 100% Handmade, dating it to the 1952-1955 period. Both coasters are in excellent shape and ready to protect you Paul McCobb or Heywood-Wakefield table. Add it to your hammered aluminum collection or Mid-Century home today.

Marcy Mayforth 1990s 4 inch vase / lamp

 

Ballard #19 turquoise vase

 

Deponceau aluminum Dancing Couple coaste

 

Deponceau aluminum 2 ship coasters

This Mid-century enamel item was created by a woman named Louise Evans, who lived in  California. Now deceased, she created this item in the early 1960s. I purchased this from her daughter Lee in late 2007. In her e-mails, the daughter stated that her mother had taken enameling classes in the early 1960s in southern California. Perhaps she worked with Annemarie Davidson or Mary Sharp or Elizabeth Madley or the great Curtis Tann.  The daughter didn't know the name of the teacher. 


What is very clear is that she mastered the enameling process as her works compare favorably with some of the best made in California at the time. 


This funky biomorphic plate measures 3 inches long x 2 inches wide at its widest point. It is a classic biomorphic  shape. The background is done in a technique pioneered by Edward Winter and used extensively by Harold Tischler. It has lines in pinkish gold with some hints of green at the rim. The  jewels on the top surface make me think of gumdrops and are done in tones of red, orange, tan!  The back is nicely counter-enameled in a dark bronze or brown color. This piece is unsigned but  tt is likely this piece came from the year 1968 as her other dated pieces I own did which were purchased at the same time. She was a talented artist and in her daughter's words was "was heavily into copper enameling, lapidary craft and gardening".   Add this item to your enamel collection today! If you are handy with jewelry, add a back to this and wear it as a killer Midcentury pin!  This Mid-century enamel item was created by a woman named Louise Evans, who lived in  California. Now deceased, she created this item in the early 1960s. I purchased this from her daughter Lee in late 2007. In her e-mails, the daughter stated that her mother had taken enameling classes in the early 1960s in southern California. Perhaps she worked with Annemarie Davidson or Mary Sharp or Elizabeth Madley or the great Curtis Tann.  The daughter didn't know the name of the teacher. 


What is very clear is that she mastered the enameling process as her works compare favorably with some of the best made in California at the time. 


This funky biomorphic plate measures 3 inches long x 2 inches wide at its widest point. It is a classic biomorphic  shape. The background is done in a technique pioneered by Edward Winter and used extensively by Harold Tischler. It has lines in pinkish gold with some hints of green at the rim. The  jewels on the top surface make me think of gumdrops and are done in tones of green, orange, yellow!  The back is nicely counter-enameled in a dark bronze or brown color. This piece is unsigned but  it is likely this piece came from the year 1968 as her other dated pieces I own did which were purchased at the same time. She was a talented artist and in her daughter's words was "was heavily into copper enameling, lapidary craft and gardening".   Add this item to your enamel collection today! If you are handy with jewelry, add a back to this and wear it as a killer Midcentury pin!  This Mid-century enamel item was created by a woman named Louise Evans, who lived in  California. Now deceased, she created this item in the early 1960s. I purchased this from her daughter Lee in late 2007. In her e-mails, the daughter stated that her mother had taken enameling classes in the early 1960s in southern California. Perhaps she worked with Annemarie Davidson or Mary Sharp or Elizabeth Madley or the great Curtis Tann.  The daughter didn't know the name of the teacher. 


What is very clear is that she mastered the enameling process as her works compare favorably with some of the best made in California at the time. 


This plate measures 6 7/84 inches long x 3 1/4 inches wide  and stands 7/8 inches high. It is a classic biomorphic teardrop shape. The background is done in a technique pioneered by Edward Winter and used extensively by Harold Tischler. It has lines in pinkish gold with some hints of green at the rim. The  jewels on the top surface make me think of gumdrops and are done in tones of cobalt blue, light blue, chartreuse, yellow and clear!  The back is nicely counter-enameled in a greenish gold color. She signed this piece with her initials LE  It is likely this piece came from the year 1968 as her other dated pieces I own did which were purchased at the same time. She was a talented artist and in her daughter's words was "was heavily into copper enameling, lapidary craft and gardening".   Add this item to your enamel collection today!  In the late 1950s and early 1960s, two Alfred University graduates, Lee and Samuel Rosen, founded a design studio in Stroudsburgh PA called Design Tehnics. They employed many talented Alfred University graduates such as Karen Karnes, Gyorgy Kepes, Vivika Heino and Nancy Wickham, later a Vermont studio potter. They used heavy dark red Pennsylvania clay, incised design and modest slip decoration. Marked DESIGN TECHNICS on base (few DT pieces were ever artist signed), this biomorphic 12 inch long low dish or bowl has a light gray underglaze and a mottled chocolate brown overglaze. It is in excellent condition and is signed both with the words Design Techincs in upper case block letters and an intertwined DT.

Louise Evans enamel biomorphic copper pl

 

Louise Evans enamel biomorphic dish

 

Louise Evans enamel biomorphic copper pl

 

Design Technics 12 inch oblong low dish

Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this #17 tapered yellow vase stands 3 1/4 inches tall and is the smallest in the series of 5 vases in this tapered form. It is done in Ballard's yellow glaze and is from his later production period, as there is no chocolate brown bottom band and the blending on the top is very smooth. In excellent condition, it is an excellent starter piece for a Ballard collector. Add it to your American Art Pottery collection today.  Produced by the Cheshire CT firm of Bovano (started in 1953 by John BOnsignor, Gene VAn Leight and Warren NOden), this set of 4 3 1/2 inch diameter coasters features what I have named the Orange Sunburst or Ray pattern which consists of alternating rays of  colors: orange, gold, a pinkish brown and chocolate brown coming out of a asymmetrically placed focal area of small enamel jewels in the same 4 colors.


 The back is done in the typical black counterenamel Bovano uses and the gold circle label which reads Handcrafted by Bovano of Cheshire Conn. Three are in excellent condition and one has two stress marks on the front.  There are no chips to the enamel. All in all, a great set to buy and use! Add this set to your Mid-Century Enamel collection today.  Produced by the Villanti Company of Italy, this 2 rest enamel ashtray shows their distinctive use of heavy thick enamel in a colorblock application.  The piece is in very good condition.  Put it on a Heywood-Wakefield blond wood table and add a funky accent piece to your Eames era decor.  Beautiful blues in this Midcentury Italian piece. Price is for the pair.  James Deponceau was born in Brockway Pennsylvania, the orignal home of the Wendell August Forge. His original name was Deponcean, one of the many Italian families in Brockway. Starting with Wendell August Forge in 1929, he left to work with Arthur Armour in 1934. He remained there until WW II. He produced his own work in Grove City, PA until 1952 when he relocated to Chautauqua New York. His work is carried on by his son Joseph and grandson Robert. He is profiled on page 82 of the book Wendell August Forge, 75 Years of Artistry in Metal written by Bonita Campbell in 1998.


This set of 4 3 1/4 inch wide hammered aluminum coasters is from the Mid-Century Eames period, the 1950s when most people has wood surfaces in their homes which had to be protected. Every home has multiple sets of coasters for special or everyday use. This particular set by James Deponceau features three of his popular  designs: the Rose Design, the Dogwood design and his finely executed Pine Cone. Each one is signed DePonceau, Chautauqua, N.Y. 100% Handmade, dating it to the 1952-1955 period. All four coasters are in very fine shape and ready to protect your Paul McCobb or Heywood-Wakefield table. Add it to your hammered aluminum collection or Mid-Century home today.

Ballard #17 yellow tapered vase

 

Bovano set 4 Orange Ray coasters

 

Villanti Italy

 

4 Deponceau aluminum Pine Rose coasters

James Deponceau was born in Brockway Pennsylvania, the orignal home of the Wendell August Forge. His original name was Deponcean, one of the many Italian families in Brockway. Starting with Wendell August Forge in 1929, he left to work with Arthur Armour in 1934. He remained there until WW II. He produced his own work in Grove City, PA until 1952 when he relocated to Chautauqua New York. His work is carried on by his son Joseph and grandson Robert. He is profiled on page 82 of the book Wendell August Forge, 75 Years of Artistry in Metal written by Bonita Campbell in 1998.


This set of 3 1/4 inch wide hammered aluminum coasters is from the Mid-Century Eames period, the 1950s when most people has wood surfaces in their homes which had to be protected. Every home has multiple sets of coasters for special or everyday use. This particular set by James Deponceau features one of his popular florals designs, the Rose Design. One rose in bloom amid leaves is featured on each coaster. Each one is signed DePonceau, Chautauqua, N.Y. 100% Handmade, dating it to the 1952-1955 period.  All four coasters are in excellent shape and ready to protect you Paul McCobb or Heywood-Wakefield table. Add it to your hammered aluminum collection or Mid-Century home today.  Produced by the Cheshire CT firm of Bovano (started in 1953 by John BOnsignor, Gene VAn Leight and Warren NOden), this 10 inch wide enamel 6 rest ashtray with a 1960s era pattern I have named Confetti features 2 different color jewels on a standard dark orange background. I have named it Twotone Confetti! the jewels in shades of dark red and a pinkish orange vary in size but are all on the small side. The back is done in the typical black counterenamel Bovano uses. It has the standard Bovano gold paper label though it has faded and most of the three original tan felt pads. What is even more amazing is that it retains most of the original label from the Hudson's department store and its original price of $10 which was a good amount in the late 1950s and early 1960s. It is in excellent condition but does have two tiny stress lines on five of the six ashtray rests, not unusual. Add it to your Mid-Century Enamel collection today  roduced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard, a student of Glidden Parker at Alfred University in the 1940s who worked in the Burlington area, this 8" wide open bowl has the very early studio period piecrust rim and the dark chocolate brown base glaze. The decoration consists of dabs of the early white and light blue glaze with the blue having mottling through it. Excellent condition. Signed with an early Ballard signature seen on pieces marked 1945 and 1946.  Signed Hildegard, this is a fascinating example of Mid-Century enamel in that the artist has used small pieces of Venetian style millefiori glass as her jewels. The jewels float on a deep green background, much like a standard Bovano background. The edge has the chocolate brown color seen on Edwards Star pieces. The back is counter-enamled in a funky bright green color and the signature is on a panel of white with the letters in green. There is some damage to the piece. Two edge imperfections on the back and an area of stress cracks on the side near the yellow millefiori near the rim.  All in all, an interesting piece by an unknown maker.

Deponceau aluminum set 4 Rose coasters

 

Bovano 10" Tricolor Confetti ashtra

 

Ballard piecrust rim early mottled bowl

 

Hildegard signed 8" low enamel bowl

Glidden Parker #49 6 1/2 inch ball vase done in Glidden's standard turquoise matrix glaze. Incised signature, no ram. Excellent condition. No chips, cracks, or crazing. Add it to your Glidden Parker or Mid Century Modern pottery collection today!  Measuring 8 inches long x 5 inches wide and standing 1 1/4 inches high on four feet, this funky example of California ceramics screams 1950s!  The yellow outside of the piece is a great contrast to the crimson red crackle interior.  It has 9 rests for cigarettes, a real living room Heywood Wakefield blond table stunner!


It is in excellent shape. On the bottom, it is marked Lane & Co, Van Nuys, Calif, USA, #2511. Add it to your California pottery or Mid Century art pottery collection today.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


This 4 1/4 inch tall vase is done in a dark turquoise glaze with heavy mottling. It is signed S. Ballard Vermont but carries no shape number though it is shape 20. In excellent condition, it is most likely from the middle period of production.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


This is one of Ballard's smallest vases, the number 40 shape. It stands 2 1/2 inches tall and is 2 5/8 inches square at the top. This particular example carries the original Ballard paper label which states Hand Made Porcelain A Product of Vermont Craftsmanship. 


The glaze on this small piece is a standard Ballard white glaze with the chocolate brown underglaze visible at the top rim and at the very bottom of the base. This dates this piece to Ballard's middle production period.

Glidden #49 turquoise ball vase

 

Lane & Co Van Nuys Ca ashtray - funky!

 

Ballard #20 shape early dark turquoise

 

Ballard #40 white square top small vase

Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


This vase is an early version of the later marked #20 vases. It is slightly irregular in shape at the top rim and may have been hand thrown.  It stands 4 1/4 inches high.  It is marked S Ballard Vermont but with no shape number. 


The very heavy mottling on the top part of the vas where a lot of chocolate brown underglaze can be seen indicates it is a very early piece as it also has the chocolate brown bottom band at the base.  It is in excellent condition. Add it to your American Art Pottery or Stanley Ballard collection today.  Produced in California by the Edwards Star Original company, this 9 3/4 inch enamel dish shows this firm's characteristic use of a bold dark base color and oblong jewels alternating with large wide panels. There are 5 yellow oblong jewels and five 2 tone green sections with a deep blue color border to each panel. There is no edge chipping or damage. It has the trademark edge which almost looks like it is beaded.  Excellent condition. There are some internal cracks to the oblong jewels but the enamel over them is smooth and not cracked. I can only assume the stress cracks happened in the firing process. The back shows the copper metal of the body as it is not counterenameled on the back.   It is signed An Edwards Star Original from Gump's, especially created for Joan and Peter Knott. Finding the owner's names is highly unusual for Edwards Star pieces.


This dish was made for the famous and elegant San Francisco department store Gump's, which is now closed  Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard, a student of Glidden Parker at Alfred University in the 1940s who worked in the Burlington area,  this 4 inch tall #20 shape vase is a transitional piecefrom his  early studio period as it has a heavily mottled white overglaze and a deep chocolate underglaze which can be clearly seen on the interior of the piece. Probably from his middle production period as there is a chocolate brown band near the base which was not present on the earliest studio work. The writing on the bottom of the piece can be seen when one looks down from the top at the bottom of the piece. This only happened in very early studio pieces.  There is a rub on the small side near the bottom where this vase when fired must have been touching another piece. Overall, a good strong example of early Stanley Ballard.  Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard, a student of Glidden Parker at Alfred University in the 1940s who worked in the Burlington area,  this white glaze biomorphically shaped lobed or Twist bowl measurees 5 1/2 inches across diagonally.  It is most likely a later production shape. It is in excellent shape.

Ballard #20 shape early studio vase

 

Edwards star Gumps green blue 9 " e

 

Ballard studio early #20 shape white vas

 

Ballard #74 5" square Twist white d

Prior to changing the name to Bennington Potters, David Gil's company was known as Cooperative Design. There, he and other Alfred designers fashioned all sorts of interesting Mid-Century items. Having trained at Alfred University, Gil came to Bennington in 1948. His designs are included in many Mid-Century exhibits and catalogues.  


This particular design is like Norman Bel Geddes famous Skyscraper cocktail shaker for Revere in that the cup has a dual purpose. In the Bel Geddes set, the top of the shaker is actually the same piece which forms the bowl of the goblet. In Gil's version, the sake cup doubles as the stopper for the sake bottle.  


This set was apparantly sold with 6 cups and the decanter as one can see still written in pencil on the bottom of this sake bottle. I don't know if there were seven cups or six in the original set. I do know  I have seen it in this early Gil color and a deep brown glaze. I only had one extra cup so now this bottle has its stopper. I particularly like the unglazed portion of the neck which helps one grip the bottle when pouring. A great and early Gil design. The cup and the bottle are both signed David Gil Bennington. Add it to your collection of Mid-Century pottery today  Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard, a student of Glidden Parker at Alfred University in the 1940s who worked in the Burlington area,  this #10 tapered vase stands 11 inches tall and is the largest in the series of 5 vases in this tapered form. It is done in Ballard's white glaze and is from his later production period. In excellent condition, it is an excellent starter piece for a Ballard collector. Add it to your American Art Pottery collection today.  Standing 6 inches tall, this melon ribbed pink cased vase features a white inside layer, a clear crystal outside layer and a layer of mica streaks. It could be English or Bohemian, even Phoenix. I am not sure. I am sure that it is in excellent condition and beautiful. Made in the 1885-1910 art glass period, it displays beautifully and would look gorgeous filled with deep red tea roses on a vanity or boudoir table. Add it to your Art Glass collection today.  Done by Lincoln Vermont potter Marcy Mayforth, this1988 8 3/4" pink tulip vase is glazed in a celadon green inside. The design is done in the sgraffito technique, then fill in as in an enamel piece. There are three pink and blue tulips blossoms on the piece, which is signed Mayforth on the bottom. It is in excellent shape.

David Gil sake bottle and stopper

 

Ballard #10 11" tall tapered white

 

6" melon ribbed cased Art Glass vas

 

Marcy Mayforth 1988 8 3 / 4" pink tul

Produced in Bennington Potter's signature teal blue/green glaze, this footed oval 13 inch long bread plate has sloping sides to it on all four sides. It rests on two cross shaped feet. The underside is completely glazed, even over the 544 shape number. Made from a design of either founder David Gil or Yusuke Aida, this ergonomically designed Mid-Century bread dish has great appeal. It is in excellent condition and looks unused.  Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard, a student of Glidden Parker at Alfred University in the 1940s who worked in the Burlington area,  this 10 3/4  inch long console bowl has the brown band at the bottom which means it is from the middle period of Ballard's production. It has a heavily mottled glaze over the chocolate underglaze. It is 3 1/3 inches wide and stands 3 inches tall. It is marked S Ballard Vermont and is in excellent condition. A great example of Ballard's skill in glazing. The matching single candleholders have the same streamlining style. One has a firing crack which happened during manufacture. Add it to your American Art Pottery collection today  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


This planter with underplate and drain hole is from his earlier period where this type of deep mustard yellow glaze was used. It carried no mold number but matches another smaller size in the same shape which has the number 60 in pencil. The bottom is incompletely glazed with the brown underglaze showing. Excellent condition.  Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard, a student of Glidden Parker at Alfred University in the 1940s who worked in the Burlington area,  this 4 inch tall #20 shape vase is from his early studio period as it has a heavily mottled blue overglaze and a deep chocolate underglaze which can be clearly seen on the interior of the piece. A recessed base is another early feature as well as the long trailing tail of the letter d of the word Ballard. Excellent condition

Bennington Potters #554 oval bread plate

 

Ballard early Deco style 3 piece console

 

Ballard #60 shape mustard planter

 

Ballard studio early #20 shape blue vase




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