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Information from the The Complete Guide to Corning Ware & Visions Cookware book by Kyle Coroneos. The Floral Bouquet pattern  was introduced in 1971. It contains the then popular colors of yellow and avocado green as well as blue. It comes in two versions. The first harder to find version has the pattern on all sides in a wrap around fashion was made for only one year before Corning redesigned the line. The second and more easily found version has the pattern on the front and back only.


This casserole is from the A Series which was introduced in 1972 and ended in 1987.


This A-1-B Floral Bouquet Covered Saucepan was made between 1972-1975. It is being sold with the C-7 lid as shown. It holds 1 quart. The Floral Bouquet pattern is shown on page 74-78 of Coroneos' 2006 guide titled The Complete Guide to Corning Ware & Visions Cookware.


Excellent vintage condition. No damage of any kind.


Using Corning items is an easy way to bake casseroles, gratins or use them as serving dishes. Retro pratical flair. I bought it very reasonably so can pass them on reasonably as well. 


Go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of America's past. Sturdy, dependable, dishwasher-friendly, it is ready for your kitchen table today.  In 1974 Dansk Designs changed their name to Dansk Designs International. So, this pair of heavy full lead crystal candleholders was most likely made in the 1970s. It was made in Japan as the label states. Both candleholders have their original label.


The form of this candleholder is very biomorphic with rounded corners on top. Each holder stands 2 inches tall and is 4 inches wide. Because they are 100% full lead crystal, they are perfectly clear and have a certain sculptural quality. The designer of this shape is Jens Quistgaard, who was the lead designer when the Nierenbergs opened their business in Mount Kisco, New York

According to wikipedia, "by 1982 Quistgaard had created more than 2000 different designs for Dansk of dinnerware, glassware and items for the home."


This pair of Dansk candleholders would look stunning in the right Midcentury decor.  The Seneca Glass Company operated from 1891 to 1983. The original factory was in Fostoria, Ohio (built, then vacated by Fostoria). Some time later, a new factory was built along the Monongahela River in Morgantown, West Virginia. Seneca's factory was next to the Morgantown Glass Works and two doors down from Beaumont Glass. This proximity led to the companies "borrowing" designs from one another and at times making or decorating glass for each other. The full name of line #1980 is Driftwood Casual, often shortened to Driftwood.


Driftwood Casual was produced from 1953-1983 and is available in a rainbow of colors, though not all pieces will be found in every color. Official colors names are Accent Red, Amber, Buttercup (later called Yellow), Charm Blue, Cinnamon (sometimes called Brown), Crystal, Delphine Blue, Gray, Heather, Lime Green, Moss Green, Peacock Blue, Plum, and Ritz Blue.


This is their #10561 Seneca Driftwood Moss Green 32 oz pitcher, shown here with a pair of Driftwood Moss Green 3 3/8 inch tall cocktail glasses. Moss Green was Seneca's name for the very popular shade of green known as avocado green.


They are ready for your Mad Men rec room or bar today. Whether you use them on your patio or terrace or in your swanky living room. Get those gin & tonics ready or just serve water or iced tea in them.  This Cambridge Glass Company #3400/14 fancy wafer stem comport stands 7 inches tall. It carries the Wildflower etch.


It is in excellent condition and ready to serve your entertaining needs today.  Add a touch of glass class from the past!

Corning 1972-1975 Floral Bouquet 1 Quart

 

Dansk Designs International Quistgaard d

 

Seneca Driftwood Moss Green Cocktail Set

 

Cambridge #3400 / 14 fancy wafer stem 7 in

Shown on page 208 of Florence's 18th Edition of "Depression Glass", this pattern was created by the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company in the late 1930s. Perhaps better known in cobalt glass with white designs, it was also made in crytal with blue silkscreened designs. 


Each 5 ounce juice glass in this set of 4 glasses stands 3 3/4 inches tall. The glass has an interior optic to it.  The design is in very good shape after 75 years with no scratches on the blue design.


Price is for the set of four.


 Introduced by Libbey Glass Company of Toledo Ohio in their 1955 Fall Catalog, here is how this line was described to retailers:  


"Formerly known as St. Moriz. Smart, new tumbler shape with textured surface suggesting cool, refreshing beverages. Sparkling crystal glass with heavy base in four sizes. Ideal for merchandising popular "On-The-Rocks" and "Gin and Tonic" drinks."


In the Fall-Winter 1957 catalog on page 19:  "Smart new shapes with a textured surface suggesting melting ice. Ideal for the currently popular On-The-Rocks and Gin-and-Tonic"


This line came in four sizes:


#5147:  Jigger, 1 1/2 oz

#5148:  On-The-Rocks, 7 oz

#5149:  Gin-and-Tonic, 10 oz

#5144:  Cooler, 12 oz.


Yet another design by the highly talented lead designer for Libbey from 1942-1979, Freda Diamond!  According to the Mauzy book on pages 148-150, this pair of 3 3/4 inch tall tumblers is from the 1934-1950 Moderntone line by the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company.


"Basic dinnerware pieces are abundant which means it will not take a major investment to amass multiple place settings. A handful of items are more expensive including certain bowls and tumblers as shown on the price list."


On that price list on page 150, a single 3.5 inch cobalt juice tumbler lists for $65. Now this book was published in 1999 and prices have come down quite a bit since. In the 18th Edition of the Florence book published in 2008, on page 135, this juice tumbler still lists for $65. It is considered very hard to find.


I bought them very reasonably so I can offer the pair here for $60. That's right, $30 each. 


 Freda Diamond (1905-1998), "Designer for Everybody" - Libbey Glass Designer


Worked for Libbey from 1942-1979. From 1942 to 1979 she was the primary designer for the Libbey Glass Company, helping them pioneer in the production of inexpensive, highly decorative tumblers, stemware, and other pieces. Among the many patterns she was responsible for include Ripple, Tempo, Emerald Glass, Stardust, and many others that we grew up with in the 1950s and 1960s.


Named the "Designer for Everybody" by Life magazine in 1954, Freda Diamond enjoyed a highly successful, fifty-year career as a home furnishings consultant. From the 1930s through the 1980s, Diamond helped firms in many American industries to design affordable products for the mass market. If someone you know set up housekeeping in the mid-twentieth century, they probably owned something -- cabinets, drapes, kitchen canisters, plastic furniture, tables, lamps, mirrors, rugs, drinking glasses, or window shades -- designed by Freda Diamond.


From the 1957 catalog, here is their marketing language for the 1955-1963 Ripple Line: "Exciting Aqua color that "goes with anything" … rippling circles blown on inner surfaces give sparkling, changing, color … an important ingredient of Libbey’s "table recipes" for "setting an imaginative table".


Shown in this photo is a set of the 3 3/8 inch tall 6 oz Juicee glasses in Aqua.


In the 1955 catalog, Libbey introduced an exciting new line by Freda Diamond: the Ripple Line in Aqua in five shapes. In the 1959 Fall - 1960 Winter catalog they introduced the "Smoke" color in Ripple. The Mint color was added in 1961 along with Crystal. In 1962 a new color Amethyst was introduced. It exists also in their Gold color but I am not sure when it was in the line.

Hazel Atlas 4 Art Deco cobalt glass Ship

 

Libbey Saint Regis #5148 7 ounce Rocks g

 

Hazel Atlas 2 cobalt glass Moderntone ju

 

Libbey glass set 4 Aqua Ripple 6 oz. Jui

Collectors of vintage American Midcentury barware most often refer to this pattern as Capri Dots. In reality, the pattern name is "Capri Skol", made by the Hazel Atlas Glass Company in the 1960s. It exists in 9 different shapes. This is a set of the 3 3/8" tall old fashioned glasses.  Forest green and chartreuse bands with two sets of black ovals as decoration. 5 1/2 inches tall. Fifties colors, yessiree! Made by Libbey Glass, these tumblers would complement many of the Midcentury dinnerware lines such as Fiesta, Harlequin, Rhythm, and many more! I love the bold black ovals which are in two groups on the funky and pop art glasses. A Freda Diamond design for Libbey i am certain. Be it a cocktail or lemonade or an iced coffee, what would YOU serve in them?  Here are the 12 ounce size from the 1973 Libbey Accent Line in tawny brown color with the Brown Camelia design on them. Very hard to find. One of Freda Diamond's best designs for Libbey. Bigger taller glasses? More cocktails fit!!  These Libbey Accent line 9 ounce Rocks glasses were #374 in their 1970-1979 catalogs. The color is a smoky brown clear color they named "tawny". The shape and the decoration were designed by one of the few female industrial designers. Her name was Freda Diamond (1905-1998) and she was the head designer at Libbey Glass Company from 1942-1979. She helped them pioneer inexpensive highly decorative tumblers, stemware and barware. She is responsible for the Accent, Impromptu, Ripple, Tempo, Stardust lines and many more. Life magazine named her "Designer for Everybody" in 1954. The decorative motif on this line was called Brown Camelia. It was produced for one year only in 1973. I like the very graphic pop art flower power feel of the design. Here is how it was advertised when it was introduced in the 1970 Pacesetter Catalog: "Here's stemware for today ... Stemware with style that's just right for the informal dining and entertaining of America's lifestyle in the 70s." This Accent line won an award in the 1970 National Housewares Manufacturers Design Competition. On 1972 it was advertised as "Bold, formal, casual, Old World look or New. Over the 9 years it was available in these colors: crystal (9 years), Tawny (9 years), Olive (6 years), Dusky Blue (2 years) and Gold (2 years). A modern classic. indeed.

set 4 Hazel Atlas Capri Skol Dots old fa

 

Vintage set 4 black ovals chartreuse for

 

Libbey scarce 1973 Beverage size Tawny A

 

Libbey set 4 Tawny Accent rocks with Bro

In the 1970s, both the Anchor Hocking Glass Company and the Federal Glass Company made a series of Zodiac mugs. A milk glass base mug was painted black as the background to the gold design. The gold paint is very susceptible to wear making excellent condition examples harder to find. This Anchor Hocking Scorpio mug stands 3 7/8 inches tall and is signed on the bottom with their "anchor in a rectangle" mark. On one side is the Zodiac sign and symbol with the dates for Scorpio. On the other side is a panel detailing the attributes of a Scorpio. The set of twelve signs is available from both companies. For those Scorpios out there who would like some daily tea or coffee out of this groovy retro mug.  How about a nice cold cocktail in a snowflake covered vintage double rocks glass? This set of four retro old fashioned rocks glasses have a compass in gold amid snowflakes on one side against a frosted background and a frosted compass on clear amid white snowflake on the other side. They are heavy as they have a 1/2 solid glass base. They stand 4 3/8 inches tall. They are not signed but definitely American made from the Midcentury period of 1950-1970. Get your bottles ready. These handle a lot of booze. Perfect for those snowbirds who love their icy winter in a glass. The graphics are in very good vintage condition but not perfect. On the other hand, they are great usable Midcentury barware  Here is the #4505/06 Candy Box with the diamond design on the larger side panels. It stands 7 1/2 inches tall x 5 1/2 inches wide. It is decorated with the #1384 Pine Cone design. In the Regent Line (1948-1956) not only were the pieces hand decorated but the backgrounds were only enhanced either with all-over iridescence or with background shadowing. In the case of the Pine Cone design, all pieces were iridized. Beyond the decoration on the plain corner panels the only other decoration on this candy box is that there is a band near the top in the same color as used on the needles.


The Pine Cone pattern continued into the 1957-1963 Con-Cora line but without the iridescence. By 1960, the Pine Cone pattern was not in the 1960 Con-Cora catalog found in Monograph 127 on pages 23-30. This helps to explain why there are fewer Con-Cora Pine Cone pieces to be found.  This Royal Haeger Midcentury Black Mistique 13H 6 inch vase has a glaze which was developed by Helmut Bruchman who was 'the creator ofthe popular glazes of the 1960s' (Paradis, p. 10-11). The glaze is amazing and contrast well with the black body. 


Unfortunately there is chip on the base rim, thus the very reasonable price. I paid $25 for it. Great shelf piece and example of this spectacular glaze.

Anchor Hocking 1970s Scorpio Zodiac coff

 

Midcentury set 4 Compass snowflake doubl

 

Consolidated Regent Line #4505 Pine Cone

 

Royal Haeger Midcentury Black Mistique 1

Glidden #163 large 11 inch long x 5 inch tall covered casserole or baking dish. Stunning. The glaze is Glidden's standard turquoise matrix. Signed with an incised signature and the number 163 on the bottom. No ram. Excellent condition. No chips, crack or crazing. 


Add it to your American Studio pottery or Mid-century collection today.  This set of cobalt blue glass tumblers was made by the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company from 1936-1939. This is the 5 inch 12 ounce size.


All are in excellent condition. Price is for the set.


Go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of America's past. Sturdy, dependable, dishwasher-friendly, it is ready for your bar or man cave now.  This pair of Bennington Potters Pink Agate #2085 candleholders stands 4 inches tall. This glaze has been discontinued by the company.


Add it to your Bennington Potters collection today. They are all ready to grace your home.


They would look great with a collection of early agate!   This Viking Epic Crimped Bon Bon #1147 circa 1957 in Persimmon was shown in the 1957-1960 Viking catalogs.  


It is in excellent vintage condition and ready to grace your Midcentury home today.  


A practical and beautiful piece of 20th century American glass.

Glidden pottery#163 covered casserole

 

Hazel Atlas 6 cobalt glass Fine Rib tumb

 

Bennington Potters Pink Agate candlehold

 

Viking Epic Crimped Bon Bon #1147 Persim

This set of five 5 1/8 inch tall white wine glasses are from the line called Fortuna Smoke that Rosenthal produced from 1963-1969. They are very thin glass. On replacements, they are listed at $30 EACH. 


I was lucky enough to find these very reasonably.I am therefore offering them at a much lower price for the set of five.


 I think they would go well with the Morgantown smoky gray glass barware as well. Add them to your retro or midcentury bar today.

 This pair of Fostoria Baroque pattern single candleholders carries the #327 Navarre etch. In 2001, this pair booked for $50. I bought them reasonably and will pass them on that way. 


Excellent condition. Price is for the pair.  Murano midcentury green mica summers bowl:  


Made in Murano Italy during the 1950-1970 period, this large bowl is done in the sommerso technique meaning an interior layer of glass is "submersed" in another of glass. In this bowl, the inner layer is pink glass with green swirls and silver mica flakes. The outer layer is white. It measures 9" across from top to folded down rim and 8" wide. A great example of Italian Midcentury mastery of glass.  Carl Radke 2014 Red with a Yellow Tut Pattern Toothpick Holder:


This Carl Radke 2014 signed toothpick holder stands 2 inches tall but its overall width is a smaller size than later ones Carl did for me. It was one of the ones where he was trying to learn the form and get the right diameter. It is blown into a traditional 1880-1895 American Art Glass shape, that being a double gourd form but a wider one. It is made of one layer then decorated: the inner red glass color layer over which a yellow Tut pattern is placed. It is then iriidized to create it lustrous finish. It is signed on the bottom "Carl Radke 15" and carries his Phoenix Studios silver paper label. It was one of the original 36 prototypes Carl created for my display of his work at the 2015 40th Annual Convention of the NTHCS (National Toothpick Holder Collector’s Society).


It is in excellent condition. $80 plus Priority Mail shipping from 05452.


Carl Radke has been blowing glass since 1970. He was one of a vanguard of young artists who participated in the Renaissance of American Art Glass in the early 1970s.


Originated by Tiffany in 1881 and popular during the early part of the 20th century, Lustre Art Glass had fallen out of favor about 1925, practically becoming a lost art. In the latter part of the 1960s, the art programs of several California universities began to rekindle an interest in glassblowing in general and in Silver Art Glass specifically. Several of the young artists became fascinated with the medium and were caught up by the challenge of rediscovering this complex and sophisticated art form.


Lustre Glass is a very specialized glassblowing medium because of the silver content in the glass. It has always been one of the most costly forms of glass to produce. In addition to the high cost of the raw materials used in Lustre Glass, the raw glass can only be maintained in the oven for a short time before the color, quality, and texture of the glass batch begins to degenerate. These two factors prevent this volatile studio glass from being mass-produced in a larger factory environment. Thus, the specific formulae and high raw material costs have kept the blowing of Silver Lustre Art Glass in the hands of a few skillful artisans as the glass maker must be chemist as well as craftsman to work successfully in this medium.


Carl Radke is one of only a few glassblowers out of the thousands in the United States who continues to work in this difficult and traditional glass. His skill with glass and glass decoration has allowed him to "play" with the medium and to develop his unique creations.

Rosenthal midcentury Fortuna Smoke wines

 

Fostoria Baroque Navaree Etch candlehold

 

Murano midcentury green mica sommerso bo

 

Carl Radke 2014 Red with Yellow Tut TP

Carl Radke 2014 Yellow with a Red Tut Pattern Toothpick Holder:


This Carl Radke 2014 signed toothpick holder stands 2 inches tall but its overall width is a smaller size than later ones Carl did for me. It was one of the ones where he was trying to learn the form and get the right diameter. It is blown into a traditional 1880-1895 American Art Glass shape, that being a double gourd form but a wider one. It is made of one layer then decorated: the inner yellow) glass color layer over which a red Tut pattern is placed. It is then iriidized to create it lustrous finish. It is signed on the bottom "Carl Radke 15" and carries his Phoenix Studios silver paper label. It was one of the original 36 prototypes Carl created for my display of his work at the 2015 40th Annual Convention of the NTHCS (National Toothpick Holder Collector’s Society).


It is in excellent condition. $80 plus Priority Mail shipping from 05452.


Carl Radke has been blowing glass since 1970. He was one of a vanguard of young artists who participated in the Renaissance of American Art Glass in the early 1970s.

Originated by Tiffany in 1881 and popular during the early part of the 20th century, Lustre Art Glass had fallen out of favor about 1925, practically becoming a lost art. In the latter part of the 1960s, the art programs of several California universities began to rekindle an interest in glassblowing in general and in Silver Art Glass specifically. Several of the young artists became fascinated with the medium and were caught up by the challenge of rediscovering this complex and sophisticated art form.


Lustre Glass is a very specialized glassblowing medium because of the silver content in the glass. It has always been one of the most costly forms of glass to produce. In addition to the high cost of the raw materials used in Lustre Glass, the raw glass can only be maintained in the oven for a short time before the color, quality, and texture of the glass batch begins to degenerate. These two factors prevent this volatile studio glass from being mass-produced in a larger factory environment. Thus, the specific formulae and high raw material costs have kept the blowing of Silver Lustre Art Glass in the hands of a few skillful artisans as the glass maker must be chemist as well as craftsman to work successfully in this medium.


Carl Radke is one of only a few glassblowers out of the thousands in the United States who continues to work in this difficult and traditional glass. His skill with glass and glass decoration has allowed him to "play" with the medium and to develop his unique creations.  This great example of Aldo Londi designed Bitossi Mid Century Italian pottery is signed on the white base ITALY and 3866. It is in his iconic Seta (Silk) pattern with vertically combed lines accented with horizontal bands of gold. This is the most common color combination I have seen in the Seta pattern: purple, blue, orange, black in repetition around the vase. 


It's a great Eames era 1950s - 1960s look. The inside is glazed in a beautiful deep purple glaze. 


It stands 13 1/4 inches tall and is in excellent vintage condition.


Add it to your Bitossi or midcentury Italian pottery or just Mid-century collection today.  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. It is from the 1955-1960 period. Bennington by Gil started in 1948 . They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. They made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores but this is an earlier more studio inspired piece. 


Marked #1541 this is a stylized pig in a highly abstract style. David Gil designed a series of animal banks, including a hippo, an owl and a lion. This was called Penurious Pig! Like Glidden Parker in the early 1940s, Gil used various animal motifs often on his ware, though most are two dimensional representations. This fun and funky pig stands 4 1/2 inches tall to the top of its back x 8 inches long. The main portion of the bank is unglazed with some impressed asterisks covering the pig's body. The asterisks are in brown, one of four colors possible. It has the original red plastic cork to seal the opening on the bottom. It is signed Bennington Potters Bennington VT which places it in the 1962-1968 time period. This pig back was shown in a 1967-68 catalogue along with the other nine shapes. 


This bank is in excellent condition with no damage. I have priced this Penurious Pig bank very fairly. It would make a stunning sculptural piece on a McCobb or Eames era credenza or coffee table.


David Gil was featured in the publication Vermont Life in its Winter 1961 issue. In an eight page spread with one full color image and 13 black and white images, there is a full history of the founding of the pottery along with great visual references of the ware being made at that time. One can see the iconic designs of Yusuke Aida, especially the double trigger mug and coffeepot along with other fascinating items. A great reference!  This gorgeous carnival glass mug was made by the Dugan / Diamond Glass company circa 1910-1925.  It is known as Storks and Rushes with Lattice Band.


It stands 4 inches tall and is in excellent condition. I bought it very reasonably and will pass it on to a mug collector, carnival glass collector or Dugan / Diamond collector.

Carl Radke 2014 Yellow with Red Tut TP

 

Bitossi Italy Aldo Londi tall Seta vase

 

Bennington Potters David Gil #1541 Pig b

 

Dugan Diamond Stork Rushes carnival glas

Done by Lincoln Vermont potter Marcy Mayforth, this is an undated 4 inch tall vase. The design is done in the sgraffito technique revealing the brown underglaze. There are three deep pink and blue tulips and connecting band on the piece, which is signed Mayforth on the bottom not with her name as the earlier 1980s pieces but with a stylized MM signature. It is in excellent shape. 


A beautiful piece by a well-respected Vermont potter whose work has been seen at Frog Hollow Crafts gallery in Burlington Vermont and Middlebury Vermont for many years.  This pair of Fostoria Baroque candleholders are etched. Hazel Marie Weatherman, in "Fostoria, Its First Fifty Years," says "Shirley Design, Plate Etching 331" was introduced in 1939 and discontinued in 1957. The etch is found only on the base of each candleholder


They stand 4 inches tall. The base has a diameter of 4 1/2 inches.


This pair is in excellent condition. Add them to your Elegant Glass or Fostoria Glass collection today.  This particular glaze came in three color variations: Orange Peel, Lime Peel, and Lime Peel as well as two decorated variations known as Navajo Blue (Lime Peel glaze with blue squiggles) and Seminole Orange (Orange Peel glaze with blue squiggles), all created by the brilliant Alrun Osterberg Guest, this is an up-and-coming line. It was produced only in 1976-77.


Alrun Guest (1942-2012) came to Haeger Potteries in 1969 from Berlin Germany and worked there until at least 2010. I consider her in the ranks of Eva Zeisel, an incredibly talented designer and ceramic engineer. 


This Royal Haeger Orange Peel #4170X vase stands 13 inches high. It is one of the larger pieces in the line. 


Part of the 1976-1977 line offered by the Haeger Pottery Co, the full line can be seen on p. 170 of the David Dilley book. Condition is excellent -- no chips, cracks, nicks, flakes, stains or other damage / problems.


There is a paper label on the bottom of the vase from the Boylan-Pearce store of Raleigh, North Carolina. I believe that the original felt on bottom with impressed Haeger mark was removed by the store for them to place their store label on the base. The vase is in excellent condition


Add it to your Royal Haeger or Mid-century pottery collection today.  This particular glaze came in three color variations: Orange Peel, Lime Peel, and Lime Peel as well as two decorated variations known as Navajo Blue (Lime Peel glaze with blue squiggles) and Seminole Orange (Orange Peel glaze with blue squiggles), all created by the brilliant Alrun Osterberg Guest, this is an up-and-coming line. It was produced only in 1976-77.


Alrun Guest (1942-2012) came to Haeger Potteries in 1969 from Berlin Germany and worked there until at least 2010. I consider her in the ranks of Eva Zeisel, an incredibly talented designer and ceramic engineer. 


This Royal Haeger Orange Peel #4170X vase stands 13 inches high. It is one of the larger pieces in the line. 


Part of the 1976-1977 line offered by the Haeger Pottery Co, the full line can be seen on p. 170 of the David Dilley book. Condition is excellent -- no chips, cracks, nicks, flakes, stains or other damage / problems.


There is a paper label on the bottom of the vase from the Boylan-Pearce store of Raleigh, North Carolina. I believe that the original felt on bottom with impressed Haeger mark was removed by the store for them to place their store label on the base. The vase is in excellent condition


Add it to your Royal Haeger or Mid-century pottery collection today.

Marcy Mayforth 1990s 4 inch vase

 

Fostoria Baroque Shirley Etch candlehold

 

Royal Haeger mid-century Orange Peel vas

 

Royal Haeger mid-century Orange Peel vas

The Seneca Glass Company operated from 1891 to 1983. The original factory was in Fostoria, Ohio (built, then vacated by Fostoria). Some time later, a new factory was built along the Monongahela River in Morgantown, West Virginia. Seneca's factory was next to the Morgantown Glass Works and two doors down from Beaumont Glass. This proximity led to the companies "borrowing" designs from one another and at times making or decorating glass for each other. The full name Driftwood Casual is often shortened to Driftwood.


Driftwood Casual is available in a rainbow of colors, though not all pieces will be found in every color. Official colors names are Accent Red, Amber, Buttercup (later called Yellow), Charm Blue, Cinnamon (sometimes called Brown), Crystal, Delphine Blue, Gray, Heather, Lime Green, Moss Green, Peacock Blue, Plum, and Ritz Blue.


This is a set of the Amber Driftwood Casual 5 1/8" tall 12 ounces Hi-Ball glasses.  This is an interesting color as the glass has darker coloration in the base due to the thickness of the glass.


The set is in excellent condition and ready for your Mad Men rec room or bar today.  Whether you use them on your patio or terrace or in your swanky living room, you can Gg green and save resources and purchase a piece of America's past. Sturdy, dependable, dishwasher-friendly, it is ready for your kitchen table today.  Made by the Anchor Hocking Company in the 1960s, the Lido line is yet another of the popular crinkle glassware so prevalent at the time. Like the Morgantown Crinkle line , it features highly textured surface. What distiniguishes the Lido line is that the pattern does not go all the way up to the rim of the glass.  It came in colors of Aquamarine, Avocado, Crystal, Honey Gold, Laser Blue, and Spicy Brown.


Anchor Hocking produced the "Milano" pattern from 1959 to 1963. The pattern name was then changed to "Lido" because subsequently the molds were remade by the Zanesville Mold Company in Ohio, a newly acquired Anchor Hocking Corporation subsidiary. The difference between the molds resulted in the `Milano' pattern name changing to "Lido." Although the two patterns are similar, the "Milano" pattern has a distinctive and more defined "crinkle" than "Lido". "Milano" was produced in Forest Green and Crystal only.  In the Lido pattern the crinkle pattern does not extend all the way to the top of the glass. There is a clear rim at the very top.


This amber Iced Tea glass stands 7 inches tall  and holds an amazing 22 ounces!  Made for cold drinks of ice tea, kool-aid, or lemonade, it is easy to grip and looks great. A practical retro vintage design ready for your kitchen today.  Made by the Anchor Hocking Company in the 1960s, the Lido line is yet another of the popular crinkle glassware so prevalent at the time. Like the Morgantown Crinkle line , it features highly textured surface. What distiniguishes the Lido line is that the pattern does not go all the way up to the rim of the glass.  It came in colors of Aquamarine, Avocado, Crystal, Honey Gold, Laser Blue, and Spicy Brown.


Anchor Hocking produced the "Milano" pattern from 1959 to 1963. The pattern name was then changed to "Lido" because subsequently the molds were remade by the Zanesville Mold Company in Ohio, a newly acquired Anchor Hocking Corporation subsidiary. The difference between the molds resulted in the `Milano' pattern name changing to "Lido." Although the two patterns are similar, the "Milano" pattern has a distinctive and more defined "crinkle" than "Lido". "Milano" was produced in Forest Green and Crystal only.  In the Lido pattern the crinkle pattern does not extend all the way to the top of the glass. There is a clear rim at the very top.


This amber Iced Tea glass stands 7 inches tall  and holds an amazing 22 ounces!  Made for cold drinks of ice tea, kool-aid, or lemonade, it is easy to grip and looks great. A practical retro vintage design ready for your kitchen today.  Produced by the Macbeth-Evans Company from 1930-1940, the Petalware pattern was made in pink, monax, cremax, decorated, Ivrene, and crystal. This is the Ivrene glass in the Petalware pattern.  The edges of the pattern show the same fiery opalescence as some of the American Sweetheart pieces also made by Macbeth-Evans.


This variation of the Petalware Ivrene is decorated with a 22K gold rim.  


The berry bowl stands 3 inches tall x 9 inches across. 


This set was part of a purchase of 49 piece of this pattern which was in the original box. It is either very very little used or never used.  The pattern can be seen on pages 175-176 of the Mauzy's 1999 Depression Glass book.


I am pricing these at exactly half of what the 1999 edition of Mauzy's Depression Glass book suggested as current values.  I bought the set very reasonably so I can afford to pass these along hopefully to a collector who will use and treasure them.


Add it to your collection of vintage American dinnerware today. It would stunning on a dark wood buffet in the Mid-century style of a blond wood credenza.

Seneca Driftwood amber set 4 Hi-Ball gla

 

Anchor Hocking Lido 22 ounce amber Iced

 

Anchor Hocking Lido 22 ounce amber Iced

 

Macbeth-Evans Petalware 9 inch berry bow

Standing 4  3/4 inches tall, this is the Fostoria Baroque Topaz yellow comport.  It features the well-loved baroque stem and the the hexagonal top dish shape. It is in excellent condition and ready to be added to your Fostoria or Fostoria Baroque or Elegant glass collection today.


I have priced this piece at 50% of the 19th Edition (2001) of the Florence Elegant Glassware of the Depression Era book.  The pattern is shown on pages 16-19).


Go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of the past. It is ready for your home today.  Produced by the Macbeth-Evans Company from 1930-1940, the Petalware pattern was made in pink, monax, cremax, decorated, Ivrene, and crystal. This is the Ivrene glass in the Petalware pattern.  The edges of the pattern show the same fiery opalescence as some of the American Sweetheart pieces also made by Macbeth-Evans.


This variation of the Petalware Ivrene is decorated with a 22K gold rim.  


The footed creamer stands 3 1/4 inches tall. The footed handled sugar bowl stands 3 1/2 inches tall. 


This set was part of a purchase of 49 piece of this pattern which was in the original box. It is either very very little used or never used.  The pattern can be seen on pages 175-176 of the Mauzy's 1999 Depression Glass book.


I am pricing these at exactly half of what the 1999 edition of Mauzy's Depression Glass book suggested as current values.  I bought the set very reasonably so I can afford to pass these along hopefully to a collector who will use and treasure them.


Add it to your collection of vintage American dinnerware today. It would stunning on a dark wood buffet in the Mid-century style of a blond wood credenza.   These stackable mugs are perfect for a small kitchen, apartment or camp where space is limited. Each stacks into another as the base is narrower than the top.  Each mug stands 4 3/8 inches tall x 3 3/4 inches wide at the top.  These mugs are what is called New Old Stock as they were never used. I bought a case of 24 of them recently. The box listed the color as Avocado Green. Talk about late 1960s, early 1970s!


They are in excellent condition. Each mug is signed Anchor Hocking Fire-King Oven-Prood Made in U.S. A. with a shape number also.


Perfect for that retro vintage kitchen, camp or apartment. Price is for the set. 4 sets of 4 mugs available.  Glidden Pottery, a unique stoneware bodied dinnerware and artware made in Alfred New York in 1940 to 1957 was designed and produced by Glidden Parker. It was said to be the American version of the Cizhou ceramics of the Chinese Song Dynasty. Glidden later had opened his ceramic plant. In 1946 the Glidden output was increased to 6000 pieces a week. In 1949 Glidden Pottery was second pottery to be used and is licensed for RAM Press. 


Glidden Pottery was founded by Glidden Parker, who himself was a student at the New York State College of Ceramics in Alfred. He attended summer school from 1937-39 where he was a student under the designer Don Schreckengost. While many attribute the success of Glidden Pottery to the genius of Glidden Parker alone, the true genius lay in his ability to select colleagues to work with who served as designers, mold makers, and decorators. Sergio Dello Strologo and Fong Chow both collaborated with Glidden Parker and numerous awards and prizes were awarded to their designs. Most of Glidden’s known glazes, shapes and patterns are in collaboration with Fong Chow. 


The marketing of Glidden pottery was done by Rubel and Company, marketers, in known giftware and women’s magazines in 1940 to 1950. In February 28, 1958 the Glidden Pottery closed.



This Glidden #58 concentric rings 5 1/2 inch tall vase is stunning and scarcely found. The glaze is not Glidden's standard turquoise matrix but a combination of a darker blue over the turquoise . Signed with an incised signature and the number 58 on the bottom. No ram. Excellent condition. No chips, crack or crazing. 


Add it to your American Studio pottery or Mid-century collection today.

Fostoria Baroque Topaz footed comport

 

Macbeth-Evans Petalware creamer sugar go

 

Anchor Hocking set 4 Green Fire-King mug

 

Glidden pottery #58 concentric rings vas

Part of the Corelle Livingware line made by Corning in the 1960s, this line was very large.  


This is the 12 inch long x 10 inch wide rimmed platter in a pattern which includes blue hearts on a green vine on both ends of the platter. I do not know the name of this pattern.  It is marked on the bottom:  Break & Chip Resistant, CORELLE, MADE IN USSA, NO Stovetop or Broiler.  

It is in excellent vintage condition and ready for your cookout on the patio. Fill it with corn on the cob or watermelon slices! 


Go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of America's past. Sturdy, dependable, dishwasher-friendly, it is ready for your kitchen table today.  This Meakin Fair Winds cup and saucer was made in Staffordshire England.  Each shape shows historical scenes of Chinese Export to America by using images from original copper engravings of the time period.


The cup shows a scene titled Sailors Farewell on one side while the other side depicts the New York State Seal. The saucer shows a scene of New York Harbor 1830 on one side while the other side shows the symbol for "E Pluribus Unum".


The colors are brown transferware on a creamy off-white.  The details are amazing.  This would look great in a maritime decor and would certainly set a stunning historical table.


The cup is marked simply England while the saucer carries a mark on the back which states "Permanent colors, dishwasher and detergent safe."  So,  Go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of the past. Sturdy, dependable, dishwasher-friendly, it is ready for your kitchen or camp table today. Historical chic! There are five sets available.


 Priced each.  This set of 8 Meakin Fair Winds dinner plates was made in Staffordshire England.  Each shape shows historical scenes of Chinese Export to America by using images from original copper engravings of the time period.


The dinner plate shows the ship called "The Friendship of Salem".  A cartouche on the rim depicts Canton Port in 1839 while on the opposite side another depicts New York Harbor in 1830. The third cartouche shows the ship U.S Delaware capturing the French ship Le Croyable across from the fourth cartouche which shows the symbol for "E Pluribus Unum".


The colors are brown transferware on a creamy off-white.  The details are amazing.  This would look great in a maritime decor and would certainly set a stunning historical table.


The mark on the back states "Permanent colors, dishwasher and detergent safe."  So,  Go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of the past. Sturdy, dependable, dishwasher-friendly, it is ready for your kitchen table today.  Priced each.  This large Noritake Nippon cake plate measures a little over 10 inches across from top to bottom and almost 11 inches from the tip of the handle to the other handle.  It is a standard Noritake shape, but it is unusual to see it NOT signed with the post-1921 Noritake mark but with an earlier purple M in wreath mark.  I would place this piece in the 1920-1925 time period before the company consciously adoped Art Deco motifs, colors and styling.


It is very practical and functional piece of china and is ready for your holiday table.  The cream color band would complement many contemporary Noritake dinnerware patterns.  The four floral cartouches are all hand-painted.  The more Victorian motif of prunus flower blossoms are done in 24K gold and form a basket shape around the floral cartouches. There were most likely 6 smaller cake plates which went with this cake plate.


It is in excellent vintage shape. Add it to your Nippon or Noritake collection today.

Corelle Hearts and Vine 12 inch platter

 

Meakin Fair Winds cup and saucer. Tea ti

 

Set 8 Meakin Fair Winds dinner plates

 

Noritake Nippon large pre-Deco cake plat

Designed for Hall China by celebrated Hungarian designer extraordinaire Eva Zeisel, this 10 oz 4 inch tall creamer in the #1881 Bouquet pattern is part of the Hallcraft Classic line.  It features sprays of 5 different flowers on its body and a green leaf on its handle.  It is in excellent condition and ready to grace your Mid-century table today.  It would look stunning on a Paul McCobb or other Eames era designer credenza or buffet.  Or simply use it on your breakfast table!  Marshall Studios was located in Veedersburg Indiana and stated in 1922 making lampshades, moving to Veedersburg in 1941.  In 1951, Jane and Gordon Martz joined the firm. 


According to Brochure #35 I have in my possession, they state that "stoneware is our specialty. The forms are simple, designed to be usable and retain the feeling of clay.  The ware is hard, durable and subtle in color.  Handcrafting is important -- all pieces are glazed and decorated by hand."  They also produced all the solid walnut lamp fittings, plus walmut framer and legs or bases for the stoneware top tables.


This 8 1/4 inch tall tapered vase has a paper Marshall Studios label with the number typed in black ink M125-30.  According to page 3 of the #35 brochure, the first number stands for the shape number and the second number is the glaze number. In this case, the glaze is their "dark brown" glaze.  The glaze has a textured appearance to it with speckles of different shades of brown in it.


The piece is in excellent condition.  Add it to your Mid Century American Studio Pottery collection today.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this Ballard #19 mustard yellow glaze flared vase stands 5 1/4 inches tall and is 5 1/8 inches across at the top.  The top rim is slightly out of round.  


This vase is marked with what I am calling (Mark #2) of the four labels i have in my collection. I think that this vase dates from the 1948-1952 period of production.  It carries an original paper label. It is much heavier than later versions of the vase.  It is hard to read the bottom but it does carry a 19 shape number.


Add it to your American Art Pottery collection or Stanley Ballard collection today.  Produced as part of the Dancing Nymphs line by the Consolidated Glass Company, the #3094 sherbet was introduced when the line of 8 inch ceramic was plates was expanded into a full luncheon set. There is a 1939 catlog showing the line on page 144 of the Wilson book. 


The sherbet stands 3 3/4 inches tall and has 12 female nudes on it. This example is the white ceramic wash treatment in which the ceramic wash was removed from the figures to leave them clear. 


The sherbet is shown on page 85 of Jack Wilson's 1989 book as plates 434. At that time, he valued a goblet at $35. 


They are harder to find than the 8 inch plates and fan vases in this pattern.


More info on the glass produced by Consolidated can be found at www.pcgcc.org. You can find an application there to join the Phoenix & Consolidated Glass Collector Club there too.

Eva Zeisel Hallcraft 10 oz. Bouquet crea $15.00

 

Martz Marshall M125-30 8 inch brown vase

 

Ballard #19 (Mark #2) mustard vase with

 

Consolidated Dancing Nymphs #3094 sherbe

This Hull Continental orange striped #57 vase measures 15 inches high x 8 inches at its widest point, signed, is in excellent shape.


Add it to your American Mid Century Art Pottery or Hull collection today.  It is a big impressive piece of pottery.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this shape seems to be one of the early ones by Ballard which didn't make it to the later production period.


This is a center bowl or console bowl which had a pair of smaller matching candleholders.  This biomorphic oblong dish is done in a standard white glaze with the chocolate brown underglaze. The two candlehodlers are sprigged on and then fired.


The bowl is very large. It measures 12 inches wide x 5 1/4 inches wide.  It is signed with the shape number 56 on the bottom and a standard S. Ballard Vermont incised mark.


Add it to your American Art Pottery collection or Studio pottery collection today.  This glassware pattern is fun, retro and funky. It is as practical  today as when it was produced in the 1960s.  Made by the Color Craft Corporation of Indianapolis, Indiana (started in 1959), this line was called Shat-R-Pruf.  The clear glass items are encased in a rubberized coating of different background colors onto which a white material was strizzled in a circle or loop pattern.


These 4 Roly Poly bar tumblers are sometimes referred to also as rocks glasses.  They stand 3 1/4 inches tall and measure 3 inches wide at the top.  They hold 12 ounces.  


This set is in excellent condition and includes one in each of the following colors:  red, orange, daffodil yellow and green.  Time to make some iced tea or something a bit stronger, head out to the patio and have a retro good time! Fill it with ice tea, lemonade, or cocktails and have some friends over for a retro patio cocktail blast!


Here is how the manufacturer advertised this line:


Crystal Clear Glass Inside - Tutone Plastisol outside


keeps liquids colder, less condensation, easy to hold, nests to save space, dishwasher safe.  (I wash mine by hand!)




 Made between 1894 - 1900, this Guttate pattern is among those started while Consolidated was still in Fostoria, Ohio prior to their move to Pennsylvania. Excellent overall condition. 


This pattern was made in the 1896-1900 era. It is shown on page 46 of the Lechner Volume 2 book. It is in excellent condition. Standard roughness on the neck under the original metal lid. What is very very unusual about this particular shaker is that the upper portion of the shaker is somewhat translucent, creating an interesting opalescent effect which I have not yet seen on another example.


Buy it for your antique glass salt shaker or early Consolidated collection today.


Find out more about collecting Phoenix and Consolidated Glass at our club website: www.pcgcc.org



I am a long time member of the Phoenix & Consolidated Glass Collectors Club and past President (1988) of the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Club. I guarantee the authenticity of this piece of Consolidated Glass. For more info on toothpick holders as a great collectible, visit the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Society web page at (www.nthcs.org)

Hull Continental #57 orange basket vase

 

Ballard #56 2 lite center console bowl

 

4 Shat-r-pruf spaghetti string Roly Poly

 

Consolidated Guttate pink variegated sha

Taylor & Ng 1984 blue Bear Orgy mug, designed by San Francisco potter and enamelist Win Ng and his partner in their consumer goods business. The mug was Made in Japan but sold in San Francisco. Part of a large Orgy series featuring different animals in compromising poses.  This paper item comes out of a Vermont country auction. Most of the items were from the 1930s or 1940s, so I imagine this fireworks collectible item is of the same vintage, but a true collector would know for sure. This little box has great graphics and is in great condition with no tears or stains.  


It measures 2 1/4 inches long x 1 1/4 inch wide and held 12 Booby Traps explosives. What I love about it are the graphics. One one side is a smiling child who has just scared the dickens out of his father who is arriving home!  The side panels feature an exploding booby trap. The top panel says I.C.C. Class-C Common Fireworks. A great display piece for a collector! Add it to your ephemera Made In Japan collection today.  Great 50s 60s italian art potteryrectangular ashtray

made in italy by raymor bitossi from a design by 

aldo londi. markings: 1581  italy


Similar ceramics were sold under the rosenthal netter label.  This two rest ashtray measures 5 1/4 inches long x 4 1/2 inches wide and stands 1 3/4 inches tall at its highest part. A great biomorphic Eames era design in the trademark blue green known as Rimini Blue.  This piece has no damage which is unusual for this type of pottery.  It seems like this Bitossi line was distibuted more in Europe than here in the States, so, buy it from me in Vermont and save shipping!


Add it to your Raymor, Bitossi, Londi, Mid-Century collection today. It would look stunning on a Paul McCobb Planner group table, don't you think?  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


This signed S. Ballard number 19 shape vase has a very unusual dark blue glaze with very little blending at the top of the vase. It stands 5 5/8 inches tall and is 5 1/8 inches across at the mouth. Although the glaze is very uniform on the outside, the inside shows mottling on the inside rim and the bottom has the chocolate brown band characteristic of Ballard's midde period of production. It is in excellent condition with just some firing cracks on the inside top rim (see photo). Add it to your American Art Pottery collection or Stanley Ballard collection today.

Taylor & Ng 1984 blue Bear Orgy mug

 

Made in Japan 12 Booby Traps box

 

Raymor Bitossi Londi Rimini Blue 1581 as

 

Ballard 19 dark turquoise flared vase

Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard, a student of Glidden Parker at Alfred University in the 1940s who worked in the Burlington area,  this early Ballard planter with attached underplate stands 2 1/2 inches tall and is only 2 5/8 inches across the top. The top piece is a bit out of round. It is rather heavily mottled. The underplate carries the number 60 but it is not incised, rather it is handwritten.  The chocolate underglaze can be seen on the bottom of the underplate. It is an early example of what become a standard Ballard stock item.  The vase part is drilled to allow one to water plants more easily. It is in excellent condition.  Produced by the Cheshire CT firm of Bovano (started in 1953 by John BOnsignor, Gene VAn Leight and Warren NOden), this 18 1/2 inch wide enamel oval ashtray features what I have named the Blue Dotpattern which consists of one blue Jewel surrounded by a blue and orange crescent shape of miniature jewels. 


The back is done in the typical black counterenamel Bovano uses and the gold circle label which reads Handcrafted by Bovano of Cheshire Conn.  Two of original felt pads are missing. It is in excellent overall shape with only one stress mark to the large blue Jewel (which happens during its making as their later labels point out). Add it to your Mid-Century Enamel collection today.  Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard, a student of Glidden Parker at Alfred University in the 1940s who worked in the Burlington area, this 3 1/2 inch square ashtray with four rests, one is each corner, is Ballard's standard production shape. This is the smallest size, #1. It comes in two larger sizes which could have nested together as was a common practice in the 1950s. 


It carries the standard S. Ballard Vermont mark and the shape mark 1. It is in excellent condition and a great beginner piece of Ballard's smoking items, of which there were many as smoking was in its heyday. Add it to your smoking, Mid-Century pottery or Ballard collection today.  Annemarie Davidson (1920-2012) learned her enameling craft first from the great Doris Hall (1907-2001) in Cambridge, MA  in 1957. In California she continued her studies with Curtis Tann.  Her combination of geometric and organic form in her designs culminated in her most celebrated abstract designs, her Jewel line which features pieces of glass used to create free-form organic shapes which she calls Jewels. She also uses a sgraffito technique, incising straight lines from the center of her plate with the sharp point of a dart. Now in her 80s, she continues to produce work today.


This 9 1/2 inch plate, most likely from the 1961-1962 time period,  is unusual for its size. It is scarce to find plates larger than her more standard 6-7 inches. This plate features 3 large yellow jewels, 8 smaller orange jewels .  The lines float over the Jewels. A prominent Palm Springs CA dealer James Elliot-Bishop on his website has named this pattern as Ghostline.


The back of the plate has three large felt pads and is signed with her charcteristic AD interwined intiails and her paper label which reads Annemarie Davidson handcrafted enamels Sierra Madre California.  Every piece was handcrafted by her alone, from start to finish. Excellent condition. 


The work of Annemarie Davidson was included in the seminal exhibit titled Painting with Fire which opened in Jan 2007 at the Long Beach Museum of Art. She was one of 30 enamelists included with a one page entry on her life and work. Her page is page 266 of the catalogue.

Ballard early #60 planter with underplat

 

HUGE 18" Bovano Blue Jewel party as

 

Ballard standard white #1 square ashtray

 

Annemarie Davidson 9 inch enamel plate




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