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Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. It is from the the post-1960 time period when Gil began to use the words Bennington Potters on pieces after having used a transition mark which included both the words Design Cooperative and Bennington Vermont.


This fluted 9 5/8 inch diameter plate was advertised in the 1964 catalogue as B 1650 and titled "Greek Head", an ashtray which could also be hung on the wall as a plaque as it had a built-in wire on the back. Its original 1964 price was $5.00.


It features a very stylized Head with a stylized beard done orange. The 1964 ad states the this piece was available in white or turquoise with colored accents. The glaze I believe is an early white one as it is quite speckled with two shades of white. The eyes of the head have been painted green. and an orange stain used on the beard.


This is a confirmed David Gil design. It was confirmed by Gloria Gil in May 2012.


The back of the plate/plaque has a wire hanger which was embedded in the pottery. It is signed 1651 and has the spark mark on the forearm. I would guess it is from the 1960-1962 period. It is in excellent condition.


Bennington Potters are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. It is from the 1955-1960 period. Bennington by Gil started in 1948 . They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. They made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores but this is an earlier more studio inspired piece. 


Marked #1541 this is a stylized pig in a highly abstract style. David Gil designed a series of animal banks, including a hippo, an owl and a lion. This was called Penurious Pig! Like Glidden Parker in the early 1940s, Gil used various animal motifs often on his ware, though most are two dimensional representations. This fun and funky pig stands 4 1/2 inches tall to the top of its back x 8 inches long. The main portion of the bank is unglazed with some impressed asterisks covering the pig's body. The asterisks are in brown, one of four colors possible. It has the original red plastic cork to seal the opening on the bottom. It is signed Bennington Potters Bennington VT which places it in the 1962-1968 time period. This pig back was shown in a 1967-68 catalogue along with the other nine shapes. 


This bank is in excellent condition with no damage. I have priced this Penurious Pig bank very fairly. It would make a stunning sculptural piece on a McCobb or Eames era credenza or coffee table.


David Gil was featured in the publication Vermont Life in its Winter 1961 issue. In an eight page spread with one full color image and 13 black and white images, there is a full history of the founding of the pottery along with great visual references of the ware being made at that time. One can see the iconic designs of Yusuke Aida, especially the double trigger mug and coffeepot along with other fascinating items. A great reference!  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard who worked in the Burlington area, this is an unusual shape for Ballard. It carries the shape number 24. The glaze is a green glaze which shows some of the chocolate brown underglaze at the rim. It is from his later period as there is almost no chocolate brown showing on the bottom rim of the vase. It is in excellent shape. 


Add it to your Ballard or American Art Pottery collection today.  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. It is from the post 1964 period when Gil only used the words Bennington Vermont on the back.


Bennington Potters is among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.  In their 1964 catalogue, Gil described their creations as "Art Objects in the Practical Realm" - Museum Honored, Hand-crafted, Modestly Priced,"


This oval 8 1/2 wide #1522 Tiger trivet / plaque in a white glaze background with brown highlighting was advertised in the 1964 catalogue as 1522, an ashtray which could also be hung on the wall as a plaque as it had a built-in wire on the back. This piece is shown in the 1964 catalogue as and is titled there Tiger. Its original 1964 price was $2.50.


It features a tiger with tail raised. It is designed as both a ashtray and a plaque.  It is signed with the late Bennington Potters mark which only has the words Bennington and Vermont. It does not carry the shape number of the design.


It is in excellent vintage shape and ready for your home. Go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of the past. It is ready for your home today.

Bennington Potters #1650 fluted plaque $80.00

 

Bennington Potters David Gil #1541 Pig b $80.00

 

Ballard midcentury green #24 oblong vase $35.00

 

Bennington Potters #1522 Tiger plaque $60.00

Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. It is from the 1960-1962 period when Gil included both the words Design Cooperative and Bennington Vermont.


This square 8 inch diameter trivet / plaque was advertised in the 1964 catalogue as 1536, a trivet which could also be hung on the wall as a plaque as it had a built-in wire on the back. This piece is shown in the 1964 catalogue as and is titled there Owl. Its original 1964 price was $3.00. This was designed by Gloria Gil.


It features a pensive Owl at rest. The cobalt and white glazed used for color on this piece pop because the background was unfired.


The back of the trivet/plaque has a wire hanger which was embedded in the pottery. It retains  four original rubber feet which protect the flat surface upon which one sets it. It is signed 1534 and has the spark mark on the forearm inside a rectangle made up of COOPERATIVE DESIGN and BENNINGTON POTTERS VERMONT. This is a transition mark used only in the 19690-1962 time period. It is in excellent vintage condition.


Bennington Potters is among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.  This Georges Scatchard  4 3/4 inch handled jug is a good example of the work that Scatchard has been doing since the 1960s. The inside of the jug is a dark blue glaze. The outside resembles his standard glaze for which he is known but if you look closely there are some subtle undertones of purple in a few places. His handle is perhaps one of his trademark designs.


This piece is signed on the bottom G. Scatchard and the year 200?.  There is some damage to the bottom of the piece. I don't know if it was dropped or was a second.  It does not affect how the jug sits on a flat surface.


The outside of the goblet is done in a mottled blue glaze and one can see both inclusions and the horizontal rings from the throwing. A beautiful piece. 


Currently located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960. An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42. According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


Having recently sold his lamp business, he no longer has an open shop. I am not sure how long one will be able to buy a piece directly from him.


So, go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of the past. It is ready for your home today.  Done by Lincoln Vermont potter Marcy Mayforth, this circa 199os sea green blue Leaves in a band 3 1/2 inch tall handless mug is unglazed inside. the body of the piece is almost identical to the iconic body that George Scatchard was using in Vermont.


 The design is done in the sgraffito technique, then filled in as in an enamel piece. There are four blue and sea green leaves on the piece. It is signed simply with two capital Ms. It is in excellent shape. 


Add it to your Vermont Studio Art Pottery collection today.  Done by Lincoln Vermont potter Marcy Mayforth, this 1996 signed Stars & Moon vase is glazed on the outside in a deep cobalt blue. The design is done in the sgraffito technique, then filled in as in an enamel piece. It stands 5 1/2 inches tall. The diameter of the vase is 2 3/4 inches wide.


There are four Shooting Stars on the piece and one Moon whose center is a different shade of blue.


It is signed Mayforth on the bottom with her last name and the dates 96. It is in excellent shape. Add it to your Vermont Art Pottery collection today.

Bennington Potters 1534 Chanticleer triv $30.00

 

George Scatchard blue glazed signed jug $25.00

 

Marcy Mayforth 1990s blue Leaves mug $20.00

 

Marcy Mayforth 1996 Stars & Moon studio $28.00

Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 


Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this is a Ballard #2 signed blue leaf shaped ashtray.


Add it to your Mid century American Studio Pottery collection today.  This is a set of four #1639 Medium mugs. Each one stands 4 3/4 inches high.  There is one in each of the following glazes:  Mountain Blue, Vermont Green, White, and Tawny Brown. The shape was designed by Japanese designer Yusuke Aida while employed by David Gil at Bennington Potters. This is part of the Classic Line which is shown in a 1966-67 catalogue in the Cunningham book and in a 1968 brochure on the website Modish.net.


One easy way to identify this line is by the handle. If the shape number is between 1601-1683 and it has this loop handle, it is an Aida design.


This line came in the following colors: Mountain Blue, White, Vermont Green, Rust, Tawny Brown. They are all in excellent condition.


In their 1964 catalogue, Gil described their creations as "Art Objects in the Practical Realm" - Museum Honored, Hand-crafted, Modestly Priced,"


These objects surely show clearly both his genius and his intent. Add it to your Mid-century American Studio Pottery collection today.  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. It was made during the 1948-1960 time period when Gil used only the words Design Cooperative, or in this case only the letters CO OP around the hand mark AND david gil BENNINGTON.


David Gil Coop Design 7 inch teardrop standing bass playing man in a dark green black glaze, with the COOP Man/hand logo. rough unglazed rim, but not signed David Gil. No Raymor label like the piano man. Excellent condition.


I recently learned that when Gil decided to mark his works with shape numbers, he started with the number 1300. However, if an earlier design was to remain in production, they marked it with a number starting with 1200. This explains the numbering and mark on the transition pieces.


They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.  Standing 3 3/4 inches tall x 4 3/4 inches wide at the base, this stunning piece of Vermont studio pottery was designed and made by Sally Duval, a longtime Vermont studio potters.  This 6 hole toothbrush potter has an underglaze of bluish gray, then two overglazes, one of a cream yellow color and the other a chocolate brown glaze.


It is in excellent condition. It is signed simply by her first name, Sally.


I have owned coffee mugs by Sally for 20+ years. I use them every day. They are sturdy and dishwasher friendly.

Ballard #2 blue leaf shaped ashtray $15.00

 

set 4 Aida #1639 Bennington Potters mugs $60.00

 

David Gil Coop Design teardrop bass play $75.00

 

Sally Duval Vermont pottery toothbrush h $35.00

Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. It is from the 1960-1962 period when Gil included both the words Design Cooperative and Bennington Vermont.


This square 8 inch diameter trivet / plaque was advertised in the 1964 catalogue as 1534, a trivet which could also be hung on the wall as a plaque as it had a built-in wire on the back. This piece is shown in the 1964 catalogue as and is titled there Chanticleer. Its original 1964 price was $3.00. This was designed by Gloria Gil.


It features a happy Rooster crowing. The cobalt and white glazed used for color on this piece pop because the background was unfired.


The back of the trivet/plaque has a wire hanger which was embedded in the pottery. It retains only one of the four original rubber feet which protect the flat surface upon which one sets it. They are however easily still found if you want to use it as a trivet.  It is signed 1532 and has the spark mark on the forearm inside a rectangle made up of COOPERATIVE DESIGN and BENNINGTON POTTERS VERMONT. This is a transition mark used only in the 19690-1962 time period. It is in excellent vintage condition.


Bennington Potters is among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.  This large bowl is decorated both on the outside and the inside with stylized fish in an abstract style. 

There are three fish on the inside and three on the outside. The bowl measures 9 1/2 inches across the top and stands 3 3/4 inches tall.  It is signed on the bottom with the signature of the potter, Bryant.


Add it to your Studio Pottery collection today. Go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of America's past. Sturdy, dependable, dishwasher-friendly, it is ready for your home today.  Bennington by Gil started in 1948 . They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. They made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores but this is an earlier more studio inspired piece. In their 1964 catalogue, Gil described their creations as "Art Objects in the Practical Realm" - Museum Honored, Hand-crafted, Modestly Priced,"



David Gil, trained at Alfred University and profiled in the Winter 1961 issue of Vermont Life, started Bennington Potters in 1948 in Bennington, VT right after WWII. 


This diminutive version of the iconic double trigger mug stands 3 1/4 inches tall. This vase is glazed with a high gloss white glaze on the inside. The outside is done in a semi matte white. It dates from the 1960-1968 period when Gil only used the term Bennington Potters on his pieces.


According to yet to be authenticated information, the suggestion for the double trigger handle was given to David Gil by one Maurice A. Douglass, a resident of Bennington Vermont and a collector of early Norton Pottery. 


In the 1964 catalogue, there are 3 sizes of the double trigger mug shown including this small #1370 size. 


This beautifully deisgned and balanced 1370 trigger mug is in excellent condition. Add it to your Mid-century Bennington Potters or David Gil collection today.

Go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of America's past. Sturdy, dependable, dishwasher-friendly, it is ready for your kitchen table today.  This Georges Scatchard early 8 1/2 inch tall  x 4 3/4 inch wide at the base vase is a great example of the work that Scatchard was doing in the 1970s and early 1980s before he decided to concentrate primarily on lamps. The inside of the rim shows the glaze which he used on the outside of the mug. You can see all the ridges of the hand thrown object.  The outside of the vase is done in tans and beiges and one can see both inclusions and the horizontal rings from the throwing.  The vase is signed on the unglazed bottom G. SCATCHARD . A beautiful piece. 


Currently located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960.  An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42.  According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


His current website, gslamps.com, shows his current production and gives a brief history of his work.

1534 Chanticleer Gloria Gil design trive $38.00

 

Bryant Fish decorated bowl $35.00

 

Cooperative Design #1370 white demitasse $12.50

 

Georges Scatchard early 8. 5 inch tall va $100.00

This Georges Scatchard early 4 1/4 inch tall  x 4 1/4 inch wide at the mouth planter / vase is a good example of the work that Scatchard was doing in the 1970s and early 1980s before he decided to concentrate primarily on lamps. The inside of the rim shows the glaze which he used on the outside of the mug. You can see all the ridges of the hand thrown object.  The outside of the goblet is done in tans and beiges and one can see both inclusions and the horizontal rings from the throwing.  The mug is signed on the unglazed bottom G. SCATCHARD . A beautiful piece. 


Currently located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960.  An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42.  According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


His current website, gslamps.com, shows his current production and gives a brief history of his work.   Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. It is from the the post-1960 time period when Gil began to use the words Bennington Potters on pieces after having used a transition mark which included both the words Design Cooperative and Bennington Vermont.


This fluted 9 5/8 inch diameter plate was advertised in the 1964 catalogue as B 1653 and titled "Daisies", an ashtray which could also be hung on the wall as a plaque as it had a built-in wire on the back.  Its original 1964 price was $5.00.


It  features six stylized daisies.  The stems, leaves, and petals are incised. The 1964 ad states the this piece was available in white or turquoise with colored accents. The glaze I believe is an early white one as it is quite high gloss with some mottling in the glaze giving the color depth.  The steams and leaves have been accented in a dark olive green and the flowers are accented in dark brown.


I believe that this series of ashtrays 1650-1655 was designed by David Gil's first wife Gloria Gil, who also designed the 1553 Fighting Cock tile. and perhaps all the tiles in that series.


The back of the plate/plaque is missing the wire hanger which was embedded in the pottery.  It is signed 1653 and has the spark mark on the forearm.  I would guess it is from the 1960-1964 period. It is in excellent condition.


Bennington Potters are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.  Prior to changing the name to Bennington Potters around 1960, David Gil's company was known as Cooperative Design. There, he and other Alfred designers fashioned all sorts of interesting Mid-Century items. Having trained at Alfred University, Gil came to Bennington in 1948. His designs are included in many Mid-Century exhibits and catalogues. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.  In their 1964 catalogue, Gil described their creations as "Art Objects in the Practical Realm" - Museum Honored, Hand-crafted, Modestly Priced,"



This #1538 saucer/coaster measures 4 5/8 inches across. It is done in the Turquoise glaze. 


The mark on the back shows that this piece, though a 1960s design, was produced later, probably in the early 1970s as it uses the lower case letters for all the words. It was meant to go with the #1537 12 oz. 3 inch tall Double Mug. Originally a dozen mug and saucers were priced at $30 a dozen in the 1964 catalogue.  In the Mid-century tradition of multiple uses for an item, it is still a very versatile and functional piece for today's home.


It is in excellent condition. Add it to your Bennington Potters or collection of Mid-Century pottery today.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area,  this 3 1/4 inch high vase very irregularly shaped vase is part of a two piece set. It has a matching vase that when set side by side,  the two pieces interlock to form a wider planter. Excellent condtion.


It carries a #12 shape number and Mark #8.  Add it to your American Art Pottery collection or Stanley Ballard collection today.

Georges Scatchard early 4 inch tall vase $40.00

 

Bennington Potters #1653 fluted plaque $25.00

 

Bennington Potters #1538 saucer / coaster $15.00

 

Ballard #12 light green puzzle vase $20.00

David Gil Coop Design #1202 7 inch teardrop Musician in very early glossy white glaze, with the COOP Man/hand logo partially visible still at the top AND the rectangular Cooperative Design Bennington Vermont mark as well as .99 in black ink. It does not have the rough unglazed rim of the earliest pieces thus I am fairly confident this is a slightly later piece circa 1960. In 1960 most pieces added the words  Bennington Potters to the incised mark.  I have other designs in this teardrop series which carry the Raymor label. 


I recently purchased the same design in white glaze, making it easier to see that the instrument is a clarnet.It is in excellent shape.


I recently learned that when Gil decided to mark his works with shape numbers, he started with the number 1300. However, if an earlier design was to remain in production, they marked it with a number starting with 1200. This explains the numbering and mark on the transition pieces.


They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.  This Georges Scatchard early 5 inch tall x 7 3/4" wide hanging planter is a good example of the work that Scatchard was doing in the 1970s and early 1980s before he decided to concentrate primarily on lamps. The rim has three holes for hanging. Ah, remember macramé!! There are another three drainage holes in the bottom of the planter which would carry excess water to the attached underplate. The inside rings clearly on this hand thrown piece as well as the body of the stoneware itself and where the drip glaze was place. You can see all the ridges of the hand thrown object. The outside of the goblet is done in tans and beiges and one can see both inclusions and the horizontal rings from the throwing. The overglaze on this piece is done in shades of blues and greens and has an abstract design. The plnater is signed on the unglazed bottom G. SCATCHARD. A beautiful early piece. 


Currently located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960. An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42. According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


His current website, gslamps.com, shows his current production and gives a brief history of his work.  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. It is from the pre-1960 time period when Gil used only the words Design Cooperative, or in this case only the letters CO OP around the hand mark.


David Gil Coop Design #1202 7 inch teardrop French horn player in signature teal glaze, with the COOP Man/hand logo. rough unglazed rim. There is still a shadow that can be seen of the Raymor paper label on bottom which states: MODERN in the Tradition of Good Taste: Raymor, designed by David Gil for Cooperative Design. The label is present on a few of the other four designs in this teardrop series. Excellent condition.



I recently learned that when Gil decided to mark his works with shape numbers, he started with the number 1300. However, if an earlier design was to remain in production, they marked it with a number starting with 1200. This explains the numbering and mark on the transition pieces.


They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.


In their 1964 catalogue, Gil described their creations as "Art Objects in the Practical Realm" - Museum Honored, Hand-crafted, Modestly Priced,"

 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard, a student of Glidden Parker at Alfred University in the 1940s who worked in the Burlington area,  this early Ballard planter with attached underplate stands 2 1/2 inches tall and is only 2 5/8 inches across the top. The top piece is a bit out of round. It is rather heavily mottled. The underplate carries the number 60 but it is not incised, rather it is handwritten.  The chocolate underglaze can be seen on the bottom of the underplate. It is an early example of what become a standard Ballard stock item.  The vase part is drilled to allow one to water plants more easily. It is in excellent condition.

David Gil Coop Design teardrop clarinet $75.00

 

Scatchard early studio large hanging pla $60.00

 

David Gil Coop design teardrop French Ho $75.00

 

Ballard early #60 planter with underplat $40.00




<b>Decorative bowl in oriental designs.


Less than perfect glazing techniques done in factory, but still a lovely piece.


Maker: Unknown

Mark: 8158  <b>


This Lekythos style vase is reminscent of ancient Greek artifacts.  


Original use:

This vase was a flask used for toilet oils, perfume, or condiments, and also appears in funerary contexts, where it was used to pour libations for the dead or was left on the grave as an offering.



Made by Napco of Bedford, Ohio.

Numbered: 2B-5516


Color: Clay


Distressed design  <b>


This Lekythos style vase is reminscent of ancient Greek artifacts. 


Original use:

This vase was a flask used for toilet oils, perfume, or condiments, and also appears in funerary contexts, where it was used to pour libations for the dead or was left on the grave as an offering.



Made by Napco of Bedford, Ohio.

Numbered: 2B-5516


Color: Dark Green


Distressed design  


<b>Design: Queen's face and neckline.


Color: Off white


Marked:  I can not make mark out, but it is numbered 8309

Lotus Bowl $8.95

 

Handpainted Acropolis Vase by Napco $14.95

 

Handpainted Acropolis Vase by Napco $14.95

 

Figural Queens Cup $6.50




<b>Design: Fruit pattern - Embossed


Beautifully designed shallow bowl with scalloped edging.  The depth is approx. 2.25 inches. 


 Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this Ballard #1 brown white mottled ashtray  


<b>Expressive multi-colored splatterware bowl is a treat for the eyes and the hands with its vivid colors and varied textures.  


<u>Colors:</u>  

Green, Yellow, Black, Orange and White.


Maker: Unknown  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. It is from the 1959-1960 period when Gil included both the words Design Cooperative and Bennington Vermont.


Bennington Potters is among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores. In their 1964 catalogue, Gil described their creations as "Art Objects in the Practical Realm" - Museum Honored, Hand-crafted, Modestly Priced."


This square 8 inch diameter trivet / plaque was advertised in the 1964 catalogue as 1532, a trivet which could also be hung on the wall as a plaque as it had a built-in wire on the back. This piece is shown in the 1964 catalogue as and is titled there Sun. Its original 1964 price was $3.00. This was designed by David Gil.


It features a cheery sun done in colors of yellow and green. 


The back of the trivet/plaque has a wire hanger which was embedded in the pottery. It retains all four original rubber feet which protects the flat surface upon which one sets it. It is signed 1532 and has the spark mark on the forearm inside a rectangle made up of COOPERATIVE DESIGN and BENNINGTON POTTERS VERMONT. This is a transition mark used only in the 1960-1962 time period. It is in excellent vintage condition.


Add it to your Midcentury Studio Pottery or Bennington Potters collection today.

Claire Burke Shallow Bowl $24.99

 

Ballard #1 brown white mottled ashtray $15.00

 

Impressionistic Hand Cup Bowl $4.75

 

Bennington Potters #1532 Sun Trivet / Plaq $32.00




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