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(1798-1879) Joined the U.S. Army in 1813. Was New York Secretary of State, 1833-39, and was elected to the Senate in 1845. In January 1861, President Buchanan appointed him Secretary of the Treasury, and on Jan. 29, 1861, he made his famous American flag dispatch to a treasury official in New Orleans, "If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot," which became a clarion call to the North! Commissioned a Major General by Abraham Lincoln, on May 16, 1861, he was first on this list, thus outranking all other volunteer officers during the Civil War. He commanded the following military departments: Dept. of Pa.; Middle Dept.; Dept. of Va.; Dept. of the East. He made an important and distinguished contribution to the Union cause when he suppressed the 1863 New York City draft riots. Was elected Governor of New York in 1872. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view in uniform with epaulettes and rank of major general, holding his sword. 1861 M.B. Brady imprint on the front mount. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Light age toning and wear. Top corners of the mount are slightly rounded.  


<b>Imprint of Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries</b>


(1823-1874) Graduated 4th in the West Point class of 1846. He won two brevets and was severely wounded in the Mexican War. As chief engineer of the fortifications of Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, he was a leading participant in the bombardment of Fort Sumter which were the opening shots of the Civil War. He later took part in General Ambrose E. Burnside's North Carolina expedition, and commanded the Department of North Carolina, the Department of Ohio, the Department of the South, and the Department of Florida respectively.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 7/8 card. Mount is trimmed. Half view pose in uniform with rank of major general. He is wearing a kepi with a U.S. hat wreath insignia and two stars clearly visible at the center representing his rank of major general. Backmark: Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries, Broadway & Tenth Street, New York & No. 352 Pennsylvania Ave, Washington, D.C., with 2 cents orange George Washington U.S. Internal Revenue tax stamp on the reverse. Light age toning, discoloration and minor wear. Very fine Mathew B. Brady image.  


<b>Signed by a North Carolina private who was wounded and captured at the battle of Gettysburg!</b>


8 1/2 x 11, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


March 30th, 1901


To the United Daughters of the Confederacy:


The undersigned, residing at Washington, N.C., who is an Ex-Confederate Soldier, but not a member of any Camp, hereby makes application for a Confederate Cross of Honor. Applicant entered the service of the Confederate States on the 10th day of M[ar]ch. 1864, as a private in Company A of the 67th Regiment of North Carolina Volunteers, C.S.A., and was at that time a resident of Beaufort County, N.C. Your applicant was honorably discharged from said service by Col. Jno. N. Whitford, Col. 67th Regt. N.C. Vol. on the 10th day of May 1865, at which time he held the rank of private.


Respectfully,

T.J. Harding

Applicant


We endorse the above application,


W.C.[?]

Member Co. K, Regt. 10 Vols., C.S.A.


W.L. Dudley

Member Co. E, Regt. 55 Vols., C.S.A.


Light age toning and wear. There are two punch holes at the top of the document which do not affect any of the content. Any document signed by a Confederate soldier who was wounded and captured at the battle of Gettysburg is always popular and in demand.


William L. Dudley, who signed this document at the bottom, was a 30 year old farmer from Pitt County, North Carolina, when he enlisted as a private on April 22, 1862, and was mustered into Co. E, 55th North Carolina Infantry. He was wounded in action at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, and captured on July 3, 1863. After being confined as a prisoner of war, he was exchanged at City Point, Va., on August 20, 1863. The date of his discharge is unknown.


The 55th North Carolina Infantry fought in the Army of Northern Virginia from Gettysburg to Cold Harbor, in the Petersburg trenches, and in the Appomattox campaign. They were in the brigades of Generals' Joseph R. Davis and John Rogers Cooke. From July 1-3, 1863, at Gettysburg, they suffered 41 men killed, 210 wounded, and 259 captured. During the Wilderness campaign the regiment lost 59% of the 640 men engaged, and when they surrendered at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, there were only 4 officers and 77 men left of the gallant 55th N.C. Infantry.  


5 x 7 3/8, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, June 6, 1861


General Orders,

No. 30


I--The State of Missouri is added to the Military Department of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and portions of Western Pennsylvania and Virginia. Major General McClellan will extend his command accordingly.


II--The Headquarters of the Department of the West are removed from St. Louis to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.


III--The three months' militia and the three years' volunteers will be paid at once to include the 31st of May, 1861. With this view, Commanding officers of these troops will cause duplicate muster rolls to be made out immediately, which they will forward to the Paymaster General in this city; and upon these rolls the officers of the Pay Department will pay in full, leaving any stoppage to be deducted at a future payment.


IV--The names of the following officers will be stricken from the Rolls of the Army:


Captain Charles H. Tyler, 2d Dragoons, for abandoning the command of, and deserting his Post, Fort Kearny.


1st Lieutenant Charles H. Rundell, 4th Infantry, for continued disobedience of orders, absence without leave, and failing to render his accounts as required by the Act of January 31, 1823.


1st Lieutenant Andrew Jackson, 3d Infantry, for absenting himself from his company without permission, and failing to make any report.


And 2nd Lieutenants Charles E. Patterson, 4th Infantry; Olin F. Rice, 6th Infantry, and Charles C. Campbell, 1st Cavalry, for tendering their resignations in the face of the enemy.


BY ORDER:

L. THOMAS

Adjutant General


There is a light vertical fold crease in the paper which does not really detract from the overall appearance of the document. Very fine 1861 U.S. War Department imprint.

CDV, General John A. Dix $100.00

 

CDV, General John G. Foster $85.00

 

Application for Confederate Cross of Hon $75.00

 

War Department Orders Issued by Adjutant $10.00




<b>Morse's Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tennessee imprint</b>


(1808-75) Congressman, Senator and Governor of Tennessee. He was nominated and elected vice president on the Union Republican ticket in 1864. Upon Abraham Lincoln's assassination in April 1865, he became our 17th president and resolved to follow Lincoln's plans for reconstruction without bitterness or malice. His reconstruction plan clashed drastically with that of the Radical Republicans in congress, and Johnson's term was one humiliation after another, culminating on Feb. 24, 1868 with a resolution of impeachment against him. This failed by one vote to pass, and he served out his term.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view pose. Backmark: Morse's Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tenn. Light horizontal crease below the subject that is hardly noticeable. Scarce imprint for an Andrew Johnson image.  


<b>United States Congressman from Massachusetts</b>


(1758-1808) Born in Dedham, Mass., he graduated from Harvard College in 1774, studied law, was admitted to the bar,  and practiced in Dedham. He served in the Massachusetts State House of Representatives in 1788, and was a member of the Massachusetts convention that was called for the ratification of the Federal Constitution. Elected as a Pro-Administration candidate for the First through the Third U.S. Congresses and as a Federalist to the Fourth Congress, he served from 1789-1797. He was the chairman of the Committee on Elections. He served as a member of the Governor's Council, 1798-1800. Chosen as the president of Harvard University in 1804, he was forced to decline the prestigious position because of failing health. Ames was an important leader in the U.S. House of Representatives, and was highly noted for his oratorical skills, and was a very influential figure of his era.


Original mid 1800's period engraving, 4 x 6 3/4, tipped to a 6 x 9 1/4 album page with black border around his portrait. Imprint of Stuart Pinx. Light age toning. Very fine. Desirable early U.S. Congressional leader.  


<b>From Seven Days to Second Bull Run</b>




By The Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1984. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on horseback surrounded by some of his top generals including Jackson, Longstreet and A.P. Hill. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition.


The Cover: Astride his gray mount Traveller, General Robert E. Lee pauses beneath an oak tree with his senior officers to reconnoiter an enemy position. The aggressive strategy Lee embraced after taking command of the Army of Northern Virginia reversed for a time the tide of war in the East.  


<b>The "Little Giant" opposed Abraham Lincoln in the 1860 presidential election


1861 Chicago imprint on the front mount</b>


(1813-1861) An outstanding legislator, and orator, he was one of the founders of the Democratic Party in Illinois. Served as U.S. Senator, 1843-61. He is best known for his debates in 1858 against Abraham Lincoln. He was narrowly defeated for the Democratic nomination for president by Franklin Buchanan in 1856. He did gain the Democratic nomination in 1860, but was defeated for the presidency by his old friend and rival Abraham Lincoln. Upon secession, and the outbreak of the Civil War, he supported Lincoln and his policies. He died of typhoid fever in 1861.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Imprint on the front of the card mount, Douglas' Grave, Born April 23, 1813. Died June 3, 1861. From Carbutt's Gallery, 131 Lake Street, Chicago. Written in pencil on the reverse of the card is "Grave of Senator Stephen A. Douglas taken shortly after his death in 1861." Light age toning and wear. Slightly rounded corners.  Very fine.

CDV, President Andrew Johnson $95.00

 

Fisher Ames $10.00

 

Lee Takes Command $15.00

 

CDV, The Gravesite of Senator Stephen A. $95.00




1861 Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of Columbia holding a sword and an American flag, etc. Motto at left edge, "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" and above, "Conquer we must, for our cause it is just. Let this be our motto. In God is our trust." "Copyright 1861" imprinted below the illustration. Light staining at the corners. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


By Jerry Korn and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1985. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of Union gunboats on the Mississippi River. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 175 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition.


The Cover: A Federal flotilla under Rear Admiral David Porter braves a storm of fire from Confederate batteries along the shore and atop the high bluffs at Vicksburg on the night of April 16, 1863. The transports and barges, lashed to the sides of Porter's gunboats for protection, carry troops and supplies downriver for Major General Ulysses S. Grant's campaign to assault Vicksburg from the south.   A bit late for our usual fare but representative of our affinity for surviving utilitarian items of gone bye everyday life, this neat old worker’s dinner bucket remains untouched, as found and apparently unused.  Not a big deal unless you appreciate such things, this old time dinner pail is complete and original even to its tin cup on the lid.  It stands just under 10 inches base to the top of its cup and is about 7 inches  in diameter.   Retaining an original bright shiny tinned finish on internal surfaces, the outer portions offer that desirable natural age patina that comes to tin with decades of natural exposure.  Now an attractive Americana collectable these sturdy dinner pails were used by , miners, factory workers, dock hands, and other laborers from the mid-19th century to hold hard-boiled eggs, vegetables, meat, pie, and other hardy fare until 1904 when the advent of the <I>thermos</I> vacuumed bottle brought about a change in design of the common <I>lunch-box</I> still popular today. A nice old piece of Americana on the fringe of our usual time period but scarce in this condition and worthy of appreciation.  .  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, August 18, 1863


General Orders

No. 288


<i>Order in relation to Seizure of Goods</i>


In every case of seizure of goods by officers acting under the authority of this Department, a true and perfect inventory thereof shall be taken in triplicate by the officer making the seizure, one copy of which shall be given to the person from whom the goods were taken, one copy retained by the officer, and the third copy will be forwarded with a report of the seizure, which will be immediately made to this Department. The officer making the seizure will be held accountable for the goods while they are under his charge, and until they are disposed of according to orders from this Department.


BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Very fine.

Conquer We Must For Our Cause it is Just $5.00

 

War on the Mississippi, Grant's Vicksbur $20.00

 

classic tin – DINNER PAIL $95.00

 

1863 Order in Relation to Seizure of Goo $8.00




4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, August 7, 1863


General Orders

No. 275


By an act of the General Assembly of the State of Iowa, approved September 11, 1862, the right to vote for certain State officers is given to Volunteers or soldiers from that State in the military service of the United States, and provision is made for the appointment of one commissioner to each regiment of Iowa Volunteers for the purpose of carrying out this act. It is hereby ordered that all such duly accredited commissioners from Iowa be furnished with proper facilities for visiting the Volunteers from that State, and allowed access to them for the purpose indicated.


BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:


E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Very fine.  


By James I. Robertson, Jr. and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1984. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with black and white photograph of a Civil War camp scene. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. There are a couple of small scratches on the front cover just above the camp kettle hanging at the center of the view. Otherwise the book is in new condition and looks like it has never been read. Excellent content pertaining to the everyday officers and men who fought in the Civil War.


The Cover: On a cold, drizzly day early in the War, Federal soldiers bivouacked near Washington, D.C., boil coffee and cook their rations over a campfire, while officers in a rain-drenched tent share a meal.   


<b>United States Congressman from Pennsylvania</b>


(1793-1851) Born in Norristown, Pa., he attended Norristown Academy, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1820, and commenced practice in Norristown. He served as a Whig U.S. Congressman from 1847-51.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/8 x 3/4, in ink, John Freedley.  A nice all original Patent June 4, 1861 / Nov. 5, 1864 desk pen stand and inkwell.  The spun brass base measures approximately 5 inches in diameter and is fitted with a pen stand of cast iron.  A glass ink reservoir is set in with a patent dated hinged pewter top.  All in nice original condition with natural age, uncleaned and with evidence of period use while remaining in nice original condition. A neat piece for the Civil War personal item and antique writing instrument collector.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

Order Regarding the Voting Rights of Iow $8.00

 

Tenting Tonight, The Soldier's Life $10.00

 

Autograph, John Freedley $5.00

 

Civil War era Pat. 1861 - 1864 DESK PEN $175.00

H 23in. x W 31in. x 8in.  H 64in. x D 16in.  


5 1/2 x 8 1/2, imprint, with vignette of a spread winged eagle on a shield with the motto, National Union, State Sovereignty. Includes a handwritten A.N.S. at the bottom of the document by Adjutant General Hiram Hilliard who also signed the document in print.


General Headquarters, State of Illinois,

Adjutant General's Office,

Springfield, July 20, 1877


General Order

No. 5


I. Notice is hereby given to the present organized companies of the Illinois National Guard, that their Muster Rolls and Enlistment Blanks as required by law, must be forwarded to the Adjutant General's office on or before the 1st day of September proximo.


II. This order is rendered necessary for the reason that a General Inspection is about to be ordered by Gen. Wm. E. Strong, Inspector General, to take place in the month of September, and the Commander-in-Chief is desirous of completing the organization of the forces of the State prior to the above date.


III. Commanding officers of Brigades, Regiments, or Companies, are notified that no excuse will be received for a non-compliance with this order. The arms of all old companies not complying will be ordered in and the commissions of the officers revoked.


By order of the Commander-in-Chief,

H. HILLIARD

Adjutant General


Handwritten in a bold pencil hand by Hilliard at the bottom of the document is the following note: "Colonel I am holding on to your resignation. I believe you had better reconsider. Hilliard."


Very minor edge chipping to the bottom and left edge of the paper which does not affect any of the content.


Hiram Hilliard was a resident of Chicago, Illinois, when he enlisted on January 23, 1864, and was commissioned major in the field and staff of the 17th Illinois Cavalry. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on October 30, 1865; and mustered out of the service on December 15, 1865, at Leavenworth, Kansas. After the war he had a prominent career as an officer in the Illinois National Guard.


 


<b>Tupelo to Stones River</b>


By James Street Jr. and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1985. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of the Civil War battle of Stones River, Tenn. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition.


The Cover: Federal troops supported by cannon fire surge across Stones River in pursuit of retreating Confederates on January 2, 1863. The intense fighting near Murfreesboro, Tennessee, climaxed a Confederate campaign to drive the Union army from Kentucky and central Tennessee, an effort that ended in frustration.

CUSTOM LIGHTING#1454 $800.00

 

FLOOR LAMP #3450 $650.00

 

Orders From Hdqtrs. of the State of Illi $10.00

 

The Struggle For Tennessee $10.00




<b>Colonel of the 18th Tennessee Infantry


Wounded five times during the War Between the States</b>


Born in Rutherford County, Tennessee, he was educated at Union University in Murfreesboro and was admitted to the bar in 1848. The following year he was elected to the state legislature, and was re-elected in 1851. He served as the mayor of Murfreesboro from 1855-59. At the outbreak of the war he raised a company of volunteers which became part of the 18th Tennessee Infantry with him being elected their colonel. He was captured at Fort Donelson, Tenn. and later exchanged. He fought gallantly at the battle of Murfreesboro where he was wounded three times. He was seriously wounded at the battle of Chickamauga and was unable to rejoin the army until the start of the Atlanta campaign. Once again he was wounded this time at Jonesboro, Ga. He was promoted to the rank of brigadier general to rank from November 15, 1864, and fought under General John Bell Hood during the bloody Franklin, Tenn. campaign. He commanded the Tennessee regiments in the Carolinas campaign, and fought at Bentonville. Palmer was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina, on May 1, 1865. Following the surrender he marched the Tennessee troops home and quietly resumed his law practice. Although he was asked on numerous occasions to run for governor of Tennessee on the Democratic ticket, he refrained from getting involved in active politics.


Antique photograph, 2 1/2 x 4. Chest up view in Confederate uniform. No imprint. Circa late 1800's. This is the only known uniformed pose of General Palmer. Very fine. Scarce general to find any images of.  


<b>The War Begins</b>


By William C. Davis and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1983. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with illustrations of a Union and Confederate soldier both holding their muskets. Also has U.S. and C.S. belt plates, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title printed in blue. Title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition.


The Cover: Two young Americans, now enemy soldiers fighting for the Union (left) and the Confederacy (right), stand stiffly for portraits taken early in the Civil War. This was the first war to be covered in detail by the camera, and soldiers sent many pictures home as mementos.  


<b>Confederate officer who was captured in 1864 during the War Between The States


United States Senator from Virginia</b>


(1844-90) Born in Shenandoah County, Virginia, he fought with the 10th Virginia Infantry and the 23rd Virginia Cavalry during the War Between The States. He was captured on May 14, 1864, at Edinburg, Va., and subsequently confined in  Antheneum Military Prison, in Wheeling, West Virginia, at Camp Chase, Ohio, Point Lookout, Maryland, and Fort McHenry, Maryland prisons. After the war he was editor of the Tenth Legion Banner; he studied law, was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Woodstock, Va.; served as a member of the Virginia State House of Delegates, 1871-75; was the Commonwealth Attorney of Shenandoah County, 1876-80; was a member of the Virginia State Senate, 1879-82; was editor of the Shenandoah Democrat and later of the Virginian at Woodstock; served as presidential elector on the Democratic ticket in 1876; and was a U.S. Senator, 1883-89.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/4 x 1/2, in ink, H.H. Riddleberger. Light age toning.   


<b>"I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer." General Ulysses S. Grant, 1864 Wilderness campaign</b>




Time Life Books, Richmond, Va., 1998. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 168 pages, illustrated, index. New condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers who experienced the savage struggles of the 1864 Wilderness campaign. Through their words and images you can relive the intense emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors-and even the humor-of this bloody saga. You hold in your hands an album of personal recollections, embellished with drawings, maps, photographs of artifacts, and especially images of the officers and men who witnessed the campaign firsthand.


This excellent book is a testament of the mutual destruction that took place in the hell of Virginia's tangled Wilderness. As you look into the eyes and read the words of the soldiers who fought there, perhaps you will be able to better understand the extremes of gallantry, cruelty, and stoicism the soldiers put on display. 


On the cover: After five weeks of campaigning in the Wilderness, Ulysses S. Grant poses  for a Brady & Co. photographer in front of his tent near Cold Harbor, Virginia, in June 1864. Grant wears the insignia of a lieutenant general, a rank that carried with it command of all Union armies.

Photograph, General Joseph B. Palmer $35.00

 

Brother Against Brother $15.00

 

Autograph, Harrison H. Riddleberger $25.00

 

Voices of the Civil War, The Wilderness $20.00




<b>A private of the 37th Mississippi Infantry</b>


8 1/4 x 13 1/2, two sided, imprinted form, filled out in ink. Form No. 6. Application for Indigent Widow of Soldier or Sailor of the late Confederacy. For Mrs. Harriet F. Davis 64 years old, who is residing in Jasper County, Mississippi. Her husband was William S. Davis, who served in Captain B.F. Loper's Co., Company H, 37th Mississippi Regiment, (The Jasper Avengers) with the regiment being commanded by Colonel Orlando S. Holland. The document further states that Private Davis served in the Confederate army for about 3 years and surrendered at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865, and he died on October 1, 1901. Bears numerous signatures including members of the board and T.Q. Brame, the Chancery Clerk, with the embossed seal of the Chancery Court of Jasper County, with vignette of an eagle sitting on an olive branch with arrows in its talons.  


Accompanying the pension document is a  letter written in ink on a piece of 5 1/8 x 8 1/2 lined stationary. 


Lumberton, Miss.

8/18/16


Mr. T.Q. Brame, 

Bay Springs, Miss.


Dear Sir:


I am living in Lumberton now and expect to make this my home as far as I know.


Yours Truly,

H.F. Davis


Light age toning and wear. Both items have a hole at the top of the paper. Archival tape repair on one of the folds on the reverse of the application document.


Private William S. Davis served with Co. H, 37th Mississippi Infantry, 1862-65. 


The 37th Mississippi Infantry, saw action at Iuka, Corinth, Perryville, Vicksburg, the Atlanta campaign, and the Nashville campaign, to name a few places.      


<b>United States Senator from Connecticut</b>


(1879-1905) Born in Washington, Litchfield County, Conn., he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1850, and commenced practice in Towanda, Pa., and then Meriden, Conn. He was clerk of the State senate, 1855-56; secretary of the State of Connecticut, 1857; member of the State senate, 1861-62; member of the State house of representatives, 1864 and 1869, serving as speaker in the latter year; State's attorney for New Haven County, 1877-79; and served as U.S. Senator, from 1879 until his death in 1905. During his time in the senate he served as the chairman on the Committee on Patents, and as a member on the Committee on Pensions, the Committee on Territories, the Committee on Cuban Relations, and the Committee on the Judiciary. 


<u>Signature</u>: 3 3/4 x 1/2, in ink, O.H. Platt.     


<b>The Valley Campaign of 1864</b>


By Thomas A. Lewis and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1987. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with color illustration of Union General Philip H. Sheridan on horseback. Also has U.S. and C.S. belt plates, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title printed in blue. Title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition.


The Cover: Major General Philip H. Sheridan gallops past a line of cheering Union soldiers in this heroic rendition of his storied, 20 mile ride from Winchester, Virginia, to the battlefield at Cedar Creek, on October 19, 1864. Sheridan's dramatic appearance infused his army with renewed spirit, turning a Federal retreat into a victory that ended Confederate control of the Shenandoah Valley.  


<b>With 1861 M.B. Brady imprint on the front mount</b>


(1826-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846 and fought in the Mexican War. Hailed at the beginning of the Civil War as the "Young Napoleon," he proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but an officer totally lacking in the essential qualities of successful command of large forces in battle. He saw action at Rich Mountain, W.V., in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and at the battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day in American history. He was defeated for the presidency in 1864 by Abraham Lincoln.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of major general, striking a Napoleonic pose. Imprint on the front mount, Gen'l Geo. B. McClellan, Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1861, by M.B. Brady, in the Clerks office of the District Court of the District of Columbia. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative from Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Sticker of McAllister Brother, 728 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia on the reverse.

Pension Application For Widow of Decease $35.00

 

Autograph, Orville H. Platt $8.00

 

The Shenandoah in Flames $15.00

 

CDV, General George B. McClellan $125.00




<b>News of the War of 1812 with reports from General William Henry Harrison</b>


4 pages. The articles include news about the Maryland and New Jersey Elections; Ad for a portrait of the late Captain James Lawrence, U.S.N.; Reward for the apprehension of a deserter from the 38th Regiment U.S. Infantry signed in print by Captain John Brookes of the same regiment; news from Upper Marlborough, and Prince George's County, Maryland; lengthy article about Geography; General Harrison's Victory which includes a very lengthy letter (3 1/2 columns) from Major General William Henry Harrison to Secretary of War, General John Armstrong that is signed in print by General Harrison with a woodcut engraving of a spread winged eagle and U.S. shield at the top of the column; General Orders of Debarkation of the March and Battle written from Head-Quarters onboard the U.S. Schooner Ariel (this a lengthy article signed in print by Edmund P. Gaines, Col. Adjt. Gen.); Chaucery's Running Fight (this is another lengthy article and it is from Comm. Chauncery to the Secretary of the Navy, William Jones); the United States Ship General Pike, off Niagra, signed in print by Isaac Chauncery; Anglo-American Politics; the American War and more. Light age toning, edge wear and chipping at the bound part of the newspaper with some very slight paper loss, there are splits at places in the centerfold when the newspaper is fully opened, and a few small light stains. Overall the paper is in very solid condition with no apparent tears. Very interesting War of 1812 newspaper highlighted by battle news from Major General William Henry Harrison, future ninth president of the United States.


WBTS Trivia: The late Captain Lawrence mentioned above was Captain James Lawrence of the United States Navy. He was the commander of the warship U.S.S. Chesapeake during the War of 1812. He was mortally wounded in action against the British warship HMS Shannon. It was during this battle that Lawrence repeatedly gave his now immortal order, "Don’t give up the ship...Fight her till she sinks" and "Tell them to fire faster, don’t give up the ship."


The Battle of the Thames was a decisive American victory in the War of 1812 against Great Britain and its Indian allies in Tecumseh's Confederacy. It took place on October 5, 1813 in Upper Canada, near Chatham, Ontario. The British lost control of western Ontario as a result of the battle. Tecumseh was killed and his Confederacy largely fell apart.       


(1823-73) Graduated in the West Point class of 1843. He fought in the Mexican War earning two brevets (Monterey & Cerro Gordo) for gallantry. He was appointed lieutenant colonel in the Regular Confederate Army in early 1861. Commanded a cavalry brigade at the battle of Shiloh, and was promoted to brigadier general, April 11, 1862. During Bragg's invasion of Kentucky, he commanded a brigade in General Polk's corps. Gardner was placed in command of the Mississippi River stronghold, at Port Hudson, La., which he was forced to surrender in July 1863. After his exchange in August 1864, he served in Mississippi under General Dick Taylor. He spent his post war years as a planter in Louisiana.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. No backmark. Tiny piece of the top left corner of the mount is chipped off. Small ink mark at upper right corner well away from the subject. There are several very tiny pin pricks to the card's surface some of which do touch upon Gardner's face and beard. They are barely visible to the naked eye but seen under magnification. There is an ink ID on the reverse, "Gen. Hood" which is incorrect. Age toning, light soiling, and wear. Scarce.  


<b>United States Civil War Congressman


One of the managers appointed to conduct the impeachment proceedings against President Andrew Johnson!


United States Senator from Iowa</b>


(1828-95) Born in Newark, Licking County, Ohio, he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1851, and practiced in Newark, Ohio, and in Fairfield, Jefferson County, Iowa. He was a member of the constitutional convention of Iowa in 1857; served in the Iowa State House of Representatives in 1857, and the State Senate, from 1859-61, being its president in 1861. He was a U.S. Congressman during the Civil War and Reconstruction, serving from 1861-69. Served as chairman on the Committee on the Judiciary. He was one of the managers appointed by the U.S. House of Representatives in 1868 to conduct the impeachment proceedings against President Andrew Johnson. He declined the appointment of U.S. Secretary of State in the administration of President Ulysses S. Grant. Instead he accepted Grant's appointment as government director of the Union Pacific Railroad serving in this position for 8 years. Served as U.S. Senator, 1883-95, being the chairman of the Committee on Mines and Mining. He also served as a member of the Committee on Expenditures of Public Money; the Committee on Revision of the Laws of the United States; and the Committee on Education and Labor.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 x 3/4, in ink, James F. Wilson. Cut slightly irregular. Very desirable President Johnson impeachment related autograph.         


<b>2nd Maine Infantry


Colonel 80th U.S. Colored Troops


Autographed carte de visite</b>


(1837-99) Born in Northport, Maine. He enlisted on May 28, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into the 2nd Maine Infantry. Promoted to 1st lieutenant, Sept. 9, 1861; captain, July 15, 1862; mustered out of the regiment on June 9, 1863. Commissioned lieutenant colonel, 80th U.S. Colored Troops, on Sept. 1, 1863; promoted to colonel, Mar. 7, 1865, brevet brigadier general, Mar. 13, 1865; mustered out of the service on Mar. 1, 1867.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 x 4 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of 1st lieutenant, and wearing gauntlets and U.S. eagle belt plate. Boldly signed in ink on the front mount, With the regards of W.S. Mudgett. No backmark. Corners of the mount are trimmed. Small piece of the albumen print has chipped off at the upper right corner. This does not affect the subject. Light age toning and wear. Very fine content. Rare.

National Intelligencer, Washington City, $35.00

 

CDV, General Franklin Gardner $75.00

 

Autograph, James F. Wilson $25.00

 

CDV, General William S. Mudgett $150.00

H 24in. x W 24in. x D 12in.  H 14in. x W 59in. x W 11in.  H 64in. x D 24in.  Still housed in its poplar wood backed period frame this 11 ¾ X 13 9 1/6  sampler was stitched by nine year old Emma Andrew in 1864.  Remaining in pleasing condition while showing convincing age and originality, our photo illustrations will speak best for condition and eye appeal.  Carefully stitched with the alphabet in upper and lower case, and a set of numerals 0 through 9, Emma documented her work with her name and <B>Age 9 years – 1864 – Ketton School</B>.  Found in New Hampshire, a rudimentary search offered a U. S. Census record of Emma listed as <I>Emma Jane Andrew</I> born <I>about</I> 1853 in Sutton, New Hampshire to George and Mary Andrew.   It appears that Emma remained in New Hampshire all her life passing away at New London, N. H. in 1929.    Her needlework sampler remains as a staple of mid 1800s America as while boys (with parents of some means and priority) were taught the <I>three Rs</I>,   their sisters might be tutored in the barest rudiments of reading and arithmetic while the focus of their education was on an assortment of skills necessary to family feeding, clothing and<I>keeping house</I>.  Popular among antique Americana and textile enthusiasts, in the day the 19th century child’s sampler offered tutorial, final exam and future family heirloom.  This Civil War dated example will be of special interest to collectors in that popular venue.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

CUSTOM WALL SCONCE #3112 $800.00

 

OLD GAS PUMP LIGHT $850.00

 

ANTIQUE BRASS CHANDELIER #1222 $4500.00

 

1864 Dated – SCHOOLGIRL SAMPLER $225.00

Found in a period paper ephemera lot, these approximately 2 5/8 X 3 3/8 inch <B><I>Sheffield Superior Patent Cutlery</I></B> and 2 13/16 inch <B><I>SAMUEL BAILEY & Co. - SHEFFIELD Superior - POCKET KNIVES</B></I> labels are entirely original and remain in fine, unused condition.  A rare find from one of the several British cutlers who made the name Sheffield synonymous with quality in early and mid-19th century America, these labels will be of special interest to knife collectors and will display well applied to a proper period pasteboard box or simply laid out or framed just as they are.   A bit of an enigma as a cutler Samuel Bailey (1791-1870) is best known as a controversial British philosophical writer.  Born to Joseph Bailey and Mary [Eadon] Bailey, upon finishing his education Samuel entered the family firm, <B>Eadon, Bailey & Co.</B>   As a member of his uncle and father’s cutlery business <U>Samuel Bailey  was one of the first Sheffield merchant cutlers to visited America in order to establish business connections in this country.</U>  It was after the firm of Eadon, Bailey & Co. was dissolved in 1813 that the cutlery firm of Samuel Bailey & Co. came into being, marketing <I>Superior Patent Cutlery</I> such as pocket knives, razors, scissors &c.  Little known today, Samuel Bailey & Co. existed only between sometime after 1813 and the later 1820’s  when Samuel Bailey cashed in his accumulated  fortune as a cutlery merchant and founded the Sheffield Banking Company in 1831.  After his failed effort to gain a place in parliament in 1835 Bailey turned to a reclusive life and is primarily remembered today as an author of books on political and ethical subjects valued by a select few.  He was never married and died in 1870 leaving his property to the town.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  H 72in. x D 56in. 


price per item  Remaining in nice condition save a small <I>scuff</I> in the emulsion (above the tree line on the right) were calling this 1/2 plate tintype <I>post</I>-Civil War simply because the ambulance wagon is unmarked and seems to be in civilian surroundings.  Though the scene may be Civil War vintage, it seems more likely that the wagon is a, period common, post war repurposing via army surplus.  A second wagon visible behind the first appears to be of the same design though of lighter color.   An interesting outdoor view who’s history and circumstance has unfortunately been lost in time.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Well documented by Civil War site <I>digger</I> historians and period print advertisement, it seems that these little die stamped tin containers saw common use once the original content was used up.  Seldom seen in any kind of condition save partial excavated examples, these little boxes made handy containers for stamps, thread, salt or anything that would fit.  Listed in Civil War vintage Boston directories, <I>Redding & Co.</I> marketed their <B>RUSSIAN SALVE</B> (composed of bee wax, perfumed oil and glycerin) as <I> a <I>pain extractor</I> that <I> reduces the most angry-looking swellings and inflammations, heals sores, wounds, burns, scalds, etc. as if by magic.</I> [ 1864 Harpers Weekly ] This original example with its military motif REDDING & Co. lid remains in excellent condition and will make a nice addition to any Civil War personal or medical cure groping.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!

two c. 1820 / early 1830 era Samuel Bail $65.00

 

RUSTY BARN LIGHT X5 $3200.00

 

½ plate post-Civil War era tintype – ARM $175.00

 

original! Redding & Co. Boston – RUSSIA $65.00

H 24in. x D 8in.  H 20in. x D 12in.  44in. x D 10in.  H 22in. x D 12in.

Foyer light #597 $650.00

 

Classic pendant copper fixture #398 $700.00

 

Deco pendant light #469 $850.00

 

Petite porcelain light #3747 $850.00




<b>Signed by soldier of the 12th Massachusetts Infantry who was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg!</b>


8 1/4 x 9 3/4, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Headquarters Department of Massachusetts,

Grand Army Of The Republic,

657 Washington St. (red rubber stamp address) stamped on top of the crossed out address of 12 Pemberton Square, Room 18.


Boston, May 20th, 1890


Special Order

No. 23


In accordance with Chap. II, Art. II, Section 3, Rules and Regulations, a dispensation is hereby granted to Gettysburg Post 191 G.A.R. to enable the investigating committee that may be appointed at the next regular meeting of the Post to report upon application for membership that may be referred to them at the same meeting. 


By Command of

George H. Innis

Department Commander


A.C. Moore

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning and wear.


George H. Innis was a 21 year old baker from Boston, when he enlisted as a private, on August 16, 1862, and was mustered into the 10th Massachusetts Light Artillery. He was mustered out of the U.S. service on June 9, 1865.


Alfred C. Monroe, was a 20 year old shoemaker from Weymouth, Ma., when he enlisted on June 26, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into Co. H, 12th Massachusetts Infantry. He was seriously wounded in action during the battle of Gettysburg, on July 1, 1863. The wound to his left arm was so severe that it resulted in the amputation of his arm. He was discharged as a result of his wound on October 19, 1863.   H 60in. x D 46in.


 Found in among our accumulated <I>cultch</I> this neat old bar set is clearly out of our usual time period but full of character such that we couldn’t resist it.  All in nice condition yet with good age, while the figures depict an earlier time, we’d guess this hand carved from native white pine bar set dates to the 1920s or 30s.  The tallest figure stands approximately 7 ¼ inches.  Aside from the above, our  photo illustrations will speak best for this wonderful folk art carved and painted bar set.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Popularly used into the early post-Civil War years, primarily due to inexpensive and readily available fuel in the form of animal fat, lard and even strained cooking grease, the Ufford <I>GREASE</I> lamp clearly saw considerable use in many a country farmhouse and undoubtably offered up lighting on more than a single Civil War winter camp table.  It would be there that the obtainable fuel would be especially appreciated.  Fashioned from tinned sheet iron with a 6 3/4 inch diameter base the lamp stands approximately 7 inches with an applied brass label; <B> S. N. & H. C. UFFORD. / 113 COURT ST. / BOSTON / KINNEARS PATENT / FEB. 4. 1851</B> this example offers good evidence of age with plenty of period use yet remains solid and in pleasing condition.  As is our usual practice we have left this neat old lamp as found, leaving the decision to carefully clean it up to the new owner.  (We’d leave it pure, just as put away.)  .  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Headquarters Department of Massachusetts

 

INDUSTRIAL / BARN LIGHTS #1906 $1500.00

 

folk-art carved BAR SET $245.00

 

Pat. 1851 GREASE LAMP by S. N. & H. C. U $165.00

This  neat looking Civil War vintage stoneware master ink is approximately 2.25 inches in diameter and stands about 5.5 inches high.  It remains in excellent condition with no cracks or damage and retains all of its’ original glaze.  This master ink is nicely maker marked GEORGE SKEY – WILNECOTE – TAMWORTH.  George Skey established his stoneware works in Tamworth in 1860 and quickly became a world leader in the manufacture of all manner of stoneware containers.  His stoneware beer bottles will offer Civil War collectors the most prevalent example of his product.  Of special interest is the period label <B>SUPERIOR BLACK INK  PREPARED BY E. S. CURTIS, BOSTON</B>. The Society of Inkwell Collectors advises that E. S. Curtis appears in historical directories for the years 1847-1848 and made powdered ink only. Its customers were given instructions for mixing and filling stoneware and glass containers. E. S. Curtis also supplied labels to be applied to their customers' bottles.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants.  A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  H 89in. x W 38in. x D 35in.  H 42in. X D 22in.



more in stock  


<b>1864 Democratic Presidential Candidate</b> 


(1826-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846 and fought in the Mexican War. Hailed at the beginning of the Civil War as the "Young Napoleon," he proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but an officer totally lacking in the essential qualities of successful command of large forces in battle. He saw action at Rich Mountain, West Virginia, in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and at the battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day in American history. He was defeated for the presidency in 1864 by Abraham Lincoln.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Seated view in uniform wih rank of major general. Artistic pose of "Little Mac" seated with his back to the camera. Backmark: J.W. Black, 163 & 173 Washington Street, Boston, and So. Turo St. Opp. Naval Academy, Newport, R.I. Period ink inscription [not in McClellan's hand] on the reverse, Mg. Gen. G.B. McClellan, U.S.A. Light age toning. Very fine. Scarce pose.

mid 19th century E. S. CURTIS - MASTER I $125.00

 

OTIS ELEVATOR VINTAGE $12000.00

 

Metal pendant light #1802 03 $650.00

 

CDV, General George B. McClellan $125.00




T-66. Richmond, Feb. 17, 1864. Bust view of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Fancy blue reverse. Crisp note that is in about uncirculated condition. 

 


<b>Journalist, Famous Poet and U.S. Army officer during the Civil War


Civil War Date Document Signed</b>


(1826-1904) Born near Penn Yan, New York, he moved with his parents to Ohio in 1840. He studied law with Thomas Corwin, was admitted to the bar in 1856, and practiced in Cincinnati as a partner of Thomas Spooner. However, a few years earlier, he had written a poem titled, "Rain on the Roof," which first appeared in the Cincinnati Great West. Its extraordinary merit was instantly recognized and the seeds of a literary pursuit had been sown in Kinney's heart. He gave up the law and became editor of The West Liberty Banner. He later became editor of a literary magazine called the Genius of the West. When the Civil War broke out he was elected captain of a company that was raised in Greene County, but before he could be mustered in, President Lincoln, through the recommendation of Salmon P. Chase, appointed Kinney, Major & Paymaster, U.S. Army. He was commissioned on June 1, 1861, and he served throughout the war being mustered out of service on November 15, 1865, with the rank of brevet lieutenant colonel. After the war he became owner and editor of the Xenia Torchlight, and was subsequently the editor of the Cincinnati Times, and he also wrote for the Ohio State Journal. He later became owner and editor of the Springfield Globe Republic. He was elected as a delegate of the Republican National Convention in Chicago that nominated Ulysses S. Grant for president, and served as the Ohio State Secretary for the convention. He served as an Ohio State Senator, 1882-83. Kinney's career in civil and military life entitles him to the high rank that Ohio has given him among her distinguished sons. His attainments as a classical student, critic and thinker, exhibited by his strong, clear writings in prose, and his eloquent speeches, give him a high position among American scholars, writers and orators. But his reputation rests mainly on his extraordinary originality as a poet. His "Rain on the Roof," "Emma Stuart," "End of the Rainbow," "Discontent," "Threnody," belong to popular literature. A volume titled, "Lyrics of the Ideal and the Real," contain some of his best productions. Source: Dictionary of American Biography. 


<u>Civil War Date Document Signed</u>: 8 x 3, imprinted check with female figure holding sword and shield, filled out in ink.


Cincinnati, Ohio, Octr. 15, 1864. Third National Bank of Cincinnati, Designated Depositary of the U.S. Pay to W.H. Scott, Jr., or bearer, One Hundred & Twenty seven and 30/100 Dollars. $127.30. Coates Kinney, Paymaster, U.S.A. Small punch hole cancellation at the center. Very fine.      Fashioned from a stout tree branch, steamed and bent to form a classic cane grip, the significances of the natural shaft has unfortunately been lost in time baring some additional research.   Fortunate for the collector / historian though is a silver band classically engraved <I><B>Col. Jos. A. Gerk     St. Louis</I></B>.  Born in 1876 of German immigrants, the native Missourian recorded <I>No</I> in response to the 1930 US Census inquiry, <I>Attended School?</I> yet he owned a <I>Radio Set</I> and could record his occupation as <B><I>Chief of Police</I></B> St Louis, Missouri. Our research found that Gerk worked his way up through the ranks to serve as Chief of Police from April 9, 1925 to October 1, 1934. An outstanding piece of Americana from <I>The Gateway To The West</I> in a time when the Chief of Police would have had some stories to tell.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Another product of last winter’s clean out, we have had this wonderful old period coffee pot for years but it is time to make some room.  Well documented in style and construction by Civil War site <I>diggers</I> and the existence of such in the Steamboat Berterand (sunk on the Missouri River in 1865) excavation collection, this example stands approximately 8 inches from base to mouth, offers period construction characteristics and good evidence of period originality and age by virtue of an attractive natural patina on outer surfaces that comes to tinned sheet iron only after decades.  Of particular note with all this is that when we remove the lid and inspect the interior, we find that it remains <U>nearly as new</U>!   With no dents, rust, or other condition issues yet with convincing evidence of age, this wonderfully preserved period pot appears never to have been used!  An outstanding addition to any period collection.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

1864 Confederate $50 Note $75.00

 

Autograph, Lieutenant Colonel Coates Kin $25.00

 

Inscribed cane of Col. Joseph A. Gerk – $350.00

 

exceptionally nice condition! Civil War $125.00

This unused 19th century paper box label is uncut measuring 7 ½ inches X 15 inches was printed for cutting to produce box end labels for the  <B>The Patent Expansion Lamp Shade</B><I> with White’s Improvements</I>, <B> Mfg. By Woodsum & Co., Boston, Mass.</B> The labels picture the lamp shade installed on an oil lamp and collapsed.  A neat item for the antique lighting enthusiast.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  This offering will fall in the <I>who cares?</I> category (especially at 50 bucks a pop!) for all but the antique writing instrument collector or the mid-19th century personal item enthusiast who appreciates the rarity of the many every day personal items, common in their day but seldom surviving.  This rare example remains <I>as new</I>and in out of the box condition while offering good evidence of age and period originality.  Guaranteed to please this rarely surviving writing instrument was fashioned from raw, unfinished, red cedar with the clearly period attachment of its vulcanized rubber eraser.  Our photo illustrations will offer the best description short of holding the pencil in your hand.  I suppose the origin of the common pencil, fitted with a rubber eraser has not been the subject of crushing interest but for those who care, it all began in 1839 when Charles Goodyear developed a method of curing raw rubber called vulcanization.  Aside from making his name common to today’s Civil War era rubber goods collectors, (see: <I>India-Rubber & Gutta-Percha In The Civil War Era</I> by Mike Woshner ) the application of Goodyear’s process gave the now durable product wide application potential with the rubber eraser becoming just one of innumerable uses for Goodyear’s vulcanized rubber.  The idea of permanently mounting a rubber eraser on the end of a common wood and graphite pencil first occurred just prior to the Civil War when in 1858 Hymen Lipman of Philadelphia received the first patent for attaching an eraser to the end of a pencil.  In 1862, Lipman sold his patent for $100,000 !  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 H 36in. x D 12in.


 H 30in. x D 24in.

3rd quarter 19th century - Patent Expans $30.00

 

ultra-rare! original mid 1800s – wood / g $50.00

 

Classic pendants 1702 03 04 $750.00

 

Formal brass light circa 1930 #1230 $2400.00




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