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Based on the French 1862 fire helmet but with considerable redesign, this fire helmet style was first used by the London Metropolitan Fire Brigade in 1868 the design was quickly adopted by the vast majority of London fire brigades then by nearly all British fire brigades and was destined to become an iconic symbol of the later half, 19th century fire fighter with nearly universal period use by major fire brigades both in Britain and in the United States.  (see: <I><B>National Hall of Flame Museum of Firefighting</I></B> collection Phoenix, AZ)  With good evidence of period use, yet remaining in pleasing original condition with a soft natural age patina and its rarely found original split leather sweat band, this classic fire helmet with its high relief fire breathing dragons and torch crest of crossed fire axes with entwined hose, this impressive brass fire helmet will display well by itself or set in any firefighting collection.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!



 


The Battle of Shiloh, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing, was fought April 6-7, 1862, in southwestern Tennessee. A Union army under Major General Ulysses S. Grant had moved via the Tennessee River deep into Tennessee and was encamped principally at Pittsburg Landing on the west bank of the river. Confederate forces under Generals' Albert Sidney Johnston and P.G.T. Beauregard launched a surprise attack on Grant there. On the first day of the battle, the Confederates struck with the intention of driving the Union defenders away from the river and into the swamps of Owl Creek to the west, hoping to defeat Grant's Army of the Tennessee before the anticipated arrival of Major General Don Carlos Buell's Army of the Ohio. The Confederate battle lines became confused during the fierce fighting, and Grant's men instead fell back to the northeast, in the direction of Pittsburg Landing. A position on a slightly sunken road, nicknamed the "Hornet's Nest," defended by the men of Brigadier Generals' Benjamin M. Prentiss's and W. H. L. Wallace's divisions provided critical time for the rest of the Union line to stabilize under the protection of numerous artillery batteries. The Confederates were forced to retreat form the bloodiest battle in United States history up to that time. 


Handsome 11 x 14 display, double matted, in gray and red, and ready to put in a frame. Includes a small remnant of a captured Confederate flag with white and red cloth visible. A rare relic from the Battle of Shiloh. Comes with COA and copy of the original note found with the flag fragment.  


Includes a 3 3/4 x 3 inch piece of tide water cypress which originated from a beam from Libby Prison. Handsomely displayed within double mat boards of cream and red, and highlighted with two modern copy photographs, and descriptive text. The photo at the top of the display is a Civil War period view showing Libby as a Confederate prison. Captain Turner, the commandant of Libby Prison, is one of the men standing in front of the tents in the foreground. The bottom photograph is a view of the reconstructed interior of Libby Prison as it appeared on display in Chicago in the late 1800's showing the cypress beams. Overall size is 11 x 14. Comes with documentation. Very neat original Civil War relic from one of the war's most infamous prisons! 


Libby Prison, established March 26, 1862, was situated on the corner of Cary and 20th streets, on the James River in Richmond, Virginia. The building was the warehouse of Libby and Sons, ship chandlers, before the Civil War. Outside of Andersonville Prison, Libby Prison was perhaps the most notorious Confederate Prison. 


*Please note that our scan is cropped as the display is too large to fit it in entirely on our scanner. The original display has nice full borders.   


Authentic, original piece of the Confederate battle flag that flew over Fort Morgan, Alabama, when it was captured by Admiral David G. Farragut in 1864. Handsomely displayed within cream and red, double mat board design. Includes a copy vignette of the naval battle of Mobile Bay, in the upper window opening, while the original Confederate battle flag remnant is prominently shown at the center of the display. The following descriptive text highlights the display at the bottom: Confederate Battle Flag of Fort Morgan, Battle of Mobile Bay. The Battle of Mobile Bay was a naval battle fought on August 5, 1864. Commanding the Union forces was Admiral David Farragut, while Admiral Franklin Buchanan led the Confederate fleet. The battle took place off the coast of Alabama, at the mouth of Mobile Bay, which was defended by two Confederate forts, Fort Morgan and Fort Gaines, and by a torpedo field (in modern terms, a minefield) that created a single narrow channel for blockade runners to enter and exit the bay. The biggest challenge for Farragut was entering the bay. With eighteen vessels, he commanded far greater firepower than the Confederate fleet of four. The Union fleet suffered the first major loss when the U.S.S. Tecumseh was critically damaged by an exploding torpedo after it wandered into the field. Within three minutes, the vessel was completely submerged. 94 men went down with the ship. Under fire from both the Confederate fleet and Fort Morgan, Farragut had to choose between retreating or risking the minefield. He then issued his famous order, "Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!" Farragut took his flagship through the minefield safely, followed by the rest of the fleet. When Union fleet reached the bay, they defeated the Confederate flotilla led by the giant ironclad, C.S.S. Tennessee. Buchanan surrendered to Farragut aboard the U.S.S. Hartford. After several weeks of bombardment from land and sea resulting in severe damage to Fort Morgan with the citadel being burned and the walls severely damaged by shot and shells, the Confederate Commander, General Page surrendered Fort Morgan on August 23, 1864 to Federal forces. This flag relic came from a small section of the Confederate flag shot down over Fort Morgan and retrieved by Fleet Surgeon James C. Palmer upon entry into the fort by Union forces and is authenticated by his note (a copy of which is) seen on the accompanying certificate. Included with the display is certificate of authenticity which incorporates a computer copy of Surgeon Palmer's original note which was pinned to the original flag relic. Overall size of the display is 11 x 14. Rare and very desirable Confederate flag relic from this famous fort! Please note that our scan is cropped because the display is larger than our scanner. The original display has nice full borders.

mid 19th century FIRE BRIGADE HELMET $375.00

 

Battle of Shiloh Captured Confederate Fl $295.00

 

Libby Prison Display $125.00

 

Fort Morgan, Alabama, Confederate Battle




<b>First President of the United States


1862 Civil War dated card</b>


(1732-99) "The Father of Our Country." George Washington was the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, and served as the first president of the United States.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 1/4 card. Bust view portrait. Backmark: Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1862, by David Nichols, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court, of the District of Massachusetts. Printed legend on the reverse: "G. Washington. This was done in New York 1790 and is acknowledged by all to be a very strong likeness. B. Goodhue." Some surface scratching to the front of the card none of which touch the subject. Light age toning. Uncommon to find with this 1862 imprint. Very desirable. No doubt some proud American, North or South, displayed this image of George Washington in a parlor album or possibly on a mantle in plain view to show their patriotism!  


8 pages. Important From New Orleans. Capture of Alexandria by Admiral Porter. General Banks' Forces in Possession. Previous Bombardment and Capture of Fort De Russy. The Great Cavalry Raid Through Mississippi. Safe Arrival of Col. Grierson's Command at Baton Rouge. Detailed Account of Their Exploits. Immense and Irreparable Damage Inflicted Upon the Enemy. Only One of Our Men Killed and Six Wounded. Proposed Organization of a Corps D'Afrique by Gen. Banks. The Great Raid in Mississippi. A Detailed Narrative of the Exploits of Our Cavalry. Wonderful Cavalry Exploit. Important From General Grant. The Rebels Report That he Has Captured Jackson, Miss. The Cavalry Raid in Virginia. Operations by the Force Under Command of Lieut. Col. Davis. From the Army of the Potomac. Visit of Senators Wade and Chandler to Falmouth, and much more. Nice 1863 issue with exciting news of Colonel Benjamin H. Grierson's cavalry raid.  <b>of the Gulf to be Paid</b>


5 x 7 3/4, imprint.


Headquarters Department of the Gulf

New Orleans, August 27, 1862


General Orders No. 65


Commanders of Brigades in this Department will have their respective commands mustered for pay on the last day of this month.


By command of

MAJOR-GENERAL BUTLER


WM. H. WEIGEL, 1st Lieut. And A.A.A.G.


Excellent. Scarce Department of the Gulf imprint.  


8 pages. IMPORTANT REBEL NEWS. Progress of the Siege of Charleston. Cummings Point Severely Bombarded by the Ironsides and Two Monitors. Fort Sumter and Two Rebel Batteries Engaged. A Counter Bombardment of Our Works on Morris Island. The Expedition in North Carolina. The War in Tennessee. An Expedition Into the Enemy's Country. The War in Indian Territory. Movements of the Blockade Runners. Arrival of the Florida. Quarrelling Over a Wrecked Rebel Prize. The Doings of the Rebel Pirates. The Law of the Blockade. Liability of Vessels Proceeding to Neutral Ports to Load for Blockaded Ports. Opinion of the Attorney General. Ship Building for the Rebels. Views of a Southern Paper on the Negro Question. The Negroes and Colonization. The Metropolitan Police. Their Services During the Riot Week. Their Honorable Record, and more news. Age toning and light wear.

CDV, General & President George Washingt $25.00

 

The New York Times, New York, May 18, 18 $35.00

 

General Ben Butler Orders Soldiers in th $15.00

 

The New York Times, August 4, 1863 $25.00




<b>Plus Reward Imprint


STOLEN! One Bright Bay Horse- A reward of $25 will be given for the capture of the man or horse!</b>


Formed in 1863, in Luray and Millport, Missouri. Shortly after the commencement of the Civil War, lawless men in the border states- that is the states lying between the loyal and seceded states- banded themselves together for the purpose of plundering honest citizens. Missouri especially was subject to the depredations of these gangs, and in time the conditions became so bad that the law-abiding people found it necessary to take some action for defense. The first organization of this character was proposed at a meeting held at Luray, Mo., in September, 1863. At a second meeting held at Millport, Mo., about a month later, a constitution and by-laws were adopted, and as horses seemed to be the principal objects of theft, the society took the name of the "Anti-Horse Thief Association." The effectiveness of such an organization quickly became apparent, the order spread to other states, and in time covered a large expanse of territory. After the war was over, when the conditions that called the association into existence no longer existed, its scope was widened to include all kinds of thefts and a national organization was incorporated under the laws of Kansas. This national order is composed of officers and delegates from the state associations and meets annually on the first Wednesday in October. Next in importance is the state division, which is made up of representatives of the local organizations, and meets annually to elect officers and delegates to the national order. The sub-orders or local associations are composed of individual members and usually meet monthly.


Wall and McCarty, in their history of the association, say, "The A.H.T.A. uses only strictly honorable, legal methods. It opposes lawlessness in any and all forms, yet does its work so systematically and efficiently that few criminals are able to escape when it takes the trail...The centralization of "Many in One" has many advantages not possessed by even an independent association, for while it might encompass a neighborhood, the A.T.H.A. covers many states...The value of an article stolen is rarely taken into consideration. The order decrees that the laws of the land must be obeyed; though it costs many times the value of the property to capture the thief. An individual could not spend $50 to $100 to recover a $25 horse and capture the thief. The A.T.H.A. would, because of the effect it would have in the future...Thieves have learned these facts and do less stealing from our members, hence the preventative protection."  Thieves thought twice!


This lot includes the following two items:


1: 4 x 5 3/4, string-bound imprint, 12 pages. Constitution of the State Grand Orders of the Anti-Horse Thief Association. Articles include- Name and Jurisdiction; Sessions and Locations; Officers and Elections; Duties of Officers; Offences; Revenue; Charters; Obligation; Fees For Services; Officers' Salaries; Standing Committees; Black Book; Description of Stock; the Constitution of Subordinate Orders; the By-Laws, and much more. Light age toning and wear. 


#2: 5 1/8 x 3, imprinted card. STOLEN! July 7, 1887. One Bright Bay Horse, eight years old, fifteen hands high, black mane and tail (hair thin in both), one white hind foot. The thief is a man about thirty-four years old, 5 feet, ten or eleven inches high, heavy black moustache and chin whiskers, rather fair skin, large round dark eyes, and black hair, high forehead, small bald spot on back of head, weighs about 180 to 190 pounds, and wore a black suit of cloth clothes somewhat worn, and a light straw hat. A reward of $25 will be given for the capture of the man or horse. Address all information to J.B. ELLIS, Altomont, Kansas. The card was mailed to a person in Kansas as is evident by the address on the reverse. Imprinted Thomas Jefferson one cent postage stamp and C.D.S., Osage Mission, Kan., Jul. 12. Light wear and staining.


Very interesting, desirable, and uncommon 19th century Anti-Horse Thief imprints.    


Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1997. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 167 pages, illustrated, index. Some thin scratches to the back of the dust jacket. The book itself is in brand new condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who experienced the Battle of Chickamauga. Through their words and images you can relieve the emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the human comedy- of the Civil War's bloodiest two days. Thus you hold in your hands an album of personal recollections from letters, diaries, photographs, sketches, and artifacts.


To compile this special volume, we combed hundreds of sources, both published and unpublished.  We had invaluable help from an extensive network of consultants. Using our own diverse resources and historical materials in libraries and archives around the United States, we were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives: manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories and privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of these soldiers and townsfolk to accompany their personal accounts.


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail systems set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. Private William J. Oliphant of the 6th Texas Infantry remembered the horror of fighting at night at Chickamauga; "It was now quite dark but just ahead of us was a brilliant light. A field was burning and we were ordered to charge through it...The fence was on fire and the tall dead trees in the field were blazing high in the air. Dead and wounded men were lying there in great danger of being consumed." 


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the army to depict events for readers. These correspondents drew virtually everything of possible interest: battles, lounging soldiers, the odd piece of equipment. Sketches dashed off in a few minutes during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication, where they were transformed into woodblock engravings suitable for printing. 


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the fledgling craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and equipment and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are well chronicled, thanks to the efforts of men who endured great hardship. Photographers like Mathew Brady and his assistants spent months following the army, etching with light the brave faces of the soldiers, as well as the bodies stiffened on the field. When Brady's stark photographs of the dead were first exhibited in New York City in 1862, the public thought, albeit briefly, that such horrific images could actually bring the war to an end. 


So here you find living testimony from the battlefield of Chickamauga. As you look into the eyes of these soldiers and civilians, as you read the words of those dazed by the violence around them or by the grief that follows the fighting, perhaps it will be possible to perceive more clearly the shattering experience that was Chickamauga. 


Cover Photograph: Lee and Gordon's Mills, about 12 miles south of Chattanooga, was the scene of some of the early skirmishes that started the two day Battle of Chickamauga. 


Cover quotation: "We must drop a soldier's tear upon the graves of the noble men who have fallen by our sides." General Braxton Bragg.  


<b>Fought in the War of 1812


Fought in the Mexican War in a Kentucky Cavalry Brigade and was captured in 1847


United States Congressman from Kentucky


Governor of Oregon</b>


(1795-1857) Born in Augusta, Va. (now West Virginia), he moved to Boone County, Ky., studied law, was admitted to the bar, and practiced in Walton, Ky. He was a member of the Kentucky State House of Representatives for many years. Fought in the Mexican War as a major in the cavalry brigade of General Thomas Marshall. He also served as aide-de-camp to General Winfield Scott. He was captured at Incarnacion in January 1847, and spent several months as a prisoner in Mexico City. He served as U.S. Congressman, 1847-49, and was the Governor of Oregon, 1850-53.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 4 1/4 x 1, in ink, Jno. P. Gaines, Kent[uck]y.    


<b>U.S. Congressman & Senator from Ohio


Governor of Ohio


U.S. Secretary of the Treasury


U.S. Minister to Mexico during the War Between The States</b>


(1794-1865) Studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1817, and practiced in Lebanon, Ohio. Served as a member of the Ohio State House, 1822-23, 1829; U.S. Congressman, 1831-40; Governor of Ohio, 1840-42; U.S. Senator, 1845-50; appointed Secretary of the Treasury, by President Millard Fillmore, serving 1850-53; U.S. Congressman, 1850-61; appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as Minister to Mexico, serving 1861-64.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/4 x 1, in ink, Thos. Corwin.

Anti-Horse Thief Association Constitutio $45.00

 

Voices of the Civil War, Chickamauga $15.00

 

Autograph, John P. Gaines $35.00

 

Autograph, Thomas Corwin $25.00




<b>Fought in the War of 1812 as a lieutenant in the 13th Kentucky Infantry


United States Congressman and Senator from Kentucky


Member of the Kentucky State House of Representatives during the Civil War</b>


Born in Goochland County, Va., he graduated from Transylvania College, in Lexington, Ky., in 1811, studied law, was admitted to the bar, and practiced in Glasgow, Ky. He fought in the War of 1812 as a lieutenant in the 13th Regiment Kentucky Infantry. Served as a member of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1816-19, and 1825-26. He was Judge of the Kentucky Court of Appeals, from 1828-35. Served as a U.S. Congressman, 1835-43. Was Chairman of the Committee on the District of Columbia. Served as a Presidential elector on the Whig ticket in 1844. He returned to the Kentucky State House serving as a representative in 1846, also holding the position of Speaker of the House. He was a U.S. Senator from 1847-53. Once again he returned to Kentucky where he served as a member of their State House of Representatives during the Civil War years of 1861-62-63. Afterwards he returned to his law practice while also engaging himself in agricultural endeavors. He died near Bowling Green, Ky., on August 23, 1876, and is interred in Fairview Cemetery, in Bowling Green.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 6 1/2 x 2 1/4, in ink, J.R. Underwood, Bowling Green, Ky.  


5 x 7 3/4, imprint


Headquarters Department of the Gulf

New Orleans, Sept. 10, 1862


General Orders No. 68


From and after this date, all applications for discharged soldiers, or furloughs for soldiers or officers, or resignations of officers, will be forwarded to the Medical Director, Dr. Chas. McCormick.


By command of

MAJOR-GENERAL BUTLER


R.S. DAVIS, Capt. And A.A.A.G.


Scarce Department of the Gulf imprint. Excellent.  <b>Stores, New Orleans</b>


7 3/4 x 9 3/4, in ink, signed by Captain Andrew Jackson McCoy.


Office Chief C.S.

New Orleans, Jany. 27, 1864


Captain Jacob Mahler,

A.Q.M.


The barque Hazeltine failed to deliver and should be charged of her Commissary Stores as follows:


36 lbs. soap 8 1/4 [$]2.97

5 [lbs] candles 23 1/2 [$] 1.18

$4.15


Very resply.,

Your obt. Servt.

A.J. McCoy

Capt & C.S.


Very fine.


Andrew Jackson McCoy, who signed this document, was a resident of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, when he enlisted on June 3, 1861, as a 1st lieutenant, and was commissioned into the Field and Staff of the 4th Wisconsin Cavalry. He was discharged for promotion on May 20, 1863, and commissioned captain, U.S. Vols. Commissary Dept. He was promoted to the ranks of brevet major, lieutenant colonel and colonel, on March 13, 1865. He was mustered out of the service on August 3, 1865.


Jacob Mahler, the recipient of this letter, enlisted on July 21, 1862, as a captain, and was commissioned assistant quartermaster, in the U.S. Vols. Q.M. Dept. He was mustered out of service on June 29, 1865.



 Measuring just over 15 inches in length, these slender black iron tongs should not be confused with later copies but are original and of the period.  We have left them just as they came to us after decades of storage offering a pleasing natural age patina and a bit of carbon <I>crust</I> on the jaws from period use.  Frequently referred to as <I>pipe tongs</I> this early utility was indeed popular among period smokers and are a favorite of modern day tobacciana collectors.  A more appropriate term though may be <I>ember tongs</I> as the tool was in fact used in retrieving a hot ember from the hearth not only to light ones pipe but to light a candle, lamp or for any use requiring additional fire. A nice companion item on the hearth in the kitchen or on the smoking table.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

Autograph, Joseph R. Underwood $25.00

 

1862 Special Orders From General Butler, $15.00

 

1864 Letter From the Office of the Chief $25.00

 

18th / mid 19th Century hand forged PIPE T $85.00

An outstanding piece of Americana, this original <B>Boston Theater</B> broadside measures an easily displayable 21 ¾ X 8 inches wide and remains solid and in pleasing condition with no rips tears or stains and only some chipping at the edges.  This wonderful old entertainment broadside announces the <B>GLORIOUS ANNIVERSARY OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE - JULY 4TH 1850 </B> celebrated with the appearance of the famed <B> RAVEL FAMILY</B>of gymnasts, tight rope performers, skaters, ballet dancers and pantomimists.   First appearing in the U. S. in 1832, theater critics and even rival theater managers held the Ravels as unsurpassed variety performers.  Renowned the world over Boston quickly became one of their most successful venues. In 1850 the Ravel Family brought a troop of in excess of forty performers appearing at both the Boston Theater on Federal Street and the Boston Anthenaeum.   An outstanding piece of Americana!  Our illustrations will do best to describe this nice old Civil War period oil tin except to advise that it stands 8 inches high and retains an unusual brass caped, slip on spout to aid in fueling smaller lighting utensils.  All original, period and remaining in pleasing condition, this piece of 19th century tinsmith work will display well.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


C.D.S., New Orleans, La., Feb. 21, 1863. The large black stamped "3" at the center indicates that 3 cents postage was due on the mailing of this envelope. Docketed at left edge, "Soldier's Letter, A.J. Willets, Surgeon, 176th Regt. N.Y. Vol." Addressed to, "George Leacole, care of Thaddeus Davids & Co., 127 William St., New York." Edge wear. Fine war date cover sent by a New York surgeon from New Orleans, Louisiana.


WBTS Trivia: The 176th New York Infantry Volunteers were known as the "Ironsides" regiment.


The regiment left the state under command of Colonel Charles C. Nott on Jan. 11, 1863, and embarked on transports for New Orleans, La.  On its arrival it was stationed in the defenses of New Orleans for several weeks and was attached to General Christopher C. Augur's division of the 19th corps, when that corps was organized.


It formed part of the garrison of New Orleans during the siege of Port Hudson, La., and took an active part in repelling the advance of the enemy under General Richard Taylor. During June, 1863, detachments of the regiment participated in the skirmishes at Pattersonville, La., Fourche Crossing, Thibodeaux, Fort Buchanan, Bayou Boeuff and Brashier City, La.


In the action at La Fourche Crossing, the regiment was commanded by Major Morgan and behaved most gallantly, in the actions at Fort Buchanan, on the Atchafalaya, and at Brashear City, the regiment met with serious disaster, over 400 men being captured. This 

disaster was not due to lack of bravery on the part of the men.


There was no one in command, but the men fought with all the bravery that could be expected. The loss of the regiment in the above actions amounted to 464 killed, wounded and captured or missing. In the spring of 1864, they were attached to the 3rd brigade, General Cuvier Grover's division, 19th army corps, it took part in General N.P. Banks Red River campaign, being engaged at Mansura and Simsport.


In July it returned to Virginia with the first two divisions of the 19th corps and took an active part in General Philip H. Sheridan's brilliant campaign in the Shenandoah Valley against General Jubal A. Early, including the battles of Berryville, the Opequan, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar 

Creek, Va.


Its loss at the Opequan was 47 killed, wounded and missing, and at Cedar Creek, 53. In the assault on Fisher's Hill it captured 4 guns from the enemy. It remained in the valley until January, 1865, when it was ordered to Savannah, Ga., with General Grover's 

division.


In March it was ordered with the division, now commanded by General Henry  W. Birge, to North Carolina, where it was temporarily attached to the 10th corps and took part in the final campaign of the Carolinas, ending with the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston at Bennett's House, N.C.


Soon after this it returned to Georgia and was finally mustered out of the U.S. service at Savannah, Ga., on April 27, 1866.  The regiment lost during service 2 officers and 31 men killed and mortally wounded; 4 officers and 177 men died of wounds and other causes of whom 1 officer and 17 men died in the hands of the enemy.


Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2  


<b>Civil War Congressman and Senator from Illinois</b>


(1811-75) Born near Lexington, Ky., he attended Centre College at Danville, Ky., and Transylvania University, at Lexington, Ky., taught school, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1831 and practiced in Shelbyville, Illinois. He served as a member of the Illinois State House of Representatives, 1836-38, and 1844-46, and was speaker in 1844. Was a member of the Illinois State Senate, 1838-42. Was a presidential elector on the Democratic ticket in 1844. He fought in the Mexican War as a captain and was promoted to the rank of major. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1847-56, and 1861-63. Was the Chairman of the Committee on Territories. Served as U.S. Senator, 1863-65.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 6 x 1 1/2, in ink, W.A. Richardson, Rushville, Ill. Cut slightly close at the top. Bold autograph.

July 4th 1850 - BOSTON THEATER BROADSIDE $195.00

 

Civil War era LAMP OIL TIN

 

War Date N. Y. Surgeon's Envelope Sent Fr $15.00

 

Autograph, William A. Richardson $20.00




Used, 3 1/2 x 5 1/2 postcard, with illustration of monument with Confederate soldier holding musket. Confederate Lot, Lexington, Ky. C.D.S., Lexington, Ky., Feb. 8, 1909, with 1 cent Ben Franklin postage stamp. Light age toning and wear.   


Unused, 3 1/2 x 5 1/2, postcard, with beautiful full color embossed illustration. Female figure in robes with laurel wreath and a bronze tablet with striking bust view of President Abraham Lincoln and his birth and death years, 1809-1865. Floral display in the foreground. Minor edge and corner wear. Overall light wear. Very fine. International Art Publ. Co., New York-Berlin. Divided back era card from the "Golden Age of Postcards." Circa 1907-1915.  <b>and Medical Departments</b>


5 x 8, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, May 14, 1861


General Orders

No. 20


I..There will be added to the General Staff of the Army, four Quartermasters and eight Assistant Quartermasters, to be promoted and selected according to existing Laws and Regulations.


II..There will be added to the Medical Department of the Army, ten Surgeons and twenty Assistant Surgeons.


The Surgeons will be promoted according to existing Laws and Regulations from the Senior Assistant Surgeons, and the Assistant Surgeons will be appointed from civil life after having passed the usual examination by a Board from the Medical Department of the Army.


Due public notice of the appointment and time and place of meeting of the Board will be given.


By Order:


L. THOMAS

Adjutant General


Official:

Assistant Adjutant General


A couple of light stains and a vertical fold. Very early war Federal Army orders signed in print by Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas. 


 


Used, 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 postcard, with full color embossed vignette of a banner with spread winged eagle, crossed cannons artillery insignia, American flag, and the slogan, In Loving Memory. Copyright 1909, L.R. Conwell, N.Y. No postage stamp. C.D.S., Poughkepsie, N.Y., May 30, 1913.

Confederate Monument, Lexington, Kentuck $5.00

 

President Abraham Lincoln Memorial Postc

 

1861 Orders Regarding Adding Officers to $10.00

 

G. A. R. Postcard, In Loving Memory $5.00




Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published in the February 21, 1863 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: The Effects of the Proclamation; Freed Negroes Coming Into Our Lines at Newbern, North Carolina. 15 1/2 x 10 3/4. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin. Historical 1863 illustration. 


WBTS Trivia: The Proclamation referred to in the caption is President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation which was issued on January 1, 1863.  <b>Are Confined


Original 1860 Harper's woodcut engravings of slaves</b>


Authentic, original woodcut engravings that were published in the June 2, 1860 issue of Harper's Weekly. Captions: #1- The Princess Madia-[From A Daguerreotype]. #2- The Only Baby Among The Africans-[From A Daguerreotype]. #3- An African-[From A Daguerreotype]. #4- The Barracoon At Key West Where The Africans Are Confined-[From A Daguerreotype]. Includes some printed text regarding these illustrations. 10 1/2 x 16. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin. Rare.   Harkening back to the days when folks gathered together in darkened country halls and city theaters to marvel at beautifully hand colored views offered by the turn of the century traveling <I>Magic Lantern</I> projectionist, this nicely slide show travel case offers its original content of 28 <B>McAllister Magic Lantern Slides</B>.  Each hand colored glass slide remains in excellent condition with no chips, cracks or condition issues.  As most of these patriotic sets have been broken up with individual views offered separately, <I>show</I> sets of the most popular and now most collectable Historic Americana and Patriotic War views are seldom found.  Included in this set are illustrative historical views from Columbus, the landing of the Pilgrims, Revolutionary War views to include Washington at Valley Forge, battle views and the Surrender Of Cornwallis.  Included are Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans then Civil War views to include Confederate artillerists active in the  Bombardment of Fort Sumter, Lincoln rallying the troops the Battle of Gettysburg and finally peace as illustrated by a pair of Union and Confederate veterans shaking hands before the American flag. 

With a sprinkling of attractive  Lady Liberty and Stars and Stripes views the collection is concluded by Spanish American War views.  Explosion of the Battleship Maine in Havana Harbor then views of land and sea battle round out the grouping with views current to the time in which the show would have been presented. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 

 


<b>1863 Philadelphia imprint</b>


(1826-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846 and fought in the Mexican War. Hailed at the beginning of the Civil War as the "Young Napoleon," he proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but an officer totally lacking in the essential qualities of successful command of large forces in battle. He saw action at Rich Mountain, W.V., in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and at the battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day in American history. He was defeated for the presidency in 1864 by Abraham Lincoln.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of major general. 1863 imprint on the front mount, F. Gutekunst, 704 & 706 Arch St., Philadelphia. Backmark: F. Gutekunst, Philadelphia, with 2 cents blue George Washington U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp. Very fine, sharp quality image.

Freed Negroes Coming Into Union Lines at $35.00

 

Slaves & The Barracoon at Key West, Flor $100.00

 

MAGIC LANTERN SLIDE SHOW– Pilgrims – Re $275.00

 

CDV General George B. McClellan $125.00




<b>Birds-eye View of the Vessels Composing The Burnside Expedition</b>


Authentic, original woodcut engravings that were published in the January 25, 1862 issue of Harper's Weekly. Captions: #1- Map Showing Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds and The Approaches to Norfolk From the South. #2- Birds-eye View of the Vessels Composing the Burnside Expedition at Fortress Monroe and Showing Norfolk and Its Approaches. 15 1/2 x 11. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a tree with numerous American flags in its branches with the names of the states of the U.S. on them. "Union" is in large red, white and blue stars and stripes letters to the right, and a verse below the tree reads, "Traitor! spare that Tree, Cleave not a single bough, In youth it sheltered me, and I'll protect it now." Published by Mumford & Co., Cincinnati. 5 1/2 x 3 1/4. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


<b>Original 1859 woodcut engravings of slaves!</b>


Authentic, original woodcut engravings that were published on the front page of the November 19, 1859 issue of Harper's Weekly. EFFECT OF JOHN BROWN'S INVASION AT THE SOUTH! #1: "Much Obliged To Dar Ar Possum Wattomie For Dese Pikes He Gin Us- Dey's Turrible Handy To Dig Tatters Wid." #2: "What's Dem Fool Niggers Fraid On? I'd Like Ter See One O' Dem Folks Ondertake To Carry Me Off, I Would!" #3: A Southern Planter Arming His Slaves To Resist Invasion. 11 x 15 3/4. Harper's Weekly, date and their ornate illustrated mast head at the top. Historic and extremely desirable 1859 dated John Brown Invasion related illustrations on the entire front page of Harper's Weekly. Suitable for framing or display. RARE!  


Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1997. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 168 pages, illustrated, index. Brand new condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who experienced the struggle for Vicksburg. Through their words and images you can relieve the intense emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the humor- of this protracted, bloody campaign. You hold in your hands an album of personal recollections, embellished with drawings, maps, photographs of artifacts, and especially, images of the people.


To compile this special volume, we combed hundreds of sources, both published and unpublished.  We had invaluable help from a network of consultants. Using our own diverse resources and historical materials in libraries and archives around the United States, we were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives: manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories and privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of these soldiers and townsfolk to accompany their personal accounts.


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail systems set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. Lieutenant Samuel H.M. Byers of the 5th Iowa Infantry, on the fierce fighting of Champion's Hill, said: "Pretty soon a musket ball struck me fair in the breast. I am dead, now, I said, almost aloud. It felt as if someone had struck me with a club. I stepped back a few paces and sat down on a log to finish up with the world...My emotions I have almost forgotten. I remember only that something said to me, It is honorable to die so. I had not a thought of friends, or of home, or of religion. The stupendous things going on around me filled my mind." 


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the army to depict events for readers. These correspondents drew virtually everything of possible interest: battles, lounging soldiers, the odd piece of equipment. Sketches dashed off in a few minutes during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication, where they were transformed into woodblock engravings suitable for printing. 


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the fledgling craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and equipment and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are well chronicled, thanks to the efforts of men who endured great hardship. Photographers like Mathew Brady and his assistants spent months following the army, etching with light the brave faces of the soldiers, as well as the bodies stiffened on the field. 


So here you find living testimony of the grim, drawn-out struggle for the geographic linchpin of the Confederacy. As you look into the eyes and read the words of the soldiers who fought over Vicksburg, and the townsfolk who endured in the midst of the strife, perhaps it will be possible to understand the extremes of emotion to which combatants and civilians alike were pushed.  


Cover Photograph: Union bombproofs and dugouts riddling the once beautiful grounds and bountiful gardens of Wexford Lodge on the outskirts of Vicksburg typify the underground shelters resorted to by people on both sides during the 47 day siege of that key Mississippi city. 


Cover quotation: "War, terrible war, had come to our very hearthstone." Alice Shirley.

Map of Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds $10.00

 

The Union Tree $5.00

 

Effect of John Brown's Invasion of the S $125.00

 

Voices of the Civil War, Vicksburg $20.00




Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1996. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 168 pages, illustrated, index. The dust jacket shows very light edge wear. A tear in the spine area of the dust jacket has been repaired on the inside with archival tape. The book is in brand new condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who experienced the Chancellorsville campaign. Through their words and images you can relieve the emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the human comedy- of one of the Civil War's major campaigns. Thus you hold in your hands an album of personal recollections, from letters, diaries, photographs, sketches, and artifacts.


To compile this special volume, we combed hundreds of sources, both published and unpublished.  We had invaluable help from a network of consultants. Using our own diverse resources and historical materials in libraries and archives around the United States, we were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives: manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories and privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of these soldiers and townsfolk to accompany their personal accounts.


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail systems set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. Mail packets were even exchanged across enemy lines. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. Corporal Nicholas Weeks of the 3d Alabama described the fray at Chancellorsville: "What a din. What a variety of hideous noises. The ping of the Minnie ball, the splutter of canister, the whistling of grape, the where are you, where are you of screaming shells and the cannon's roar from a hundred mouths went to make up the music for the great opera of death."  


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the army to depict events for readers. These correspondents, or specials, drew virtually everything of possible interest: pitched battles, lounging soldiers, the odd piece of military equipment. Sketches dashed off in a few minutes during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication, where they were transformed into woodblock engravings suitable for printing. 


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the fledgling craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and equipment and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are well chronicled, thanks to the efforts of men who endured great hardship. Travel was tedious with cumbersome equipment and portable darkrooms mounted on wagon beds. But photographers like Captain Andrew J. Russell, who captured images of the Chancellorsville campaign, spent months following the army, etching with light the brave faces of the soldiers, as well as the bodies stiffened on the field. When Mathew Brady's stark photographs of the dead were first exhibited in New York City in 1862, the public thought, albeit briefly, that such horrific images could actually bring the war to an end.  


So here you find living testimony from the fighting fields of Chancellorsville. As you look into the eyes of these husbands and wives, sons and daughters, as you read the words of soldiers and civilians dazed by the violence or by the grief that follows the fighting, perhaps it will be possible to perceive more clearly the shattering experience that was the Chancellorsville campaign.  


Cover Photograph: In a photograph by Andrew J. Russell taken on May 1 or 2, 1863, two Union officers standing just beyond enemy musket range survey Rebel positions southwest of Fredericksburg while their infantrymen take cover in captured rifle pits. On May 3 these troops of William T.H. Brooks' division would advance toward Chancellorsville and suffer a bloody repulse at nearby Salem Church.


Cover quotation: "Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees." Lieutenant General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson.  Published by William H. Hortsmann and Sons, Philadelphia, this 1851 folio (11 ¾ X 14 7/8 x ½ inch thick) 1st edition of 1851 is Illustrated from the <I>Original Text and Drawings in the War Department. </I> Drawn by G. C. Humpries.  Nine pages of text outline and describe the new (1851) uniform and dress code for artillery, infantry, riflemen, insignia, swords, and dragoons; officers and enlisted.  Detailed illustrations cover all manner of dress to include buttons, swords and sashes as well as horse furniture for <I>General Officers</I> and the <I>Cavalry Corps</I>.  This highly collectable volume offers seven finely colored plates from chromolithograph printing and four additional original hand colored plates. Thirteen additional lithographic line drawing plates show uniform details.  The volume is rebound with new boards and black <I>library</I> covering, new brown end papers and retaining its original gold embossed <I><B>UNIFORM AND DRESS OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY</I></B> on the front board.  All else original and as published with good evidence of age, originality and moderate period use but no tears, repairs or objectionable condition issues.  An outstanding item for the <I>deep dish</I> Civil War enthusiast this piece has been in our own library for over thirty years.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 


Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1997. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 168 pages, illustrated, index. New condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who experienced the battle of Fredericksburg. Through their words and images you can relieve the emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the human comedy- of this pageant of unimaginable courage and bloodshed. You hold in your hands an album of personal recollections, embellished with drawings, maps, photographs of artifacts, and, especially, images of people.


To compile this special volume, we combed hundreds of sources, both published and unpublished.  We had invaluable help from a network of consultants. Using our own diverse resources and historical materials in libraries and archives around the United States, we were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives: manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories and privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of these soldiers and townsfolk to accompany their personal accounts.


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail systems set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. Mail packets were even exchanged across enemy lines. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. Private Alexander Hunter of the 17th Virginia Infantry, on the hopeless Federal assault against Marye's Heights, said, "From the hill back of the heights the division of Pickett watched the advance, filled with wonder and a pitying admiration for men who could rush with such unflinching valor, such mad recklessness into the jaws of destruction...Across the plain, with no martial music to thrill them, only a stillness that would strike terror into spirits less gallant- across the plain still onward sweeps the dauntless brigade with serried lines and gleaming steel. It was superb!" 


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the Union armies to depict events for readers. Present at Fredericksburg were not only the best Northern artists but an Englishman working for the Illustrated London News who sketched some rare views behind Confederate lines. Such sketches, dashed off in a few moments during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication, where they were transformed into woodblock engravings suitable for printing. 


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the fledgling craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and equipment and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are well chronicled, thanks to the efforts of men who endured great hardship. Photographers like Mathew Brady and his assistants spent months following the army, capturing powerful images of battlefields already transformed into hallowed ground.  


So here you find living testimony of the sanguinary clash of titanic forces at the quiet town of Fredericksburg, Virginia. As you look into the eyes and read the words of the soldiers who fought there and the townsfolk caught between the two armies, perhaps it will be possible to understand the extremes of tenacity, heroism, and folly on display during these fateful days.


Cover Photograph: Colonel Robert Nugent, commanding the 69th New York Infantry, fell seriously wounded in the celebrated attack of the Irish Brigade at Fredericksburg. His men, although repulsed, were among the fallen who came closest to the Rebel held stonewall on Marye's Heights.  


8 pages. IMPORTANT FROM CHARLESTON. Arrival of the Mary Sanford with News to Saturday. Rebel Reports to Tuesday. Our Forces Expecting Batteries on the Upper End of Morris Island. Forts Moultrie and Johnson Firing on the Working Parties. Explosion of a Rebel Magazine, The Military and Naval Situation in Charleston Harbor. The Failure of the Gallant Attack on Fort Sumter. Alleged Barbarity of Beauregard. Details of Operations. The Storming of Fort Sumter. How the Enterprise Was Planned and Why it Failed. Gallantry of Our Naval Forces. Inhuman Threats From Beauregard. Torpedoes at Fort Wagner. How the Negroes Fight. B.C. Tilghman of the Third U.S.C.I. Writes from Morris Island. THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC. The Position on the Rapidan Unchanged. One Hundred and Fifty Prisoners Taken by Gen. Pleasanton. A Military Suggestion as to Lee's Movements. Perils of General Burnside's Army. Our Cavalry Operations. Gen. Pleasanton's Advance. Gen. Rosecrans' Army. Rebel Reports of the Situation. Skirmishing Near Dalton and Lafayette. A General Engagement Expected. Reported Junction With Burnside. A Voice From North Carolina. An Eloquent Plea for Peace and Reconstruction. A Declaration that it will be Better to Live with than Under the Northern People. The Subjugation of Mississippi and Louisiana Acknowledged. General Lee Stumping the North. The Rebel Military Movement. Parrott Guns Modern Artillery. Gen. Dix and Gov. Seymour. Employment of Slaves in the Army, and more war news. Some edge chipping at extreme left border which does not affect any of the content. Very fine 1863 issue.

Voices of the Civil War, Chancellorsvill $20.00

 

Rarely seen! Horstman & Sons 1851 - U $2350.00

 

Voices of the Civil War, Fredericksburg $20.00

 

The New York Times, September 17, 1863 $45.00

Our photos will likely do best in describing this exceptionally nice Victorian era microscope.  Unmarked as to maker, the microscope remains in fine, as new condition.  Its original 8 x 3 7/8 x 3 hinged case remains in solid condition and is pleasing to the eye while it does offer evidence of age and period use.  A nice item for the optical enthusiast, this old Victorian microscope will set in well with period scientific or medical collectables.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  All in nice original condition save two or three small fraying spots to the braided cord as evidence of period use and originality. (see photos)  Complete and eye appealing, retaining its original soft infantry blue without the usual fading to blue / gray as is so common with these infantry cords, this turn of the century U. S. Army issue aiguillette will make a nice companion piece with a period infantry spike helmet without spending a lot of money.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of General George B. McClellan. Light age toning. Fine illustration of "Little Mac" one of the commanders-in-chief of the Union Army during the Civil War.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


<b>Served in the 148th Pennsylvania Infantry


Wounded twice during the Civil War and had his hand amputated!


Pennsylvania State Congressman


Autograph Letter Signed with cover</b>


Meyer was a 21 year old resident of Rebersburg, Pa., when he enlisted on August 25, 1862, as a private, and was mustered into Co. A, 148th Pennsylvania Infantry. He was wounded in action on May 3, 1863, at the battle of Chancellorsville, Va. He was promoted to corporal on November 16, 1863. He was wounded a second time this coming on May 10, 1864, at the battle of Po River, Va., which resulted in the amputation of his left hand. He was discharged for wounds on September 10, 1864, at Campbell Hospital, Washington, D.C. After the war he served as a Pennsylvania State Congressman. 


<u>Autographed Letter Signed</u>: 5 1/2 x 9, in ink, on imprinted Pennsylvania House of Representatives letter sheet with State seal and his name and district printed at the top. Comes with the original imprinted cover with House of Representatives, State of Pennsylvania, Henry Meyer, Centre County, and State seal, C.D.S., Harrisburg, Pa., Feb. 12, with 3 cents green George Washington postage stamp. Addressed in the hand of Henry Meyer, to his wife, Mrs. Mattie J. Meyer, Rebersburg, Centre County, Pa.


Harrisburg, Pa. 

Feb. 10, 1883


Dear Mattie,


We had a Saturday's session today, but about seventy five members were absent, nearly all have gone home now. It is snowing fast tonight and no doubt till tomorrow there will be a deep snow. Brechbil and I had bad luck on Monday, his horse fell and broke a shaft of the sleigh. I suppose I will get to Coburn next Saturday till noon- or till 10 o'clock A.M. If our horse will be fit to drive then. Suppose you ask Woodling about it, and if Birds' eyes are not bad, perhaps he could send some one for me. There is nothing new. Please drop a note.


Yours &c,


H. Meyer


Very fine letter and cover with nice Pennsylvania House of Representatives imprints.

cased Victorian MICROSCOPE $125.00

 

Indian Wars / Spanish American War - U. $85.00

 

General George B. McClellan $5.00

 

Autograph, Henry Meyer $35.00




8 pages. THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC. Continued Advance of the Cavalry. Fighting at the Rapidan. Our Passage at Raccoon Ford Disputed. The Main Body of the Rebels Reported at Richmond. The Cars Running to Culpepper. THE SIEGE OF CHARLESTON. Important Reports. Half of James Island Said to be in Our Possession. A White Flag Flying Over Fort Moultrie. Two Monitors Lying Between Sumter and Moultrie. PRESIDENT'S PROCLAMATION. The Habeas Corpus Suspended Throughout the United States in Certain Specified Cases By the President of the United States. [Signed in print by Abraham Lincoln].  The Rebel Rams and Pirates. The Rebel Pirates. Ironclads in the Mersey. The Privateer Florida. Interesting News From Memphis. Another Pirate Afloat. A Bark rigged Cruiser in the South Pacific. Her Attempt to Capture the Clipper Ship Snow Squall. Interesting Narrative of Captain Dillingham. The War in Arkansas. Gen. Blunt's Brilliant Successes. Progress of General Steele's Expedition. One Hundred Thousand Square Miles Reclaimed From Rebel Rule. News From the Department of the Gulf and The Kansas Border. Much more war news. Some edge chipping which does not affect any of the content. Very nice bright and clean 1863 issue with important Lincoln Proclamation on the front page.  


<b>War Date Orders Signed regarding the discharge of firearms!</b>


(1836-67) Born in Washington, D.C., he was the son of Colonel John J. Abert, Chief of the Army Topographical Engineers. Commissioned 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Light Artillery, on June 18, 1855, and promoted to 1st lieutenant, on March 31, 1857. On May 14, 1861, he was commissioned captain of the 3rd U.S. Cavalry, and he was transferred to the 6th U.S. Cavalry, on August 3, 1861. He served for a time as Aide-de-Camp to General George B. McClellan, and as Inspector General on the staff of General Nathaniel P. Banks. He was promoted to brevet major, on May 27, 1862, for gallantry in the battle of Hanover Court House, Va., and brevet lieutenant colonel, on September 17, 1862, for gallantry in the battle of Antietam, Md. On November 17, 1862, he was appointed assistant inspector general. He was commissioned colonel of the 3rd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, on November 16, 1864. He was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on March 13, 1865, for his gallant and meritorious Civil War service. Mustered out of the volunteer service on September 18, 1865. After the war, Abert served in the Regular U.S. Army, dying on active duty, on August 25, 1867, at Galveston, Texas.


<u>War Date Document Signed</u>: 7 3/4 x 10, in ink.


Head Quarters Rockville  Expedition,

Rockville, [Md.], June 12th, 1861


General Orders

No. 3


The discharge of firearms in camp or on the march except by order or by a sentinel on post in the discharge of his duty is strictly prohibited and orders for firing will be given only as against the enemy and for the purpose of cleaning arms in case of necessity.  In the latter case the order of the commanding officer of the regiment or corps will be required and that will be given only between the hours of 10 to 12 A.M.


The discharge of firearms will be considered an evidence of the presence or approach of the enemy and all guards within hearing will be immediately formed and measures taken by them to ascertain the cause of the alarm.


This order and the 49th Article of War will be read at the head of each Company of the expedition and commanders of regiments and Corps will enforce the strictest observance of both in their respective commands.


By order of Colonel Stone

Wm. S. Abert

1st Lieut., 4th Arty.

A.A. Adjt. Gen.      


Light age toning. Excellent content.  


Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1995. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 168 pages, illustrated, index. New condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who personally experienced the Second Manassas campaign. Through their words and images you can relieve the emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the human comedy- of one of the Civil War's major engagements. Thus, you hold in your hands an album of personal recollections from letters, diaries, photographs, sketches, and artifacts. 


To compile this special volume, we combed hundreds of sources, both published and unpublished.  We had invaluable help from an extensive network of consultants. Using our own diverse resources and historical materials in libraries and archives around the United States, we were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives: manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories and privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of these writers to accompany their personal accounts.


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail systems set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. Mail packets were even exchanged across enemy lines. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. Andrew Coats of the 5th New York Infantry recorded, "War has been designated as Hell, and I can assure you that where the Regiment stood that day was the very vortex of Hell. Not only were men wounded, or killed, but they were riddled." 


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the Union armies to depict events for readers. These correspondents, or "specials" drew virtually everything of possible interest: pitched battles, lounging soldiers, the odd piece of military equipment. Sketches dashed off in a few moments during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication, where they were transformed into woodblock engravings suitable for printing. 


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the fledgling craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and equipment and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are well chronicled, thanks to the efforts of men, who endured great hardship. Travel was tedious, with cumbersome equipment and portable darkrooms mounted on wagon beds. But photographers like Mathew Brady and his assistants spent months following the army, etching with light the brave faces of the soldiers, as well as the bodies stiffened on the field. When Brady's stark photographs of the dead were first exhibited in New York City in 1862, the public thought, albeit briefly, that such horrific images could actually bring the war to an end. 


So you hold in your hands living testimony from the battlefield at Manassas. As you look into the eyes of these soldiers and civilians dazed by the violence around them or the grief that follows the fighting, perhaps it will be possible to perceive more clearly the experience that was the shattering experience that was Second Manassas.


Cover Photograph: A Federal train lies burned to the wheels by Confederate forces near Manassas Junction.  Some years ago we acquired a small number of earlier 1800s through Civil War era <B>straight shank</B> (eyeless) fish hooks with original <B>hand tied cotton cord leader</B> and are offering them here <U>individually</U> priced for the antique fishing gear enthusiast or Civil War collector who would enjoy having an example.   Remaining in original to the period, unused condition after decades of storage, this example of a once so common piece of basic fishing equipment will lay well in any period fishing grouping.  A handy item in the haversack or <I>ditty</I>bag of any well prepared Civil War troop.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

The New York Times, September 16, 1863 $45.00

 

Autograph, General William S. Abert $95.00

 

Voices of the Civil War, Second Manassas $20.00

 

Original Civil War era FISH HOOK with ha $30.00

Not a big deal but a nice honest utility to display with Civil War vintage personal items without spending a lot of money.  A <I>must have</I> in the days before plastic bags and cellophane wrapped snacks, the days when a hand full of black walnuts or pecans served as a welcome treat, a <I>nut pick</I> (also a handy tool to loosen a knot) was a common utility carried in pocket or haversack. This antique bone mounted iron pick remains in pleasing condition with a telltale age <I>shrinkage</I> crack in the bone as good evidence of age and originality.  Solid and ready for use!   please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  Measuring 24 1/8 x30 ¾ inches on its original stretcher, this oil on canvas beardless Lincoln portrait is signed (<I>A. Aloisi</I>) and offers good evidence of age and originality while remaining in pleasing condition save an easily restorable  small tear just above the ear and some natural age thin spots that are likewise easily restorable. (All easily seen in our illustrations, we have chosen to leave the painting as found to preserve originality.) The painting is taken from a photograph by Alexander Heslet during a June 3,1860 sitting while Lincoln was campaigning for the presidency.  A popular image of the <I>Rail Splitter</I> in the early campaign, Heslet’s Lincoln and images taken from his work, became well known in the period and are especially sought by todays collectors.  Lincoln’s law partner, William Herndon, commented that the image was <I> so essentially Lincolnian; no other artist has ever caught it.</I>  Nicely done yet offering a crudeness not seen in the work of a trained artist, the special charm of this old piece will place it in the <I>folk art</I> category to most.  An exceptional piece of Americana, this early presidential campaign rendering from the Springfield, Illinois photographer’s  a beardless Abraham Lincoln photograph will show off well.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  This set of 11 antique  vegetable ivory buttons will be distinctive to the vintage clothing enthusiast as they were fashioned in the classic 18th early 19th century design with <U>two holes on the back and a single hole on the front.</U>  All are matching and remain in excellent condition and are of a nice size comparable to those used with the period frock or coat.  This set will make an attractive addition to any period garment restoration project or simply to display with period sewing or personal things.  We have acquired a limited few sets of antique buttons of <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and have scattered them through the site. (Enter <B>buttons</B> in our search to see all.) Ideal for restoration of vintage clothing of all design, these buttons will go especially well on southern made garments.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 This set of 7 earlier to mid 1800s shirt or blouse buttons (illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison) were fashioned from natural <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and will make an attractive addition to any period garment restoration project or simply to display with period sewing or personal things.  They will go especially well with Civil War period material.  We have acquired a limited few sets of antique buttons of <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and have scattered them through the site. (Enter <B>buttons</B> in our search to see all.)  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

19th century bone mounted Nut Pick $30.00

 

c. 1860 Abraham Lincoln - FOLK ART OIL P $525.00

 

1700s early 1800s VEGETABLE IVORY BUTTO $35.00

 

antique natural VEGETABLE IVORY BUTTON s $35.00

This set of 7 earlier to mid 1800s shirt or blouse buttons (illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison) were fashioned from natural <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and will make an attractive addition to any period garment restoration project or simply to display with period sewing or personal things.  They will go especially well with Civil War period material.  We have acquired a limited few sets of antique buttons of <I>butternut</I> vegetable ivory and have scattered them through the site. (Enter <B>buttons</B> in our search to see all.)  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  This set of 9 antique  burl walnut buttons will be distinctive to the vintage clothing enthusiast as they were fashioned in the classic 18th early 19th century design with <U> two holes on the back and a single hole on the front.</U>  All are matching and remain in excellent condition with the exception of one which has a period chip.  A nice size comparable to those used with the period military frock or waist coat, these buttons would go especially well on a Southern style garment.  We have acquired a limited few sets of antique buttons of <I>butternut </I>vegetable ivory and have scattered them through the site. (Enter <B>buttons</B> in our search to see all.) Ideal for restoration of vintage clothing of all design, these buttons will go especially well on southern made garments.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 We have acquired a nice lot of original antique black iron <I>roller buckles</I> and are offering them here individually priced for the collector / historian who would like an example for use or display.  Originally emanating from the clean out of 19th century harness and leather work shop where the harness maker cut the buckles from used leather and threw them into a large wood box for reuse.   From this mix we have separated a number of classic <I>roller buckles</I> and are offering them here in <U>two sizes</U> all remaining in pleasing <I>as found</I> and usable condition many even retaining remnants period black paint finish.  We have buckles sized to accept 1 3/8 and 1 ¼ inch wide straps so <U>be sure and note the size you need</U> when ordering.  Wider waist belts were frequently cut down on the leading end to accept the standard 1 3/8 inch buckle.  (<I>see illustration</I>)   A classic design of the Civil War era we have seen these heavy black-iron roller buckles in use back to the Mexican War vintage <I>Grimsley</> U. S. Dragoon saddles.   Wide Civil War military use on all manner of leather accoutrements, horse equipment, waist belts and more has been well documented. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  Lots of folks may file this offering under <I>who cares</I> but for the serious mess gear collectors offering will be meaningful.  A nice all original and period example of F. Grosgean’s <B>Patent January 28, 1862</B> two piece mess spoon.  Fashioned from light, tinned sheet iron, die struck with overlapping sections of the handle and bowl soldered together to form the finished spoon.  Grosgean’s design claimed a stronger yet lighter eating utensil.  This rarely surviving example remains in pleasing all original condition yet with good evidence of age and period originality.  (<U> We currently have a number of collectable Civil War era mess spoon variations from an old collection.  Use <I>spoon</I> in our search box to see them all.</U>    <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

antique natural VEGETABLE IVORY BUTTON s $25.00

 

late 1700s early 1800s hand-cut BURL WA $35.00

 

Original! Antique! ROLLER BUCKLES $32.00

 

F. Grosgean’s Patent 1862 – two piece t $85.00

An unusual and desirable item for the Civil War era mess equipment and personal item enthusiast is this <B>J. Fallows Patent 1865</B> mess spoon was constructed of die-struck tined sheet iron in accordance with the direction offered by the Fallows patent (see illustration).  The spoon handle is formed from two thin iron sheets with the top sheet crimped over the lower with the two piece handle crimped and soldered to the bowl.   (Patent markings are barely discernable on the spoon handle.)  The design resulted in a stronger spoon while utilizing lighter material.  This rarely surviving example remains in excellent original condition yet with good evidence of period originality.  An especially nice personal item, this piece will lay in well with any quality Civil War grouping.   (<U> We currently have a number of collectable Civil War era mess spoon variations from an old collection.  Use <I>spoon</I> in our search box to see them all.</U>    <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 

 An unusual and desirable item for the Civil War era mess equipment and personal item enthusiast is this <B>J. Fallows Patent 1865</B> mess spoon was constructed of die-struck tined sheet iron in accordance with the direction offered by the Fallows patent (see illustration).  The spoon handle is formed from two thin iron sheets with the top sheet crimped over the lower with the two piece handle crimped and soldered to the bowl.   (Patent markings are barely discernable on the spoon handle.)  The design resulted in a stronger spoon while utilizing lighter material.  This rarely surviving example remains in excellent original condition yet with good evidence of period originality.  An especially nice personal item, this piece will lay in well with any quality Civil War grouping.     (<U> We currently have a number of collectable Civil War era mess spoon variations from an old collection.  Use <I>spoon</I> in our search box to see them all.</U>   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 

 


<b>Autograph Document Signed</b>


(1809-73) A planter and lawyer in Clarke County, Va., Underwood was a Free-Soiler in politics and was virtually driven from Virginia for his attacks on slavery during the presidential campaign of 1856. A Republican office holder during the Civil War, he became a U.S. district court judge in Virginia, in 1864. In this capacity he asserted the right of the United States to confiscate property of persons in rebellion and treated Confederate President Jefferson Davis with great harshness during and after Davis' indictment for treason in 1866. He presided over the Virginia constitutional convention which met at Richmond in December 1867.


<u>Autograph Document Signed</u>: 8 x 2 3/4, manuscript in ink. Received of Mrs. E.E. Jackson one hundred eighteen Dollars & seventy five cents it being a portion of four hundred & seventy five Dollars recently received by her from the estate of Col. George Jackson for the benefit of her children. John C. Underwood for Maria G. Underwood. 


Light age toning and wear.


E.E. Jackson and Col. George Jackson were kinfolk of Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson. This document came out of a Jackson family collection I had many years ago. 


Comes with an original newspaper clipping titled, "The Funeral of Judge Underwood," that is dated Washington, Dec. 14, 1873.  


 


3 pages, 5 3/8 x 8 3/4, imprint.


House.....No. 8


Commonwealth of Massachusetts


Office of Pension Agent, 29 Pemberton Square

Boston, January 1, 1894


To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court assembled:


I have the honor to submit my sixth annual report for the year ending December 31, 1893.


The business of this office, since the change of administration, is much more perplexing than it has been in previous years. One reason is from the fact that many claims which had been prosecuted, claimants examined, and the testimony necessary to establish the claim under the Act of June 27, 1890, had been forwarded to the Department and placed upon the completed files ready for the certificates to be issued, the rulings of the new Commissioner, in which a different construction was placed upon the Act of June 27, 1890, made it necessary for these claimants to again furnish the testimony with some additions to comply with the new ruling of the Commissioner.


Much more content including a detailed statement of the business of the office during the year. Signed in print by J.B. PARSONS, State Pension Agent. Click on the enlargements to see the complete content of the document.


Light wear. There is a small chip out of the paper at the upper corner of the last page which does not affect any of the content. Interesting Massachusetts pension document concerning Civil War soldiers and their families.

Scarce J. FALLOWS PAT. 1865 – table spoo $65.00

 

Scarce J. FALLOWS PAT. 1865 - MESS SPOON $85.00

 

Autograph, John C. Underwood $75.00

 

Report of the State Pension Agent of Mas $10.00




<b>Governor of Rhode Island


United States Senator from Rhode Island


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1815-84) Born in Coventry, R.I., he graduated from Brown University in 1833. Was editor of the Providence Journal in 1838, and afterwards became one of its owners. Served as Governor of Rhode Island, 1849-50. Served as U.S. Senator, from 1859-84, including the President Andrew Johnson impeachment congress. He was President pro tempore of the Senate (41st to 43rd Congresses) was chairman of the Republican Conference (37th to 49th Congresses) and served on the Committee on Revolutionary Claims.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 3/8, in ink, H.B. Anthony, R.I.  


Bust of General George B. McClellan in uniform on the obverse with his name above and the year 1863 below, with Army & Navy within wreath on the reverse and crossed sabers at the bottom. Fine.  


<b>The Companion Volume to the Celebrated PBS Television Series by Ken Burns</b>


By Geoffrey C. Ward, With Ric Burns and Ken Burns. Published by Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1991. Large 9 1/2 x 11 1/4, hardcover edition with dust jacket. 425 pages, illustrated, index. New condition. If you enjoyed the monumental Ken Burns documentary, "The Civil War," you will love adding this companion book to your collection! 


With more than 500 illustrations; rare Civil War photographs, many never before published, as well as paintings, lithographs, and maps reproduced in full color.


It was the greatest war in American history. It was waged in 10,000 places- from Valverde, New Mexico, and Tullahoma, Tennessee, to St. Albans, Vermont, and Fernandina on the Florida coast. More than three million Americans fought in it and more than 600,000 men died in it. Not only the immensity of the cataclysm but the new weapons, the new standards of generalship, and the new strategies of destruction- together with the birth of photography- were to make the Civil War an event present ever since in the American consciousness. Thousands of books have been written about it. Yet there has never been a history of the Civil War quite like this one.


A wealth of documentary illustrations and a narrative alive with original and energetic scholarship combine to present both the grand sweep of events and the minutest of human details. Here are the crucial events of the war; the firing of the first shots at Fort Sumter; the battles of Shiloh, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg; the siege of Vicksburg; Sherman's dramatic march to the sea; the surrender at Appomattox. Here are superb portraits of the key figures: Abraham Lincoln, claiming for the Presidency almost autocratic power in order to preserve the Union; the austere Jefferson Davis, whose government disappeared almost before it could be formed; Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant, seasoned generals of fierce brilliance and reckless determination. Here is the America in which the war was fought: The Civil War is not simply the story of great battles and great generals, it is also an elaborate portrait of the American people- individuals and families, northerners and southerners, soldiers and civilians, slaves and slaveowners, rich and poor, urban and rural- caught up in the turbulence of the times.


An additional resonance is provided by four essays, the work of prominent Civil War historians. Don E. Fehrenbacher discusses the causes of the war; Barbara J. Fields writes about emancipation; James M. McPherson looks at the politics of the 1864 election; C. Vann Woodward speculates on how the war has affected the American identity. And Shelby Foote talks to filmmaker Ken Burns about wartime life on the battlefield and at home.


A magnificent book. In its visual power, its meticulous research, its textual brilliance, and the humanity of its narrative, The Civil War will stand among the most illuminating and memorable portrayals of the American past.


Jacket photograph: The 5th Vermont at Camp Griffin, Virginia, at the beginning of the war. Its men would see action at Yorktown, Savage's Station, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, in the Shenandoah, and at Petersburg- and 338 of them would not return when the fighting ended.   


<b>United States Congressman from Massachusetts


Governor of Massachusetts</b>


(1784-1864) Born in East Freetown, Mass., he graduated from Brown University in 1804. He studied law at Tapping Reeve's law school in Litchfield, Connecticut where he was a schoolmate of John C. Calhoun, who served as a mentor and friend for many years. He was admitted to the Norfolk County bar in 1807, and opened a practice in Taunton, Mass. Was clerk of the Massachusetts State Senate in 1811. He served as a U.S. Congressman from 1817-21. He was Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts, 1824-25; and Acting Governor of Massachusetts, 1825; Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, 1825-40; Governor of Massachusetts, 1840-41, and 1843-44. In 1845, President James K. Polk appointed Morton collector of the port of Boston, and served from 1845-49. He was a delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1853 and was a member of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives in 1858.


Antique portrait engraving with his name and state printed below his likeness, "Marcus Morton of Massachusetts." Engraved by J & H.G. Langley, New York. 4 1/8 x 7. Tipped to 6 x 9 1/4 album page with black ink border around the engraving. Circa mid 1800's.

Autograph, Henry B. Anthony

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, General $50.00

 

The Civil War; An Illustrated History $25.00

 

Marcus Morton $10.00




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