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An unusual and desirable item for the Civil War era mess equipment and personal item enthusiast is this <B>J. Fallows Patent 1865</B> mess spoon was constructed of die-struck tined sheet iron in accordance with the direction offered by the Fallows patent (see illustration).  The spoon handle is formed from two thin iron sheets with the top sheet crimped over the lower with the two piece handle crimped and soldered to the bowl.   (Patent markings are barely discernable on the spoon handle.)  The design resulted in a stronger spoon while utilizing lighter material.  This rarely surviving example remains in excellent original condition yet with good evidence of period originality.  An especially nice personal item, this piece will lay in well with any quality Civil War grouping.     (<U> We currently have a number of collectable Civil War era mess spoon variations from an old collection.  Use <I>spoon</I> in our search box to see them all.</U>   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 

 


<b>Autograph Document Signed</b>


(1809-73) A planter and lawyer in Clarke County, Va., Underwood was a Free-Soiler in politics and was virtually driven from Virginia for his attacks on slavery during the presidential campaign of 1856. A Republican office holder during the Civil War, he became a U.S. district court judge in Virginia, in 1864. In this capacity he asserted the right of the United States to confiscate property of persons in rebellion and treated Confederate President Jefferson Davis with great harshness during and after Davis' indictment for treason in 1866. He presided over the Virginia constitutional convention which met at Richmond in December 1867.


<u>Autograph Document Signed</u>: 8 x 2 3/4, manuscript in ink. Received of Mrs. E.E. Jackson one hundred eighteen Dollars & seventy five cents it being a portion of four hundred & seventy five Dollars recently received by her from the estate of Col. George Jackson for the benefit of her children. John C. Underwood for Maria G. Underwood. 


Light age toning and wear.


E.E. Jackson and Col. George Jackson were kinfolk of Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson. This document came out of a Jackson family collection I had many years ago. 


Comes with an original newspaper clipping titled, "The Funeral of Judge Underwood," that is dated Washington, Dec. 14, 1873.  


 


3 pages, 5 3/8 x 8 3/4, imprint.


House.....No. 8


Commonwealth of Massachusetts


Office of Pension Agent, 29 Pemberton Square

Boston, January 1, 1894


To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court assembled:


I have the honor to submit my sixth annual report for the year ending December 31, 1893.


The business of this office, since the change of administration, is much more perplexing than it has been in previous years. One reason is from the fact that many claims which had been prosecuted, claimants examined, and the testimony necessary to establish the claim under the Act of June 27, 1890, had been forwarded to the Department and placed upon the completed files ready for the certificates to be issued, the rulings of the new Commissioner, in which a different construction was placed upon the Act of June 27, 1890, made it necessary for these claimants to again furnish the testimony with some additions to comply with the new ruling of the Commissioner.


Much more content including a detailed statement of the business of the office during the year. Signed in print by J.B. PARSONS, State Pension Agent. Click on the enlargements to see the complete content of the document.


Light wear. There is a small chip out of the paper at the upper corner of the last page which does not affect any of the content. Interesting Massachusetts pension document concerning Civil War soldiers and their families.  


Bust of General George B. McClellan in uniform on the obverse with his name above and the year 1863 below, with Army & Navy within wreath on the reverse and crossed sabers at the bottom. Fine.

Scarce J. FALLOWS PAT. 1865 - MESS SPOON $85.00

 

Autograph, John C. Underwood $75.00

 

Report of the State Pension Agent of Mas $10.00

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, General $50.00




<b>United States Congressman from Massachusetts


Governor of Massachusetts</b>


(1784-1864) Born in East Freetown, Mass., he graduated from Brown University in 1804. He studied law at Tapping Reeve's law school in Litchfield, Connecticut where he was a schoolmate of John C. Calhoun, who served as a mentor and friend for many years. He was admitted to the Norfolk County bar in 1807, and opened a practice in Taunton, Mass. Was clerk of the Massachusetts State Senate in 1811. He served as a U.S. Congressman from 1817-21. He was Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts, 1824-25; and Acting Governor of Massachusetts, 1825; Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, 1825-40; Governor of Massachusetts, 1840-41, and 1843-44. In 1845, President James K. Polk appointed Morton collector of the port of Boston, and served from 1845-49. He was a delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1853 and was a member of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives in 1858.


Antique portrait engraving with his name and state printed below his likeness, "Marcus Morton of Massachusetts." Engraved by J & H.G. Langley, New York. 4 1/8 x 7. Tipped to 6 x 9 1/4 album page with black ink border around the engraving. Circa mid 1800's.  


<b>United States Senator & Congressman from Pennsylvania


United States Secretary of the Treasury</b>


(1761-1849) Born in Geneva, in what is now present day Switzerland, he immigrated to America in the 1780's. He was naturalized in Morgantown, Va., and ultimately settled in Pennsylvania. He served as U.S. Senator 1793-94; U.S. Congressman, 1795-1801; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1801-14; U.S. Minister to France, 1816-23; and U.S. Minister to the United Kingdom, 1826-27. Gallatin then settled in New York City, where he helped found New York University in 1831 to offer university education to the working and merchant classes as well as the wealthy. He became president of the National Bank in New York City from 1831 to 1839. His last great endeavor was founding the American Ethnological Society in 1842, and serving as its president until 1848. With his studies of the languages of Native Americans, he has been called "the father of American ethnology." At his death in 1849, Gallatin was the last surviving member of President Thomas Jefferson's Cabinet and the last surviving senator from the 18th century.


Antique, portrait engraving. Seated view of Gallatin holding his top hat and cane. Overall size is 5 7/8 x 9. Circa mid 1860's.    A classic piece of original Americana, this 1842 dated silk temperance ribbon measures approximately 6 5/8 inches long by 2 1/16 wide.  Pleasing to the eye. natural age patina and some tattering at the ends only add charm and good evidence of originality. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  


<b>Killed at Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia in 1864


U.S. Army Document Signed</b> 


(1835-64) Graduated in the West Point class of 1858. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Harker was engaged in drilling Ohio troops and became colonel of the 65th Ohio Infantry. He fought with General Don Carlos Buell's Army of the Ohio at the battle of Shiloh. By the time of the battle of Perryville he was a brigade commander and helped chase Confederate General Braxton Bragg out of Kentucky. At the battle of Murfreesboro, his conduct was so distinguished that he was promoted to brigadier general. At Chickamauga, Harker conducted the famous defense of the hill on which the Snodgrass home stood, which helped earn the nickname of the "Rock of Chickamauga" for his superior General George H. Thomas. In the Atlanta campaign he commanded a brigade in General O.O. Howard's IV Corps. Undaunted by the fact that he had four horses shot out from under him in battle, Harker went into the battle of Kennesaw Mountain on horseback. Becoming a conspicuous target for Rebel sharpshooters, he was mortally wounded during the attack and died a few hours later. 


<u>Document Signed</u>: 15 x 9 3/4, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


This is the Monthly Summary Statement of Lieutenant Charles G. Harker, when he served in the 9th U.S. Infantry. It is dated November 30, 1859. 


I certify that the above is a true statement of all the moneys which have come into my hands, on account of the Quartermaster's Department, during the month of November 1859, and that the disbursements have been faithfully made. The balance due the United States is deposited in the Sub Treasury, San Francisco, Cal. C.G. Harker, 2nd Lt. 9th Inf., A.A. Quartermaster, U.S.A. Very fine. Desirable autograph.

Marcus Morton $10.00

 

Albert Gallatin $10.00

 

original c. 1842 COLD WATER ARMY – Temper $65.00

 

Autograph, General Charles G. Harker $250.00




5 x 7 3/4, imprint.


Headquarters Department of the Gulf

New Orleans, Sept. 6, 1862


General Orders No. 67


All commanders of Regiments, Batteries and detached Companies, in this Department, having discharged soldiers or men entitled to go home, will repor[t] the same to the Quartermaster immediately, so that they may be sent by the first transport.


By command of

MAJOR GENERAL BUTLER


R.S. DAVIS, Capt. & A.A.A.G.


Scarce Department of the Gulf imprint. Excellent.  


Antique 19th century fleam which was a bloodletting medical device. The brass case contains three foldable hinged steel blades. When closed the brass case or handle measures 3 1/2 inches in length. When the blades are fully opened the device measures about 6 1/2 inches in length. All three blades are stamped with the makers name which I can't make out. Very fine.    


<b>The Cradle of Liberty</b>


In 1740, at a meeting held in Boston, merchant Peter Faneuil offered to build a public market house at his own expense and donate it as a gift to the city. His offer was accepted and the building which was partly funded by profits from slave trading was begun in Dock Square in September 1740, and completed in 1742. Built in the style of an English country market by artist John Smibert, the ground floor served as a market house with an assembly room above. Faneuil Hall was the site of several important speeches by Sam Adams, James Otis and other patriots encouraging independence from England thus earning the nickname, "the Cradle of Liberty." Through its illustrious 275 year history many other famous orators have spoken here among them Daniel Webster, Edward Everett, Wendell Phillips, Charles Francis Adams, and Oliver Wendell Holmes. In 1806, the hall was expanded by Charles Bulfinch which included the addition of a third floor.  


Antique steel engraving of the famous market house and meeting hall in Boston. Executed by W.H. Bartlett & H. Griffiths. Overall size is 9 1/4 x 6. Circa mid 1800's. Excellent.  Measuring approximately 9 ½ inches in length, this slender hand forged curling iron remains in eye pleasing original condition and will set in nicely in any quality colonial Americana or Revolutionary War personal grouping.   <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!

1862 Orders Issued by General Benjamin F $15.00

 

Civil War Era Brass Medical Bleeder $150.00

 

Faneuil Hall, Boston, Massachusetts $10.00

 

1700s early 1800s CURLING IRON $65.00

A 800 yard unopened, original label, turn of the century, spool of 8oz. <I>CARPET WARP FOR WEAVING</I> from the January & Woods Inc. <I> Maysville Cotton Mills </I> in Kentucky.  A bit apart from our usual fare but when we had an opportunity to acquire a few spools of this wonderful old cord from turn of the century American grown and milled cotton we could not resist.  Besides those textile collector / historians who would enjoy an early unopened display spool from the historic old Maysville, Kentucky cotton mill, there are other <I>Antiquers</I> who will recognize the practical use potential of 800 yards of turn of the century Kentucky milled, 8oz cotton warp. (Easily distinguishable from <I>modern</I> spun cotton twine, this material will do well in any number of antique applications.)  

      Prior to its recent demolition the historic old Maysville Cotton Mill had been a leading producer of carpet warp, rug yarns, cotton twine, twisted cord and tent rope.  It had been in continuous operation since the first building was erected about 1834 with the exception of several months during the Civil War, when due to the inability to secure cotton, the mill closed from November, 1861 to March, 1862. J&W was one of only a few cotton mills in the country that continued operations throughout the Civil War.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

 A 800 yard unopened, original label, turn of the century, spool of 8oz. <I>CARPET WARP FOR WEAVING</I> from the <I> LILY MILLS - SHELBY, N. Carolina</I> cotton mill.  A bit apart from our usual fare but when we had an opportunity to acquire a few spools of this wonderful old cord from early 1900s North Carolina grown and milled cotton we could not resist.  Besides those textile collector / historians who would enjoy an early unopened display spool from the old Shelby, North Carolina cotton mill, there are other <I>Antiquers</I> who will recognize the practical use potential of 800 yards of turn of the century Southern milled, 8oz cotton warp. (Easily distinguishable from <I>modern</I> spun cotton twine, this material will do well in any number of antique applications.)  Lily Mills located in Shelby, on the edge of cotton country in North Carolina was founded in 1903 as part of growing industry in the post- Civil War, Reconstruction South. It was one of several mills which began to flourish in the region as they processed locally grown cotton in local mills.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

 


<b>United States Congressman from Pennsylvania


Civil War Governor of Minnesota


United States Senator from Minnesota


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress


United States Secretary of War</b>


(1815-1903) Born near Harrisburg, Pa., he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1839, and began practice in Harrisburg. Served as U.S. Congressman from Pennsylvania, 1843-47, and as the first Territorial Governor of Minnesota, 1849-53. He was elected as the second Governor of Minnesota after statehood and served from January 2, 1860 to July 10, 1863. Ramsey is credited with being the first Union governor to commit troops to the war effort during the Civil War. He resigned the governorship to become a U.S. Senator, having been elected to that post in 1863, and served until 1875. He served as Chairman of the Committee on Post Office and Post Roads. Was Secretary of War from 1879 to 1881, under President Rutherford B. Hayes. He was the Chairman of the Edmunds Committee dealing with the question of Mormonism and polygamy in Utah, 1882-86. He was a delegate to the centennial celebration of the adoption of the Federal Constitution in 1887. 


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 3 1/8, in ink, Alex. Ramsey, Minn.


       Dated May 1867 this check is drawn on the account of the state of Wisconsin in the amount of $100.00 and is signed by then Wisconsin Secretary of State <B>Bvt. Brig. General Thomas S. Allen</B> who served in the <B>2nd Wisconsin Infantry</B> then as Colonel in command of the <B>5th Wisconsin Infantry</B>.  The check is made to Allen’s clerk <I>Richard Lester</I> who served as <U>1st Sgt.- 2nd Wis.</U> (Sgt. Lester was wounded at Bull Run, Virginia)      

      Though Thomas S. Allen entered the Civil War in April 1861 as a private in the Governor’s Guards (Co. K, 1st Wis. Inf.)  by the end of June he was serving as Captain of Co. I, 2nd Wisconsin which he had raised at the request of the Governor.  A month later Allen led his troops at the <B>Battle of Bull Run</B>, then over the next several months was promoted through the ranks to Lt. Colonel.  Allen led his troops into the <B>Battle of Gainesville</B>, where he was <U>wounded in the neck and the wrist</U>, but refused to leave the field. He was again wounded at the <B>Battle of South Mountain</B>.  In January 1863 Allen was promoted to colonel of the <B>5th Infantry</B>. On May 3, he commanded the regiment at the bloody attack on <B>Marye's Heights</B>, during the <B>2nd Battle of Fredericksburg</B>. On November 7 he was <U>wounded</U> again, during the <B>Battle of Rappahannock Station</B>. When the 5th Infantry’s term of service was up in the summer of 1864, Allen volunteered to reorganize it with new recruits, and served through the end of the war.  He was brevetted <B>Brig. Gen. U.S. Volunteers</B>. In the post-Civil War years Gen. Allen served as Wisconsin’s Secretary of State, was a driving force in the organizing of the <B>Grand Army of the Republic</B> in Wisconsin, and <U>served as its commander, 1869-1870</U>.   A nice item for the autograph enthusiast or Wisconsin in the Civil War items. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

vintage -Maysville, Kentucky – Cotton Mi $20.00

 

vintage LILY MILLS - Shelby, N. Carolina $20.00

 

Autograph, Alexander Ramsey $35.00

 

Gen. Thomas S. Allen 2nd & 5th Wisconsin $65.00

This outstanding Civil War era advertising game board was put out by <B> SNOW & BROWN, 29 Dauphin Street, Mobile, Alabama</B>.  The board measures 12 inches square when open and remains in excellent condition, strong at the hinge with a game surface that remains bright and nearly as new.  The back which is exposed when closed, remains in pleasing condition while offering wear as good evidence of age, originality and period use and carrying.  While we have not been able to date the establishment of the partnership of Snow & Brown at 29 Dauphin, Street, we found that Snow (J. H. Snow) commenced business at that address in 1855 and that the partnership business of Snow & Brown at the same location burned in 1874.   One period description advised that the Dauphin Street establishment <I>’was an elegantly arranged and handsomely fitted up temple of music filled with pianos, organs, and musical instruments’</I>.  Equally well known in Mobile as a music teacher, Snow was a prolific publisher of popular Confederate sheet music from this same address on Deuphin, Street.  (see: <I>CONFEDERATE SHEET MUSIC</I> by E. Lawrence Able)   Among the several such was the <B>JEFFERSON DAVIS GRAND MARCH</B> published in 1861.  An exceptionally nice item to set in with any Civil War era gaming or personal grouping, this neat old advertising game board will be of special interest to the collector of period Southern items.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 

 


Silver coin with the Roman numeral III with stars around the edges and an olive branch above and a bundle of 3 arrows beneath is on one side, and on the opposite side is a six pointed star with an American shield inside of it and United States of America around the edges. The year, which is at the bottom center, has faded. It looks to me like it might be 1857. Very good.

 

Footnote: This was the smallest of United States silver coins, called the "trime" by the Treasury Department, and it was authorized by Congress, on March 3, 1851.  


Excavated, State Seal of Virginia, Civil War, coat size uniform button with Virtus' spear resting on Tyranny. Missing shank. Backmark: Canfield Bro. & Co., Baltimore. Dug in central Virginia.   


<b>United States Senator from Delaware


United States Secretary of State


Ambassador to Great Britain</b>


(1828-98) Born in Wilmington, Delaware, to a family long prominent in public affairs, Bayard studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1851. He soon built up a large practice and served as U.S. Attorney for Delaware 1853-54. A peace Democrat, he opposed both secession and the Civil War. He was later elected to the U.S. Senate, serving from 1869-85, a seat held by his father and grandfather before him. Possessed of great ability and integrity, he was widely mentioned as a presidential possibility in 1880 and 1884. Upon the election of Grover Cleveland to the presidency in 1884, Bayard resigned his senate seat to become Cleveland's secretary of state. Bayard later was appointed U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 3 3/4, in ink, T.F. Bayard, Delaware.

mid 1800s advertising checkerboard – SNO $295.00

 

United States 3 Cents Piece $10.00

 

State of Virginia Civil War Button $150.00

 

Autograph, Thomas F. Bayard $35.00

<b>State Cavalry Battalion</b>


7 1/2 x 9 3/4, imprinted form, filled out in ink, dispensing ammunition to Major H.D. Ogden, Comdg. 1st La. State Cavalry Battalion, itemized list includes 6000 Enfield rifle cartridges in two different calibers, 840 buck & ball shot, 1800 caps, and six packing crates, signed by Major R.L. Robertson, Major & Ordnance Officer. Dated June 27, 1863. On brown necessity paper. Exceptional condition. Rare.



<u>Henry D. Ogden</u>


The First Black Troops in Confederate Service, The Louisiana Native Guard


In May of 1861, 1,500 "Free Men of Color," gathered at an assembly in New Orleans with the intent of assisting the new Confederate Government in the defense of their city. On May 2, 1861, Governor Thomas O. Moore of Louisiana, accepted the regiment as part of the Louisiana Militia. All the line officers were men of color and the Governor appointed Militia Colonel Henry D. Ogden as the white commander of the regiment. Creoles had been used in the past by both the French and Spanish as militia troops during the previous century and free men of color fought with Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. These men were educated and most had trades such as doctors, silversmiths, carpenters, architects, tailors, etc. These free men of color were property owners and identified closer to the white population than the non-white sector of the city. They had two grand reviews which took place November 23, 1861, and January 7, 1862. Enthusiasm waned as Confederate authorities gave the regiment few supplies and support. On February 15, 1862, the Legislature effectively disbanded the unit but they were quickly reinstated by Governor Moore on March 24th as Admiral Farragut entered the Mississippi River. On May 1, 1862, Union forces under General Benjamin F. Butler occupied the city and the regiment melted into the population. Butler soon became aware of a threat to the city from Confederate forces and asked to create a regiment of the free blacks who had previously been in the Louisiana Militia. On September 27, 1862, the two regiments of the Louisiana Native Guard were organized to fight for the Union. Colonel Henry D. Ogden, upon the surrender of New Orleans, had joined the staff of General Mansfield Lovell and had evacuated with Lovell from the city. He was assigned to Camp Moore, La., and was then promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on Governor Moore's staff, and he served in various capacities in the Trans-Mississippi Department in Northern Louisiana. He surrendered at Natchitoches, La., in May 1865, and returned to New Orleans. His involvement in organizing the first Black troops to serve the Confederacy is little known, but it is documented that he was the first and only white officer of this unit in 1861-62.  


6 x 2, imprint. Lottery of the State of Kentucky. Covington, Ky. July 7, 1863. The winning numbers on this ticket were 38, 55 and 72. Uncommon.  A nice honest piece with appealing evidence of age and period use, this Springfield U. S. Model 1840 remains in excellent all original condition with an appealing deep chocolate natural age patina overall and that untouched but issued and used quality that is so hard to find today.  A Maine attic find of some years ago, this honest old .69 caliber smooth bore musket is complete with the exception of its ramrod (easily replaced if you wish) and remains otherwise  as issued with its nicely marked and 1841 dated SPRINGFIELD lock  The Mod. 1840 musket enjoyed a long run in the military with use in the Mexican War through the American Civil War.  The .69 caliber smooth-bore Mod.1840 was the last of the flintlocks and as such was found in considerable supply in both Northern and Southern armories at the outbreak of the Civil War.  (Conspiracy enthusiasts find it more than interesting that in the late days prior to secession, then Secretary of War Jefferson Davis was said to have caused the filling of Southern States arsenals with such <I>surplus </I> arms.)  With arsenal conversion to the percussion system, the old Mod. 1840 musket saw considerable service by both Union and Confederate troops remaining a common site on the battlefield through 1863 with many remaining in action for the duration of the Civil War.  (see: Coates & Thomas Civil War Small Arms) An all too scarce opportunity to acquire a good honest example of one of these U. S. Springfield made and converted Civil War Springfield muskets at a less than prohibitive price.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked </U>three  day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>


<U>A note about firearms:</U>   WE SUPPORT RESPONSIBLE CONTROL OF MODERN FIREARMS AND EMPHASIZE HERE THAT THIS PIECE IS CONSIDERED AN ANTIQUE / COLLECTABLE AND IS THEREFORE OUTSIDE  RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO COVERED (MODERN) FIREARMS. THE PIECE IS OFFERED AS A HISTORICAL COLLECTABLE ONLY AND THOUGH MECHANICALLY OPERABLE, IS NOT TO BE CONSIDERED  FIREABLE UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES.  <U>PURCHASE OF THIS ITEM WILL CONSTITUTE A FULL UNDERSTANDING OF AND AGREEMENT WITH  THE ABOVE. </U>

 


<b>United States Congressman from Illinois


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1820-97) Admitted to the bar in 1841, he commenced practice in St. Charles, Illinois. Elected as U.S. Congressman in 1856, Farnsworth served to March 1861, and was described as a full blown "Lovejoy abolitionist." In September 1861, he recruited the 8th Illinois Cavalry and was commissioned their colonel. The regiment saw action under him during the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign. During the Antietam campaign, Farnsworth held brigade command in General Alfred Pleasanton's division. Promoted to brigadier general, November 29, 1862, he was with his brigade at Fredericksburg. In March 1863, he was re-elected to Congress, and resigned his military commission. He was re-elected successively and held his congressional seat until 1873. He aligned himself with the Radical Republicans and voted for every extreme Reconstruction measure put before congress including the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson. Served as Chairman of the Committee on Post Office and Post Roads. His nephew was General Elon J. Farnsworth who was killed in action at Gettysburg.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 4 1/4, in ink, J.F. Farnsworth, St. Charles, Illinois.

Alexandria Arsenal Supplies Ammuntion to $250.00

 

1863 State of Kentucky Lottery Ticket $20.00

 

Civil War era percussion conversion - U. $895.00

 

Autograph, General John F. Farnsworth $50.00

A bit late for our usual fare but we couldn’t resist when we had the opportunity to acquire a small lot of these original caps for the old cast iron or <I>white-metal</I> cap guns us old-timers remember from our boyhood.  (These are modern times however so we must offer the appropriate caution that these caps are offered for display purposes only.)   Offered here as a <U>lot of 5 </U> red paper rolls, these neat old caps will lay in well with a single example or collection of those wonderful old toy <I>repeater</I> cap guns. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Some considerable time ago we were fortunate enough to acquire a small number of original pasteboard spools containing the most wonderful early polished satin ribbon.  This offering from that grouping is an all original un-used 10 yard spool of 1 3/8 inch wide ribbon. (If you would prefer more narrow 7/8 inch wide ribbon enter <B>3160</B> in our search feature.) An exceptional find for the textile collector or conservator who would appreciate such a rarity either for display or use in a restoration.   The spool is complete and as it was sold with a full complement of 10 yards of 1 3/8 inch wide polished satin ribbon wound with a paper liner as was the custom in the time and secured at the end by a small straight pin.  The ribbon is that rich chocolate brown that Civil War era collectors will appreciate.  The spool measures approximately 3 3/16 inches in diameter and will make a wonderful companion piece as is for any period sewing or textile grouping.   A classic process of the Victorian era ribbon maker was to stiffen the finely loomed satin with such as starch, shellac or bee wax.  The ribbon was then passed through pressurized and  polished hot rollers.  This process was called calendaring and produced a durable high metallic gloss on the ribbon.  (Likely more than you needed to know.)   A wonderful find for the Civil War era textile enthusiast !  please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 


<b>Judge Advocate of the Union Army


Special Judge Advocate during the trial of the Lincoln Conspirators!


One of the managers in the President Andrew Johnson impeachment trial</b>


(1815-1900) Served as U.S. Congressman, 1855-63. He appointed George A. Custer as a cadet to the U.S. Military Academy. Appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as Judge Advocate of the Union Army in 1864. He also served as Judge Advocate during the trial of the Lincoln Conspirators. Re-elected to the U.S. Congress, he served 1865-73. Served as one of the managers in the impeachment proceedings against President Andrew Johnson, and made the three day closing speech at the trial. Served as Minister to Japan, 1873-85.


<u>Document Signed</u>: 8 x 3, imprinted bank check filled out and signed in ink. M.R. Penn, General Merchandise, Means, Harrison Co., Ohio. Cadiz, O.[hio], Dec. 8, 1896. The Fourth National Bank. Pay to the order of Henry Kimball, $18.50. Jno. A. Bingham. Stamped Paid. Endorsed on the reverse. Light age toning and wear. Desirable Lincoln related signature.  


4 1/4 x 6 5/8, imprint, 7 pages.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, July 9, 1863


General Orders

No. 212


I..The Invalid Corps will be organized in Companies of two classes of Battalions.


II..Those men enlisted in, or transferred to, the Invalid Corps, who are most efficient and able-bodied, capable of using the musket, performing guard duty, making light marches, &c, &c, will be assigned to Companies of the First Battalion. Those of a minor degree of physical efficiency, or who possess special qualifications as cooks, nurses, or clerks, and whose services are required in hospitals, will be assigned to Companies of the Second Battalion.


III..Companies of the First Battalion will be employed mainly as provost guards, and guards in cities, &c. They will be armed with muskets, and will not be liable to active campaigns with the field armies.


IV..Companies of the Second Battalion will be armed with side arms only, and will be employed in hospitals as cooks, nurses, clerks, orderlies, &c., and as guards to hospitals or other public buildings.


Much more informative content. Issued by order of the Secretary of War and signed in print by E.D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant General. Very fine.

antique toy Cap Gun – CAPS (5 rolls) $22.00

 

Victorian era POLISHED SATIN RIBBON – or $45.00

 

Autograph, John A. Bingham $125.00

 

Order Concerning the Organization of the $15.00




<b>Badly wounded during the battle of Perryville, Kentucky</b>


(1823-91) He was born at Florence, Alabama, graduated from the Jesuit College of St. Joseph's at Bardstown, Ky. in 1841, studied law, and started a practice in Murfreesboro, Tenn., and later moved his law office to Florence. He served as solicitor of the fourth judicial circuit of Alabama from 1851-57. He later became the editor of the Florence Gazette and strongly supported the 1860 presidential campaign of former U.S. Vice President and future Confederate General John C. Breckenridge. Upon the commencement of the War Between the States Wood entered the Confederate Army as captain of the "Florence Guards," and upon the organization of the 7th Alabama Infantry, was elected their colonel on May 18, 1861. He served with his regiment at Pensacola, Florida until February 1862, having been promoted to brigadier general on January 7th, and was ordered to take his command and join General Albert Sidney Johnston's army in Kentucky. After fighting bravely at Shiloh, he commanded a brigade of General Simon B. Buckner's division at the battle of Perryville, Ky., where he was severely wounded by an artillery shell fragment. He served in General Patrick Cleburne's division at the battles of Murfreesboro and Chickamauga. After the war he served in the Alabama legislature in 1882-83, was a member of the law faculty at the University of Alabama, and later served as attorney for the Alabama Great Southern Railroad. 


Antique, silver print photograph, 2 x 4. Half view wearing double breasted Confederate brigadier general's uniform coat with over the shoulder belt, rectangular belt plate, and the hilt and top portion of his sword visible. No imprint. Circa early 1900's print.     An attractive apothecary label for GARRIGUE’S VEGETABLE WORM CONFECTIONS, sold by E. B. Garrigue, Philadelphia.   Nicely printed on colorful blue stock so typical of the period, this 7 ¾" X 5 3/8’ uncut label extols the wondrous virtues of Mr. Garrigue’s little vegetable pills in ridding one of stomach worms.  A common affliction of the Civil War era and an especially frequent malady of the Southern camp where warm weather and flies took their toll from Yankee soldiers who’s systems and personal habits were not accustom to sustained heat and close living.  All original and in fine condition, this is a nice original item for the Civil War, medical, sutler or country store collector.  please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  A nice Civil War vintage crochet cotton, cut steel decorated misers purse.  Narrow in the middle and closed at both ends, miser's purses ranged in the course of their history from 8 to 10 inches long.  A knitted or crocheted <I>tube</I> with short slit in the narrow midsection to let the carrier drop coins or other small objects into either end of the tube.  The purse was closed by moving the rings, or sliders toward the ends, gathering the fabric snugly around the contents. The <I>toes</I>or ends were usually tasseled, one end was generally square the other rounded.  Frequently categorized by collectors as being exclusively for ladies use, the misers purse was an equally popular personal item of both sexes.  All in excellent original condition, we’d expect the considerable cut steal decoration on this example would more likely place it in the ladies us category. While the cut steal embellishment shows some rust as evidence of age and originality, this classic example remains solid and suitable for careful use or will fit well in any period accessory or personal item collection.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Our photos will do best to describe these nice Civil War era die-struck brass hat letters except to offer that they are completely original and in fine unissued condition with a mellow natural patina as evidence of age and originality.  The letters stand approximately 1 inch (illustrated with a quarter for size comparison) and sport original soldered on fastening wires.  Of interest to the collector will be that we acquired these letters several years ago now when we were fortunate enough to purchase a number of items brought home by a W. Stokes Kirk clerk when the Philadelphia based Civil War surplus dealer closed up shop in 1976.  Founded in 1874, W. Stokes Kirk, like Bannerman in New York, purchased large quantities of all manner of Civil War surplus at government auction. Seems like an impossibility today but seasoned collectors can remember the two outfits offering original Civil War material as late as the 1960s and early 1970s.  This small grouping of Co. insignia offers a now rare opportunity as we make the letters available here <U>individually priced</U>for the collector who would like a single example as a companion piece or more than one for display.  We have just a few each of letters <B>A</B> through <B>G</B> with <B>K</B> and <B>L</B>. Just indicate in your order which letter or letters you would like. (Use key word <B>letters</B> or <B>numerals</B> in our search to find other examples.)  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

Photograph, General Sterling A. M. Wood $25.00

 

Civil War era WORM CURE APOTHECARY LABEL $65.00

 

CIVIL WAR era LADIES MISER’S PURSE $95.00

 

original ! Civil War era enlisted Hardee $35.00




4 x 6 5/8.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, July 23, 1863


General Orders

No. 226


The County of St. Mary's, Md., is detached from the Middle Department, and will form a separate Military District. Brigadier General G. Marston is assigned to the command of St. Mary's District; Headquarters at Point Lookout.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning. Very fine.


Trivia: St. Mary's County is where Francis Scott Key, the author of a poem which became The Star Spangled Banner, grew up.


Over 600 African Americans from St. Mary's County served in the Union Army during the Civil War; two were awarded the Medal of Honor.


 


<b>War Date Endorsement Signed</b>


(1822-1905) Graduated from West Point in 1842 and fought in the Mexican War. At the battle of Cerro Gordo he was so severely wounded that he was left for dead until picked up by a burial detail 36 hours later. On October 2, 1861, he was appointed colonel of the 1st Minnesota Infantry, which he commanded at the battle of Balls Bluff, Va. In the spring of 1862, now a brigadier general, he commanded a brigade in the 2nd Corps, Army of the Potomac. At the battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862, he was very severely wounded which left him incapacitated for several months. Promoted to major general to rank from November 29, 1862, he successively commanded the defenses of Philadelphia, the operations at Brazos Santiago Pass on the Texas Gulf Coast, the 13th Corps, and various districts along the Mississippi River. In December 1864, he was given command of the Department of the Mississippi, which he held until the end of the war.


<u>War Date Endorsement Signed</u>: 3 1/2 x 2 1/2, in ink, Head Quarters U.S. Forces, Matagorda Bay, Feb. 2, 1864. Approved, other articles will be disposed of as recommended in this report. N.J.T. Dana, Maj. Genl. Light age toning.  An attractive item for the country store or writing instrument enthusiast, this original circa 1840 broadside is printed on one side for posting and measures 10 ¼ X 6 ¾ inches promoting Boston Apothecary and Chemist, Thomas Hollis’s (see Mexican War through Civil War era Boston Business Directories) <B><I>BLACK WRITING INK for steel or quill pens</B></I>   Remaining in excellent original condition with no rips tears or repairs, there is some age staining that could be easily removed by proper restoration methods but we would leave the piece as is.  With lots of eye appeal and a good size for display, this scarce old advertising broadside will set in well in any number of period collectable categories.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  


<b>War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1818-79) Graduated in the West Point class of 1838. He served during the Mexican War as aide-de-camp to General William J. Worth. He fought the Seminoles in Florida and helped pacify the warring factions in Kansas. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Barry served first in the defense of Fort Pickens, Florida. Ordered north, he then served as chief of artillery to General Irvin McDowell at 1st Bull Run and held the same position under General George B. McClellan. Appointed brigadier general on August 20, 1861, he took an active part in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and was later chief of artillery of the huge defense system which encircled Washington, D.C. In 1864, he was assigned as chief of artillery on the staff of General William T. Sherman participating in all the actions of the Atlanta campaign, and the 1865 Carolina's campaign which terminated in the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 2 1/2 x 1 1/4, in ink, William F. Barry, Brig. Genl., Inspt. of Art. Light staining.

General Marston Assigned to Command $15.00

 

Autograph, General Napoleon J. T. Dana $125.00

 

original c. 1840 – HOLLIS BLACK INK / Fo $95.00

 

Autograph, General William F. Barry $75.00

Acquired several years ago when we were fortunate enough to purchase several groupings from the personal collections of our longtime friend, Dr. Francis Lord, this just post Civil War militia piece was noted by Lord as a waist belt plate of the <B><I>HOUSUM ZOUAVES</I></B> worn by  <I>John C. Gerbig</I>.  (Will come with our letter to preserve its origin.)  A quick google search found John C. Gerbig and the Housum Zouaves in the 1902 Pennsylvania Adjutant General Report where the following is offered on page 421:

      

<I><B>Capt. John C. Gerbig</B> He was a private in Chambers Artillery, April 1860.  Pvt. Co. A 2nd Penn. Vol. Inf. three months service, 1861.  Quartermaster Sgt. under Capt. P. L. Pearse, Co. A, 2nd Maine Infantry to 1864.  Sergeant, <B>Housum Zouaves</B> August 13, 1868.  2nd  Lt. Co. C 8th Regt. Infantry, Oct. 6, 1882. 1st Lt. Aug. 2, 1883, honorably discharged June 19, 1884.</I>  


A pioneer Civil War collector from a day when nearly no one else paid much attention to the details of many now valued Civil War collectable categories, Francis had an abiding interest in all manner of 19th century military equipage.  His primary interest was in Civil War however and led to his widely known, multi volume, pioneer reference, <I>Lord’s CIVIL WAR COLLECTORS ENCYCLOPEDIA</I>.  While a lot of detailed knowledge has been gained as the interest and <U>value</U> of Civil War collectibles increased so dramatically over the years, Dr. Lord’s first and second volumes in particular and his <I>Civil War Sutlers & Their Wares</I> continue to offer valuable and reliable reference to Civil War collectors.  (Use <I>Lord</I> in our search feature to find other Lord collection items.) As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 This antique salesman’s sample is a scaled down working, demonstration model of the full scale, <I>hand crank</I>,  cloths wringer by the American Wringer Company of New York.  [Seldon A. Bailey invented the mechanical clothes wringer in 1859  and began producing the wringers on a small scale in 1860 as the <B>American Wringer Co.</B>.  The company prospered for years until the powered washing machine became widely available.]  Fashioned of wood with tinned cast iron components and rubber rollers, the body of the wringer (minus the crank) is 5 ¾ inches wide.   This miniature remains in nice all original condition.  A really neat little collectable, this wringer will come with a copy of a wringer advertisement taken from a Civil War era <I>Leslies</I>.     As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !



 Measuring 7 1/8 inches square when completed this six piece pasteboard <B>SCOTCH</B> puzzle remains in eye appealing condition with bright color yet with good evidence of age and originality.  An attractive display item illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison. <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !   H 18in. x D 14in.

WILL MOUNT UP OR DOWN

Francis Lord collection- post Civil War $175.00

 

working model - Salesman’s Sample CLOTHE $195.00

 

19th century word & picture PUZZLE $40.00

 

CLASSIC LIGHT FIXTURE $550.00

Measuring approximately 5 ½ X 4 1/8 inches this small preprinted and hand completed receipt confirms the extensive utilization of slave labor on <B><I>fortifications at and near the City</I></B> as Richmond prepared for the Seven Days Battles that would soon swirl around the Capitol City. The slave <I>Booker</I> was provided by <I>Anne Belle Leftwich</I>, child bride of [destined to be Colonel] <I>Alexander Hamilton Leftwich</I> who would serve in Co. B <B>VMI Corps of Cadets</B> at the <I><B>Battle of Newmarket</I></B>.  Ordered by regular Confederate Engineer, <B>Lt. Col. W. H. Stevens</B> who was responsible for Richmond’s fortifications. He was promoted to Brig. General in August 1864 and is said to have been the last man to cross the Mayo Bridge the night Richmond was evacuated.  All original and in pleasing condition with no rips, tears or repairs.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 H 64in. x W 27in.  H 20in. x W 26in.

TWO AVAILABLE..PRICE PER UNIT  This nice original earlier to mid 19th century W. Smith & Son sail makers needle packet still contains 9 period needles in a variety of stout sizes.  A neat item for the Civil War era and collector, these heavy, hand cut needles will clean up nicely however they are offered here just as they came to us after decades of storage and likely just as they were carried in an original W. Smith & Son needle case. A necessary utility to the soldier in the field for repair of shelter half, Sibly tent, or leather accoutrement, these heavy steel needles were a staple among entrepreneurial soldiers and sailors who considered them a primary tool as they cut fanciful scrimshaw decorations in beef, whale bone or ivory for trade, sale or to send back home.  A nice original and as found period personal item. (If you would like a single example  of a slightly smaller #12 needle use the search word <B>needle</B> see our Item # 900 ) Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

rare! 1862 Slave Labor Receipt for: FORT $325.00

 

VINTAGE CRYSTAL CHANDELIER $3400.00

 

DECO PENDANT LIGHT $1800.00

 

Civil War era SAIL MAKERS NEEDLE PACKET $95.00

A fine condition early design <I>Goodyear’s Patent</I> antique hard rubber cup <U>complete</U>and in its original blue lacquered tin travel case.  The case lid is embossed <B>INDIA RUBBER – TELESCOPING TUMBLER – MADE BY – THE INDIA RUBBER – COMB C</B>.  The original case remains in pleasing condition and retains a good amount of its period blue finish.  Difficult to find as they frequently lost a section and were cast aside in the period, this design pre dated the Niles Patent 1860 cup which added a base flange to prevent separation and a cover to make the cup self-contained. (see: <I>India-Rubber & Gutta-Percha In The Civil War Era</I> by Mike Woshner )  A nice item for the Civil War <I>smalls</I>, personal item or hard rubber collector.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 This nice stained bone mounted, two tine fork and matching knife will be best described by our photographs.  All in nice original condition with no cracks in the classic green stained bone, this later 18th century / early 19th century will make an attractive companion set laid in a Revolutionary War era haversack or with a period mess grouping .  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


 


<b>Document Signed</b> 


(1837-1910) Commissioned 2nd lieutenant, 31st New York Infantry, January 2, 1862; 1st lieutenant, May 9, 1862; captain, A.A.G., March 11, 1863; major, A.A.G., July 15, 1864; brevet lieutenant colonel, January 23, 1865; brevet colonel and brigadier general, March 13, 1865. Cited for gallantry during the battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Va., and Monocacy, Md. King served on the staffs of Generals' Calvin E. Pratt, Henry D. Terry, James B. Ricketts, Christopher C. Augur, and Winfield S. Hancock respectively.


<u>Document Signed</u>: 6 3/4 x 9, imprint, signed in ink. 


Head-Quarters, Middle Military Department 

Baltimore, June 29th, 1866 


Special Orders, No. 129 


1. Leave of absence is hereby granted the following named officer:


1st Lieutenant George B. Rodney, 4th United States Artillery, for ten (10) days.


2. The men on detached service at these Headquarters will be mustered for pay tomorrow, June 30th, by Brevet Lieutenant Colonel H.H. Bingham, Judge Advocate, 1t 11 o'clock, A.M. 


By command of Major General W.S. Hancock


ADAM E. KING

Assistant Adjutant General


OFFICIAL:

Adam E. King

Assistant Adjutant General


Signed in ink by King. Staining at bottom of the document.


George B. Rodney, enlisted on April 24, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Heavy Artillery. He was mustered out on August 5, 1861. On August 5, 1861, he was commissioned 1st lieutenant, 4th U.S. Light Artillery. Promoted to captain by brevet on December 31, 1862, for Stone River, Tenn.; and major by brevet on September 20, 1863, for gallantry in the battle of Chickamauga, Ga.


Henry H. Bingham, Awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantry in the battle of the Wilderness, Va.


Wounded three times during the war!


(1841-1912) Born in Philadelphia, Pa., he graduated from Jefferson College in 1862. He enlisted on Aug. 22, 1862, and was commissioned 1st Lieutenant, in the 140th Pennsylvania Infantry, and was soon promoted to Captain, on Sept. 9, 1862. During the battle of Gettysburg, in July 1863, he was serving as Judge Advocate on the staff of General Winfield S. Hancock, when he was wounded on July 2nd. The next day he witnessed Pickett's Charge, from a position near the "Angle" where the Confederates reached what is now called the "High Water Mark." He received the personal effects from Confederate General Lewis A. Armistead, whoo lie mortally wounded, and carried the sad news to General Hancock, Armistead's dear friend from before the war. Bingham was a Mason, as was Armistead, and the story of how he provided assistance to his dying fellow Mason, was used in Masonic literature. Today, near the Gettysburg National Cemetery, is a monument which is titled, "Friend to Friend," which depicts Captain Henry H. Bingham, assisting General Lewis A. Armistead. During the battle of the Wilderness, on May 6, 1864, Bingham rallied and led into action a portion of the troops who had given way under fierce Confederate assaults, and was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his conspicuous bravery. On May 12, 1864, at the battle of Spotsylvania, Va., he was wounded for the second time during the war, and he was wounded for the third time on April 7, 1865, at Farmville, Va. He was promoted to Brevet Brigadier General, on April 9, 1865. Bingham was appointed postmaster of Philadelphia, by President Andrew Johnson, in March 1867, and served until December 1872. He was a delegate to the Republican National Conventions of 1872 though 1900, and was elected United States Congressman in 1878, and served until his death. In Congress, he served as Chairman of the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, and on the Committee on Expenditures in the Post Office Department.

   


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a Union sailor in uniform standing on a rope ladder and waving his cap. A large American flag is seen behind him. Motto below, "Three Cheers for the Red, White & Blue." 5 3/8 x 3. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

early India Rubber TELESCOPING CUP with $175.00

 

mid to late 1700s through early 1800s K $65.00

 

Autograph, General Adam E. King $20.00

 

Three Cheers for the Red, White & Blue $5.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a soldier standing at attention wearing a shako with plume, crossed belts, and holding his musket with fixed bayonet. Behind him is a flag pole with waving American flags, tents and the U.S. Capitol building flying American flags in the background. Motto: "Our Flag Is Still There." 5 1/4 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  H 30in. x W 32in. x D 10in.  H 48in. x D 14in


Sold as a pair  H 40in. x D 21in.

Our Flag is Still There $5.00

 

VINTAGE INDUSTRIAL TEE LIGHT $1200.00

 

INDUSTRIAL PULLEY PENDANTS $1500.00

 

ANTIQUE PENDANT LIGHT $4500.00




<b>Killed near Bethesda Church by a Yankee Sharpshooter in 1864</b>


(1830-64) Born at Milledgeville, Georgia, he was the captain of a militia company known as the "Baldwin Blues" and the company entered Confederate service in 1861 when they joined the 4th Georgia Infantry. He was elected colonel of the regiment in May 1862 and saw action with the Army of Northern Virginia at South Mountain, and Sharpsburg and was promoted to the rank of brigadier general on November 1, 1862. He went on to fight at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness and Spotsylvania. Considered one of the premier brigadiers in the Confederate army, he was instantly killed by a Yankee sharpshooter on June 2, 1864, near Bethesda Church, while supervising the entrenchments of his line. 


Antique photograph, 2 1/2 x 3 1/2, in Confederate uniform. No imprint. Circa early 1900's print.  


<b>United States Congressman from Alabama


Confederate Senator</b>


(1814-63) He practiced law in Alabama, and served in the U.S. Congress, 1844-46, where he became a leader of the Southern "Fire-eaters." He drafted the Alabama Platform in 1848, which asserted that slaveholders had the right to take their slaves with them to the new territories, and later advocated secession. He supported the Southern Democrats in their nomination of John C. Breckinridge for president in 1860, and drafted Alabama's secession ordinance and served in the Confederate Senate from 1861 until his death in 1863.


Antique photograph, 3 3/4 x 5 3/4, chest up view portrait. No imprint. Circa 1800's post Civil War print. Light wear.  


<b>Commander of Waul's Texas Legion</b>


(1813-1903) Born in Sumter District, South Carolina, he studied law in Vicksburg, Mississippi and was admitted to the bar in 1835. He afterwards moved to Gonzales County, Texas where he became a plantation owner and continued to practice law. He was elected to the Provisional Confederate Congress in 1861 and served until the establishment of the permanent government. At that time he recruited what became known as Waul's Texas Legion and was commissioned their colonel on May 17, 1862. He surrendered with his command at the fall of Vicksburg on July 4, 1863, and after his exchange he was promoted to brigadier general. He commanded a brigade during the 1864 Red River Campaign, fighting in the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill. Later transferred to Arkansas, he fought at the battle of Jenkins' Ferry. After the close of the war he was elected to the first Texas reconstruction convention and thereafter he practiced law in Galveston.


Antique photograph, 4 1/4 x 6 1/4. Bust view portrait in Confederate uniform. No imprint. Circa 1800's, post Civil War print. Scarce.    H 14in. x W 4in .x D 6in.

Photograph, General George P. Doles $25.00

 

Photograph, William L. Yancey $10.00

 

Photograph, General Thomas N. Waul $25.00

 

Classic wall sconces $225.00




4 1/8 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, July 16, 1863


General Orders

No. 218


By direction of the President of the United States, Brigadier General Quincy A. Gillmore is appointed to the command of the Tenth Army Corps, in place of Major General David Hunter, relieved, to date from June 12, 1863.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Very fine.  


<b>Served as Lieutenant Colonel of the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry and Colonel of the 12th Pennsylvania Infantry during the Civil War


U.S. Congressman from Pennsylvania


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1823-76) Born in Old Brighton, Beaver County, Pa., he attended Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1844, and commenced practice in Lancaster. Served as the district attorney of Lancaster County, 1856-59. During the Civil War he was lieutenant colonel of the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, and colonel of the 12th Pennsylvania Infantry. Served as United States Congressman, 1868-73, which included the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. Was a delegate to the Pennsylvania State Constitutional Convention of 1873. 


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 4 1/4 x 3 1/4, in ink, O.J. Dickey, Lancaster, Penna. Very fine.  <b>of Virginia and North Carolina


General Dix to Command the Department of the East</b>


4 1/8 x 6 3/4, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, July 15, 1863


General Orders

No. 217


I..By direction of the President of the United States, the Departments of Virginia and North Carolina are united into one, and Major General J.G. Foster assigned to the command.


II..Major General John A. Dix will immediately repair to New York city, and relieve Major General Wool from the command of the Department of the East.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Very fine.  


<b>Document signed by soldier wounded at Port Hudson, La.</b>


7 1/2 x 3, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Head-Quarters of U.S. Greenleaf Post No. 20, G.A.R.


Coleraine, Feby. 18th, 1879


To J.M. Scott, Quarter Master: Pay to the order of A.A. Smith the sum of Four Dollars. L.E. Call, Commander. A.A. Smith, Adjutant. Endorsements on the reverse. Excellent.


Levi E. Call, was an 18 year old mechanic from Coleraine, Mass., when he enlisted on August 27, 1862, as a private, and was mustered into Co. B, 52nd Massachusetts Infantry. He was wounded in action on June 14, 1863, at Port Hudson, La. He mustered out of this regiment at the expiration of their term of service, on August 14, 1863. He mustered into the 2nd Massachusetts Light Artillery, on September 3, 1864, and was mustered out of service on June 11, 1865.

General Gillmore Appointed Commander of $15.00

 

Autograph, Oliver J. Dickey $25.00

 

General Foster Named Commander Departmen $15.00

 

Payment Voucher G. A. R. Post No. 20, Cole $10.00




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