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Best described by our photo illustrations, this nice pair of shoulder scales remain in excellent uncleaned, unpolished and as found condition even retaining the label of well-known Civil War military goods suppliers <I> Schuyler – Hartley & Graham</I>.  Could be polished to as new in appearance however we would leave them untouched as good evidence of natural age ands originality.   Such scales were primarily issued early Civil War to Cavalry and Mounted Artillery troops though examples of Infantry issue may be found in period photography.  An especially nice pair, difficult to find.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 This nice all original wallet remains in excellent condition and is untouched and as found leaving the decision of dressing application to the new owner. (Only the finest antique leather dressing and then <U> very lightly</U> please!)  Fashioned of naturally tanned soft and pliable leather the wallet is of the classic style and construction of the Civil War period unfolding to offer several partitioned sections for bills and personal documents.  The wallet measures approximately 3 3/4 X 6 3/4 inches closed and remains in nice pliable condition with good evidence of age and originality. Will set nicely in any period personal grouping as is.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Rooted in history, the iron <I>JEW’S HARP</I>a.k.a mouth harp, jaw harp and in later times <I>Ozark Harp</I>, graced many a Civil War <I>hoedown</I> both in field camp and among the folks at home.  This desirable horseshoe design is a favorite among collectors who frequently relate its use to cavalry though in actuality the horseshoe form was a popular 19th century design in all manner of application.  Offered here untouched and as it came out of decades of attic storage, this example remains in pleasing <I>playable</I> condition.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 


<b>With back mark of Vannerson & Jones, Richmond, Va.


Severely wounded at the battle of 1st Manassas


Commander of the Trans-Mississippi Department</b>


(1824-93) Graduated in the West Point class of 1845. He won the brevets of 1st lieutenant and captain for gallantry at Cerro Gordo and Contreras in the Mexican War. From 1849-52, he was assistant professor of mathematics at West Point. Later he served in the Indian campaigns on the Texas frontier. A native of Florida, he resigned his commission on April 6, 1861, when Florida seceded from the Union, and entered the Confederate Army as a lieutenant colonel, and served in the Shenandoah Valley under General Joseph E. Johnston. On June 17, 1861, he was commissioned brigadier general in the Provisional Confederate Army and was severely wounded at the battle of 1st Manassas. He was promoted to major general on October 11, 1861, and in 1862, was in command of the District of East Tennessee. General Smith participated in General Braxton Bragg's invasion of Kentucky, and won a decisive victory at Richmond, Ky., on August 30, 1862. He became lieutenant general from October 9, 1862. From 1862-65 he was in command of the Trans-Mississippi Department, and received permanent rank of general in the Provisional Confederate Army on February 19, 1864. His army repelled General Nathaniel P. Banks's force, during the Red River campaign, in the spring of 1864. Smith was almost the last Confederate general in the field, but in a hopelessly isolated situation, he finally surrendered his troops to General E.R.S. Canby on May 26, 1865. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. But view in Confederate uniform. Period ink inscription on the front, "E.K. Smith." Backmark: Vannerson & Jones Photographers, 77 Main Street, Richmond, Va., with a 2 cents orange, George Washington, U.S. Internal Revenue tax stamp. Light age toning. Desirable card with this back mark from the Confederate capitol city.

Civil War era - SHOULDER SCALES $250.00

 

Civil War era and earlier LEATHER WALLET $95.00

 

antique horseshoe – MOUTH or ‘JEW’S HA $55.00

 

CDV, General Edmund Kirby Smith $250.00




<b>Sunk in the Yazoo River, Mississippi, on December 12, 1862</b>


The city-class gunboat, U.S.S. Cairo, was built by James Eads & Co., at Mound City, IL., in 1861. The ironclad was named after the city of Cairo, Illinois. She was commissioned in January 1862, and served in the Union Navy's Western Gunboat Flotilla on the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers.


In 1862, she was active in the occupation of Nashville, Memphis and Clarksville, Tenn., and played a prominent role in the capture of Fort Pillow. On December 12, 1862, as part of the Yazoo Pass Expedition, the U.S.S. Cairo was clearing mines in preparation for an attack on Haines Bluff, Miss., and was sunk by a mine detonated by Confederate soldiers hidden behind a river bank. The Cairo was the first ship ever sunk by a mine remotely detonated by hand.  


In 1956, the ship was located in the Yazoo River and a salvage operation began. Over the next few years the deteriorating wreck was raised and eventually put on display at the Vicksburg National Military Park. She is one of only four Civil War era ironclads in existence, and is listed on the National Register.


Includes an authentic, small piece of wood that was salvaged from the wreck of the C.S.S. Cairo, in 1965. It is mounted at lower right on a 5 x 7, photo card, titled, "U.S.S. Cairo, Civil War Ironclad Wood Relic," with a photograph of the ship and crew in 1862. It comes with a second, 5 x 7, photo card, with a brief printed history of the Cairo, [click on the enlargement to read the exact description], an image of the original wood relic that this piece came from, and an illustration of the sinking of the Cairo. Both cards could be matted and framed together to make a very nice display item for a Civil War naval collector!  


 


<b>United States Congressman from Maine</b>


(1790-1857) Born in Hallowell, Maine, he attended Hallowell Academy, studied law, was admitted to the bar, and commenced his practice in Farmington, Kennebec County, Maine, in 1812. He was the Farmington town clerk, from 1814-19, served in the Maine House of Representatives, in 1822, 1829, and 1832, and served in the Maine State Senate, 1838-39. Was a U.S. Congressman, 1847-49, and chairman of the Committee on Mileage. After serving 1 term in the U.S. Congress, he returned to his law practice in Maine serving his community until his death in Farmington, on May 6, 1857. He is buried in Center Meeting House Cemetery, Farmington, Maine.


<u>Signature with town and state</u>: 6 1/4 x 1 1/4, in ink, Hiram Belcher, Farmington, Maine.     


<b>War period endorsement signed


Earned the "Thanks of Congress" for his heroic exploits during the capture of Fort Fisher, North Carolina in 1865!</b>


(1827-90) Born in Hartford, Connecticut, he attended Yale Law School, became a lawyer, and served as clerk of the Superior Court of New Haven County, Conn. Terry was one of those rare militia officers who rose to eminence in the volunteer ranks during the Civil War and remained in the Regular Army after the war to earn the rank of major general. He fought at the 1st battle of Bull Run, Va., in command of the 2nd Connecticut Infantry, a 90 day unit that he raised. He then recruited the elite 7th Connecticut Infantry, taking part with them in the capture of Port Royal, S.C., and the siege and capture of Fort Pulaski, Ga. Appointed brigadier general, he served in the various operations against Charleston, S.C. until the fall of 1863 when he was transferred to General Benjamin F. Butler's Army of the James, taking over command of the 10th Corps. During 1864, he served in the campaigns against Richmond and Petersburg, Va., and in early 1865 he commanded the forces that captured Fort Fisher, N.C., thus sealing off the Confederacy's last port, Wilmington, N.C. For this exploit he received the "Thanks of Congress." His forces were then attached to General John M. Schofield's Army of the Ohio, with which it operated in conjunction with General William T. Sherman until the Confederate surrender. During his post war army career, Terry served mainly in Indian Territory, and he helped to negotiate the Treaty of Fort Laramie in 1868, which ended "Red Cloud's campaign" against United States troops in the territory. He was in charge of the Department of Dakota at the time of the famous battle of the Little Big Horn in 1876. Five companies of Custer's 7th U.S. Cavalry were annihilated with Custer among the 268 men killed. During this battle General Terry was in personal command of the various columns engaged in the field, including that of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer. Much controversy arose at the time as to whether Custer had exceeded Terry's orders; but Terry refused to comment on the matter. In October 1877, he went to Canada to negotiate with "Sitting Bull," and he was still in command in Montana during the Nez Perce War and he sent reinforcements to intercept "Chief Joseph."  As the great Northern Pacific Railway was building their transcontinental line across Montana in 1881, the new town of Terry, Montana was named in General Terry's honor. He was promoted to major general in 1886, and named commander of the Military Division of the Missouri. He retired from the U.S. Army on April 5, 1888, and died in New Haven, Conn., on December 16, 1890. He is buried in Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, which is surrounded by the Yale College campus.


<u>War period endorsement signed</u>: 3 1/8 x 3, partly imprinted form, filled out in ink. Head Quarters Dep't Virginia (and North Carolina which has been crossed out in red ink), (Fort Monroe has also been crossed out in red ink) and written above it is Richmond, Va., July 18th, 1865. Approved- The disposition within recommended will be made. Alfred H. Terry, Major Genl. Commanding. Written on the reverse is "Eleven Canteens." General Terry is a very desirable autograph for his heroic deeds during the Civil War and Indian War.    


<b>To a prominent Virginia lawyer who served in the 12th Virginia Light Artillery during the war!</b>


War date Confederate envelope with a very nice pair of 5 cents Jeff Davis (Scott #7) postage stamps, tied on with a Richmond, Va. postmark, the month is indistinct, but the 8th day, and the year 1862 are very solid. Beautifully addressed to James M. Donnan, Esq., Petersburg, Virginia. Light crease near the top, not affecting the content. There are a couple of small stains on the reverse. Very fine and quite desirable Confederate war date cover.


James M. Donnan was born on May 6, 1824, in Amelia County, Virginia. He commenced the study of law in the office of his elder brother Alexander in 1842. James worked in his brother's law partnership of (Judge William T.) Joynes and Donnan until 1854, when the brothers formed their own practice under the firm name of Alexander & James M. Donnan, practicing law in Petersburg until 1878.


James fought in the Mexican War, serving in Captain Archer's Company of the 1st Virginia Volunteers, commanded by Colonel Hamtramck. He was honorably discharged with the regiment at Fort Monroe, Va. in 1848.


Prior to the War Between the States, he was a member of the Whig Party, whose bitterest foes were the Democrats, so after the war Donnan would have nothing to do with the Democratic Party, and he allied himself very strongly with the Republican Party. 


The Donnan Brothers law firm were the most sought after lawyers in Petersburg for many years, and they were very active during the antebellum and war years handling all kinds of slavery cases in the Petersburg area.


During the War Between the States, James M. Donnan served in Co. B, 12th Virginia Light Artillery, in 1864-65. He signed an Oath of Allegiance to the United States government on June 24, 1865.


He was appointed to be United States Consul to Belfast, Ireland, serving from 1873 to 1880, when he returned to Virginia.


He died on January 14, 1893, and is buried in Blandford Cemetery, Petersburg, Va.


James M. Donnan was known to be an exceptionally upright man, strong in his convictions, unflinching in his position, and noted for his courage and firmness of character.

U. S. S. Cairo, Civil War Ironclad, Wood R $35.00

 

Autograph, Hiram Belcher

 

Autograph, General Alfred H. Terry $250.00

 

1862 Confederate Cover Addressed to Pete $125.00




<b>War period signature with rank</b>


(1812-97) Born in Fairfax County, Virginia, he was the son of Francis Lightfoot Lee II, grandson of Richard Henry Lee, brother-in-law of Francis P. Blair, Jr., and Montgomery Blair, and cousin of Robert E. Lee. He was appointed a midshipman in the U.S. Navy in 1825, and saw extensive service at sea, including action during the Mexican War. At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, he was captain of the sloop of war, <i>Vandalia</i>. Lee then commanded the steam sloop, <i>Oneida</i>, in the 1862 New Orleans, Louisiana, campaign, and in operations on the Mississippi River. He became well known among Washington's social elite due much to the influence of his wife, Elizabeth, the daughter of Francis Preston Blair. Being a native Virginian, he was asked about his loyalty to the United States, and Lee famously replied, "When I find the word Virginia on my commission, I will join the Confederacy." This quote was often referred to because of the actions taken by his famous cousin, General Robert E. Lee, and thus illustrated how the war divided families. In September 1862, Lee was appointed commander of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron with the rank of Acting Rear Admiral. His flagship at this time was the <i>Philadelphia</i>. He led this force for over two years, during which time it was responsible for the blockade of the North Carolina coast and operations on North Carolina and Virginia inland waterways, all areas of very active fighting between Union and Confederate forces. He transferred to the Mississippi River Squadron, October 1864, and commanded it to the end of the war. His flagship during the Mississippi campaign was the <i>Black Hawk</i>.


<u>War period signature with rank</u>: 2 1/2 x 1, in ink, S.P. Lee, A.[cting] R.[ear} A.[dmiral].     


<b>Signed by prominent Pennsylvania merchant, coal operator & land speculator</b>


7 1/4 x 2 3/4, imprinted document, filled out in ink. Illustration of a sailor seated on a cotton bale and holding an American flag, with a barrel and sexton at left. Sailing ship and goods at upper right, 2 cents George Washington hand cancelled revenue tax stamp at upper left. Drawn on The Pittston Bank, Pittston, Penna., Jany. 6, 1864. Pay to A.C. Thompson, $11.98. Signed at lower right by J.B. Schooley. Minor age toning and wear. Cut cancelled. Very fine Civil War dated check from coal mining country in Pennsylvania as the country begins it's fourth year of war.   


WBTS Trivia: Jesse B Schooley, (1811-85). He grew up on a large farm in Wyoming, Pennsylvania, and was a land speculator, merchant, and coal operator in the Wyoming Valley. He had many holdings and agreements in Pittston, Jenkins Township, West Pittson, Exeter, Wyoming, Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, and many other areas in the state.


Interesting facts about Pittston, Pa.:  Pittston is in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, situated between Scranton and Wilkes-Barre. The city gained prominence in the mid 1800's and early 1900's as an active anthracite coal mining town. 


Located in the Wyoming Valley on the east side of the Susquehanna River, and the south side of the Lackawanna River, it was  named after the famous British statesman William Pitt, and was settled around 1770.


During the Revolutionary War, the Wyoming Valley was an active battleground between the British and the Continental Army. On July 3, 1778, a force of British soldiers, with the assistance of about 700 Indians, attacked and killed nearly 300 American Patriots. Connecticut Continentals, led by Captain Jeremiah Blanchard and Lieutenant Timothy Keyes, held and maintained a fort in Pittstown. On July 4, 1778, one day after the Battle of Wyoming, a group of British soldiers took over the fortress and some of it was destroyed. Two years later, the Continentals stormed the fortification and recaptured it. From then on it was under Patriot control until the end of the war in 1783.


 


<b>Note signed with rank</b>


(1813-91) He sailed with his father, Commodore David Porter, to the West Indies to suppress piracy in 1824, and joined the U.S. Navy in 1829. He served in the Gulf during the Mexican War. On April 22, 1861, he was named commander, and with his mortar fleet joined his foster brother, Admiral David G. Farragut, in March 1862 for the capture of New Orleans. He took command of the Mississippi River Squadron in September 1862 with rank of Acting Rear Admiral, and in cooperation with General William T. Sherman captured Arkansas Post in January 1863. He was present during the Vicksburg surrender and served in General N.P. Banks's Red River campaign of 1864. Sent east, he commanded the North Atlantic Squadron and fought at Fort Fisher, N.C., for which he received his fourth Thanks of Congress. Promoted Vice Admiral in 1866, he was superintendent of the Naval Academy and appointed Admiral of the Navy in 1870. He was the brother of Commodore William D. "Dirty Bill" Porter and the cousin of General Fitz John Porter.


<u>Note Signed with rank</u>: 5 3/8 x 2 3/4, in ink. Mr. Sumner, Please send me a bottle of Perry's improved ___. "D.D. Porter," Admiral. Only the signature is in the hand of Admiral Porter. Boldly signed. Light age toning, fold wear, and some other scattered wear. Desirable Civil War naval officer.  This near <I>as new</I> leather covered one-pint traveling flask is complete with its original pewter maker marked cup with nicely marked <B>W. T. FRY’S PATENT OCTOBER 20, 1863  </B> on the spout and early production <B> W. T. FRY NEW YORK  TOP WARRANTED NOT TO LEAK OR COME OFF</B> on the cap. A classic utility of the Civil War era and a favorite personal item of the soldier, examples of this style may be found in such prestigious collections as the <U>Gettysburg Visitor Center</U> Civil War museum collection as well as the old <U> Museum of the Confederacy</U> collection in Richmond.  This unusually nice condition example will make a fine addition to any quality Civil War vintage grouping.     <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Autograph, Admiral Samuel P. Lee $65.00

 

1864 Pittston, Pennsylvania Bank Check $8.00

 

Autograph, Admiral David D. Porter $75.00

 

Civil War era - W. T. FRY Pat. 1863 TRAV $195.00

We’ll depend on our photo illustration to provide the physical description of this attractive Reconstruction era shako except to advise that it remains in pleasing and complete condition while offering good evidence of age and originality.   This  beaver shako retains its early style 2 inch wide split leather sweat band with the maker label of <B>G. W. Simmons & Son. Military Regalia and Firemen’s Goods <I>OAK HALL</I> 32 to 38 North Street, Boston </B>, with original infantry chin strap buttons and plate.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Not as old as our usual fare but we felt this little Pat. 1911marked lamp was worthy of inclusion.  It stands a mere 7 inches from base to top of its milk glass shade and remains in pleasing original condition throughout with the patent marking in the glass gust under the screw off burner.  A nice item for the vintage lighting enthusiast! <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison this antique grass<I>striping</I>tool was used to <I>strip</I> or cut narrow strands from wide bladed grass for the purpose of weaving.  A blade of fibrous swamp or marsh grass was held in place by pressing down on a spring guide and drawn along its length over the several tiny blades.  The grass was thus cut into long narrow strips for weaving baskets or other utilitarian and decorative handcrafts.  All original and still in nice working condition this antique<I>stripper</I> will go well as a companion piece with related items and is still useable for old stile crafting. <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!


 


<b>Matched pair, imprinted letter sheet and envelope</b>


Antique, imprinted, unused matched pair, that includes a piece of 5 x 6 1/2, stationary, with illustration of the Chapel of Pennsylvania Lutheran College, Gettysburg, Pa., with printed title below. The envelope which measures 5 1/8 x 3 1/4, has the exact same illustration as that of the letter sheet. Complete with back flap. Both items are evenly aged and in excellent condition. Very desirable Gettysburg items.


WBTS Trivia: The chapel was part of the Pennsylvania College campus, in Gettysburg, that was founded in 1832. It was later renamed Gettysburg College. Located on a ridge west of the town, it became a focal point of the fighting on the first day of the battle, July 1, 1863. The college buildings including the chapel were used as field hospitals for wounded Union and Confederate soldiers during and after the monumental 3 day battle of Gettysburg.

Civil War Reconstruction / Indian War er $375.00

 

vintage bedside or ‘CHAMBER’ LAMP $65.00

 

antique - Grass Basket WEAVING TOOL $55.00

 

Chapel of Pennsylvania Lutheran College, $15.00




<b>War period signature with rank</b>


(1822-1900) Born in Fredericksburg, Virginia, his naval officer father died when he was 2 years old, and he was raised up by his uncle, Matthew Fontaine Maury, the famous "Father of Modern Oceanography and Naval Meteorology." He graduated from the University of Virginia in 1842, commenced the study of law, but then changed course by accepting an appointment to West Point, graduating in the class of 1846, and was commissioned 2nd lieutenant in the Regiment of Mounted Rifles. His antebellum record in the Regular U.S. Army was distinguished and included receiving the brevet of 1st lieutenant for bravery at Cerro Gordo during the Mexican War, where he suffered a painful wound that almost resulted in the amputation of his arm. His gallantry in this battle prompted the citizens of Fredericksburg and the Legislature of Virginia to honor him with a special presentation sword. After convalescing at White Sulphur Springs, Va., he was assigned to the U.S. Military Academy as an instructor, serving in that capacity from 1847 until 1852. He then returned to active field duty with the Mounted Rifles, serving in the Oregon Territory, and then on the Texas frontier. He then returned east and commanded the Cavalry School at the Carlisle Military Barracks in Pennsylvania in 1858. He authored a book, "Tactics for Mounted Rifles," which became the standard textbook on the subject. When the War Between the States broke out, Maury was stationed in Santa Fe, New Mexico Territory, serving there as Assistant Adjutant General. Hearing the news of the firing on Fort Sumter, South Carolina, he resigned from the United States Army, and traveled back to his native Virginia where he entered the Confederate Army as a colonel, serving as Adjutant General, then as Chief of Staff under General Earl Van Dorn. He was promoted to brigadier general for gallantry at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, on March 18, 1862. He also fought gallantly in the battles at Iuka and Corinth, Mississippi, and was appointed major general, November 4, 1862. After serving at Vicksburg, Miss., and in East Tennessee, he was appointed commander of the Army of the Gulf, at Mobile, Alabama, which he defended very capably until its capture in 1865. After the war ended Maury came home to Virginia and established an academy in Fredericksburg where he taught classical literature and mathematics. In 1868, he was the founder of the Southern Historical Society. He also wrote the book, "Recollections of a Virginian in the Indian, Mexican, and the Civil Wars." He was appointed by President Grover Cleveland, as Minister to Colombia, and served at that post from 1887 to 1889.


<u>War period signature with rank</u>: 4 1/2 x 1, in ink, Dabney H. Maury, Assistant Adjutant General. Very nicely signed on blue lined paper.  


<b>United States Senator from Delaware


United States Secretary of State</b>


(1796-1856) Born in Dagsboro, Delaware, he graduated from Yale College in 1815, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1819, and commenced practice in Dover. He was a member of the Delaware State House of Representatives, in 1824; Secretary of State of Delaware, 1826-28; U.S. Senator, 1829-36, 1845-49, and 1853-56. He served as chairman of the Committee on the Judiciary. He was the Chief Justice of Delaware, 1837-39. Served as U.S. Secretary of State in the Cabinet of President Zachary Taylor, 1849-50. 


<u>Signature with State</u>: 4 7/8 x 3/4, in ink, Jno. M. Clayton, of Del.  


(1824-1881) Born in Liberty, Union County, Indiana, he graduated in the West Point class of 1847, and was a Mexican War veteran. Serving on the western frontier, he was wounded in a skirmish with Apaches in 1849. He resigned his commission in 1853, invented a breech loading rifle, was appointed a Major General of the Rhode Island State Militia and was elected to Congress as a Democrat. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he organized the 1st Rhode Island Infantry, becoming their Colonel. He was in command of a brigade at the 1st battle of Bull Run. Having become a favorite of President Lincoln, he was given command of the expedition against the coast of North Carolina, he fought at Antietam, and in December of 1862, commanded the Army of the Potomac during their bitter defeat at Fredericksburg. General Burnside also saw action at Knoxville, the Overland Campaign, and at Petersburg. In his post war career he was elected Governor of Rhode Island three times, and later served as a United States Senator.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view wearing a double breasted frock coat with dress epaulettes and the rank of brigadier general. He also wears a sash, gauntlets, and is holding his sword. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Also has a paper sticker of the agent, McAllister & Brother, Philadelphia. Light age toning. Very fine image of "Old Sideburns" as he was known.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with a standing illustration of General George Washington in uniform. Motto below: "Let us cherish his memory, And emulate his example." Light age toning. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

Autograph, General Dabney H. Maury $125.00

 

Autograph, John M. Clayton $35.00

 

CDV, General Ambrose E. Burnside $125.00

 

General George Washington $4.00




(1824-1902) He was born in Baden, Germany, and graduated from a military academy at Karlsruhe in 1843, and became a subaltern in the service of Grand Duke Leopold. During the 1848 insurrections he acted as Minister of War for the revolutionary forces which were overthrown by the Prussians, and fled to New York in 1852. During the years before the Civil War he taught school and held a major's commission in the 5th New York Militia. Sigel was appointed brigadier general on August 7, 1861, and major general on March 22, 1862. Despite his military shortcomings, he did much to unify the large German population of the Northern states and contributed thousands of recruits to the Union ranks. "I fights mit Sigel," became almost a password among the Dutch and his influence with them never waned. He performed well at the capture of Camp Jackson, and the engagement at Carthage, Mo. At Elkhorn Tavern he contributed greatly to the Union victory. He saw action in the 2nd Bull Run campaign, and later commanded the Department of West Virginia. In 1864, he had the misfortune to fight the battle of New Market, Va., against the cadets of the Virginia Military Institute, by whom he was soundly trounced.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Full standing view in uniform with rank of brigadier general, holding Hardee hat with plume, and sword. Backmark: E. Anthony, N.Y. Very nice.  


(1805-74) Born in Jamaica, Vermont. When the Civil War commenced he was serving as colonel of the 2nd Massachusetts Militia. On May 25, 1861, he was commissioned colonel of the 1st Massachusetts Infantry, and he commanded them in the 1st battle of Bull Run, where he had a horse shot out from under him. During the 1862 Virginia Peninsula campaign he saw action at Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Glendale, and Malvern Hill. For bravery at Williamsburg, General Joseph Hooker recommended him for promotion to brigadier general. He later commanded a brigade in the division of General John J. Abercrombie. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. Standing view in a Napoleonic pose in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Bottom of the mount is trimmed. Light age toning and wear. Very sharp view. Nice image.     


10 x 15, imprinted form, filled out in ink. 


The United States In Account with Michael Doyle of H Company, Fifty-Second Regiment of Penna. Volunteers on account of Clothing during his enlistment; the money value of each issue being hereby acknowledged. Enlisted at Scranton, Pa. on the fourth day of April 1864. Includes information for Date of Issue, Money Value, Rank of Private, Signature of Soldier, and Signature of Witness. Settled to date of discharge July 12, 1865. Signed multiple times by Private Michael Doyle with his X mark, Charles C. Brattenberg, 2d Lt., and Joseph R. Roberts, 1st Sergt. Light age toning and wear. Very fine.


The 52nd Pennsylvania Infantry served at Fort Henry, Lee's Mills, Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Fair Oaks, Battery Gregg, Morris Island, Charleston, Fort Johnson, (2 killed, 5 wounded, 80 captured), James Island and Fort Wagner.    


<b>Signature with rank of Brigadier General


Military Governor of Louisiana in 1862</b>


(1819-78) Born in Saco, Maine, his famous father, Ether Shepley, served as a U.S. Senator, and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. George graduated from Dartmouth College, studied law, and began a practice in Bangor. He served as U.S. District Attorney for Maine prior to the war. He became close friends with soon to be Union Major General Benjamin F. Butler when they served together as delegates in the 1860 Democratic National Convention at Charleston, S.C. Commissioned colonel of the 12th Maine Infantry in November 1861, he accompanied General Butler's forces in the expedition against New Orleans, La. After the capture of the city on May 1, 1862, Shepley became Butler's right hand man and he assigned him as post commander at New Orleans, and the military governor of Louisiana in June 1862. He was promoted to rank of brigadier general to rank from July 18, 1862. General Shepley continued to work in this capacity until the spring of 1864, when he was assigned to the District of Eastern Virginia under the command of his old comrade General Butler again. As the war began to wind down, Shepley operated as chief of staff to General Godfrey Weitzel, and was appointed military governor of Richmond, Va. in April 1865. After the war, he returned to his law practice, and in 1869, President Ulysses S. Grant appointed him United States circuit court judge for the state of Maine.


<u>Signature with rank</u>: 5 1/2 x 2 1/8, in ink, G.F. Shepley, Brig. Genl. U.S. Vols. Beautiful and large bold autograph.

CDV, General Franz Sigel $100.00

 

CDV, General Robert Cowdin $125.00

 

52nd Pennsylvania Infantry Clothing Acco $15.00

 

Autograph, General George F. Shepley $75.00




<b>United States Congressman from Pennsylvania


Chief Justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court</b>


(1806-74) Born in Middlesex, Butler County, Pa., he studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1829, and commenced practice in Erie, Pa. Thompson served in the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives, 1832-34, and in 1855, and was Speaker of the House in 1834. He was a delegate to the Pennsylvania State Constitutional Convention in 1838. He served as presiding judge of the Sixth Judicial District Court, from 1838-1844. He was a U.S. Congressman, from 1845-51, and served as Chairman of the Committee on the Judiciary. Thompson was an Associate Justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court from 1857-66, and then served as the Chief Justice of that court from 1866-72.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/4 x 1/2, in ink, James Thompson.  


Commemorative envelope celebrating the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's immortal Gettysburg Address, delivered at the Gettysburg National Cemetery, on November 19, 1863. Full color illustration at left of President Lincoln on the reviewing stand giving his speech. At the upper right is a Battle of Gettysburg, July 1-3, 1863, Forever U.S.A. postage stamp, that features a vignette of Pickett's Charge. The postage stamp has been tied on to the cover with a pair of circular cancellations; one has an illustration of President Lincoln with the motto, In God We Trust, Liberty, 1863; and the other one has Gettysburg, Pa., 17325, Nov. 19, 2013, the date of the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. 7 1/8 x 3 5/8.    


<b>War period signature with rank


Served as Governor of California</b>


(1822-94) He was born in the western New York hamlet of Bustion, and graduated from the United States Military Academy in the celebrated class of 1846. His classmates were future Civil War Generals Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, George B. McClellan, Ambrose Powell Hill, Darius N. Couch, George E. Pickett, and Cadmus M. Wilcox. Stoneman served in the 1st U.S. Dragoons, and the 2nd U.S. Cavalry, from 1846-61. He was appointed Chief of Cavalry, Army of the Potomac, with the rank of brigadier general, on August 13, 1861. He saw action in the 1862 Virginia Peninsula campaign, at Yorktown, and Williamsburg; at the battle of Fredericksburg; in the famous cavalry raid that took on his name, General Stoneman's 1863 Richmond Raid, during the Chancellorsville campaign; he commanded the Cavalry Corps, of the Army of the Ohio, during the Atlanta campaign, until he was captured on July 31, 1864, while on a raid designed to free the Union prisoners that were confined at the notorious Andersonville Prison, in Georgia. After his exchange, he operated in southwestern Virginia, East Tennessee and North Carolina in cooperation with General William T. Sherman's advancing army. After the war he settled in what is present day San Marino, California, and served as Railroad Commissioner of California. He was elected Governor of California in 1882 and served in that position for 4 years.


<u>War period signature with rank</u>: 4 7/8 x 1 3/8, in ink, George Stoneman, Maj. Genl. Slightly faded. Important Union Civil War General.   

 While considered as being among the rarer of German origin martial arms, of significance to the American Civil War historian will be that this example of the Mod.1849 German Navy percussion pistol was altered by the <U>Philadelphia, Wurfflein family of gunsmiths</U>  when the limited number of these pistols were purchased for import at the outset of the American Civil War.   This rather massive three pound single shot percussion pistol measures approximately 16 inches in total length with a 9 1/4 inch 62 caliber barrel and remains in excellent condition as will be best described here by our illustrations.   Untouched and original to the period with the signature Philadelphia, Wurfflein belt hook alteration and American standard musket nipple this rare Civil War import will set well in any quality Civil War collection.   The lock is marked with the classic Double-Headed Eagle of the German Confederation with SUHL, S&C and Anchor.  A total of 1,000 of these pistols were ordered for the Bundesmarine on 19 May 1849.  This short lived first German Federal Navy lasted a mere four years upon which two of its ships were transferred to the Royal Prussian Navy with the remainder of their vessels, less their armament sold commercially.  Pistols from the ships sold were stored at the Fortress of Mainz until 1861 when in the early Civil War clamor for arms,  approximately eight-hundred of these Mod. 1849 pistols were purchased for import to this country. (see illustration <I>Civil War Guns</I> by William B. Edwards  p. 292 / see also: illustration and description of a lesser example -  11/18/2013 <I>Bonhmans Antique Arms Auction Catalogue</I> lot#4250)  

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Autograph, James Thompson $20.00

 

The Gettysburg Address Sesquicentennial $5.00

 

Autograph, General George Stoneman $95.00

 

rare! Civil War import - Mod. 1849 Germ $1295.00

A desirable piece of Western photographic Americana and an especially interesting photo for the U. S. Signal Corps collector, this scarce <I>Gurnsey’s Rocky Mountain Views</I> stereo view card is titled <B>U. S. Signal Station & Observatory</B>  and depicts the rock bound U. S. Signal Station in operation atop atop Pike’s Peak in 1873.   Standing at right in forage cap with binoculars in hand is <B>Albert James Myer</B>.   An Army Surgeon before the  Civil War, developer of the Army Signal Corps <I>wig-wag</I> signaling system and at the outbreak of the Civil War then Major Myers became the army’s first signal officer and was ordered to organize and command the Signal Corps. Rising in the ranks to Colonel Myer was brevetted to Brig. General before the end of the war.  In 1866 Gen. Myer was recognized by Congress as Chief Signal Officer, U. S. Signal Corps, a position he held until his death.  Ultimately Gen. Albert James Myer was recognized as <I>founder and father</I> of both the U. S. Signal Corps and the U. S. Weather Bureau.  <U> Myer is identified in an alternate view of the Pike’s Peak Signal Station housed in the Library of Congress, prints and photographs collection. </U>  ( see our illustration)  Clearly taken in the same session as the Library of Congress <I>identified</I> example, (see details) the view offered here has captured Myer now wearing his forage cap but with binoculars still in hand and with the same unidentified companion.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  


Edited by Michael Frizot. Published by Konemann, 1998. Large 9 1/4 x 12, hardcover with dust jacket. 775 pages, profusely illustrated, photographic credits, bibliography, and index. Excellent  condition. Very desirable book on the history of photography!


This volume brings together contributions by the most respected specialist in the image field. Editor Michel Frizot writes a substantial portion of the text, along with 29 additional authors who offer a plethora of analytical information and a very wide variety of points of view on the history of photography. Put simply, it is a book about why people take photographs and what photographs can do. At a whopping 775 pages, this huge volume has something for everyone! It is well worth its weight in gold. The writings are certainly useful and interesting, but the real impact of this wonderful book is the sheer abundance and diversity of its over 1000 black-and-white and full-color photographs. An extensive bibliography, notes, and index make this a useful tool for students of history as well as those studying art and photography, but the marvelous photographs make it a browser's dream.  


Stereoscopic, cabinet size photographs of the National President Abraham Lincoln Monument in Springfield, Illinois. This is a close up view of the military figures that flank President Lincoln on one side of him, and is titled, "Artillery Group." There is a detailed description on the reverse of the card explaining the artillery group depicted on this monument. Photographed by J.A.W. Pittman, for J.C. Power. Also includes the names of the Executive Committee, with the date April 18, 1882, and more. Imprint on the front mount, Entered by John Carroll Power, in 1883, in the office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington. Light age toning and wear. 7 x 4 1/4.  


Includes a wood fragment that originated from the scaffold used to execute the four Lincoln conspirators; Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, David Herold and George Atzerodt, on July 7, 1865, just after 1 P.M., on a sweltering 100 degree Washington afternoon, in the prison yard of the Old Arsenal Penitentiary. Beautifully presented in a scarlett suede mat with florentine gold trim. Measures about 8 x 10. The wood relic is housed at the center of the display under a 3X magnifying cover. Above is an Alexander Gardner copy photograph of the four dead conspirators hanging from the gallows, with descriptive text below. This relic was secured as a souvenir by a soldier of the 1st U.S. Volunteer Infantry who served as a guard at the execution. Comes with a certificate of authencity which incorporates a copy photograph of the original note and piece of wood that this fragment originated from. Extremely desirable President Abraham Lincoln assassination, and Lincoln Conspirators related relic!

Gurnsey’s Rocky Mountain View – Pike’s P $75.00

 

A New History of Photography $50.00

 

National Abraham Lincoln Monument, Sprin $10.00

 

Wood From The Gallows Where The Lincoln $250.00




<b>Famous for his American flag dispatch, "If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot!" This became a clarion call in the North during the Civil War!


New York Secretary of State


United States Senator from New York</b> 


(1798-1879) Born in Boscawen, New Hampshire, he joined the U.S. Army in 1813, and served until 1828.  In 1830, he was appointed by Governor Enos T. Throop as Adjutant General of the New York State Militia. Was New York Secretary of State, 1833-39, and served as a member of the New York State Assembly in 1842, and was elected to the United States Senate, serving 1845-49. In 1853, Dix was president of the Mississippi and Missouri Railroad. He was Postmaster of New York City 1860-61. In 1861, President Buchanan appointed him U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, and on January 29, 1861, he made his famous American flag dispatch to a treasury official in New Orleans, "If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot!" Commissioned Major General by President Abraham Lincoln, on May 16, 1861, he was first on this list, thus outranking all other volunteer officers during the Civil War. At the beginning of the war he arrested six members of the Maryland General Assembly and prevented Maryland from seceding from the Union, which earned him President Lincoln's gratitude and praise. That winter, he commanded an organization known as "Dix's Command" within General George B. McClellan's Department of the Potomac. Dix commanded the Department of Virginia from June 1862 until July 1863, and the Department of the East from July 1863 until April 1865. On July 22, 1862, General Dix and Confederate General Daniel H. Hill made an agreement for the general exchange of prisoners between the Union and Confederate armies. This agreement became known as the "Dix-Hill Cartel." It established a scale of equivalents, where an officer would be exchanged for a fixed number of enlisted men, and also allowed for the parole of prisoners, who would undertake not to serve in a military capacity until officially exchanged. The cartel worked well for a while, but it ended up breaking down when Confederate officials insisted on treating black prisoners as fugitive slaves and returning them to their previous owners. He made an important and distinguished contribution to the Union cause when he suppressed the 1863 New York City draft riots. General Dix was active in the defense of Suffolk, Virginia, which was part of his department. He served as the chairman of the 1866 National Union Convention. He was U.S. Minister to France, 1866-69, and Governor of New York, 1873-74.


<u>War period signature with rank</u>: 2 3/4 x 1, in ink, John A. Dix, Major General. Comes with an antique 4 3/4 x 6 1/2, photograph of Dix in uniform with rank of major general.  

 <b>Address</b>


6 1/4 x 3 1/2, imprinted folio cardstock that features the 3 cents U.S. postage stamp of President Abraham Lincoln with quote from his immortal Gettysburg Address, "That Government Of The People, By The People, For The People, Shall Not Perish From The Earth." Abraham Lincoln. The double page interior has detailed printed story titled, "In Commemoration of the 85th Anniversary of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address." The reverse has advertising information. Light age toning. Very fine. Desirable Lincoln collectible.  


(1822-94) He graduated from West Point in the celebrated class of 1846. His classmates were future Civil War Generals Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, George B. McClellan, Ambrose Powell Hill, Darius N. Couch, George E. Pickett, and Cadmus M. Wilcox. George Stoneman served in the 1st U.S. Dragoons, and the 2nd U.S. Cavalry, 1846-61. He was appointed Chief of Cavalry, Army of the Potomac, with the rank of brigadier general, on August 13, 1861. He saw action in the 1862 Virginia Peninsula campaign, at Yorktown, and Williamsburg; at the battle of Fredericksburg; in General Stoneman's 1863 Richmond Raid, which happened during the Chancellorsville campaign; he commanded the Cavalry Corps, of the Army of the Ohio, during the Atlanta campaign, until he was captured on July 31, 1864, while on a raid designed to free the prisoners at Andersonville, Ga. After his exchange, he operated in southwestern Virginia, East Tennessee and North Carolina. 


Engraved portrait of Stoneman in uniform with rank of major general, made from a Brady photograph. There is a nice printed facsimile autograph below his likeness. 1865 imprint of Virtue & Yorston, New York at the bottom. Light age toning and a couple of small stains.    


Beautiful full color illustration of the famous surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, to Union General Ulysses S. Grant, in the parlor of the McLean House, Appomattox Court House, Virginia, on April 9, 1865. A five cents, U.S. postage stamp, honoring the 100th anniversary (1865-1965) of the surrender at Appomattox is at the upper right corner. The U.S. Military Historic Stamp Collection is imprinted at the bottom. The reverse has detailed information regarding the surrender. 8 x 4 1/2. Printed on card stock. Excellent.

Autograph, General John A. Dix $65.00

 

Commemoration of the 85th Anniversary of $10.00

 

General George Stoneman $15.00

 

The Surrender of General Robert E. Lee a $10.00




By David Herbert Donald. Published by Simon & Schuster, New York, 1995. Hardcover, with dust jacket, 714 pages, index, illustrated. Light wear to the back of the dust jacket. The book itself is clean, tight and in excellent condition. Recommended reading by this Pulitzer Prize winning author.


Destined to become a classic in American history and biography. David Herbert Donald's "Lincoln" is a masterly account of how one man's extraordinary political acumen steered the Union to victory in the Civil War, and of how his soaring rhetoric gave meaning to that agonizing struggle for nationhood and equality. This fully rounded biography of America's sixteenth President is the product of Donald's half century of study of Lincoln and his times.  Untouched and as found with period construction characteristics this tinned sheet iron candle holder looks for all the world to have been fashioned utilizing a 6 ¾ inch diameter <I>haversack</I> size mess plate.  Remaining in excellent condition yet showing good age and period originality, this country made tin plate candle holder will lay in well in any Civil War vintage personal item or lighting display. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  Best described here by our photo illustrations this <B><I>WADHAMS Manufacturing Co.</B></I>  gutta-percha / thermoplastic, 9th plate photo case with its <I><B> Kinsley & Parker’s HINGE  Patented June 1st, 1858</I></B>, remains in untouched and as found condition with a small tear to the velvet liner and a minor <I>scuff</I> to the original label but importantly, with <U>no imperfections</U> to the case itself.  A rare photo case (see: Rinehart case No. 15) tight at the hinges and with no cracks, chips, blemishes or other condition issues.    <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  A bit of an enigma to us, a Google search for <I>The Virginia Co.</I> will offer more insight but suffice it to say here that the antique bass decoration offered here measures approximately 2 ¾ X 3 ¼ inches and features the  Virginia Company coat of arms with <B><I>THE VIRGINIA CO.</B></I> boldly cast in its banner.  The piece was constructed by sand casting and polished on its face all resulting in a loss of fine detail but commensurate with early construction methods.  Untouched on its face with a nice patina polished only by handling, the back of the piece is dark with a rough surface commensurate with period sand casting.   The decoration remains suspended on its well-worn and crudely hand stitched period leather harness strap sectioned to approximately 9 inches in length.   The strap is pierced at the top apparently for display as a wall hanging which is likely how the piece survived.   Formed in the pre-colonial time when the entire eastern seaboard of America was named Virginia from Maine to the Carolinas, the Virginia Company was empowered by the Crown to govern the colonies; this right was not conferred onto the colonies until the dissolution of the Company after considerable hardship and widespread destruction by Natives which all but decimated the English population.  The right to self-government was not taken from the colonies however, thus establishing the wide spread principle among remaining colonists that they should be self-governing.   While the specific history of this piece has been lost in time it is clearly worthy.    <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Lincoln $20.00

 

original! Civil War vintage CANDLE HOLDE $65.00

 

rare! Wadhams / Kinsley & Parker’s Pat $115.00

 

important! THE VIRGINIA COMPANY – harne $175.00




<b>75th Anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg</b>


9 1/2 x 4 1/8, imprinted, multi-colored envelope. Gettysburg, Blue And Gray Reunion, 75th Anniversary, Battle of Gettysburg, 1938, with illustrations of the United States and Confederate flags, and more. Includes an illustration of the Eternal Light Peace Memorial to be dedicated by President [F.D.] Roosevelt, Sunday, July 3, 1938. Pennsylvania State Commission, John S. Rice, Chairman, Gettysburg, Pa. Excellent condition. Very desirable Gettysburg Blue & Gray Reunion collectible.  


Each shoulder knot has a gold bullion border with black felt interior, and a cuff size U.S. Navy button with eagle and anchor motif. The reverse is lined with black felt, and has a hinged brass fastener and hook. The manufacturer's name, address and trade mark is stamped on the brass fastener, J. Starkey, 23 Conduit St., London, with their trade mark logo to the left. Post Civil War period, circa late 1800's. Both of these United States naval shoulder knots are in excellent condition.


The manufacturing company, Joseph Starkey, was based in London, and they were embroiderers, gold and silver lace men, and makers of military accoutrements.       


<b>United States Congressman from Delaware</b>


(1814-1896) Born in Concord, Sussex County, Del., he attended the Newark Academy, graduated from Yale College in 1834, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1837, and moved to Georgetown, Delaware, where he commenced practice. He served as the Secretary of State of Delaware, from 1841-1844. He was a U.S. Congressman, from 1845-51, serving as the chairman of the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds. He was appointed Associate Justice of the Delaware Superior Court in 1855, and he served in that position until 1893. As a member of the 1861 peace conference held in Washington, D.C., he tried to prevent the country from plunging into civil war.

    

<u>Signature with Place</u>: 5 x 1 1/4, in ink, John W. Houston, Geo.[rge] Town, Delaware.  


6 1/2 x 3 5/8. July 1-3, 1863. Blue shield design with stripes within it, and 2 stars above. There is a map of the key points on the Gettysburg battlefield inside of the shield, and First Day of Issue within a riband below. Civil War Centennial, with the dates, 1861-1961, 1865-1965, with a vignette of crossed U.S. and Confederate flags, cannon, and drum. Published by ABC Cachets. Excellent.

Blue & Gray Reunion Cover, Gettysburg 19 $15.00

 

Pair of United States Navy Shoulder Knot $195.00

 

Autograph, John W. Houston

 

Gettysburg Patriotic Cover, Civil War Ce $5.00




By Justin G. Turner, and Linda Levitt Turner, with an introduction by Fawn M. Brodie. Published by Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1972. First Edition. Hardcover with illustrated dust jacket. 750 pages, with bibliography, index, and illustrations. The book is in very nice condition, it is tight and clean, with some very minor foxing to the page ends, and very minor wear to the dust jacket. Very desirable subject matter regarding the life of this independent thinking Kentucky belle who would become the wife of Abe Lincoln & ultimately the first lady of the United States. A must have for any Lincoln collector!



From her exuberant girlhood, she was courted by both Abraham Lincoln, and his rival, Stephen A. Douglas, through the White House years, to the bleak wanderings of her widowhood, here, for the first time, is the authentic voice of one of the most misunderstood figures in our history-Abraham Lincoln's wife.


All her available letters (609), of which more than half have never before been published, are now brought together. They span forty-two years; they are addressed not only to her husband, children, and friends, but also to such historical figures as Edwin M. Stanton, Charles Sumner, General Ulysses S. Grant, and Queen Victoria. They have been gathered from archives and attics, and are interwoven with an authoritative, intensely human biographical narrative in a book that shatters the distorted image, indeed caricature, that is the Mary Todd Lincoln of popular myth.


In letter after letter, the real woman emerges; the sought after belle with a mind of her own who married a poor nobody against her family's wishes; the young bride, accustomed to luxury, trying to make a home in one room of a public inn; the indulgent mother, run ragged by her growing brood of boys; the ambitious helpmate of an equally ambitious young lawyer, legislator, congressman-entertaining for him, giving him company, and shrewd opinions on speaking trips throughout the country.


And then, Mrs. President Lincoln, stunned by the hostility of Washington society; letting fly at Cabinet members; meddling in political appointments and military affairs; outdoing all previous First Ladies in grandeur, and piling up huge debts for clothes, jewels, and furnishings; presiding over her salon in the Blue Room with wit and grace, but failing to notice that it was filled with sycophants eager to make use of her. And the private Mary Lincoln, beset by personal tragedies, by the death of sons, by the Confederate allegiance of most of her family, by periods of psychic disturbance and breakdowns, yet all the while trying to cheer and ease her burdened and moody husband. Finally-the ultimate tragedy, the assassination. And the widow, ignored, sick, and weak, pursued by creditors, fighting for many years to get even a small pension, fleeing to foreign lands to escape the ridicule of the vampire press, asking, can life be endured.


Like the woman herself, her letters by turn charm, amuse, infuriate, and command passion-in a book that provide an important new source for historians, and at long last give Mary Todd Lincoln her own day in court.     


<b>The younger brother of General John Hunt Morgan!


Captured during General Morgan's famous raid into Ohio in 1863!


Very rare Civil War Prisoner of War cover sent by Captain C.H. Morgan via a Flag of Truce to Mrs. General John Hunt Morgan!</b>


(1839-1912) He graduated from Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky, in 1859, and soon after was appointed the United States Consul to Messina, Italy. While serving as a U.S. Government representative, he joined the fight for Italian independence, and was wounded in action. He resigned his post in 1861 to serve in London as the Secretary of the Southern Committee. When the War Between the States broke out he returned home to Kentucky and joined the Confederate Army. He was wounded and captured at the battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, April 6, 1862. After his exchange, he was commissioned captain, and served in his brother General John Hunt Morgan's Kentucky command as his aide-de-camp. He was captured along with his brother John, and his brother-in-law General Basil Duke, in July 1863 during General Morgan's celebrated Ohio Raid. Initially confined at the Ohio State Penitentiary in Columbus, Ohio, he was later transferred to Fort Delaware in February 1864. He was eventually released from captivity in 1865 just prior to the cessation of hostilities.  After the war he spent 15 years as a steward at the East Kentucky Lunatic Asylum. He married Ellen Key Howard, the niece of Francis Scott Key the author of The Star Spangled Banner. He was the father of Thomas Hunt Morgan, whose work in chromosomal heredity earned him the Nobel Prize in 1933. Charlton Hunt Morgan died on October 10, 1912, and is buried in Lexington Cemetery, Fayette County, Kentucky.


<u>Civil War Prisoner of War Cover Sent via Flag of Truce</u>: 4 1/2 x 2 5/8, endorsed and addressed in ink in the hand of Captain Charlton Hunt Morgan as follows: "Via Flag of truce, From C.H. Morgan, Prisoner of War. Mrs. Genl. Jno. H. Morgan, Care Col. Thos. Fleming, Augusta, Ga." Light wear and a few small stains at the edges. Very neat and bold handwriting. Very rare and desirable!!


<b>Please note that the illustrations of General John Hunt Morgan and his wife Mattie, and of Captain Charlton H. Morgan [taken in 1864 by John L. Gilhon while Morgan was a prisoner of war at Fort Delaware] are for display purposes only. They are not part of the lot you are buying. However, I will include Xerox copies of them with your purchase.</b> 


WBTS Trivia: The recipient of Captain C.H. Morgan's letter was Martha "Mattie" Ready Morgan, the wife of his brother General John Hunt Morgan. She was the daughter of United States Congressman Charles Ready of Tennessee. Mattie travelled with her aunt, Mrs. C.S.W. Fleming, and her husband, Colonel Thomas W. Fleming, to Augusta, Georgia, at different periods of the war.


On the night of September 3, 1864, while en-route to attack Union forces near Knoxville, General John Hunt Morgan camped near Greenville, Tennessee. Early the next morning he was surprised by a detachment of Union cavalry and was killed in the garden of the house where he had been sleeping, shot in the back while attempting to retreat and rally his men. General J.H. Morgan is also buried in Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky.          


<b>Photographed in Louisville, Kentucky</b>


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Large bust view of a heavily bearded Confederate officer wearing a double breasted Confederate uniform coat. His beard obscures any rank on his collar. Nicely signed in ink on the reverse, J.A. Benton, Louisville, Ky. Backmark: J.C. Elrod, Photographer, 136 Main, below 4th, Louisville, Ky. Excellent identified Confederate image.  


<b>Fought in the War for Texas Independence, 1835-36


Killed at the battle of Blair's Landing, Louisiana in 1864</b>


(1814-64) He graduated from the University of Nashville, and studied law under his father who was a justice of the Tennessee Supreme Court. Green left Tennessee in 1835 to join the Texas volunteers and fought in the Texan Revolution, 1835–36.  At the Battle of San Jacinto, he helped operate the famed "Twin Sisters" cannons, the only artillery present in General Sam Houston's army. A few days after their decisive victory, Houston rewarded Green with a commission as lieutenant. In early May, he was promoted to major and assigned as aide-de-camp to General Thomas J. Rusk. In 1840, he participated in the campaign against the Comanche Indians on the Colorado River. During the Mexican War, he served under General Zachary Taylor, recruited a company of Texas Rangers, designated the 1st Texas Rifles, and served as their captain during the 1846 capture of Monterrey. He served as clerk of the Texas Supreme Court, 1841-61, in the Republic of Texas, and the State of Texas. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he was appointed colonel of the 5th Texas Cavalry which he led at the battle of Valverde, New Mexico Territory. He distinguished himself at Galveston, Texas, and under General Richard Taylor in Louisiana. Promoted to brigadier general, May 20, 1863, he saw action in the Red River campaign, at the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, and he was killed in action at Blair's Landing, Louisiana,  on April 12, 1864, when he was struck by a shell from one of the Union gunboats.


<u>Signature with Date</u>: 4 x 2, in ink, Filed Oct. 5, 1857, T. Green, Clk., S.C. This was written by Green when he served as clerk of the Texas Supreme Court.

Mary Todd Lincoln, Her Life And Letters $25.00

 

Captain Charlton Hunt Morgan Signed & Ad $495.00

 

CDV, Identified Confederate Civil War Of

 

Autograph, General Thomas Green




This imprinted folio letter sheet measures 7 3/4 x 9 3/4, with vignette of the New Jersey State Seal at upper left with the motto, "Liberty And Prosperity." Imprint at upper right, "HEAD-QUARTERS, Mercer Brigade, New Jersey State Militia, 186_. Excellent condition. Comes with a large business size envelope, 8 1/4 x 3 1/2, with the New Jersey State Seal at left, with imprint above, "State of New Jersey." Imprint at upper right, "HEAD-QUARTERS, Mercer Brigade, N.J.S.M." Mfg. imprint, A.W. Orr, N.Y. Very fine. Extremely desirable, and very scarce, pair of New Jersey, Civil War items which are unused.           


<b>War period signature with rank


Wounded 3 times during the Civil War


United States Attorney General</b>


(1820-91) Born in Charlestown, Mass., he graduated from Harvard in 1838, and Harvard Law School in 1840. He was admitted to the bar in Franklin Country where he practiced law from 1841-49. Devens had a very notable antebellum career as a lawyer, Massachusetts State Senator, U.S. Marshal, orator, and U.S. Attorney General. Forced to participate in the return of an escaped slave to his owner while serving as marshal, he attempted to purchase, unsuccessfully, the bondsman's liberty with his own funds. Immediately upon President Lincoln's call for volunteers, Devens, a militia brigadier, offered his services, and on on April 16, 1861, Devens gave an impassioned speech at Mechanics Hall in Worcester to a large crowd where he called upon the young men of Worcester to rise and go with him to rescue Washington.  Shortly afterwards he was mustered in as Major of the 3rd Battalion of Massachusetts Rifles, a 90 days unit. Devens was later commissioned Colonel of the 15th Massachusetts Infantry and fought at Ball's Bluff, where a uniform button saved his life when he was struck by a rifle ball and wounded. Promoted to Brigadier General of volunteers on April 15, 1862, he commanded a brigade at the battle of Seven Pines during the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and was again wounded. At the battle of Fredericksburg, Devens commanded a brigade of the 6th Army Corps, and at Chancellorsville, where he was wounded a third time, he directed a division in General O.O. Howard's 11th Army Corps. According to a report by General Steward L. Woodford, who served with him, General Devens remounted his horse, stayed with his men, and did not go to the hospital until his men had bivouacked. Upon his return to duty, he commanded a division of the Army of the James 1864-65, distinguishing himself at the battle of Cold Harbor, Va., while commanding the 3rd Division, 18th Army Corps in General Ulysses S. Grant's Overland Campaign. During the final stages of the Siege of Petersburg, he commanded the 3rd Division of the 24th Army Corps. His troops were the first to occupy Richmond, Va., after its capture in April 1865. Devens remained in the army for a year as commander of the Military District of Charleston, South Carolina, before mustering out of the army and returning home. He later served as the fifth Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic from 1873–75, and was also a veteran companion of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. He served as a Judge of the Massachusetts Superior Court, 1867-73, and was an Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court, 1873-77. He served as the United States Attorney General, 1877-81, in the cabinet of President Rutherford B. Hayes.


<u>War Period Signature with Rank</u>: 6 7/8 x 2, in ink, Yours Respty., Chas. Devens, Brig. Gen. U.S. Vols., Comdg. 3d Div., 24 Army Corps. Age toning.  


<b>Severely wounded in the battle of 1st Manassas, Virginia</b>


(1824-93) Graduated in the West Point class of 1845. He won the brevets of 1st lieutenant and captain for gallantry at Cerro Gordo and Contreras during the Mexican War. From 1849-52, he was assistant professor of mathematics at West Point. Later he served in the Indian campaigns on the Texas frontier. A native of Florida, he resigned his commission on April 6, 1861, at the time that Florida seceded from the Union. He entered the Confederate service as a lieutenant colonel and served in the Shenandoah Valley under General Joseph E. Johnston. On June 17, 1861, E.K. Smith was commissioned brigadier general in the Provisional Army of the Confederate States and was severely wounded at 1st Manassas. He was promoted to major general on October 11, 1861, and in 1862 he was in command of the District of East Tennessee. Smith participated in General Braxton Bragg's invasion of Kentucky, and won a decisive victory at Richmond, Ky., on August 30, 1862. He became lieutenant general from October 9, 1862. From 1862-65 he was in command of the Trans-Mississippi Department, and received permanent rank of general in the Provisional Army on February 19, 1864. In the spring of 1864, his army repelled the Red River expedition of General N.P. Banks. Smith was almost the last Confederate general in the field, but in a hopelessly isolated situation, he finally surrendered his troops to General E.R.S. Canby on May 26, 1865. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in Confederate uniform. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, Manufacturers of the best Photographic Albums. Light age toning, a few discoloration spots in the background area, and light wear.  


<b>United States Senator from Delaware

 

Secretary of State of Delaware</b>


(1783-1863) Born in New Haven, Conn., he graduated from Yale College in 1801, studied law, was admitted to the bar, and commenced practice in New Haven. He subsequently moved to Philadelphia and Baltimore where he continued to practice law, and ultimately moved to Wilmington, Delaware in 1815, where he was the president of the National Bank of Wilmington  and Brandywine. He served as Secretary of State of Delaware 1845-1849. He served as U.S. Congressman from Delaware 1849-51.  He was one of the founders of Delaware College, in Newark, Delaware.


<u>Signature with State</u>: 4 3/4 x 1, in ink, John Wales, Delaware.

Mercer Brigade, New Jersey State Militia $35.00

 

Autograph, General Charles Devens $95.00

 

CDV, General Edmund Kirby Smith $150.00

 

Autograph, John Wales




<b>War Period Signature with Rank</b>


(1814-79) Born in Hadley, Mass., he was the grandson of a captain who fought in the Revolutionary War. Graduating in the West Point class of 1837, Hooker was commissioned 2nd lieutenant in the 1st U.S. Artillery. His first assignment was fighting in Florida in the 2nd Seminole Indian War. He served in the Mexican War in the campaigns of General Zachary Taylor, and General Winfield Scott, and was cited for gallantry in the battles of Monterrey, National Bridge and Chapultepec. Hooker left the army in 1853, and settled in Sonoma County, California where he was a farmer and land developer. He held a commission as colonel in the California Militia, 1859-61. When the Civil War broke out Hooker requested a commission, but his application was rejected very probably because of resentment held against him by General Winfield Scott, General-in-Chief of the U.S. Army. Hooker had testified against his former commander Scott in the court-martial case of Gideon J. Pillow (future Confederate General) for insubordination. After the Union Army's defeat at the 1st battle of Bull Run, Va., Hooker wrote a letter directly to President Abraham Lincoln whereby he complained of military mismanagement and touted his own abilities and qualifications and once again requested a commission. Lincoln consented and commissioned him brigadier general of volunteers, in August 1861. He commanded a brigade and then a division around Washington, D.C., as part of the effort to organize, and train the new Army of the Potomac, commanded by General George B. McClellan. During the 1862 Virginia Peninsula Campaign, he commanded the 2nd Division of the 3rd Corps, and made a good name for himself as a combat leader who handled himself well, and aggressively sought out the key points on battlefields. He led his division with distinction at the battles of Williamsburg and Seven Pines. He became extremely annoyed at the cautious generalship of General McClellan and openly criticized his commander's failure to capture Richmond. Commenting on McClellan's leadership, General Hooker was quoted as saying that, "He is not only not a soldier, but he does not know what soldier-ship is." Hooker was promoted to major general on July 26, 1862. Following the second battle of Bull Run, Va., Hooker replaced General Irvin McDowell as commander of the 3rd Corps, Army of Virginia, soon re-designated the 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac. During the Maryland Campaign, he led the 1st Corps at the battles for South Mountain, and at Antietam, where his corps launched the first assault of the bloodiest day in American military history, driving south into the corps of General Stonewall Jackson, where they fought each other to a standstill. Hooker, aggressive and inspiring to his men, left the battle that morning with a foot wound. The battle of Fredericksburg, Va., fought on December 13, 1862, was another Union debacle. Upon recovering from his foot wound, General Hooker was briefly made commander of the 5th Corps, but was then promoted to "Grand Division" command, that consisted of both the 3rd and the 5th Corps. He was contemptuous about Burnside's plan to assault the fortified heights of Fredericksburg, deeming it "preposterous." His Grand Division suffered terrible losses in their futile assaults which were ordered by General Burnside over General Hooker's vehement protests. Burnside followed up this battle with the humiliating Mud March in January 1863, and Hooker's criticism of his commander bordered on formal insubordination. He described Burnside as a "wretch ... of blundering sacrifice." Burnside planned a wholesale purge of his subordinates, including Hooker, and drafted an order for the president's approval. He stated that Hooker was "unfit to hold an important commission during a crisis like the present," but President Lincoln had run out of patience, and instead removed Burnside as Commander of the Army of the Potomac. Lincoln then appointed General Joseph Hooker to command of the Army of the Potomac, on January 26, 1863. Some members of the army saw this move as inevitable, given Hooker's reputation for aggressive fighting, something sorely lacking in his predecessors. Hooker's plan for the spring and summer campaign of 1863 was both elegant and promising. He first planned to send his cavalry corps deep into the enemy's rear, disrupting supply lines and distracting him from the main attack. He would pin down General Robert E. Lee's much smaller army at Fredericksburg, while taking the large bulk of the Army of the Potomac on a flanking march to strike Lee in his rear. Once Lee was defeated, he could move on to seize Richmond. Unfortunately for Hooker and the Union, the execution of his plan did not match the elegance of the plan itself. The Union and Confederate armies would fatefully meet in the epic battle of Chancellorsville, Va., fought on May 1,2,3, 1863, which has been called "Lee's perfect battle," because of his ability to vanquish a much larger foe through audacious tactics. Hooker had a devastating encounter with a cannonball while he was standing on the porch of his headquarters. The ball struck a wooden column against which he was leaning, initially knocking him senseless, and then putting him out of action for the rest of the day with a concussion. Political winds blew strongly in the following weeks as generals maneuvered to overthrow Hooker or to position themselves if Lincoln decided to do so on his own. On the eve of what would become the battle of Gettysburg, President Lincoln had made his decision. On June 28, 1863, 3 days before the epic battle in Pennsylvania, General George G. Meade was promoted to the command of the Army of the Potomac, and accomplished what many considered to be the impossible, he defeated Confederate General Robert E. Lee, and sent his celebrated Army of Northern Virginia, back to Virginia. General Hooker's military career was not ended by his poor performance in the summer of 1863. He went on to regain a reputation as a solid corps commander when he was transferred with the 11th and 12th Corps of the Army of the Potomac westward to reinforce the Army of the Cumberland around Chattanooga, Tennessee. Hooker was in command at the battle of Lookout Mountain, playing an important role in General Ulysses S. Grant's decisive victory at the battle of Chattanooga. He led his corps, now designated as the 20th Corps, competently in the 1864 Atlanta Campaign under General William Tecumseh Sherman, but asked to be relieved before the capture of the city because of his disgust with the promotion of General Oliver O. Howard, upon the death of General James B. McPherson. Not only did Hooker have seniority over Howard, but he blamed Howard for his defeat at Chancellorsville. Howard, who had commanded the 11th Corps, was routed by General Stonewall Jackson's famous flank attack. After leaving Georgia, Hooker commanded the Northern Department, comprising the states of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, with headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio, from October 1, 1864, until the end of the war. After the war, Hooker led President Abraham Lincoln's funeral procession in Springfield, Illinois, on May 4, 1865. He served in command of the Department of the East, and the Department of the Lakes following the war. He was mustered out of the volunteer service on September 1, 1866, and retired from the U.S. Army on October 15, 1868, with the regular army rank of major general. He died on October 31, 1879, while on a visit to Garden City, New York, and is buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio, his wife's home town.


<u>War Period Signature with Rank</u>: 2 3/4 x 1 1/2, in ink, Joseph Hooker, Brig. Gen., Comdg. Age toning. Very popular Civil War autograph.             


Authentic 1863 dated engraving of Major General "Fightin' Joe" Hooker. Full standing view in uniform with rank of major general with sword. Printed facsimile signature below his portrait which was painted by Alonzo Chappel, and executed from the likeness of the latest photograph of Hooker from life. Johnson, Fry & Co., Publishers, New York. Entered according to act of Congress A.D. 1863, Johnson, Fry & Co. in the clerk's office of the district court of the southern district of N.Y. 8 x 10 1/4. 


<u>General Joseph Hooker</u>: (1814-79) Born in Hadley, Mass., he was the grandson of a captain who fought in the Revolutionary War. Graduating in the West Point class of 1837, Hooker was commissioned 2nd lieutenant in the 1st U.S. Artillery. His first assignment was fighting in Florida in the 2nd Seminole Indian War. He served in the Mexican War in the campaigns of General Zachary Taylor, and General Winfield Scott, and was cited for gallantry in the battles of Monterrey, National Bridge and Chapultepec. Hooker left the army in 1853, and settled in Sonoma County, California where he was a farmer and land developer. He held a commission as colonel in the California Militia, 1859-61. When the Civil War broke out Hooker requested a commission, but his application was rejected very probably because of resentment held against him by General Winfield Scott, General-in-Chief of the U.S. Army. Hooker had testified against his former commander Scott in the court-martial case of Gideon J. Pillow (future Confederate General) for insubordination. After the Union Army's defeat at the 1st battle of Bull Run, Va., Hooker wrote a letter directly to President Abraham Lincoln whereby he complained of military mismanagement and touted his own abilities and qualifications and once again requested a commission. Lincoln consented and commissioned him brigadier general of volunteers, in August 1861. He commanded a brigade and then a division around Washington, D.C., as part of the effort to organize, and train the new Army of the Potomac, commanded by General George B. McClellan. During the 1862 Virginia Peninsula Campaign, he commanded the 2nd Division of the 3rd Corps, and made a good name for himself as a combat leader who handled himself well, and aggressively sought out the key points on battlefields. He led his division with distinction at the battles of Williamsburg and Seven Pines. He became extremely annoyed at the cautious generalship of General McClellan and openly criticized his commander's failure to capture Richmond. Commenting on McClellan's leadership, General Hooker was quoted as saying that, "He is not only not a soldier, but he does not know what soldier-ship is." Hooker was promoted to major general on July 26, 1862. Following the second battle of Bull Run, Va., Hooker replaced General Irvin McDowell as commander of the 3rd Corps, Army of Virginia, soon re-designated the 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac. During the Maryland Campaign, he led the 1st Corps at the battles for South Mountain, and at Antietam, where his corps launched the first assault of the bloodiest day in American military history, driving south into the corps of General Stonewall Jackson, where they fought each other to a standstill. Hooker, aggressive and inspiring to his men, left the battle that morning with a foot wound. The battle of Fredericksburg, Va., fought on December 13, 1862, was another Union debacle. Upon recovering from his foot wound, General Hooker was briefly made commander of the 5th Corps, but was then promoted to "Grand Division" command, that consisted of both the 3rd and the 5th Corps. He was contemptuous about Burnside's plan to assault the fortified heights of Fredericksburg, deeming it "preposterous." His Grand Division suffered terrible losses in their futile assaults which were ordered by General Burnside over General Hooker's vehement protests. Burnside followed up this battle with the humiliating Mud March in January 1863, and Hooker's criticism of his commander bordered on formal insubordination. He described Burnside as a "wretch ... of blundering sacrifice." Burnside planned a wholesale purge of his subordinates, including Hooker, and drafted an order for the president's approval. He stated that Hooker was "unfit to hold an important commission during a crisis like the present," but President Lincoln had run out of patience, and instead removed Burnside as Commander of the Army of the Potomac. Lincoln then appointed General Joseph Hooker to command of the Army of the Potomac, on January 26, 1863. Some members of the army saw this move as inevitable, given Hooker's reputation for aggressive fighting, something sorely lacking in his predecessors. Hooker's plan for the spring and summer campaign of 1863 was both elegant and promising. He first planned to send his cavalry corps deep into the enemy's rear, disrupting supply lines and distracting him from the main attack. He would pin down General Robert E. Lee's much smaller army at Fredericksburg, while taking the large bulk of the Army of the Potomac on a flanking march to strike Lee in his rear. Once Lee was defeated, he could move on to seize Richmond. Unfortunately for Hooker and the Union, the execution of his plan did not match the elegance of the plan itself. The Union and Confederate armies would fatefully meet in the epic battle of Chancellorsville, Va., fought on May 1,2,3, 1863, which has been called "Lee's perfect battle" because of his ability to vanquish a much larger foe through audacious tactics. Hooker had a devastating encounter with a cannonball while he was standing on the porch of his headquarters. The ball struck a wooden column against which he was leaning, initially knocking him senseless, and then putting him out of action for the rest of the day with a concussion. Political winds blew strongly in the following weeks as generals maneuvered to overthrow Hooker or to position themselves if Lincoln decided to do so on his own. On the eve of what would become the battle of Gettysburg, President Lincoln had made his decision. On June 28, 1863, 3 days before the epic battle in Pennsylvania, General George G. Meade was promoted to the command of the Army of the Potomac, and accomplished what many considered to be the impossible, he defeated Confederate General Robert E. Lee, and sent his celebrated Army of Northern Virginia, back to Virginia. General Hooker's military career was not ended by his poor performance in the summer of 1863. He went on to regain a reputation as a solid corps commander when he was transferred with the 11th and 12th Corps of the Army of the Potomac westward to reinforce the Army of the Cumberland around Chattanooga, Tennessee. Hooker was in command at the battle of Lookout Mountain, playing an important role in General Ulysses S. Grant's decisive victory at the battle of Chattanooga. He led his corps, now designated as the 20th Corps, competently in the 1864 Atlanta Campaign under General William Tecumseh Sherman, but asked to be relieved before the capture of the city because of his disgust with the promotion of General Oliver O. Howard, upon the death of General James B. McPherson. Not only did Hooker have seniority over Howard, but he blamed Howard for his defeat at Chancellorsville. Howard, who had commanded the 11th Corps, was routed by General Stonewall Jackson's famous flank attack. After leaving Georgia, Hooker commanded the Northern Department, comprising the states of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, with headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio, from October 1, 1864, until the end of the war. After the war, Hooker led President Abraham Lincoln's funeral procession in Springfield, Illinois, on May 4, 1865. He served in command of the Department of the East, and the Department of the Lakes following the war. He was mustered out of the volunteer service on September 1, 1866, and retired from the U.S. Army on October 15, 1868, with the regular army rank of major general. He died on October 31, 1879, while on a visit to Garden City, New York, and is buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio, his wife's home town.            


<b>War Period Signature With Rank</b>


(1819-1893) Famous for his association with the invention of the game of baseball. At Cooperstown, N.Y., home of the Baseball Hall of Fame, the baseball diamond there is named after him. From a prominent New York family, his grandfather fought in the American Revolution, his father was a two term Congressman and both his brothers were colonels in the Civil War. He graduated from the West Point class of 1842, and served in the Mexican War with the artillery branch of service. In April 1861, Doubleday served in the garrison at Fort Sumter, and he was said to have aimed the first gun to reply to the Confederate batteries. Appointed a brigadier general, he commanded a brigade of McDowell's corps during the 2nd Bull Run campaign. At Antietam and Fredericksburg, he commanded a division of the 1st corps. His greatest performance of the war came at Gettysburg when he assumed command of the 1st corps after the death of General John F. Reynolds. Doubleday remained in the U.S. Army after the Civil War, retiring in 1873.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 4 x 1 1/4, in ink, A. Doubleday, Major Genl. Vol.  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Full standing view of a young Confederate soldier wearing a shell jacket and kepi with the brim turned up. He poses with his hand on a studio table with table covering at his side. No imprint. Possibly a Confederate cavalryman or artilleryman. Light age toning, and wear, and  a surface abrasion to the reverse of the card.

Autograph, General Joseph Hooker $150.00

 

General Joseph Hooker $15.00

 

Autograph, General Abner Doubleday

 

CDV, Confederate Civil War Soldier $125.00




Gold hanger at the top of the badge with straight pin fastener on the reverse. Attached to the hanger is a large 1 3/4 x 1 3/4 celluloid button with color vignette of a mounted cavalryman holding his saber. Blank reverse. Attached to the hanger is a gold ribbon with black imprint, 10th N.Y. Cavalry Veterans 43rd Anniversary And Reunion At Hotel Crandall, Binghamton, N.Y. Sept. 21-22-23, 1904. The overall length of the badge is 7 1/4 inches. The celluloid button is slightly discolored, there is a small 1/4 inch tear near where the ribbon and hanger connect, the ribbon shows a few small red and blue ink spots at the bottom left, some discoloration and wear, and the bottom of the ribbon is frayed. Comes displayed in a 6 x 8 1/4, glass faced case with blue velvet background.  


Among the most important engagements of the 10th New York Cavalry were Leesburg, Beverly Ford, Middleburg, Gettysburg, Shepherdstown, Sulphur Springs, Auburn, Bristoe Station, Todd's Tavern, Haw's Shop, Trevilian Station, King and Queen Court House, St. Mary's Church, Deep Bottom, Lee's Mill, Reams' Station, Poplar Spring Church, Boydton Plank Road, Prince George Court House, Stony Creek Station, Hatcher's Run, Dinwiddie Court House, Sailor's Creek, Farmville and at Appomattox Court House. [Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2].

    


<b>From Headquarters Army of the United States</b>


5 1/4 x 3 1/2, with imprint at upper left, Headquarters Army Of The United States. Postmarked, Washington, D.C., Feb. 24, 6 A.M., with 2 cents red/brown George Washington postage stamp. (A57-effective date October 1, 1883). Addressed to Mr. Wilmer Moore, No. 20 Cane Street, Atlanta, Ga. Partial circular date stamped on the reverse, Atlanta, Ga., Feb. 25, 1885, Recd.,12 P.M., with a docket in pencil, "Sheridan," presumably written by the recipient. The envelope is not addressed by Sheridan himself, but most likely was written by one of his aides. The time period fits as Sheridan was appointed Commanding General of the U.S. Army in 1884, and he was probably in Washington, D.C. on the date  this cover was mailed. An interesting footnote about Mr. Moore is that he received an envelope sent to him by General Winfield S. Hancock at about the same time as the Sheridan correspondence. [an item I recently sold]. Although I have not been able to find out any information about Mr. Wilmer Moore, one can fairly speculate that he might have been someone connected to, known by, or of some other importance to have received correspondence from two of the highest ranking Generals in the U.S. Army, General Philip H. Sheridan and General Winfield S. Hancock, within a matter of a few days. Light age toning and wear. 


<u>General Philip H. Sheridan</u>: (1831-88) A prominent Civil War commander, he graduated in the West Point class of 1853. Appointed brigadier general of volunteers, on September 13, 1862, and major general, on March 16, 1863. He fought in the battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, the Chattanooga campaign, Missionary Ridge, Yellow Tavern, Trevilian Station, the 1864 Shenandoah Valley campaign including the battles of Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek, and in the 1865 Appomattox campaign which resulted in the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia commanded by General Robert E. Lee, to name but a few of his battle honors. General Ulysses S. Grant summed up Sheridan's performance in the final days of the Civil War as, "I believe General Sheridan has no superior as a general, either living or dead, and perhaps not an equal." During the Indian Wars General Sheridan saw much action against the Plains Indians in the 1870's. Upon the retirement of General William T. Sherman in 1884, Sheridan became commanding general of the United States Army.  Best described by our photo illustrations we offer this <I>if only it could talk</I> earlier to mid-1800s hat with some trepidation as we have had it for some time as witness to our weakness for such colorful old headgear. Time to move it on though, as we continue our attempt in <I>weeding out</I> a 50 + year accumulation.  Measuring 13 inches across the brim front to back with an 8 inch diameter crown standing 7 ¼  inches high this character rich old <I>stove pipe</I> shows a good amount of period wear and age while remaining sound and with no holes, tears or separations.  The extra wide split leather sweat band indicative of the period remains intact.  An eye pealing classic, the clearly period red, white and blue cockade sets this piece of as a most appealing example of classic Americana.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Best described by our photo illustrations, this attractive period used tobacco pipe will make an attractive  personal item addition set in with any quality Civil War / Indian Wars grouping.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

10th New York Cavalry Reunion Badge

 

Cover Sent by General Philip H. Sheridan $25.00

 

earlier through the Civil War era Beaver $495.00

 

19th century - brier & hard rubber TOBAC $55.00




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