View Orders Back to AntiqueArts Home Page Come and view all that's new! Come and view all that's new! More than 135 upscale Antiques shops Would you like to sell your antiques here? Have a question or suggestion? A comprehensive guide to antiques resources on the World Wide Web
Antique Arts Showcase
What's New in the Collector's Showcase?
The Most Recent Additions to This Category are First!


 Architectural Antiques
 Art
 Autographs
 Bed Bath & Vanity
 Books
 China & Dinnerware
 Clocks & Watches
 Coins & Currency
 Cultures & Ethnicities
 Furniture & Accessories
 Glass
 Jewelry
 Lamps & Lighting
 Memorabilia
 Metalware
 Militaria
 Miscellaneous
 Music Related
 Paper & Ephemera
 Photographica
 Political
 Porcelain & Pottery
 Silver

H 28in. x D 9in.


Multi-faceted smoke glass


Price is per fixture.

Can buy all 3    or 1 only  H 38in. x W 64in. x 12in.  A medical / surgical relic from a time when chloroform was administered by hand utilizing a specially designed <I>dripper</I> bottle and a cloth over the nose and mouth.  (In a search of our personal collection / museum site at MaineLegacy.com you will find an account of how Gettysburg Artillerist, Col. Freeman McGilvery was killed by an overdose of chloroform during simple surgery for a wound of the thumb.)  This little dripper stands approximately 3 3/8 inches including the stopper.   With good evidence of age and period use, yet remaining in pleasing condition, this seldom seen dripper will make a nice addition to any quality medical / surgical grouping.


<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 


(1808-90) Born near Dublin, Ireland. Appointed a midshipman in the U.S. Navy in 1826. His initial cruise was made on the Vincennes, which, between 1827 and 1830, under Commander Bolton, was the first U.S. Man-O-War to circumnavigate the globe. In 1837, he was commissioned lieutenant. He participated actively in the naval operations of the Mexican War; aided in the capture of Monterey and San Diego; served under Stockton at the battle of the Mesa, where he was wounded; led a night attack on the outposts of Mazalan; was present at the bombardment of Guaymas, and captured twenty blockade runners and destroyed a number of gunboats in the Gulf of California. During 1850-53 he was on duty as inspector of ordnance, and organized that department in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. He was promoted to commander on September 14, 1855. In January 1861, he was given command of the steamship Pawnee, which he took from Philadelphia to Washington, and when the Civil War broke out he declared his allegiance to the Federal government. For a time the Pawnee was the principal naval protection of the Union capitol city, and by order of General Winfield Scott, he covered the landing of Colonel Elmer E. Ellsworth's command at Alexandria, Va. On May 25, 1861, Rowan, as commander of the Pawnee, attacked the Confederate forces erecting batteries at Acquia Creek, Va., but hauled off after being struck nine times. He accompanied the expedition under Commander Silas H. Stringham which captured the forts and garrisons at Hatteras Inlet, N.C. He then successively commanded the Brooklyn and the Delaware. On February 7, 1862, under Commodore Louis M. Goldsborough, he led a naval flotilla to the sounds of North Carolina, and on the following day took a leading part in the capture of Roanoke Island. On February 9th, he was ordered to pursue the fleeing Confederates into Albemarle Sound, and on February 10th, destroyed their works and captured their fleet. He also passed up the Pasquotank River, took possession of Elizabeth City and Edenton, and effectively obstructed the Chesapeake and Albemarle Canal. He conducted several other expeditions for the subjugation of the North Carolina coast, and when Goldsborough returned to Hampton Roads succeeded him in command of the fleet. On February 10, 1862, Commander Rowan co-operated with General Ambrose E. Burnside in the capture of Winston, on March 12th in the capture of Newbern, and on April 25th in the capture of Beaufort. Rowan received the Thanks of Congress for his actions, and on July 16, 1862, was promoted to captain. As a reward for his distinguished gallantry he was also promoted to commodore to rank from that same date. When Admiral Dahlgren took command of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Rowan was given the command of the New Ironsides, which was under fire fourteen times in Charleston Harbor, and was struck 133 times. In early 1864, Rowan assumed command of the squadron in the absence of Admiral Dahlgren. He was promoted to rank of rear admiral, on July 25, 1866, and in 1866-67, was commandant of the Norfolk Navy Yard. From 1868-70, he was in command of the Asiatic Squadron. Promoted to vice admiral in 1870, he was commandant of the New York Navy Yard, 1872-79; president of the board of naval examiners, 1879-81; governor of the naval observatory in 1882; and chairman of the light house board in 1883.


<u>Signature with Rank and Date</u>: 3 x 2, in ink, Report to Capt. [Daniel L.] Braine, S.C. Rowan, Vice Admr., Jany. 30/74. Light staining.

MCM pendant lights $650.00

 

TRIPLE HOLOPHANE PENDANT $1500.00

 

19th century Chloroform Dripper $65.00

 

Autograph, Admiral Stephen C. Rowan, U. S $60.00




(1798-1876) Born in Middletown, New York, he entered the navy as a midshipman in 1809. He fought in the War of 1812, the Second Barbary War, the Mexican War, and the Civil War. In 1819, Stringham was serving aboard the Cyane, conveying black settlers to Liberia. While the Cyane was off the African coast, Stringham was given command of a boat and captured four slaver ships. He was then appointed prize-master and sent home with the captured prizes. In 1821, Stringham was appointed First Lieutenant of the brig Hornet, and was promoted to captain in 1841. He served as Commandant  of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, 1845-46. He was appointed commander of the Ohio in 1846, during the Mexican War and took part in the bombardment of Vera Cruz as it was besieged by troops under General Winfield Scott. Afterwards he commanded the Brazil Squadron. In 1851, he took charge of the Gosport Navy Yard, in Va., serving there until 1855, when he was appointed commander of the Mediterranean Squadron, with his flagship being the famous frigate the Cumberland. He then returned to Gosport where he commanded until 1859. Considered to be one of the most trusted confidants of Gideon Welles, the U.S. Secretary of the Navy, Stringham was appointed Flag Officer and commander of the North Atlantic Blockading Fleet, which he led on their successful expedition to Hatteras Inlet, N.C., in 1861, where he innovated a bombardment technique. He was promoted to rank of Rear Admiral, on August 1, 1862, and then served as commandant of the Boston Navy Yard, 1864-66, and later was Port Admiral of New York. He died in Brooklyn, N.Y., on February 7, 1876, and is buried in Green Wood Cemetery, in Brooklyn.


<u>Signature with Rank</u>: 3 3/4 x 3/4, in ink, S.H. Stringham, Commander.  Best described here by our photos, this classic early hand forged iron <I>New Bedford</I> whaling harpoon head dates in the 18th, very early 19th century and is offered here pure and as found on the New England coast.   Measuring 12 ½  inches in length with a tapered socket to accommodate its stout hickory shaft, this blacksmith wrought relic of early whaling is offered here with a natural untouched  surface.  A scarce remnant of nautical Americana.     <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


      Best described as to condition by our photographs except to advise that this Civil War Burnside carbine is <U>entirely original</U> with appropriate metal component government inspector and manufacturer markings and is complete with <U>matching serial numbers</U>.  This so called by collectors <B>5th Model Burnside</B> carbine shows good evidence of period use and carrying, to include a <I>telltale</I> carbine shoulder sling hook scar at the wrist just above the sling ring.     Remaining in pleasing condition with no breaks, cracks or repairs, the piece offers desirable natural age surfaces, all free of <I>dreaded</I> modern day over cleaning. 

     Of significance to the Civil War collector / historian will be that a search of the <I> Springfield Research Service</I> coveted four volume serial number reference, places this serial number <B>29271</B>, squarely between listed Burnside Cavalry Carbines #29256 and #29288 <U>both issued to Troop C,</U>  <B>2nd Illinois Cavalry</B> .  With only fifteen arms separating our #29271 and # 29256 and  seventeen carbines  between this arm and #29288, there is little room for doubt that this gun was in the same case lot as issued to the troops of Co. C 2nd Illinois Cavalry.   Of even more interest, especially to the Confederate collector, will be the <U>Confederate capture and reissue marking on the buttstock just below the lower tang.</U>  (see: Steven W. Knott’s <B><I>Captured & Collected Confederate Reissued Firearms</I></B>)  Additional provenance as to 2nd Illinois Cavalry issue, with good indication of the appropriateness of the Confederate capture marking on this arm, is offered by the identification of yet another 2nd Ill. Cavalry Burnside (#2888)  issued to Co. D bearing Confederate capture and reissue marking. (see: lodgewood.com/Burnside_p_3733.html )   

     A general word on the Burnside cavalry carbine and captured and reissued Confederate guns as referenced in Steven W. Knott's excellent book, <I>Captured & Collected Confederate Reissued Firearms</I>.  Designed by Rhode Island Governor, Ambrose Burnside before his stint as a Union General, the .54 caliber Burnside carbine was the first breech loading metallic cartridge carbine of the Civil War.  Evolving from the 1st Model through what is commonly referred to by collectors as the <I>5th Model</I>, which was produced from late 1863 through the end of the war and officially referred to as the Model 1863 by the Government, even though the receivers of the guns were marked Model 1864, the Burnside was the third most issued cavalry carbine of the Civil War with rarely recognized examples falling into Confederate hands as captured and reissued weapons.    Knott's  volume on the subject offers illustrated documentation on all manner of arms being picked up from battlefields and sent back to Confederate arsenals where they would be inspected and repaired as necessary before being reissued into Confederate service.  These Confederate weapons can be identified by a distinctive font single letter A, F, Q, T & Z inspector's stamp found on the underside of the stock in front of the trigger assembly or behind the lower tang.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>



<U>A note about firearms:</U>   WE EMPHASIZE HERE THAT THIS PIECE IS CONSIDERED AN ANTIQUE / COLLECTABLE AND IS THEREFORE OUTSIDE  FEDERAL RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO COVERED (MODERN) FIREARMS. THE PIECE IS OFFERED AS A HISTORICAL COLLECTABLE ONLY AND THOUGH MECHANICALLY OPERABLE, IS NOT TO BE CONSIDERED  FIREABLE UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES. THE PURCHASER ASSUMES ALL LIABILITY FOR PURCHAS, CONTROL AND OWNERSHIP.  <U>PURCHASE OF THIS ITEM WILL CONSTITUTE A FULL UNDERSTANDING OF AND AGREEMENT WITH  THE ABOVE. </U>





 


(1811-90) Born in Charleston, S.C., he was appointed midshipman in April, 1828, and performed his first services in the West Indies and the Mediterranean Sea. He was promoted to lieutenant in 1841, and during the Mexican War was at Vera Cruz and Tampico, commanding the siege guns in the bombardment of Vera Cruz. He was promoted to commander in September 1855, and in 1859-60, he commanded the Dolphin in the Paraguay expedition and for a time had charge of the Brazilian squadron. When the Civil War broke out, Steedman although of Southern birth, remained loyal to the Union. He volunteered to Admiral Dupont for any service needed and rendered great and timely assistance in keeping open railroad communications between Washington and the North. He later served with the Mississippi squadron and then was assigned to the command of the Bienville of the North Atlantic squadron, and led the second column of Admiral Dupont's fleet in the attack and capture of Port Royal, S.C. Steedman aided in the capture of all the ports south of Savannah, and then, returning to the North, was, in the spring of 1862, transferred to the command of the Paul Jones. In August, 1862, he participated in the capture of Fort McAllister; on September 17th, he engaged the batteries at St. John's Bluff, Florida, and two weeks later, with the cooperation of land forces, forced their surrender. He was promoted to captain in September 1862, and was transferred to the Powhatan, which he served on for several months in the blockade of his hometown of Charleston. After towing the captured ram, Atlanta, to Philadelphia, in 1864, he took command of the Ticonderoga and pursued the Confederate cruiser Florida into Brazilian waters. Returning to the North Atlantic squadron, he saw action at both attacks on Fort Fisher, N.C., and then served for two years with the Mediterranean squadron. He was on special service in 1868, and from 1869 until 1872 he commanded the Boston Navy Yard. He was commissioned to rank of commodore in July 1866, and rear admiral, in May 1871. 


<u>Signature with branch of service</u>: 4 1/2 x 1, in ink, Chas. Steedman, U.S. Navy.

Autograph, Admiral Silas H. Stringham, U $65.00

 

1700s early 1800s Hand forged Whaling Ha $145.00

 

2nd Illinois Cavalry issue – Confederate $2350.00

 

Autograph, Admiral Charles Steedman, U. S $50.00

Drawing depicting Warren and Harold Shinn done in 1897 using pen and ink by American artist Everett Shinn (1876-1953) as indicated by his signature and date on the drawing.  The drawing was possibly done for use as an illustration.  Approximate visible image dimensions are 22.5"w x 18.5"h.  The drawing is matted and framed in a black frame.  There is some age toning to the paper and water staining to the mat.


Would be glad to answer any questions you may have and/or provide a cost for mailing this item.  Painting depicting performers waiting in line to go through a stage door done using charcoal and gouache by American artist Everett Shinn (1876-1953) in 1915 as indicated by his signature and date on the painting.  Approximate visible painted image dimensions are 18.75"w x 13.75"h.  The painting is matted and framed in a black frame.  The painting has a Berry-Hill Gallery exhibition label.


Would be glad to answer any questions you may have and/or provide a cost for mailing this item.  Painting depicting a woman at a chicken coop done using pastels on paper by American artist Everett Shinn (1876-1953) in 1899 as indicated by his signature and date.  Approximate painted image dimensions are 22"w x 17"h.  The painting is framed in a wood frame with gold liner.  Has a small bit of paint loss on the fence post to the left of the lower part of the woman's skirt.


Would be glad to answer any questions you may have and/or provide a cost for mailing this item.  


<b>United States Congressman from Alabama


Elected to the Confederate Congress in 1863


Tragically killed in 1864!</b>


(1807-64)  He was born in Rhea County, Tenn., moved with his father to Bellefontaine, Alabama,  settled on a plantation, and was engaged in growing cotton. He served as a Representative in the Alabama State House, 1845-46, and was a U.S. Congressman 1847-61. He served as chairman on the Committee on Revisal and Unfinished Business, and also served on the Committee on Public Lands. He withdrew from the U.S. Congress in 1861, when Alabama seceded from the Union, and was unsuccessful in his bid to become a Confederate Congressman. Returning to his cotton plantation for the next 2 years, he was elected as a member of the Confederate Congress in 1863, but did not take his seat when the new Congress met because he was expelled by the unanimous vote of his colleagues for suspicion of being disloyal. Mr. Cobb met with a tragic, accidental death on November 11, 1864, when he was shot to death by his own pistol during the construction of a fence on his plantation near Bellefontaine, Alabama. He is buried at the Cobb family estate, near Cobb’s Bridge, in Madison County, Alabama.        


<u>Signature with place</u>:  5 x 1, in ink, W.R.W. Cobb, Bellefonte, Ala. Trimmed closely at the top.

PEN & INK DRAWING DEPICTING TWO FIGURES $1500.00

 

STAGE DOOR PAINTING BY AMERICAN ARTIST E $12500.00

 

AMERICAN ARTIST EVERETT SHINN PASTEL PAI $17500.00

 

Autograph, William R. W. Cobb $25.00




<b>United States Congressman & Senator from Alabama


Governor of Alabama</b>


(1811-79)  Born near Franklin, Tennessee, he moved with his parents to Lauderdale County, Alabama, attended an academy there, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1831, and commenced a practice in Florence, Ala. Served as a member of the Alabama State House of Representatives in 1832, and was a U.S. Congressman from 1841-49, and 1851-61. He was chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means, and also served on the Judiciary Committee. He served as the Governor of Alabama 1874-78, and was a U.S. Senator from March 4, 1879, until his death on December 31, 1879. He is buried in Athens City Cemetery. 


<u>Signature with place</u>:  4 x 1, in ink, Geo. S. Houston, Athens, Ala.

 This exceptionally well-wrought black iron <I>sticking tommy</I> candle holder measure approximately 11 ½ inches in length and remains in excellent original condition while offering good evidence of age and originality.  Popular among collectors of antique mining memorabilia, with a frequent emphasis on gold and silver mining in the American West these easy to carry and convenient to use lighting implements saw wide application in 18th through mid-19th century.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  With little change in design and construction through a considerable period of popular use, (from approximately the period of the Civil War through WW I) dating of such binoculars as Civil War era takes a bit of care. Knowledgeable collector / historians in the field generally consider the diameter of the eye piece lens as telltale with the larger 7/8 inch diameter eye piece lenses such as is offered here considered to be true Civil War vintage. With little if any change otherwise, these French import binoculars were utilized by American military for decades with the eye piece lenses becoming progressively smaller until they were soon less than half the size of the Civil War variety.  While demonstrating appropriate age with good evidence of period use and carrying, this pair remain in unusually nice condition, complete and operable with desirable <I> LEMAIRE FABT PARIS</I> marking, excellent optics and original leather covering on body and lens shades. (see: W.C. Davis <I>Fighting Men of the Civil War</I> Union Signal Corps, p. 184)  Most frequently exposed to hard service, true Civil War vintage examples are seldom encountered in this condition.  Note: Established circa 1846, Armand Lemaire produced some of the periods finest optics to include early telegraph operator telescopes, the camera obscura, early scientific microscopes. His binoculars saw popular military use during the Civil War to include those for the U. S. Signal Corps.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Commercially repurposed for sale from <I>army surplus</I> this attractive old bell measures approximately 3 ¼ inches across the mouth and stands about 6 inches high.  The bell remains in excellent untouched and original condition retaining a pleasing bronze patina and a goodly amount of its black enamel on the handle.  The bell sports an attractive cast in panoply of American Eagles with shield, banner and star bursts.  Examples of these bells, with an account of their origin, may be seen in the U. S. Army Quartermaster Museum collection at Fort Lee, Virginia.   These bells were cast in four sizes (this being the smallest) under contract to the U. S. Army during the Pierce and Buchanan administrations for use by experimental Army camel pack trains moving from Texas to the West Coast.  A solution to the occurrence of blinding dust storms, Camels were trained to <I>march in line</I> following the sound of the bell of preceding camel during long treks. The bells are said to have been later pressed into use by the Army during the Civil War with collectors of that era frequently referring  to these  artifacts as <I>Union Cavalry Bells</I> referencing Dr. Francis Lord’s <I>Civil War Collectors Encyclopedia</I>.  Though in our fifty plus years of seeking out such things, we have had three or four of the patriotic motif bells in addition to a full set of varying sizes in our own collection, we have seen only two other example of this small size repurposed bell.  One remaining in our own collection, all are identical in so far as construction clearly repurposed by the same source.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Autograph, George S. Houston $20.00

 

19th century hand wrought ‘Sticking Tom $95.00

 

Civil War era BINOCULARS $195.00

 

Patriotic DESK BELL from period repurpos $145.00

All in outstanding <I>minty</I> condition, this wonderful pair of hand knit cotton socks are in a man’s medium and are offered here in entirely original and as found condition after decades of cedar chest storage.  Carefully hand done in an intricate pattern, this beautiful pair of sox bare the period stencil identification of the proud artisan and will serve as a wonderful personal item in any Civil War period grouping. An eye pealing example of period needle work for the sewing and ladies craft enthusiast! <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Emanating from the Civil War <I>curio</I> collection of <B>Pvt. Emerson T. Getchell</B> late of the <B>3rd Maine Infantry</B> then Co. C of the <B>17th Maine Infantry</B>, this rare blacksmith forged iron collar remains in purely untouched condition with a 4 to 4 ¾ inch internal diameter and unquestionable evidence of age and originality.   With hand wrought construction, the collar was fashioned with three lateral <I>pockets</I> each holding a small stone or two that rattled when the wearer moved about. Sometimes referred to as a <I>crab rattle</I> by collector / historians, this <I>rattle</I> collar or shackle was only one of similarly constructed types to include smaller wrist or ankle devices of the same design intended to detect movement and or location.  As such it is said the type saw a primary use in instances of recovered <I>runaway</I> slaves not only for its sound production but as an identifier to discourage future freedom seeking attempts.  A rare item that will be of special interest to the collector / historian of the African-American experience, this relic of a darker place in history was part of a large collection of Civil War and related material accumulated by Getchell who settled in Washington D. C. after the war.   Traveling  extensively the Maine veteran amassed a large collection much of which was donated to the Hubbard Free Library in Hallowell, Maine where much of the material was displayed until the 1950s  before being relegated to storage.  In 1991 Library officials commissioned Jacob’s Well Auction Co. in Farmingdale, Maine to sell the Getchell material as part of a fund drive.  In a small auction advertisement (a copy to be provided) a mix of such as <I>a framed map of Capt. John Smith’s Virginia</I>, Libby Prison relics,  slavery items, <I>Confederate knife</I> and <I>lots of unique small items</I> were all set down as a <I><U>Partial E. T. Getchell</I></U> listing.  As such this rarely surviving <I>runaway</I> slave collar went unnoticed and unappreciated.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 


<b>Matched pair, imprinted letter sheet and envelope</b>


Antique, imprinted, unused matched pair, that includes a piece of 4 5/8 x 6 5/8, stationary, with an illustration of one of the most strategic positions on the Gettysburg battlefield, "Devil's Den," with printed title below it. The envelope which measures 5 1/8 x 3 1/4, has the exact same illustration as that of the letter sheet. Complete with back flap. Both items are aged toned and in excellent condition. Any memorabilia related to Devil's Den is always very desirable!


WBTS Trivia: Devil's Den, located on the southern end of the Gettysburg battlefield, is a foreboding boulder strewn hill that is estimated to have been formed millions of years ago from volcanic rock. Devil's Den played an important part in the second day's battle, on July 2, 1863. It was from this spot, hidden between these large rock formations, that Rebel sharpshooters picked off Union soldiers opposite them on Little Round Top. It is definitely one of the highlights to see when touring the Gettysburg National Military Park.  


Vintage set of 10 prints of Confederate Generals in uniform with biographical sketches printed below their portraits. Includes: Generals' Robert E. Lee, Thomas J. Jackson, James Longstreet, John Bell Hood, Joseph E. Johnston, P.G.T. Beauregard, Nathan Bedford Forrest, Braxton Bragg, E.K. Smith, and Leonidas Polk. Each one is printed on quality card stock that measures, about 3 x 5. Comes with the original, 5 1/4 x 3 1/2 imprinted envelope that these prints came in. Features the Confederate States Seal at the upper left with an illustration of President Jefferson Davis at the center. Printed below it is: Confederate States of America, and the quote, "Stand firmly by your cannon, Let ball and grape-shot fly, and trust in God and Davis, But keep your powder dry." Ten Different Confederate State's Generals, With Biographical Sketches, Made From Rare Prints, 50 Cents A Set. There is also a full color Confederate battle flag at the upper right corner. The envelope has been cut open at the right edge to get the cards out. Excellent C.S.A. collectible.

Civil War vintage Fancy Knit COTTON SOC $95.00

 

18th early 19th century forged iron Sl $695.00

 

Devil's Den, Gettysburg Battlefield $20.00

 

Set of 10 Prints of Confederate Generals $15.00




6 1/2 x 3 1/2, envelope. First Day Of Issue, Commemorating Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, with a full color portrait of President Lincoln, within a frame design with red ribbon, and a  shield below with a quote from his famous speech, "...that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." Facsimile signature, A. Lincoln, below the quote. There is a  blue, 3 cents, President Abraham Lincoln, U.S. postage stamp, with a portrait of Lincoln, and a quote from his address, affixed at upper right, and it is tied on by a black stamped "First Day Of Issue," and has a C.D.S., Gettysburg, PA., Nov. 19, 1948- 9 AM. Addressed in ink to a local resident; Mrs. S.H. Hess, 233 Chambersburg St., Gettysburg, Pa. Very fine and desirable Lincoln-Gettysburg item. 


WBTS Trivia: President Abraham Lincoln gave his Gettysburg Address during the dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery, on Thursday, November 19, 1863.      


<b>Matched pair, imprinted letter sheet and envelope


Marks the spot near where President Lincoln delivered his Gettysburg Address!</b>


Antique, imprinted, unused matched pair, that includes a piece of 5 x 6 1/2, stationary, with illustration of the Soldiers' Monument, National Cemetery, Gettysburg, Pa., with printed title below. The envelope which measures 5 1/8 x 3 1/4, has the exact same illustration as that of the letter sheet. Complete with back flap. Both items are evenly aged and in excellent condition. Very desirable Gettysburg items.


WBTS Trivia: The Soldiers' Monument marks the spot near where President Abraham Lincoln delivered his immortal Gettysburg Address, dedicating the Gettysburg National Cemetery, on November 19, 1863.   


<b>Signed by two very prominent Gettysburg citizens!</b>


6 x 2 1/2, imprinted check on blue paper, filled out in ink. Diamond shaped orange & brown tax stamp imprinted at the center of the check, with a bust view of President George Washington, and United States Internal Revenue, Two Cents printed around the edges. Gettysburg, PA., Dec. 17, 1877. [Check] No. 25. Gettysburg National Bank, Pay to the Order of J.C. Neely. Twenty five Dollars. Signed at lower right by D. Kendlehart. Endorsed on the reverse by J.C. Neely. Typical cut cancellation. Very fine. Desirable Gettysburg document signed by two of its most prominent citizens!



<u>Jacob C. Neely</u>:


The recipient of this check, who signed it on the reverse, J.C. Neely, was born in Adams County, Pa., on February 3, 1838, and graduated from Gettysburg College, in the class of 1856. After studying law, he commenced a practice in 1859, and became a member of the Adams County Bar Association. He married a daughter of Dr. S.S. Schumacher, president of the Gettysburg Theological Seminary. Mr. Neely served for six years as district attorney, and was regarded as one of the best lawyers in Adams County. He served as legal counsel for the 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment in their famous and controversial case against the Memorial Association over the location of their monument at the "Bloody Angle," the historic area where Pickett's Charge was repulsed, on July 3, 1863, at the battle of Gettysburg. Neely also served as a commissioner who helped the John P. Rose Farm settle their claims caused by the damage that occurred to the farm during the battle of Gettysburg. Mr. Neely died on Friday, May 25, 1894, and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Gettysburg. Other Gettysburg notables that are buried there include the citizen hero of the battle of Gettysburg, John L. Burns, and the only civilian killed during the battle, Jennie Wade. 



<u>David Kendlehart</u>:


(1813-91)  A prosperous businessman in Gettysburg, he was president of the city council on June 26, 1863, when Confederate General Jubal A. Early, entered Gettysburg and demanded goods and money from the town. Kendlehart refused, but offered for the stores to be opened so the town's civilians could supply what they could of the general's demands. He later slipped out of town and maintained a low profile during the battle until the morning of July 4th, when he entered the Union lines and informed Union Commander, General George G. Meade of the Confederate withdrawal from the streets of Gettysburg.


Kendlehart, also the owner of a shoe business on Baltimore Street, met General Early as he rode into town less than a week before the outbreak of battle, and demanded to speak with the borough’s mayor. The Confederate general’s inquiry proved fruitless however, as Burgess Robert Martin’s wife informed General Early that Martin and most of the councilmen had already left the town in advance of the arrival of the Confederates army. The responsibility of representing the borough in negotiations with Early therefore fell to Mr. Kendlehart. Early demanded that Kendlehart furnish the rebel troops with thousands of pounds of provisions, shoes, hats, and U.S. currency. Kendlehart’s refusal to supply the rebels, citing limited authority of the Borough, and the impossibility of securing so much material in a small municipality such as Gettysburg.


His tactful argument may have saved the town from ruin in retribution for his noncompliance. Although he refused to hand over the supplies, Kendlehart removed responsibility from the borough, and did, however, suggest that the Confederates go from household to household asking the citizens of Gettysburg to furnish whatever they could. Kendlehart would leave Gettysburg proper that evening to remain hidden two miles outside of the borough at McAllister’s Mill until the end of the battle, at which point the leaderless citizens exercised their own political agenda with General Early. The money in the town bank was hidden, families hid their food and possessions, residents protected their free black neighbors from capture, and most of the Gettysburg citizens lied about having anything of value when the Confederate soldiers asked. The Rebels gained very little from the town’s unified defiance, marveling at how such a population could possess so little.


David Kendlehart died on April 30, 1891, and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Gettysburg, Pa.

        


Brass coat size uniform button, with a lined field, with New York State Seal at the center, encircled by stars, and the motto "Excelsior" below the shield. Measures just under 1 inch in diameter. Retains almost 100% of its gold gilt finish. Backmark: Scovill Mfg. Co., Waterbury, State of New York. Complete with shank. This button is post Civil War, but it has the exact same face as those that were worn during the Civil War. Circa 1870, Indian War period. An excellent example for display.

Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, 1948 First $10.00

 

Soldiers' Monument, Gettysburg National $20.00

 

Gettysburg National Bank Check $45.00

 

New York State Uniform Button $15.00




<b>Signature with rank</b>


(1821-97) Born in Sackets Harbor, N.Y., he entered the U.S. Navy as a midshipman in 1837, and was promoted to passed midshipman in 1843. During his long naval career he served in the West Indies Squadron, the Mediterranean Squadron, the Home Squadron, the U.S. Coast Survey, the East India Squadron, and the Pacific Squadron. During the Mexican War, he participated in the siege of Isla de Sacrificios off Vera Cruz, the surrender of the Castle San Juan de Ulua, he was on patrol in the Gulf of Mexico, and took part in the seizure of Tuxpan. He was promoted to master in 1850, lieutenant in 1851, and commander in 1862. He served as the commanding officer of the steam gunboat, USS Penobscot in the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron in 1863, and later that year he was commander of the sloop of war, the USS Juniata in the East Gulf Blockading Squadron. His next assignment was as commander of the side wheel gunboat, USS Osceola in the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, which he led in both attacks on Fort Fisher, N.C., in December 1864, and January 1865. Rear Admiral David D. Porter complimented Clitz for his actions at Fort Fisher in his January 28th dispatch, and recommended him for promotion. After the war Clitz continued with his prominent naval career, and was promoted to captain in 1866; he commanded the sloop of war, USS Pawnee, in the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1868-69; commanded the steam frigate, USS California in the Pacific Squadron, 1870-72; promoted to commodore in 1872; he commanded the Naval Station at Port Royal, S.C., 1876-77; was lighthouse inspector, 1878-80; promoted to rear admiral in 1880; was commander-in-chief of the Asiatic Squadron, 1880-83, and retired from the U.S. Navy in 1883.


<u>Signature with rank</u>: 3 1/2 x 1 3/8, in ink, Very Respectfully, J.M.B. Clitz, Commodore U.S.N. Diagonal cut at left edge which does not affect the signature in any way. Cut closely at the bottom. 


 


<b>War Period Signature with rank of Major General</b>


(1831-88) A very prominent Civil War commander, he graduated in the West Point class of 1853. Appointed brigadier general of volunteers, on September 13, 1862, and major general of volunteers, on March 16, 1863, Sheridan fought in the battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, in the Chattanooga campaign, at Missionary Ridge, and Yellow Tavern, (where his men killed the legendary Confederate cavalry General J.E.B. Stuart), Hawes' Shop, Trevilian Station, and in the 1864 Shenandoah Valley campaign, including the battles of Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek, where General Sheridan, a brilliant battlefield tactician, made his famous twenty mile ride from Winchester, arriving on the field just in the nick of time to rally his army from the jaws of defeat, and lead them on to victory. Having made a wasteland of "The Valley," he famously said that "a crow would have to carry its own rations." For this achievement he received the "Thanks of Congress," and was promoted to the rank of Major General, in the Regular U.S. Army, on November 14, 1864. Sheridan then moved to the front at Petersburg which put him in position to play a critical role in the 1865 Appomattox campaign, resulting in the Union victories at Five Forks, and Sailor's Creek. General Sheridan once again led his troops with great distinction and smashed the Confederates which ultimately led to the surrender of the renowned Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by arguably the Civil War's greatest commander, General Robert E. Lee. Sheridan was present at the McLean House, at Appomattox Court House, where General Lee signed the formal surrender treaty, on April 9, 1865. General-in-Chief of the Union armies, Ulysses S. Grant, summed up Sheridan's performance in the final days of the war with the following quote, "I believe General Sheridan has no superior as a general, either living or dead, and perhaps not an equal." During the Indian Wars, General Sheridan saw much action against the Plains Indians, in the 1870's. Upon the retirement of General William T. Sherman in 1884, Philip H. Sheridan became commanding general of the United States Army.


<u>Signature with rank</u>: 3 1/2 x 1 3/8, in ink, Official Business, P.H. Sheridan, Maj. Genl. Volunteers. The bottom corners are cut irregular which does not touch upon the autograph in any way. This circa 1863-64 example is very boldly signed, and it would make a nice addition to any Civil War collection!   


<b>With backmark of Vannerson & Jones, Richmond, Va.</b>


(1818-93) The 4th highest ranking officer in the Confederacy. Graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1838. Brevetted captain and major for gallantry in the Mexican War. He was in command at Charleston, S.C., in April 1861, during the bombardment and capture of Fort Sumter and rose to instant fame in the Confederacy. He also saw action at 1st Manassas, Shiloh, the 1863-64 Charleston, S.C. campaign, Bermuda Hundred and Petersburg. Beauregard was a railroad executive in the 1860's and early 1870's and later served as Commissioner of public works in New Orleans and Adjutant General of Louisiana.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform. Backmark: Vannerson & Jones, Richmond, Va., with a 2 cents orange, George Washington, Internal Revenue tax stamp. Light age toning, discoloration, and wear. Always a popular Confederate image with this Southern backmark.  


Solid brass saddle ring with patina that measures 1 5/8 inches in diameter. This relic was found along the Chambersburg Pike west of Herr's Ridge, which was the position of the Confederate Army, on July 1, 1863, during the battle of Gettysburg. It was in this general vicinity that the opening shots of the battle were fired. 


WBTS Trivia: The famous Battle of Gettysburg commenced early on the morning of July 1, 1863. The first shot was said to be fired by a Union cavalry officer in General John Buford's command, along the Chambersburg Pike, 3 miles west of town. The Confederate Army, marching down the Chambersburg Pike from Cashtown, were on their way into Gettysburg to search for desperately needed supplies. Rebel skirmishers were sent forward only expecting to possibly encounter some Yankee militia in the area, but instead they were unexpectedly met by dismounted elements of General Buford's cavalry. Two brigades of General Henry Heth's division, of General A.P. Hill's, 3rd Corps, of General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, were in line of battle on the top of Herr's Ridge, just west of Willoughby's Run. When the opening salvo was fired, General Heth ordered his division forward, and the Confederate assault on Gettysburg was underway! In the meantime, Union General John F. Reynold's 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac, were arriving on the field from the south, and they managed to repulse the Rebel assault, with General Reynolds being killed in the action.

Autograph, Commodore John M. B. Clitz, U. $40.00

 

Autograph, General Philip H. Sheridan $215.00

 

CDV, General P. G. T. Beauregard $185.00

 

Saddle Ring Recovered at Gettysburg $10.00

A bit late for our usual fare but a nice collectable worthy of a good home is this original <B> ANSON MILLS PAT. FEB. 1 1881</B>  <I>TC Orndorff Sole Manf Worecester Mass</I> marked Remington Dog cartridge belt buckle.  Measuring approximately 3 1/8 X 2 ¾ inches, this sporting buckle with the Remington Dog design was derived from the military U. S. marked 45-70 caliber web cartridge belt issued with the Springfield Trapdoor rifle and carbine.  Best described as to condition by our photo illustrations, this all original die struck brass buckle will set well with any period sport shooting collection.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Standing approximately 11 ¼ inches with a 3 5/8 inch base, this lead soldered sheet iron fire starter remains complete with its original spun iron wire and brick <I>fire ball</I>.  All original and in pleasing condition yet with good evidence of age and originality, with a little lantern oil inside, this piece would be <I>just the thing</I> in a country home, Civil War winter camp, cook fire, or western chuck wagon as the flame of the oil soaked <I>fire ball</I> made quick work of starting a heat giving fire.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  


<b>Killed at the battle of Piedmont, Virginia in 1864!


Military Document Signed With Rank</b>


(1824-64) Born in Washington County, Virginia, his sobriquet was "Grumble" Jones. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1848, and served on the frontier with the "Mounted Rifles" until 1857, when he resigned his commission in the U.S. Army. When his home state seceded from the Union, he organized a company known as the "Washington Mounted Rifles," and was elected their captain. He served under Colonel J.E.B. Stuart at 1st Manassas, and became colonel of the 1st, and 7th Virginia Cavalry Regiments. He continued to serve under now General Stuart and was promoted to brigadier general September 19, 1862. He particularly distinguished himself at the war's biggest cavalry battle, Brandy Station, Va. Jones was considered to be the best outpost officer in the cavalry by his superiors. He protected the army's flank and rear on their march to Gettysburg in 1863. He was then assigned to command the Department of Southwest Virginia and East Tennessee where he rendered superb service. He participated in General James Longstreet's Knoxville campaign, and fought at Cloyd's Mountain in western Virginia, and at the battle of Piedmont, on June 5, 1864, he was struck by a ball and instantly killed while encouraging his men in the front lines. In the subsequent confusion and retreat his body fell into the hands of the Yankees, who returned it to his friends. General William E. "Grumble" Jones was buried in the graveyard of the Old Glade Springs Presbyterian Church, in Virginia.


<u>Document Signed</u>: 15 3/4 x 9 1/2, manuscript in ink. 


The United States on Account of Army Subsistence in the Quarter ending the 31st of December 1853, in Account with Lieut. W.E. Jones, Rifles, A.A.C.S., en-route from Fort Ewell, Texas, &c, &c, &c, to Corpus Christi. 


I certify on honor that the above account current exhibits an accurate and true Statement of all monies received and expended by me on Account of Subsistence in the Army, and there is now due me from the Commissary Department ($165.92) One Hundred and sixty five Dollars & 92/100. 


W.E. Jones, 

2d Lieut. R.[egiment] M.[ounted] R.[ifles], 

A.A.C.S.


Docket on the reverse: Account Current for the 4th Quarter 1853. Lieut. William E. Jones, Rifles, A.A.C.S.


Written on blue lined paper that shows some fold wear. Very desirable Confederate General K.I.A.  


This document was signed by Lieutenant Jones when he was serving in the pre Civil War United States Army.  Measuring approximately 6 ½ inches square by 6 ¼ inches deep this late mid 1800s wooden tobacco box retains its  <B>J. B. Pace <I>Chewing or Smoking</I> Virginia Tobacco</B> on all four sides.  Proclaiming the early post-Civil War product of James Baker Pace who founded  the nearly full block tobacco works in war torn Richmond in late 1865, this early <I>reconstruction</I> era  <I>LIGHT PRESSED / Gold Rods</I> tobacco box will make an eye appealing addition to any period grouping. ( Founder J. B. Pace now rests with good company in Richmond’s Hollywood Cemetery.)


<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Anson Mills Pat. 1881 - REMINGTON DOG - $65.00

 

earlier to Civil War era - Fire Starter $145.00

 

Autograph, General William E. Jones $175.00

 

mid-19th century Richmond, Va. – TOBACCO $135.00

Not like the usual find of a very delicate, marginal condition, lady's fan of the period, this example was clearly intended for practical use while offering a timely fashion statement.  It remains in fine durable condition and is, after decades of attic storage, ready for display with other period lady's finery or even for use and carrying should the lady desire.  Sturdily and yet attractively and delicately made with stained hardwood slats and that classic coarsely woven brown linen that connoisseurs of period textile will recognize, this fan remains in fine original condition in every respect. No splits tears or repairs!   The piece measures just over 13 inches in length when folded.  A common fashion statement and practical ladies utility of the Civil War period.  A fine all original accessory.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  While its historic provenance as to origin has been lost in time, this <B>Pat. 1861</B> marked, <I><B>Booth</I></B> monogramed coin silver tablespoon will brighten up any quality Civil War period grouping and will be sure to foster lots of speculation.  Bearing the period engraved sir name of the infamous Abraham Lincoln assassin,  <U>John Wilkes Booth</U>, this Gorham & Co., <I>Cottage Pattern</I> coin silver spoon measures 6 ¾ inches in length, weighs 35.3 grams and remains in pleasing condition.  

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 


<b>Found on Culp's Hill


From the Confederate States Armory and Museum collection of Gettysburg!</b>


This is the brass throat only of an Enfield bayonet scabbard. Measures 1 1/4 inches long, and 1 inch wide. With green patina typically found on dug brass relics. There is a vertical split on one side of the piece. Excavated at Culp's Hill which played an important role in all 3 days of the battle. Ex-Fred Edmunds museum collection. An old friend of mine when I lived in Gettysburg, Fred owned and operated the Confederate States Armory and Museum, located on Baltimore Street, opposite the historic Jennie Wade House.   


<b>U.S. Navy pay voucher signed by this Union Civil War naval hero!</b>


(1811-88) Born in New Brunswick, N.J., he was a career navy man. He was appointed midshipman, November 1, 1826; lieutenant, September 6, 1837; commander, September 14, 1855; captain, July 16, 1862; commodore, July 25, 1866; rear admiral, July 1, 1870; retired, January 28, 1872. He served on the <i>"Princeton"</i> during the Mexican War. From April 18-24, 1862, Boggs commanded the Union gunboat <i>"Varuna"</i> during the attack on Forts Jackson & St. Philip, on the Mississippi River, during the campaign to capture New Orleans. His men fought one of the most memorable close quarter sea battles of the entire war, suffering horrendous casualties. After destroying six Confederate gunboats and two rams and exhibiting heroic bravery, the <i>"Varuna"</i> was sunk with 184 casualties. Receiving his U.S. Navy captain's commission in July 1862, Boggs was the commanding officer of the steam sloops <i>"Juniata,"</i> and <i>"Sacramento,"</i> with the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron during the remainder of the Civil War.


<u>U.S. Navy Pay Voucher Signed</u>: 8 x 2 1/4, imprinted document, filled out in ink. 


United States Navy Yard, New York, May 1, 1856. Received, from J. Geo. Harris, Purser United States Navy, One hundred & fifty five Dollars, ninety six Cents, on account of my Pay, &c. $155.96/100. Chas. S. Boggs. Includes check stub at left. Excellent condition. Very desirable.

Victorian era - LADY'S FAN $95.00

 

Pat. 1861- BOOTH MONOGRAMED coin silver $135.00

 

Enfield Bayonet Scabbard Throat Recovere $15.00

 

Autograph, Admiral Charles S. Boggs, U. S $75.00




<b>The oldest private military college in the United States!


Norwich turned out hundreds of officers and soldiers who fought in President Abraham Lincoln's Union armies during the Civil War!</b>


2 piece, convex, non-excavated coat size uniform button. 3/4 inches in diameter. Face of the button has spread winged eagle with shield, and is holding arrows and olive branches in its talons, and retains almost 100% of its gold gilt finish. On the top of the eagle are the raised letters, "Cadet," and below it is "N.U.," for Norwich University. The reverse is complete with a shank and has the manufacturer's imprint of D. Evans & Co., Attleboro, MS. [Massachusetts]. Very nice example.


WBTS Trivia: Norwich University, also known as The Military College of Vermont, is the oldest private military college in the United States. Founded in 1819, at Norwich, by Captain Alden Partridge, a military educator and former superintendent of the United States Military Academy, at West Point, N.Y. 


In 1825, the academy moved to Middletown, Connecticut, to provide better naval training to the school's growing Corps of Cadets. However, the state of Connecticut declined to grant Captain Partridge a charter, and he moved the school back to Norwich in 1829. 


The state of Vermont granted the school a charter in 1834, and recognized the institution thenceforth as Norwich University. 


At the commencement of the Civil War in April 1861, Norwich cadets served as instructors of the state militias throughout the northeast, and the entire class of 1862, enlisted for the war upon its graduation. Norwich turned out hundreds of officers and soldiers who fought in President Lincoln's armies during the Civil War, including 4 recipients of the Medal of Honor, 1 who led a corps, 7 who headed divisions, 21 who led brigades, and 38 who commanded regiments. 


These Norwich soldiers became eyewitnesses to some of the war's most dramatic events, including the bloodiest single day in American military history at the battle of Antietam, Maryland. They also fought in the attack at Marye's Heights in the battle of Fredericksburg, Va., and in the historic repulse of Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg, Pa. 


A total of 755 Norwich men served during the Civil War, including an estimated 56 who fought for the Confederacy. 


The daring Confederate raid on St. Albans, Vermont, brought much fear to the neighboring town of Newport thinking it would be a certain target of the Rebel raiders. The Corps of Cadets were quickly ordered into action, boarded an express train that same day, and it was a great relief to the citizens living there when the gallant Norwich Cadets came marching in to save the day.   


<b>The history of General Stonewall Jackson's celebrated 1862 Shenandoah Valley campaign!</b>


By Champ Clark and The Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1984. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of Confederate Generals' Stonewall Jackson, Turner Ashby, and Richard S. Ewell, all of whom are mounted. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Excellent content about the 1862 Shenandoah Valley Campaign in which General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's name became  legendary in Civil War history. Very nice book.  


<b>Killed in the battle of Wilson's Creek, Missouri in 1861</b>


(1818-61) Graduated from West Point in the class of 1841. He fought against the Florida Seminoles, and was brevetted to rank of captain for bravery and gallantry while fighting in the Mexican War. Before the Civil War, he served in "Bleeding Kansas," where his political and military ideas were formulated. He was promoted to brigadier general on May 17, 1861, and more than any other man, General Lyon saved the border state of Missouri for the Union. He was killed in action at the battle of Wilson's Creek, near Springfield, Mo., on August 10, 1861.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/8 x 3 5/8 card. Full standing view in uniform with epaulettes and holding his hat and sword. Photographer's label on the reverse: McClees Photographer, 910 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Light age toning, and slight staining on the reverse. Edges of the mount are trimmed.  


2 piece, convex, coat size uniform button, with raised, intertwined letters, G.A.R., on a lined field. Measures 7/8 inches in diameter. Back mark: Horstmann Bros. & Co., Phil. Complete with shank on the reverse. Non dug. Very nice example which retains almost 100% of its gold gilt finish.


WBTS Trivia: The Grand Army of the Republic was a fraternal order composed of Union Civil War veterans, and was founded in Springfield, Illinois, in 1866.

Norwich University Cadet Uniform Button $15.00

 

Decoying The Yanks, Jackson's Valley Cam $15.00

 

CDV, General Nathaniel Lyon $95.00

 

Grand Army of the Republic Uniform Butto $10.00




<b>From the famous Shields Museum collection of Gettysburg!</b>


Confederate .577 caliber Enfield bullet with cone cavity recovered on the first day's battlefield, of July 1, 1863, west of the town, near the Chambersburg Pike. Very desirable Gettysburg relic. 


Arthur "Ott" Shields opened a museum on the Chambersburg Pike, west of Gettysburg, near the General F. Reynolds equestrian monument, in 1925. Shields had one of the earliest and most comprehensive Gettysburg relic collections which rivaled the best museums in town including that of his father-in-law, John Rosensteel. The Shields family continued to operate the museum until the National Park Service purchased their property in 1985. The collection was sold that year by locally run Redding Auctions.


WBTS Trivia: On the morning of July 1, 1863, Confederate troops under the command of General Henry Heth marched down the Chambersburg Pike towards the town of Gettysburg. They were met by dismounted Union cavalrymen commanded by General John Buford, and the epic battle of Gettysburg was under way!   


<b>Recovered along the Emmitsburg Road in an area occupied by Confederate troops during the battle of Gettysburg, on July 2, 1863!</b>


Excavated friction primer. This is a short copper tube that would have been filled with gun powder, and it has a perpendicular spur that would have been filled with a priming mixture. It was a device used to initiate the firing of a muzzle loading cannon. The friction primer was inserted into the vent of a cannon, and when it was ignited it caused a spark like a match that ignited the powder charge within the cannon chamber which caused the gun to fire. Measures 1 3/4 inches in length, with the spur measuring 5/8 inch wide. Found in an area along the Emmitsburg Road, south of town, in an area occupied by Confederate troops during the battle. Very desirable artillery related Gettysburg relic.   


<b>Lost the 1864 Presidential election to President Abraham Lincoln


Governor of New Jersey</b>


(1826-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846 and fought in the Mexican War. Hailed at the beginning of the Civil War as the "Young Napoleon," he proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but an officer totally lacking in the essential qualities of successful command of large forces in battle.  He saw action at Rich Mountain, W.V., in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and at the battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day in American history.  He was defeated for the presidency of the U.S. in 1864 by Abraham Lincoln. Served as Governor of New Jersey, 1878-81.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card.  Bust view in uniform with rank of major general.  Imprint on the front mount, J. Gurney & Son, N.Y.  Back mark: J. Gurney & Son, 707 Broadway, N.Y.  Light age toning and minor corner wear. Very fine.


 


Oval lapel pin with stud fastener on the reverse. Measures 5/8 inches in diameter. G.A.R. logo on the obverse with vignette of the figure of Liberty in the center flanked by a Union sailor and soldier clasping hands in fraternity. Two children are kneeling in the foreground representing charity and the assurance of protection from their military comrades. Grand Army Of The Republic Veteran, 1861-1866, is in raised letters around the circumference of the pin. The fastening stud on the reverse allowed the Union veteran to proudly wear this pin in the lapel button hole of their coat. Minor traces of light green patina. Fine example.


WBTS Trivia: The Grand Army of the Republic was a fraternal order composed of Union Civil War veterans, and was founded in Springfield, Illinois, in 1866.

Confederate . 577 Caliber Enfield Bullet $15.00

 

Civil War Cannon Friction Primer Excavat

 

CDV, General George B. McClellan $75.00

 

G. A. R. Lapel Pin $25.00




<b>Signed as Rear Admiral and Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy</b>


(1819-92) Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he was appointed a midshipman in 1833. He saw action in the Seminole War, 1839-42, and participated in the Mexican War at the taking of Vera Cruz, Tobasco, and Tupan. Commissioned commander in October 1861, he served with much distinction on the <i>"Wabash,"</i> and as fleet captain of Rear Admiral Samuel F. Dupont at the battle of Port Royal, S.C., and was in command of the naval forces in the trenches at the capture of Fort Pulaski, Ga. He directed the movements of a fleet of gunboats that were engaged in occupying strategic points along the Atlantic coast south of Port Royal, S.C., and he also commanded the expedition to St. Augustine, Fla., and up the St. Mary's River, in March 1862. He was fleet captain in the <i>"New Ironsides,"</i> in the attack on Charleston, and in the subsequent operations of the South Atlantic blockading squadron. In the fall of 1863, he was assigned to the command of the steam sloop <i>"Iroquois"</i> in which he was engaged on special service until the end of the war. He was the superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy, from 1874–78, and again in 1880–81. He retired from the navy in 1881. He had two brothers killed in battle; Lieutenant Alexander Rodgers, 1841 graduate of West Point, who was killed during the attack on Chapultepec, in 1847, during the Mexican War, and Commander George W. Rodgers, who was killed while in the command of the ironclad <i>"Catskill"</i> during the bombardment of Charleston, S.C., in 1863.


<u>Signature with rank, title and date</u>: 5 1/4 x 1 1/8, in ink, Reported 25 Aug. 1875, C.R.P. Rodgers, Rear Admiral Supdt. Very boldly signed.    


(1833-1907) He was born in Sullivan County, Tennessee, was taken by his parents to Talladega, Alabama in 1836, and followed in his father’s footsteps by getting into architecture and building. In 1861, he served as a lieutenant of the Talladega Artillery, spending six weeks at Fort Morgan, Ala. His company was then reorganized into infantry, and Shelley was elected captain of the 5th Alabama Infantry. He served in the 1861, 1st Manassas, Va. campaign, and in 1862, he recruited the 30th Alabama Infantry, and was commissioned its colonel. He fought in General Braxton Bragg’s Kentucky invasion, at Port Gibson, and was captured at Vicksburg. After his exchange, his command was assigned to the Army of Tennessee, and he participated in every battle they fought in from Chattanooga until its final surrender at Greensboro, N.C. He was promoted to brigadier general on September 17, 1864. In the famous assault on the Union works at Franklin, Tenn., Shelley, now commanding a brigade, lost 432 men killed and wounded. General Shelley himself escaped without injury, but had his horse killed from underneath him, and several bullets pierced his uniform. He served as  a U.S. Congressman from Alabama, 1877-85.


<u>Photograph</u>: 2 1/2 x 4, silver print image, in civilian attire. Printed on thick photographic paper, but is not on a mount.  Fine condition. Circa late 1800's. There are no photos of General Shelley in uniform known to exist. Scarce.       


(1821-83) He was born at Saugus, Mass., and studied at Phillips Academy, in Andover, Mass. Appointed a midshipman in 1838, he served on the brig  <i>"Washington,"</i> in the squadron of Commodore Matthew Perry, and in 1847, during the Mexican War,  he took part in the capture of Tabasco, Mexico. In 1861, President Abraham Lincoln gave Fox an appointment in the navy, and sent him on the steamer <i>"Baltic,"</i> on a mission whose objective was to bring relief to Major Robert Anderson, and his small garrison, at Fort Sumter. Arriving too late, Fox found that the Confederates had already bombarded Fort Sumter, and forced its surrender. Afterwards, he was allowed to go to the beleaguered fort, and bring away Major Anderson and his garrison. President Lincoln named Fox the Assistant Secretary of the Navy on August 1, 1861, a post he held for the entire Civil War. It was Fox who to a large degree planned the capture of New Orleans, the opening of the Mississippi River and the appointment of Admiral David G. Farragut to command. Working closely with Secretary of the Navy, Gideon Welles, he was a superb administrator and planner. Fox was sent on a special mission to Russia in 1866, to convey a "Joint Resolution of Congress" which expressed "deep regret" at the recent assassination attempt on the life of Czar Alexander II. In addition, and of greater importance, Welles requested that Fox visit important naval stations and collect all of the intelligence that he could obtain. His voyage was made on the ironclad, <i>"Miantonomoh,"</i> (named after the Indian Chief of the same name) which was the first vessel of this class to cross the Atlantic Ocean. 


<u>Signature with title</u>: 4 3/4 x 1 3/4, in ink, with imprinted closing, I am, respectfully, yours, &c., G.V. Fox, Actg. Secretary.  


Adopted by the New York Monuments Commission on May 6, 1893. These beautiful medals were made to honor the heroic New York soldiers who fought in the famous battle of Gettysburg, and were issued on July 1, 2, and 3, 1893, on "New York Day," at Gettysburg, on the thirtieth anniversary of the battle. The bronze medal was struck at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia by order of the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. A circular was printed and sent to the executive officers of each New York veteran organization requesting that they use the utmost care in verifying that every soldier who would receive one of these medals had in fact participated in the battle of Gettysburg.


The bronze bar at top includes the dates of the battle, July 1-2-3, 1863, and Gettysburg Veteran. Attached below by a suspension ring is a heavy bronze medal that measures 1 3/4 x 1 3/4. The obverse shows the New York State seal with its motto, Excelsior, at the center, and is surrounded in raised letters, "Dedication of State Monuments at Gettysburg, July 1, 2, 3, 1863, New York Day." The reverse of the medal shows the New York State monument flanked by the dates 1863 and 1893 and surrounded by a laurel wreath. The medal is backed by a red, white and blue ribbon. Complete with pin back on the reverse of the top bar. Very fine condition. Comes displayed in a glass faced case with blue velvet backing. Measures 3 1/4 x 4 1/4. An attractive medal that was awarded to New York Soldiers who fought in the monumental three day battle of Gettysburg, Pa. Very desirable!

Autograph, Admiral Christopher R. P. Rodg $50.00

 

Photograph, General Charles M. Shelley $15.00

 

Autograph, Gustavus V. Fox, Assistant Se $65.00

 

1893 New York Day at Gettysburg Medal $150.00




<b>Alexander Gardner View</b>


Wet plate, albumen photograph, 3 x 2 1/4, on 3 3/4 x 2 3/4 card mount. No backmark. Identification on the reverse, "Bridge over the Chickahominy, Virginia." View showing the bridge with the Chickahominy River in the foreground. Light age toning. 


Otherwise known by the name of its builder, and marked on the map, "Woodbury's Bridge." The picture is taken at a point where the accumulated waters most presented the character of a stream, the swamp being in some places all of a mile in width, and supporting on its treacherous surface a luxuriant growth. In the depths of this morass, the home of almost every variety of Virginia reptile, the soldiers worked several weeks, constructing the causeway known as New Duane's, Sumner's- Upper and Lower- Bottom's, and Railroad Bridge. The cutting of dams above, and heavy rains, stopped the workmen a number of times, and destroyed their labor, by converting the whole valley into a broad lake, whose waters, pressing through the length of the swamp carried everything irresistibly before them. In this way, during the battle of Fair Oaks, Sumner's troops had barely passed over, when the rapidly accumulated waters of the river carried away the bridge; and it was claimed by the engineers that the weight of the men in crossing kept it in place. If, in that fight, our troops had been defeated, the limited facilities of recrossing the Chickahominy would probably have led to the capture of the greater portion of the corps. The Grape Vine Bridge was so called for its tortuous course through the swamp. Its construction was necessarily rude, as rough, unhewn, and twisted logs formed the material. Down in the woods, the air seemed to be suffocating with stagnation, while beneath the pall of mist, an immense orchestra of double bass bull frogs kept up a continual din, which at night drowned the rumble of the wagons over the corduroys. [Source: Gardner's Photographic Sketch Book Of The Civil War].   


<b>Matched pair, imprinted letter sheet and envelope</b>


Antique, imprinted, unused matched pair, that includes a piece of 5 x 6 1/2, stationary, with illustration of the Recitation Hall, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, Pa., with printed title below. The envelope which measures 5 1/8 x 3 1/4, has the exact same illustration as that of the letter sheet. Complete with back flap. Both items are evenly aged and in excellent condition. Very desirable Gettysburg items.


WBTS Trivia: The recitation hall was part of the Pennsylvania College campus, in Gettysburg, that was founded in 1832. It was later renamed Gettysburg College. Located on a ridge west of the town, it became a focal point of the fighting on the first day of the battle, July 1, 1863. The college buildings were used as field hospitals for wounded Union and Confederate soldiers during and after the monumental 3 day battle of Gettysburg.  This c. 1750 – 1800 blacksmith wrought padlock is functional and all original with screw type key that opens the lock when screwed in all the way and secures the lock when unscrewed and removed.  An exceptional companion piece in combination with any Colonial / Revolutionary War period item with a hasp for a lock.  Whether used to secure a period chest or displayed alone simply as a rare working example of the type, this lock will make a nice addition to any period grouping.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 This nice all original wallet remains in excellent condition and is untouched and as found leaving the decision of dressing application to the new owner. (Only the finest antique leather dressing and then <U> very lightly</U> please!)  Fashioned of naturally tanned soft and pliable leather the wallet is of the classic style and construction of the Civil War period unfolding to offer several partitioned sections for bills and personal documents.  The wallet measures approximately 3 3/4 X 6 3/4 inches closed and remains in nice pliable condition with good evidence of age and originality. Will set nicely in any period personal grouping as is.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Photograph, Military Bridge Across The C $100.00

 

Recitation Hall, Gettysburg College, Get $15.00

 

1700s / very early 1800s hand wrought Wo $95.00

 

Civil War era and earlier LEATHER WALLET $95.00




<b>Sunk in the Yazoo River, Mississippi, on December 12, 1862</b>


The city-class gunboat, U.S.S. Cairo, was built by James Eads & Co., at Mound City, IL., in 1861. The ironclad was named after the city of Cairo, Illinois. She was commissioned in January 1862, and served in the Union Navy's Western Gunboat Flotilla on the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers.


In 1862, she was active in the occupation of Nashville, Memphis and Clarksville, Tenn., and played a prominent role in the capture of Fort Pillow. On December 12, 1862, as part of the Yazoo Pass Expedition, the U.S.S. Cairo was clearing mines in preparation for an attack on Haines Bluff, Miss., and was sunk by a mine detonated by Confederate soldiers hidden behind a river bank. The Cairo was the first ship ever sunk by a mine remotely detonated by hand.  


In 1956, the ship was located in the Yazoo River and a salvage operation began. Over the next few years the deteriorating wreck was raised and eventually put on display at the Vicksburg National Military Park. She is one of only four Civil War era ironclads in existence, and is listed on the National Register.


Includes an authentic, small piece of wood that was salvaged from the wreck of the C.S.S. Cairo, in 1965. It is mounted at lower right on a 5 x 7, photo card, titled, "U.S.S. Cairo, Civil War Ironclad Wood Relic," with a photograph of the ship and crew in 1862. It comes with a second, 5 x 7, photo card, with a brief printed history of the Cairo, [click on the enlargement to read the exact description], an image of the original wood relic that this piece came from, and an illustration of the sinking of the Cairo. Both cards could be matted and framed together to make a very nice display item for a Civil War naval collector!  


 


<b>War period endorsement signed


Earned the "Thanks of Congress" for his heroic exploits during the capture of Fort Fisher, North Carolina in 1865!</b>


(1827-90) Born in Hartford, Connecticut, he attended Yale Law School, became a lawyer, and served as clerk of the Superior Court of New Haven County, Conn. Terry was one of those rare militia officers who rose to eminence in the volunteer ranks during the Civil War and remained in the Regular Army after the war to earn the rank of major general. He fought at the 1st battle of Bull Run, Va., in command of the 2nd Connecticut Infantry, a 90 day unit that he raised. He then recruited the elite 7th Connecticut Infantry, taking part with them in the capture of Port Royal, S.C., and the siege and capture of Fort Pulaski, Ga. Appointed brigadier general, he served in the various operations against Charleston, S.C. until the fall of 1863 when he was transferred to General Benjamin F. Butler's Army of the James, taking over command of the 10th Corps. During 1864, he served in the campaigns against Richmond and Petersburg, Va., and in early 1865 he commanded the forces that captured Fort Fisher, N.C., thus sealing off the Confederacy's last port, Wilmington, N.C. For this exploit he received the "Thanks of Congress." His forces were then attached to General John M. Schofield's Army of the Ohio, with which it operated in conjunction with General William T. Sherman until the Confederate surrender. During his post war army career, Terry served mainly in Indian Territory, and he helped to negotiate the Treaty of Fort Laramie in 1868, which ended "Red Cloud's campaign" against United States troops in the territory. He was in charge of the Department of Dakota at the time of the famous battle of the Little Big Horn in 1876. Five companies of Custer's 7th U.S. Cavalry were annihilated with Custer among the 268 men killed. During this battle General Terry was in personal command of the various columns engaged in the field, including that of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer. Much controversy arose at the time as to whether Custer had exceeded Terry's orders; but Terry refused to comment on the matter. In October 1877, he went to Canada to negotiate with "Sitting Bull," and he was still in command in Montana during the Nez Perce War and he sent reinforcements to intercept "Chief Joseph."  As the great Northern Pacific Railway was building their transcontinental line across Montana in 1881, the new town of Terry, Montana was named in General Terry's honor. He was promoted to major general in 1886, and named commander of the Military Division of the Missouri. He retired from the U.S. Army on April 5, 1888, and died in New Haven, Conn., on December 16, 1890. He is buried in Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, which is surrounded by the Yale College campus.


<u>War period endorsement signed</u>: 3 1/8 x 3, partly imprinted form, filled out in ink. Head Quarters Dep't Virginia (and North Carolina which has been crossed out in red ink), (Fort Monroe has also been crossed out in red ink) and written above it is Richmond, Va., July 18th, 1865. Approved- The disposition within recommended will be made. Alfred H. Terry, Major Genl. Commanding. Written on the reverse is "Eleven Canteens." General Terry is a very desirable autograph for his heroic deeds during the Civil War and Indian War.    


<b>To a prominent Virginia lawyer who served in the 12th Virginia Light Artillery during the war!</b>


War date Confederate envelope with a very nice pair of 5 cents Jeff Davis (Scott #7) postage stamps, tied on with a Richmond, Va. postmark, the month is indistinct, but the 8th day, and the year 1862 are very solid. Beautifully addressed to James M. Donnan, Esq., Petersburg, Virginia. Light crease near the top, not affecting the content. There are a couple of small stains on the reverse. Very fine and quite desirable Confederate war date cover.


James M. Donnan was born on May 6, 1824, in Amelia County, Virginia. He commenced the study of law in the office of his elder brother Alexander in 1842. James worked in his brother's law partnership of (Judge William T.) Joynes and Donnan until 1854, when the brothers formed their own practice under the firm name of Alexander & James M. Donnan, practicing law in Petersburg until 1878.


James fought in the Mexican War, serving in Captain Archer's Company of the 1st Virginia Volunteers, commanded by Colonel Hamtramck. He was honorably discharged with the regiment at Fort Monroe, Va. in 1848.


Prior to the War Between the States, he was a member of the Whig Party, whose bitterest foes were the Democrats, so after the war Donnan would have nothing to do with the Democratic Party, and he allied himself very strongly with the Republican Party. 


The Donnan Brothers law firm were the most sought after lawyers in Petersburg for many years, and they were very active during the antebellum and war years handling all kinds of slavery cases in the Petersburg area.


During the War Between the States, James M. Donnan served in Co. B, 12th Virginia Light Artillery, in 1864-65. He signed an Oath of Allegiance to the United States government on June 24, 1865.


He was appointed to be United States Consul to Belfast, Ireland, serving from 1873 to 1880, when he returned to Virginia.


He died on January 14, 1893, and is buried in Blandford Cemetery, Petersburg, Va.


James M. Donnan was known to be an exceptionally upright man, strong in his convictions, unflinching in his position, and noted for his courage and firmness of character.       


<b>War period signature with rank</b>


(1812-97) Born in Fairfax County, Virginia, he was the son of Francis Lightfoot Lee II, grandson of Richard Henry Lee, brother-in-law of Francis P. Blair, Jr., and Montgomery Blair, and cousin of Robert E. Lee. He was appointed a midshipman in the U.S. Navy in 1825, and saw extensive service at sea, including action during the Mexican War. At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, he was captain of the sloop of war, <i>Vandalia</i>. Lee then commanded the steam sloop, <i>Oneida</i>, in the 1862 New Orleans, Louisiana, campaign, and in operations on the Mississippi River. He became well known among Washington's social elite due much to the influence of his wife, Elizabeth, the daughter of Francis Preston Blair. Being a native Virginian, he was asked about his loyalty to the United States, and Lee famously replied, "When I find the word Virginia on my commission, I will join the Confederacy." This quote was often referred to because of the actions taken by his famous cousin, General Robert E. Lee, and thus illustrated how the war divided families. In September 1862, Lee was appointed commander of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron with the rank of Acting Rear Admiral. His flagship at this time was the <i>Philadelphia</i>. He led this force for over two years, during which time it was responsible for the blockade of the North Carolina coast and operations on North Carolina and Virginia inland waterways, all areas of very active fighting between Union and Confederate forces. He transferred to the Mississippi River Squadron, October 1864, and commanded it to the end of the war. His flagship during the Mississippi campaign was the <i>Black Hawk</i>.


<u>War period signature with rank</u>: 2 1/2 x 1, in ink, S.P. Lee, A.[cting] R.[ear} A.[dmiral].

U. S. S. Cairo, Civil War Ironclad, Wood R $35.00

 

Autograph, General Alfred H. Terry $250.00

 

1862 Confederate Cover Addressed to Pete $125.00

 

Autograph, Admiral Samuel P. Lee $65.00




<b>Signed by prominent Pennsylvania merchant, coal operator & land speculator</b>


7 1/4 x 2 3/4, imprinted document, filled out in ink. Illustration of a sailor seated on a cotton bale and holding an American flag, with a barrel and sexton at left. Sailing ship and goods at upper right, 2 cents George Washington hand cancelled revenue tax stamp at upper left. Drawn on The Pittston Bank, Pittston, Penna., Jany. 6, 1864. Pay to A.C. Thompson, $11.98. Signed at lower right by J.B. Schooley. Minor age toning and wear. Cut cancelled. Very fine Civil War dated check from coal mining country in Pennsylvania as the country begins it's fourth year of war.   


WBTS Trivia: Jesse B Schooley, (1811-85). He grew up on a large farm in Wyoming, Pennsylvania, and was a land speculator, merchant, and coal operator in the Wyoming Valley. He had many holdings and agreements in Pittston, Jenkins Township, West Pittson, Exeter, Wyoming, Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, and many other areas in the state.


Interesting facts about Pittston, Pa.:  Pittston is in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, situated between Scranton and Wilkes-Barre. The city gained prominence in the mid 1800's and early 1900's as an active anthracite coal mining town. 


Located in the Wyoming Valley on the east side of the Susquehanna River, and the south side of the Lackawanna River, it was  named after the famous British statesman William Pitt, and was settled around 1770.


During the Revolutionary War, the Wyoming Valley was an active battleground between the British and the Continental Army. On July 3, 1778, a force of British soldiers, with the assistance of about 700 Indians, attacked and killed nearly 300 American Patriots. Connecticut Continentals, led by Captain Jeremiah Blanchard and Lieutenant Timothy Keyes, held and maintained a fort in Pittstown. On July 4, 1778, one day after the Battle of Wyoming, a group of British soldiers took over the fortress and some of it was destroyed. Two years later, the Continentals stormed the fortification and recaptured it. From then on it was under Patriot control until the end of the war in 1783.


 


<b>Note signed with rank</b>


(1813-91) He sailed with his father, Commodore David Porter, to the West Indies to suppress piracy in 1824, and joined the U.S. Navy in 1829. He served in the Gulf during the Mexican War. On April 22, 1861, he was named commander, and with his mortar fleet joined his foster brother, Admiral David G. Farragut, in March 1862 for the capture of New Orleans. He took command of the Mississippi River Squadron in September 1862 with rank of Acting Rear Admiral, and in cooperation with General William T. Sherman captured Arkansas Post in January 1863. He was present during the Vicksburg surrender and served in General N.P. Banks's Red River campaign of 1864. Sent east, he commanded the North Atlantic Squadron and fought at Fort Fisher, N.C., for which he received his fourth Thanks of Congress. Promoted Vice Admiral in 1866, he was superintendent of the Naval Academy and appointed Admiral of the Navy in 1870. He was the brother of Commodore William D. "Dirty Bill" Porter and the cousin of General Fitz John Porter.


<u>Note Signed with rank</u>: 5 3/8 x 2 3/4, in ink. Mr. Sumner, Please send me a bottle of Perry's improved ___. "D.D. Porter," Admiral. Only the signature is in the hand of Admiral Porter. Boldly signed. Light age toning, fold wear, and some other scattered wear. Desirable Civil War naval officer.  We’ll depend on our photo illustration to provide the physical description of this attractive Reconstruction era shako except to advise that it remains in pleasing and complete condition while offering good evidence of age and originality.   This  beaver shako retains its early style 2 inch wide split leather sweat band with the maker label of <B>G. W. Simmons & Son. Military Regalia and Firemen’s Goods <I>OAK HALL</I> 32 to 38 North Street, Boston </B>, with original infantry chin strap buttons and plate.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Not as old as our usual fare but we felt this little Pat. 1911marked lamp was worthy of inclusion.  It stands a mere 7 inches from base to top of its milk glass shade and remains in pleasing original condition throughout with the patent marking in the glass gust under the screw off burner.  A nice item for the vintage lighting enthusiast! <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

1864 Pittston, Pennsylvania Bank Check $8.00

 

Autograph, Admiral David D. Porter $75.00

 

Civil War Reconstruction / Indian War er $375.00

 

vintage bedside or ‘CHAMBER’ LAMP $65.00




< prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 next >

AntiqueArts.com home page! How to use this page! How to advertise here How we manage your personal information Terms of use TIAS home page