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Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison this antique grass<I>striping</I>tool was used to <I>strip</I> or cut narrow strands from wide bladed grass for the purpose of weaving.  A blade of fibrous swamp or marsh grass was held in place by pressing down on a spring guide and drawn along its length over the several tiny blades.  The grass was thus cut into long narrow strips for weaving baskets or other utilitarian and decorative handcrafts.  All original and still in nice working condition this antique<I>stripper</I> will go well as a companion piece with related items and is still useable for old stile crafting. <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!


 


<b>Matched pair, imprinted letter sheet and envelope</b>


Antique, imprinted, unused matched pair, that includes a piece of 5 x 6 1/2, stationary, with illustration of the Chapel of Pennsylvania Lutheran College, Gettysburg, Pa., with printed title below. The envelope which measures 5 1/8 x 3 1/4, has the exact same illustration as that of the letter sheet. Complete with back flap. Both items are evenly aged and in excellent condition. Very desirable Gettysburg items.


WBTS Trivia: The chapel was part of the Pennsylvania College campus, in Gettysburg, that was founded in 1832. It was later renamed Gettysburg College. Located on a ridge west of the town, it became a focal point of the fighting on the first day of the battle, July 1, 1863. The college buildings including the chapel were used as field hospitals for wounded Union and Confederate soldiers during and after the monumental 3 day battle of Gettysburg.     


<b>War period signature with rank</b>


(1822-1900) Born in Fredericksburg, Virginia, his naval officer father died when he was 2 years old, and he was raised up by his uncle, Matthew Fontaine Maury, the famous "Father of Modern Oceanography and Naval Meteorology." He graduated from the University of Virginia in 1842, commenced the study of law, but then changed course by accepting an appointment to West Point, graduating in the class of 1846, and was commissioned 2nd lieutenant in the Regiment of Mounted Rifles. His antebellum record in the Regular U.S. Army was distinguished and included receiving the brevet of 1st lieutenant for bravery at Cerro Gordo during the Mexican War, where he suffered a painful wound that almost resulted in the amputation of his arm. His gallantry in this battle prompted the citizens of Fredericksburg and the Legislature of Virginia to honor him with a special presentation sword. After convalescing at White Sulphur Springs, Va., he was assigned to the U.S. Military Academy as an instructor, serving in that capacity from 1847 until 1852. He then returned to active field duty with the Mounted Rifles, serving in the Oregon Territory, and then on the Texas frontier. He then returned east and commanded the Cavalry School at the Carlisle Military Barracks in Pennsylvania in 1858. He authored a book, "Tactics for Mounted Rifles," which became the standard textbook on the subject. When the War Between the States broke out, Maury was stationed in Santa Fe, New Mexico Territory, serving there as Assistant Adjutant General. Hearing the news of the firing on Fort Sumter, South Carolina, he resigned from the United States Army, and traveled back to his native Virginia where he entered the Confederate Army as a colonel, serving as Adjutant General, then as Chief of Staff under General Earl Van Dorn. He was promoted to brigadier general for gallantry at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, on March 18, 1862. He also fought gallantly in the battles at Iuka and Corinth, Mississippi, and was appointed major general, November 4, 1862. After serving at Vicksburg, Miss., and in East Tennessee, he was appointed commander of the Army of the Gulf, at Mobile, Alabama, which he defended very capably until its capture in 1865. After the war ended Maury came home to Virginia and established an academy in Fredericksburg where he taught classical literature and mathematics. In 1868, he was the founder of the Southern Historical Society. He also wrote the book, "Recollections of a Virginian in the Indian, Mexican, and the Civil Wars." He was appointed by President Grover Cleveland, as Minister to Colombia, and served at that post from 1887 to 1889.


<u>War period signature with rank</u>: 4 1/2 x 1, in ink, Dabney H. Maury, Assistant Adjutant General. Very nicely signed on blue lined paper.  


<b>United States Senator from Delaware


United States Secretary of State</b>


(1796-1856) Born in Dagsboro, Delaware, he graduated from Yale College in 1815, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1819, and commenced practice in Dover. He was a member of the Delaware State House of Representatives, in 1824; Secretary of State of Delaware, 1826-28; U.S. Senator, 1829-36, 1845-49, and 1853-56. He served as chairman of the Committee on the Judiciary. He was the Chief Justice of Delaware, 1837-39. Served as U.S. Secretary of State in the Cabinet of President Zachary Taylor, 1849-50. 


<u>Signature with State</u>: 4 7/8 x 3/4, in ink, Jno. M. Clayton, of Del.

antique - Grass Basket WEAVING TOOL $55.00

 

Chapel of Pennsylvania Lutheran College, $15.00

 

Autograph, General Dabney H. Maury $125.00

 

Autograph, John M. Clayton $35.00




(1824-1881) Born in Liberty, Union County, Indiana, he graduated in the West Point class of 1847, and was a Mexican War veteran. Serving on the western frontier, he was wounded in a skirmish with Apaches in 1849. He resigned his commission in 1853, invented a breech loading rifle, was appointed a Major General of the Rhode Island State Militia and was elected to Congress as a Democrat. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he organized the 1st Rhode Island Infantry, becoming their Colonel. He was in command of a brigade at the 1st battle of Bull Run. Having become a favorite of President Lincoln, he was given command of the expedition against the coast of North Carolina, he fought at Antietam, and in December of 1862, commanded the Army of the Potomac during their bitter defeat at Fredericksburg. General Burnside also saw action at Knoxville, the Overland Campaign, and at Petersburg. In his post war career he was elected Governor of Rhode Island three times, and later served as a United States Senator.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view wearing a double breasted frock coat with dress epaulettes and the rank of brigadier general. He also wears a sash, gauntlets, and is holding his sword. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Also has a paper sticker of the agent, McAllister & Brother, Philadelphia. Light age toning. Very fine image of "Old Sideburns" as he was known.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with a standing illustration of General George Washington in uniform. Motto below: "Let us cherish his memory, And emulate his example." Light age toning. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


(1824-1902) He was born in Baden, Germany, and graduated from a military academy at Karlsruhe in 1843, and became a subaltern in the service of Grand Duke Leopold. During the 1848 insurrections he acted as Minister of War for the revolutionary forces which were overthrown by the Prussians, and fled to New York in 1852. During the years before the Civil War he taught school and held a major's commission in the 5th New York Militia. Sigel was appointed brigadier general on August 7, 1861, and major general on March 22, 1862. Despite his military shortcomings, he did much to unify the large German population of the Northern states and contributed thousands of recruits to the Union ranks. "I fights mit Sigel," became almost a password among the Dutch and his influence with them never waned. He performed well at the capture of Camp Jackson, and the engagement at Carthage, Mo. At Elkhorn Tavern he contributed greatly to the Union victory. He saw action in the 2nd Bull Run campaign, and later commanded the Department of West Virginia. In 1864, he had the misfortune to fight the battle of New Market, Va., against the cadets of the Virginia Military Institute, by whom he was soundly trounced.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Full standing view in uniform with rank of brigadier general, holding Hardee hat with plume, and sword. Backmark: E. Anthony, N.Y. Very nice.  


(1805-74) Born in Jamaica, Vermont. When the Civil War commenced he was serving as colonel of the 2nd Massachusetts Militia. On May 25, 1861, he was commissioned colonel of the 1st Massachusetts Infantry, and he commanded them in the 1st battle of Bull Run, where he had a horse shot out from under him. During the 1862 Virginia Peninsula campaign he saw action at Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Glendale, and Malvern Hill. For bravery at Williamsburg, General Joseph Hooker recommended him for promotion to brigadier general. He later commanded a brigade in the division of General John J. Abercrombie. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. Standing view in a Napoleonic pose in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Bottom of the mount is trimmed. Light age toning and wear. Very sharp view. Nice image.

CDV, General Ambrose E. Burnside $125.00

 

General George Washington $4.00

 

CDV, General Franz Sigel $100.00

 

CDV, General Robert Cowdin $125.00




10 x 15, imprinted form, filled out in ink. 


The United States In Account with Michael Doyle of H Company, Fifty-Second Regiment of Penna. Volunteers on account of Clothing during his enlistment; the money value of each issue being hereby acknowledged. Enlisted at Scranton, Pa. on the fourth day of April 1864. Includes information for Date of Issue, Money Value, Rank of Private, Signature of Soldier, and Signature of Witness. Settled to date of discharge July 12, 1865. Signed multiple times by Private Michael Doyle with his X mark, Charles C. Brattenberg, 2d Lt., and Joseph R. Roberts, 1st Sergt. Light age toning and wear. Very fine.


The 52nd Pennsylvania Infantry served at Fort Henry, Lee's Mills, Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Fair Oaks, Battery Gregg, Morris Island, Charleston, Fort Johnson, (2 killed, 5 wounded, 80 captured), James Island and Fort Wagner.    


<b>Signature with rank of Brigadier General


Military Governor of Louisiana in 1862</b>


(1819-78) Born in Saco, Maine, his famous father, Ether Shepley, served as a U.S. Senator, and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. George graduated from Dartmouth College, studied law, and began a practice in Bangor. He served as U.S. District Attorney for Maine prior to the war. He became close friends with soon to be Union Major General Benjamin F. Butler when they served together as delegates in the 1860 Democratic National Convention at Charleston, S.C. Commissioned colonel of the 12th Maine Infantry in November 1861, he accompanied General Butler's forces in the expedition against New Orleans, La. After the capture of the city on May 1, 1862, Shepley became Butler's right hand man and he assigned him as post commander at New Orleans, and the military governor of Louisiana in June 1862. He was promoted to rank of brigadier general to rank from July 18, 1862. General Shepley continued to work in this capacity until the spring of 1864, when he was assigned to the District of Eastern Virginia under the command of his old comrade General Butler again. As the war began to wind down, Shepley operated as chief of staff to General Godfrey Weitzel, and was appointed military governor of Richmond, Va. in April 1865. After the war, he returned to his law practice, and in 1869, President Ulysses S. Grant appointed him United States circuit court judge for the state of Maine.


<u>Signature with rank</u>: 5 1/2 x 2 1/8, in ink, G.F. Shepley, Brig. Genl. U.S. Vols. Beautiful and large bold autograph.  


<b>United States Congressman from Pennsylvania


Chief Justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court</b>


(1806-74) Born in Middlesex, Butler County, Pa., he studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1829, and commenced practice in Erie, Pa. Thompson served in the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives, 1832-34, and in 1855, and was Speaker of the House in 1834. He was a delegate to the Pennsylvania State Constitutional Convention in 1838. He served as presiding judge of the Sixth Judicial District Court, from 1838-1844. He was a U.S. Congressman, from 1845-51, and served as Chairman of the Committee on the Judiciary. Thompson was an Associate Justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court from 1857-66, and then served as the Chief Justice of that court from 1866-72.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/4 x 1/2, in ink, James Thompson.  


Commemorative envelope celebrating the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's immortal Gettysburg Address, delivered at the Gettysburg National Cemetery, on November 19, 1863. Full color illustration at left of President Lincoln on the reviewing stand giving his speech. At the upper right is a Battle of Gettysburg, July 1-3, 1863, Forever U.S.A. postage stamp, that features a vignette of Pickett's Charge. The postage stamp has been tied on to the cover with a pair of circular cancellations; one has an illustration of President Lincoln with the motto, In God We Trust, Liberty, 1863; and the other one has Gettysburg, Pa., 17325, Nov. 19, 2013, the date of the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. 7 1/8 x 3 5/8.

52nd Pennsylvania Infantry Clothing Acco $15.00

 

Autograph, General George F. Shepley $75.00

 

Autograph, James Thompson $20.00

 

The Gettysburg Address Sesquicentennial $5.00




<b>War period signature with rank


Served as Governor of California</b>


(1822-94) He was born in the western New York hamlet of Bustion, and graduated from the United States Military Academy in the celebrated class of 1846. His classmates were future Civil War Generals Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, George B. McClellan, Ambrose Powell Hill, Darius N. Couch, George E. Pickett, and Cadmus M. Wilcox. Stoneman served in the 1st U.S. Dragoons, and the 2nd U.S. Cavalry, from 1846-61. He was appointed Chief of Cavalry, Army of the Potomac, with the rank of brigadier general, on August 13, 1861. He saw action in the 1862 Virginia Peninsula campaign, at Yorktown, and Williamsburg; at the battle of Fredericksburg; in the famous cavalry raid that took on his name, General Stoneman's 1863 Richmond Raid, during the Chancellorsville campaign; he commanded the Cavalry Corps, of the Army of the Ohio, during the Atlanta campaign, until he was captured on July 31, 1864, while on a raid designed to free the Union prisoners that were confined at the notorious Andersonville Prison, in Georgia. After his exchange, he operated in southwestern Virginia, East Tennessee and North Carolina in cooperation with General William T. Sherman's advancing army. After the war he settled in what is present day San Marino, California, and served as Railroad Commissioner of California. He was elected Governor of California in 1882 and served in that position for 4 years.


<u>War period signature with rank</u>: 4 7/8 x 1 3/8, in ink, George Stoneman, Maj. Genl. Slightly faded. Important Union Civil War General.   

 While considered as being among the rarer of German origin martial arms, of significance to the American Civil War historian will be that this example of the Mod.1849 German Navy percussion pistol was altered by the <U>Philadelphia, Wurfflein family of gunsmiths</U>  when the limited number of these pistols were purchased for import at the outset of the American Civil War.   This rather massive three pound single shot percussion pistol measures approximately 16 inches in total length with a 9 1/4 inch 62 caliber barrel and remains in excellent condition as will be best described here by our illustrations.   Untouched and original to the period with the signature Philadelphia, Wurfflein belt hook alteration and American standard musket nipple this rare Civil War import will set well in any quality Civil War collection.   The lock is marked with the classic Double-Headed Eagle of the German Confederation with SUHL, S&C and Anchor.  A total of 1,000 of these pistols were ordered for the Bundesmarine on 19 May 1849.  This short lived first German Federal Navy lasted a mere four years upon which two of its ships were transferred to the Royal Prussian Navy with the remainder of their vessels, less their armament sold commercially.  Pistols from the ships sold were stored at the Fortress of Mainz until 1861 when in the early Civil War clamor for arms,  approximately eight-hundred of these Mod. 1849 pistols were purchased for import to this country. (see illustration <I>Civil War Guns</I> by William B. Edwards  p. 292 / see also: illustration and description of a lesser example -  11/18/2013 <I>Bonhmans Antique Arms Auction Catalogue</I> lot#4250)  

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 A desirable piece of Western photographic Americana and an especially interesting photo for the U. S. Signal Corps collector, this scarce <I>Gurnsey’s Rocky Mountain Views</I> stereo view card is titled <B>U. S. Signal Station & Observatory</B>  and depicts the rock bound U. S. Signal Station in operation atop atop Pike’s Peak in 1873.   Standing at right in forage cap with binoculars in hand is <B>Albert James Myer</B>.   An Army Surgeon before the  Civil War, developer of the Army Signal Corps <I>wig-wag</I> signaling system and at the outbreak of the Civil War then Major Myers became the army’s first signal officer and was ordered to organize and command the Signal Corps. Rising in the ranks to Colonel Myer was brevetted to Brig. General before the end of the war.  In 1866 Gen. Myer was recognized by Congress as Chief Signal Officer, U. S. Signal Corps, a position he held until his death.  Ultimately Gen. Albert James Myer was recognized as <I>founder and father</I> of both the U. S. Signal Corps and the U. S. Weather Bureau.  <U> Myer is identified in an alternate view of the Pike’s Peak Signal Station housed in the Library of Congress, prints and photographs collection. </U>  ( see our illustration)  Clearly taken in the same session as the Library of Congress <I>identified</I> example, (see details) the view offered here has captured Myer now wearing his forage cap but with binoculars still in hand and with the same unidentified companion.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  


Edited by Michael Frizot. Published by Konemann, 1998. Large 9 1/4 x 12, hardcover with dust jacket. 775 pages, profusely illustrated, photographic credits, bibliography, and index. Excellent  condition. Very desirable book on the history of photography!


This volume brings together contributions by the most respected specialist in the image field. Editor Michel Frizot writes a substantial portion of the text, along with 29 additional authors who offer a plethora of analytical information and a very wide variety of points of view on the history of photography. Put simply, it is a book about why people take photographs and what photographs can do. At a whopping 775 pages, this huge volume has something for everyone! It is well worth its weight in gold. The writings are certainly useful and interesting, but the real impact of this wonderful book is the sheer abundance and diversity of its over 1000 black-and-white and full-color photographs. An extensive bibliography, notes, and index make this a useful tool for students of history as well as those studying art and photography, but the marvelous photographs make it a browser's dream.

Autograph, General George Stoneman $95.00

 

rare! Civil War import - Mod. 1849 Germ

 

Gurnsey’s Rocky Mountain View – Pike’s P $75.00

 

A New History of Photography $50.00




Stereoscopic, cabinet size photographs of the National President Abraham Lincoln Monument in Springfield, Illinois. This is a close up view of the military figures that flank President Lincoln on one side of him, and is titled, "Artillery Group." There is a detailed description on the reverse of the card explaining the artillery group depicted on this monument. Photographed by J.A.W. Pittman, for J.C. Power. Also includes the names of the Executive Committee, with the date April 18, 1882, and more. Imprint on the front mount, Entered by John Carroll Power, in 1883, in the office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington. Light age toning and wear. 7 x 4 1/4.  


Includes a wood fragment that originated from the scaffold used to execute the four Lincoln conspirators; Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, David Herold and George Atzerodt, on July 7, 1865, just after 1 P.M., on a sweltering 100 degree Washington afternoon, in the prison yard of the Old Arsenal Penitentiary. Beautifully presented in a scarlett suede mat with florentine gold trim. Measures about 8 x 10. The wood relic is housed at the center of the display under a 3X magnifying cover. Above is an Alexander Gardner copy photograph of the four dead conspirators hanging from the gallows, with descriptive text below. This relic was secured as a souvenir by a soldier of the 1st U.S. Volunteer Infantry who served as a guard at the execution. Comes with a certificate of authencity which incorporates a copy photograph of the original note and piece of wood that this fragment originated from. Extremely desirable President Abraham Lincoln assassination, and Lincoln Conspirators related relic!     


<b>Famous for his American flag dispatch, "If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot!" This became a clarion call in the North during the Civil War!


New York Secretary of State


United States Senator from New York</b> 


(1798-1879) Born in Boscawen, New Hampshire, he joined the U.S. Army in 1813, and served until 1828.  In 1830, he was appointed by Governor Enos T. Throop as Adjutant General of the New York State Militia. Was New York Secretary of State, 1833-39, and served as a member of the New York State Assembly in 1842, and was elected to the United States Senate, serving 1845-49. In 1853, Dix was president of the Mississippi and Missouri Railroad. He was Postmaster of New York City 1860-61. In 1861, President Buchanan appointed him U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, and on January 29, 1861, he made his famous American flag dispatch to a treasury official in New Orleans, "If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot!" Commissioned Major General by President Abraham Lincoln, on May 16, 1861, he was first on this list, thus outranking all other volunteer officers during the Civil War. At the beginning of the war he arrested six members of the Maryland General Assembly and prevented Maryland from seceding from the Union, which earned him President Lincoln's gratitude and praise. That winter, he commanded an organization known as "Dix's Command" within General George B. McClellan's Department of the Potomac. Dix commanded the Department of Virginia from June 1862 until July 1863, and the Department of the East from July 1863 until April 1865. On July 22, 1862, General Dix and Confederate General Daniel H. Hill made an agreement for the general exchange of prisoners between the Union and Confederate armies. This agreement became known as the "Dix-Hill Cartel." It established a scale of equivalents, where an officer would be exchanged for a fixed number of enlisted men, and also allowed for the parole of prisoners, who would undertake not to serve in a military capacity until officially exchanged. The cartel worked well for a while, but it ended up breaking down when Confederate officials insisted on treating black prisoners as fugitive slaves and returning them to their previous owners. He made an important and distinguished contribution to the Union cause when he suppressed the 1863 New York City draft riots. General Dix was active in the defense of Suffolk, Virginia, which was part of his department. He served as the chairman of the 1866 National Union Convention. He was U.S. Minister to France, 1866-69, and Governor of New York, 1873-74.


<u>War period signature with rank</u>: 2 3/4 x 1, in ink, John A. Dix, Major General. Comes with an antique 4 3/4 x 6 1/2, photograph of Dix in uniform with rank of major general.  

 <b>Address</b>


6 1/4 x 3 1/2, imprinted folio cardstock that features the 3 cents U.S. postage stamp of President Abraham Lincoln with quote from his immortal Gettysburg Address, "That Government Of The People, By The People, For The People, Shall Not Perish From The Earth." Abraham Lincoln. The double page interior has detailed printed story titled, "In Commemoration of the 85th Anniversary of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address." The reverse has advertising information. Light age toning. Very fine. Desirable Lincoln collectible.

National Abraham Lincoln Monument, Sprin $10.00

 

Wood From The Gallows Where The Lincoln $250.00

 

Autograph, General John A. Dix $65.00

 

Commemoration of the 85th Anniversary of $10.00




(1822-94) He graduated from West Point in the celebrated class of 1846. His classmates were future Civil War Generals Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, George B. McClellan, Ambrose Powell Hill, Darius N. Couch, George E. Pickett, and Cadmus M. Wilcox. George Stoneman served in the 1st U.S. Dragoons, and the 2nd U.S. Cavalry, 1846-61. He was appointed Chief of Cavalry, Army of the Potomac, with the rank of brigadier general, on August 13, 1861. He saw action in the 1862 Virginia Peninsula campaign, at Yorktown, and Williamsburg; at the battle of Fredericksburg; in General Stoneman's 1863 Richmond Raid, which happened during the Chancellorsville campaign; he commanded the Cavalry Corps, of the Army of the Ohio, during the Atlanta campaign, until he was captured on July 31, 1864, while on a raid designed to free the prisoners at Andersonville, Ga. After his exchange, he operated in southwestern Virginia, East Tennessee and North Carolina. 


Engraved portrait of Stoneman in uniform with rank of major general, made from a Brady photograph. There is a nice printed facsimile autograph below his likeness. 1865 imprint of Virtue & Yorston, New York at the bottom. Light age toning and a couple of small stains.    


Beautiful full color illustration of the famous surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, to Union General Ulysses S. Grant, in the parlor of the McLean House, Appomattox Court House, Virginia, on April 9, 1865. A five cents, U.S. postage stamp, honoring the 100th anniversary (1865-1965) of the surrender at Appomattox is at the upper right corner. The U.S. Military Historic Stamp Collection is imprinted at the bottom. The reverse has detailed information regarding the surrender. 8 x 4 1/2. Printed on card stock. Excellent.     Untouched and as found with period construction characteristics this tinned sheet iron candle holder looks for all the world to have been fashioned utilizing a 6 ¾ inch diameter <I>haversack</I> size mess plate.  Remaining in excellent condition yet showing good age and period originality, this country made tin plate candle holder will lay in well in any Civil War vintage personal item or lighting display. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  Best described here by our photo illustrations this <B><I>WADHAMS Manufacturing Co.</B></I>  gutta-percha / thermoplastic, 9th plate photo case with its <I><B> Kinsley & Parker’s HINGE  Patented June 1st, 1858</I></B>, remains in untouched and as found condition with a small tear to the velvet liner and a minor <I>scuff</I> to the original label but importantly, with <U>no imperfections</U> to the case itself.  A rare photo case (see: Rinehart case No. 15) tight at the hinges and with no cracks, chips, blemishes or other condition issues.    <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

General George Stoneman $15.00

 

The Surrender of General Robert E. Lee a $10.00

 

original! Civil War vintage CANDLE HOLDE $65.00

 

rare! Wadhams / Kinsley & Parker’s Pat $115.00

A bit of an enigma to us, a Google search for <I>The Virginia Co.</I> will offer more insight but suffice it to say here that the antique bass decoration offered here measures approximately 2 ¾ X 3 ¼ inches and features the  Virginia Company coat of arms with <B><I>THE VIRGINIA CO.</B></I> boldly cast in its banner.  The piece was constructed by sand casting and polished on its face all resulting in a loss of fine detail but commensurate with early construction methods.  Untouched on its face with a nice patina polished only by handling, the back of the piece is dark with a rough surface commensurate with period sand casting.   The decoration remains suspended on its well-worn and crudely hand stitched period leather harness strap sectioned to approximately 9 inches in length.   The strap is pierced at the top apparently for display as a wall hanging which is likely how the piece survived.   Formed in the pre-colonial time when the entire eastern seaboard of America was named Virginia from Maine to the Carolinas, the Virginia Company was empowered by the Crown to govern the colonies; this right was not conferred onto the colonies until the dissolution of the Company after considerable hardship and widespread destruction by Natives which all but decimated the English population.  The right to self-government was not taken from the colonies however, thus establishing the wide spread principle among remaining colonists that they should be self-governing.   While the specific history of this piece has been lost in time it is clearly worthy.    <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>



 


<b>75th Anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg</b>


9 1/2 x 4 1/8, imprinted, multi-colored envelope. Gettysburg, Blue And Gray Reunion, 75th Anniversary, Battle of Gettysburg, 1938, with illustrations of the United States and Confederate flags, and more. Includes an illustration of the Eternal Light Peace Memorial to be dedicated by President [F.D.] Roosevelt, Sunday, July 3, 1938. Pennsylvania State Commission, John S. Rice, Chairman, Gettysburg, Pa. Excellent condition. Very desirable Gettysburg Blue & Gray Reunion collectible.  


Each shoulder knot has a gold bullion border with black felt interior, and a cuff size U.S. Navy button with eagle and anchor motif. The reverse is lined with black felt, and has a hinged brass fastener and hook. The manufacturer's name, address and trade mark is stamped on the brass fastener, J. Starkey, 23 Conduit St., London, with their trade mark logo to the left. Post Civil War period, circa late 1800's. Both of these United States naval shoulder knots are in excellent condition.


The manufacturing company, Joseph Starkey, was based in London, and they were embroiderers, gold and silver lace men, and makers of military accoutrements.       


6 1/2 x 3 5/8. July 1-3, 1863. Blue shield design with stripes within it, and 2 stars above. There is a map of the key points on the Gettysburg battlefield inside of the shield, and First Day of Issue within a riband below. Civil War Centennial, with the dates, 1861-1961, 1865-1965, with a vignette of crossed U.S. and Confederate flags, cannon, and drum. Published by ABC Cachets. Excellent.

important! THE VIRGINIA COMPANY – harne $175.00

 

Blue & Gray Reunion Cover, Gettysburg 19 $15.00

 

Pair of United States Navy Shoulder Knot $185.00

 

Gettysburg Patriotic Cover, Civil War Ce $5.00




<b>The younger brother of General John Hunt Morgan!


Captured during General Morgan's famous raid into Ohio in 1863!


Very rare Civil War Prisoner of War cover sent by Captain C.H. Morgan via a Flag of Truce to Mrs. General John Hunt Morgan!</b>


(1839-1912) He graduated from Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky, in 1859, and soon after was appointed the United States Consul to Messina, Italy. While serving as a U.S. Government representative, he joined the fight for Italian independence, and was wounded in action. He resigned his post in 1861 to serve in London as the Secretary of the Southern Committee. When the War Between the States broke out he returned home to Kentucky and joined the Confederate Army. He was wounded and captured at the battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, April 6, 1862. After his exchange, he was commissioned captain, and served in his brother General John Hunt Morgan's Kentucky command as his aide-de-camp. He was captured along with his brother John, and his brother-in-law General Basil Duke, in July 1863 during General Morgan's celebrated Ohio Raid. Initially confined at the Ohio State Penitentiary in Columbus, Ohio, he was later transferred to Fort Delaware in February 1864. He was eventually released from captivity in 1865 just prior to the cessation of hostilities.  After the war he spent 15 years as a steward at the East Kentucky Lunatic Asylum. He married Ellen Key Howard, the niece of Francis Scott Key the author of The Star Spangled Banner. He was the father of Thomas Hunt Morgan, whose work in chromosomal heredity earned him the Nobel Prize in 1933. Charlton Hunt Morgan died on October 10, 1912, and is buried in Lexington Cemetery, Fayette County, Kentucky.


<u>Civil War Prisoner of War Cover Sent via Flag of Truce</u>: 4 1/2 x 2 5/8, endorsed and addressed in ink in the hand of Captain Charlton Hunt Morgan as follows: "Via Flag of truce, From C.H. Morgan, Prisoner of War. Mrs. Genl. Jno. H. Morgan, Care Col. Thos. Fleming, Augusta, Ga." Light wear and a few small stains at the edges. Very neat and bold handwriting. Very rare and desirable!!


<b>Please note that the illustrations of General John Hunt Morgan and his wife Mattie, and of Captain Charlton H. Morgan [taken in 1864 by John L. Gilhon while Morgan was a prisoner of war at Fort Delaware] are for display purposes only. They are not part of the lot you are buying. However, I will include Xerox copies of them with your purchase.</b> 


WBTS Trivia: The recipient of Captain C.H. Morgan's letter was Martha "Mattie" Ready Morgan, the wife of his brother General John Hunt Morgan. She was the daughter of United States Congressman Charles Ready of Tennessee. Mattie travelled with her aunt, Mrs. C.S.W. Fleming, and her husband, Colonel Thomas W. Fleming, to Augusta, Georgia, at different periods of the war.


On the night of September 3, 1864, while en-route to attack Union forces near Knoxville, General John Hunt Morgan camped near Greenville, Tennessee. Early the next morning he was surprised by a detachment of Union cavalry and was killed in the garden of the house where he had been sleeping, shot in the back while attempting to retreat and rally his men. General J.H. Morgan is also buried in Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky.          


This imprinted folio letter sheet measures 7 3/4 x 9 3/4, with vignette of the New Jersey State Seal at upper left with the motto, "Liberty And Prosperity." Imprint at upper right, "HEAD-QUARTERS, Mercer Brigade, New Jersey State Militia, 186_. Excellent condition. Comes with a large business size envelope, 8 1/4 x 3 1/2, with the New Jersey State Seal at left, with imprint above, "State of New Jersey." Imprint at upper right, "HEAD-QUARTERS, Mercer Brigade, N.J.S.M." Mfg. imprint, A.W. Orr, N.Y. Very fine. Extremely desirable, and very scarce, pair of New Jersey, Civil War items which are unused.           


<b>War period signature with rank


Wounded 3 times during the Civil War


United States Attorney General</b>


(1820-91) Born in Charlestown, Mass., he graduated from Harvard in 1838, and Harvard Law School in 1840. He was admitted to the bar in Franklin Country where he practiced law from 1841-49. Devens had a very notable antebellum career as a lawyer, Massachusetts State Senator, U.S. Marshal, orator, and U.S. Attorney General. Forced to participate in the return of an escaped slave to his owner while serving as marshal, he attempted to purchase, unsuccessfully, the bondsman's liberty with his own funds. Immediately upon President Lincoln's call for volunteers, Devens, a militia brigadier, offered his services, and on on April 16, 1861, Devens gave an impassioned speech at Mechanics Hall in Worcester to a large crowd where he called upon the young men of Worcester to rise and go with him to rescue Washington.  Shortly afterwards he was mustered in as Major of the 3rd Battalion of Massachusetts Rifles, a 90 days unit. Devens was later commissioned Colonel of the 15th Massachusetts Infantry and fought at Ball's Bluff, where a uniform button saved his life when he was struck by a rifle ball and wounded. Promoted to Brigadier General of volunteers on April 15, 1862, he commanded a brigade at the battle of Seven Pines during the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and was again wounded. At the battle of Fredericksburg, Devens commanded a brigade of the 6th Army Corps, and at Chancellorsville, where he was wounded a third time, he directed a division in General O.O. Howard's 11th Army Corps. According to a report by General Steward L. Woodford, who served with him, General Devens remounted his horse, stayed with his men, and did not go to the hospital until his men had bivouacked. Upon his return to duty, he commanded a division of the Army of the James 1864-65, distinguishing himself at the battle of Cold Harbor, Va., while commanding the 3rd Division, 18th Army Corps in General Ulysses S. Grant's Overland Campaign. During the final stages of the Siege of Petersburg, he commanded the 3rd Division of the 24th Army Corps. His troops were the first to occupy Richmond, Va., after its capture in April 1865. Devens remained in the army for a year as commander of the Military District of Charleston, South Carolina, before mustering out of the army and returning home. He later served as the fifth Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic from 1873–75, and was also a veteran companion of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. He served as a Judge of the Massachusetts Superior Court, 1867-73, and was an Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court, 1873-77. He served as the United States Attorney General, 1877-81, in the cabinet of President Rutherford B. Hayes.


<u>War Period Signature with Rank</u>: 6 7/8 x 2, in ink, Yours Respty., Chas. Devens, Brig. Gen. U.S. Vols., Comdg. 3d Div., 24 Army Corps. Age toning.  


<b>Severely wounded in the battle of 1st Manassas, Virginia</b>


(1824-93) Graduated in the West Point class of 1845. He won the brevets of 1st lieutenant and captain for gallantry at Cerro Gordo and Contreras during the Mexican War. From 1849-52, he was assistant professor of mathematics at West Point. Later he served in the Indian campaigns on the Texas frontier. A native of Florida, he resigned his commission on April 6, 1861, at the time that Florida seceded from the Union. He entered the Confederate service as a lieutenant colonel and served in the Shenandoah Valley under General Joseph E. Johnston. On June 17, 1861, E.K. Smith was commissioned brigadier general in the Provisional Army of the Confederate States and was severely wounded at 1st Manassas. He was promoted to major general on October 11, 1861, and in 1862 he was in command of the District of East Tennessee. Smith participated in General Braxton Bragg's invasion of Kentucky, and won a decisive victory at Richmond, Ky., on August 30, 1862. He became lieutenant general from October 9, 1862. From 1862-65 he was in command of the Trans-Mississippi Department, and received permanent rank of general in the Provisional Army on February 19, 1864. In the spring of 1864, his army repelled the Red River expedition of General N.P. Banks. Smith was almost the last Confederate general in the field, but in a hopelessly isolated situation, he finally surrendered his troops to General E.R.S. Canby on May 26, 1865. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in Confederate uniform. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, Manufacturers of the best Photographic Albums. Light age toning, a few discoloration spots in the background area, and light wear.

Captain Charlton Hunt Morgan Signed & Ad $495.00

 

Mercer Brigade, New Jersey State Militia $35.00

 

Autograph, General Charles Devens $95.00

 

CDV, General Edmund Kirby Smith $150.00




<b>War Period Signature with Rank</b>


(1814-79) Born in Hadley, Mass., he was the grandson of a captain who fought in the Revolutionary War. Graduating in the West Point class of 1837, Hooker was commissioned 2nd lieutenant in the 1st U.S. Artillery. His first assignment was fighting in Florida in the 2nd Seminole Indian War. He served in the Mexican War in the campaigns of General Zachary Taylor, and General Winfield Scott, and was cited for gallantry in the battles of Monterrey, National Bridge and Chapultepec. Hooker left the army in 1853, and settled in Sonoma County, California where he was a farmer and land developer. He held a commission as colonel in the California Militia, 1859-61. When the Civil War broke out Hooker requested a commission, but his application was rejected very probably because of resentment held against him by General Winfield Scott, General-in-Chief of the U.S. Army. Hooker had testified against his former commander Scott in the court-martial case of Gideon J. Pillow (future Confederate General) for insubordination. After the Union Army's defeat at the 1st battle of Bull Run, Va., Hooker wrote a letter directly to President Abraham Lincoln whereby he complained of military mismanagement and touted his own abilities and qualifications and once again requested a commission. Lincoln consented and commissioned him brigadier general of volunteers, in August 1861. He commanded a brigade and then a division around Washington, D.C., as part of the effort to organize, and train the new Army of the Potomac, commanded by General George B. McClellan. During the 1862 Virginia Peninsula Campaign, he commanded the 2nd Division of the 3rd Corps, and made a good name for himself as a combat leader who handled himself well, and aggressively sought out the key points on battlefields. He led his division with distinction at the battles of Williamsburg and Seven Pines. He became extremely annoyed at the cautious generalship of General McClellan and openly criticized his commander's failure to capture Richmond. Commenting on McClellan's leadership, General Hooker was quoted as saying that, "He is not only not a soldier, but he does not know what soldier-ship is." Hooker was promoted to major general on July 26, 1862. Following the second battle of Bull Run, Va., Hooker replaced General Irvin McDowell as commander of the 3rd Corps, Army of Virginia, soon re-designated the 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac. During the Maryland Campaign, he led the 1st Corps at the battles for South Mountain, and at Antietam, where his corps launched the first assault of the bloodiest day in American military history, driving south into the corps of General Stonewall Jackson, where they fought each other to a standstill. Hooker, aggressive and inspiring to his men, left the battle that morning with a foot wound. The battle of Fredericksburg, Va., fought on December 13, 1862, was another Union debacle. Upon recovering from his foot wound, General Hooker was briefly made commander of the 5th Corps, but was then promoted to "Grand Division" command, that consisted of both the 3rd and the 5th Corps. He was contemptuous about Burnside's plan to assault the fortified heights of Fredericksburg, deeming it "preposterous." His Grand Division suffered terrible losses in their futile assaults which were ordered by General Burnside over General Hooker's vehement protests. Burnside followed up this battle with the humiliating Mud March in January 1863, and Hooker's criticism of his commander bordered on formal insubordination. He described Burnside as a "wretch ... of blundering sacrifice." Burnside planned a wholesale purge of his subordinates, including Hooker, and drafted an order for the president's approval. He stated that Hooker was "unfit to hold an important commission during a crisis like the present," but President Lincoln had run out of patience, and instead removed Burnside as Commander of the Army of the Potomac. Lincoln then appointed General Joseph Hooker to command of the Army of the Potomac, on January 26, 1863. Some members of the army saw this move as inevitable, given Hooker's reputation for aggressive fighting, something sorely lacking in his predecessors. Hooker's plan for the spring and summer campaign of 1863 was both elegant and promising. He first planned to send his cavalry corps deep into the enemy's rear, disrupting supply lines and distracting him from the main attack. He would pin down General Robert E. Lee's much smaller army at Fredericksburg, while taking the large bulk of the Army of the Potomac on a flanking march to strike Lee in his rear. Once Lee was defeated, he could move on to seize Richmond. Unfortunately for Hooker and the Union, the execution of his plan did not match the elegance of the plan itself. The Union and Confederate armies would fatefully meet in the epic battle of Chancellorsville, Va., fought on May 1,2,3, 1863, which has been called "Lee's perfect battle," because of his ability to vanquish a much larger foe through audacious tactics. Hooker had a devastating encounter with a cannonball while he was standing on the porch of his headquarters. The ball struck a wooden column against which he was leaning, initially knocking him senseless, and then putting him out of action for the rest of the day with a concussion. Political winds blew strongly in the following weeks as generals maneuvered to overthrow Hooker or to position themselves if Lincoln decided to do so on his own. On the eve of what would become the battle of Gettysburg, President Lincoln had made his decision. On June 28, 1863, 3 days before the epic battle in Pennsylvania, General George G. Meade was promoted to the command of the Army of the Potomac, and accomplished what many considered to be the impossible, he defeated Confederate General Robert E. Lee, and sent his celebrated Army of Northern Virginia, back to Virginia. General Hooker's military career was not ended by his poor performance in the summer of 1863. He went on to regain a reputation as a solid corps commander when he was transferred with the 11th and 12th Corps of the Army of the Potomac westward to reinforce the Army of the Cumberland around Chattanooga, Tennessee. Hooker was in command at the battle of Lookout Mountain, playing an important role in General Ulysses S. Grant's decisive victory at the battle of Chattanooga. He led his corps, now designated as the 20th Corps, competently in the 1864 Atlanta Campaign under General William Tecumseh Sherman, but asked to be relieved before the capture of the city because of his disgust with the promotion of General Oliver O. Howard, upon the death of General James B. McPherson. Not only did Hooker have seniority over Howard, but he blamed Howard for his defeat at Chancellorsville. Howard, who had commanded the 11th Corps, was routed by General Stonewall Jackson's famous flank attack. After leaving Georgia, Hooker commanded the Northern Department, comprising the states of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, with headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio, from October 1, 1864, until the end of the war. After the war, Hooker led President Abraham Lincoln's funeral procession in Springfield, Illinois, on May 4, 1865. He served in command of the Department of the East, and the Department of the Lakes following the war. He was mustered out of the volunteer service on September 1, 1866, and retired from the U.S. Army on October 15, 1868, with the regular army rank of major general. He died on October 31, 1879, while on a visit to Garden City, New York, and is buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio, his wife's home town.


<u>War Period Signature with Rank</u>: 2 3/4 x 1 1/2, in ink, Joseph Hooker, Brig. Gen., Comdg. Age toning. Very popular Civil War autograph.             


Authentic 1863 dated engraving of Major General "Fightin' Joe" Hooker. Full standing view in uniform with rank of major general with sword. Printed facsimile signature below his portrait which was painted by Alonzo Chappel, and executed from the likeness of the latest photograph of Hooker from life. Johnson, Fry & Co., Publishers, New York. Entered according to act of Congress A.D. 1863, Johnson, Fry & Co. in the clerk's office of the district court of the southern district of N.Y. 8 x 10 1/4. 


<u>General Joseph Hooker</u>: (1814-79) Born in Hadley, Mass., he was the grandson of a captain who fought in the Revolutionary War. Graduating in the West Point class of 1837, Hooker was commissioned 2nd lieutenant in the 1st U.S. Artillery. His first assignment was fighting in Florida in the 2nd Seminole Indian War. He served in the Mexican War in the campaigns of General Zachary Taylor, and General Winfield Scott, and was cited for gallantry in the battles of Monterrey, National Bridge and Chapultepec. Hooker left the army in 1853, and settled in Sonoma County, California where he was a farmer and land developer. He held a commission as colonel in the California Militia, 1859-61. When the Civil War broke out Hooker requested a commission, but his application was rejected very probably because of resentment held against him by General Winfield Scott, General-in-Chief of the U.S. Army. Hooker had testified against his former commander Scott in the court-martial case of Gideon J. Pillow (future Confederate General) for insubordination. After the Union Army's defeat at the 1st battle of Bull Run, Va., Hooker wrote a letter directly to President Abraham Lincoln whereby he complained of military mismanagement and touted his own abilities and qualifications and once again requested a commission. Lincoln consented and commissioned him brigadier general of volunteers, in August 1861. He commanded a brigade and then a division around Washington, D.C., as part of the effort to organize, and train the new Army of the Potomac, commanded by General George B. McClellan. During the 1862 Virginia Peninsula Campaign, he commanded the 2nd Division of the 3rd Corps, and made a good name for himself as a combat leader who handled himself well, and aggressively sought out the key points on battlefields. He led his division with distinction at the battles of Williamsburg and Seven Pines. He became extremely annoyed at the cautious generalship of General McClellan and openly criticized his commander's failure to capture Richmond. Commenting on McClellan's leadership, General Hooker was quoted as saying that, "He is not only not a soldier, but he does not know what soldier-ship is." Hooker was promoted to major general on July 26, 1862. Following the second battle of Bull Run, Va., Hooker replaced General Irvin McDowell as commander of the 3rd Corps, Army of Virginia, soon re-designated the 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac. During the Maryland Campaign, he led the 1st Corps at the battles for South Mountain, and at Antietam, where his corps launched the first assault of the bloodiest day in American military history, driving south into the corps of General Stonewall Jackson, where they fought each other to a standstill. Hooker, aggressive and inspiring to his men, left the battle that morning with a foot wound. The battle of Fredericksburg, Va., fought on December 13, 1862, was another Union debacle. Upon recovering from his foot wound, General Hooker was briefly made commander of the 5th Corps, but was then promoted to "Grand Division" command, that consisted of both the 3rd and the 5th Corps. He was contemptuous about Burnside's plan to assault the fortified heights of Fredericksburg, deeming it "preposterous." His Grand Division suffered terrible losses in their futile assaults which were ordered by General Burnside over General Hooker's vehement protests. Burnside followed up this battle with the humiliating Mud March in January 1863, and Hooker's criticism of his commander bordered on formal insubordination. He described Burnside as a "wretch ... of blundering sacrifice." Burnside planned a wholesale purge of his subordinates, including Hooker, and drafted an order for the president's approval. He stated that Hooker was "unfit to hold an important commission during a crisis like the present," but President Lincoln had run out of patience, and instead removed Burnside as Commander of the Army of the Potomac. Lincoln then appointed General Joseph Hooker to command of the Army of the Potomac, on January 26, 1863. Some members of the army saw this move as inevitable, given Hooker's reputation for aggressive fighting, something sorely lacking in his predecessors. Hooker's plan for the spring and summer campaign of 1863 was both elegant and promising. He first planned to send his cavalry corps deep into the enemy's rear, disrupting supply lines and distracting him from the main attack. He would pin down General Robert E. Lee's much smaller army at Fredericksburg, while taking the large bulk of the Army of the Potomac on a flanking march to strike Lee in his rear. Once Lee was defeated, he could move on to seize Richmond. Unfortunately for Hooker and the Union, the execution of his plan did not match the elegance of the plan itself. The Union and Confederate armies would fatefully meet in the epic battle of Chancellorsville, Va., fought on May 1,2,3, 1863, which has been called "Lee's perfect battle" because of his ability to vanquish a much larger foe through audacious tactics. Hooker had a devastating encounter with a cannonball while he was standing on the porch of his headquarters. The ball struck a wooden column against which he was leaning, initially knocking him senseless, and then putting him out of action for the rest of the day with a concussion. Political winds blew strongly in the following weeks as generals maneuvered to overthrow Hooker or to position themselves if Lincoln decided to do so on his own. On the eve of what would become the battle of Gettysburg, President Lincoln had made his decision. On June 28, 1863, 3 days before the epic battle in Pennsylvania, General George G. Meade was promoted to the command of the Army of the Potomac, and accomplished what many considered to be the impossible, he defeated Confederate General Robert E. Lee, and sent his celebrated Army of Northern Virginia, back to Virginia. General Hooker's military career was not ended by his poor performance in the summer of 1863. He went on to regain a reputation as a solid corps commander when he was transferred with the 11th and 12th Corps of the Army of the Potomac westward to reinforce the Army of the Cumberland around Chattanooga, Tennessee. Hooker was in command at the battle of Lookout Mountain, playing an important role in General Ulysses S. Grant's decisive victory at the battle of Chattanooga. He led his corps, now designated as the 20th Corps, competently in the 1864 Atlanta Campaign under General William Tecumseh Sherman, but asked to be relieved before the capture of the city because of his disgust with the promotion of General Oliver O. Howard, upon the death of General James B. McPherson. Not only did Hooker have seniority over Howard, but he blamed Howard for his defeat at Chancellorsville. Howard, who had commanded the 11th Corps, was routed by General Stonewall Jackson's famous flank attack. After leaving Georgia, Hooker commanded the Northern Department, comprising the states of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, with headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio, from October 1, 1864, until the end of the war. After the war, Hooker led President Abraham Lincoln's funeral procession in Springfield, Illinois, on May 4, 1865. He served in command of the Department of the East, and the Department of the Lakes following the war. He was mustered out of the volunteer service on September 1, 1866, and retired from the U.S. Army on October 15, 1868, with the regular army rank of major general. He died on October 31, 1879, while on a visit to Garden City, New York, and is buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio, his wife's home town.            


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Full standing view of a young Confederate soldier wearing a shell jacket and kepi with the brim turned up. He poses with his hand on a studio table with table covering at his side. No imprint. Possibly a Confederate cavalryman or artilleryman. Light age toning, and wear, and  a surface abrasion to the reverse of the card.  


<b>From Headquarters Army of the United States</b>


5 1/4 x 3 1/2, with imprint at upper left, Headquarters Army Of The United States. Postmarked, Washington, D.C., Feb. 24, 6 A.M., with 2 cents red/brown George Washington postage stamp. (A57-effective date October 1, 1883). Addressed to Mr. Wilmer Moore, No. 20 Cane Street, Atlanta, Ga. Partial circular date stamped on the reverse, Atlanta, Ga., Feb. 25, 1885, Recd.,12 P.M., with a docket in pencil, "Sheridan," presumably written by the recipient. The envelope is not addressed by Sheridan himself, but most likely was written by one of his aides. The time period fits as Sheridan was appointed Commanding General of the U.S. Army in 1884, and he was probably in Washington, D.C. on the date  this cover was mailed. An interesting footnote about Mr. Moore is that he received an envelope sent to him by General Winfield S. Hancock at about the same time as the Sheridan correspondence. [an item I recently sold]. Although I have not been able to find out any information about Mr. Wilmer Moore, one can fairly speculate that he might have been someone connected to, known by, or of some other importance to have received correspondence from two of the highest ranking Generals in the U.S. Army, General Philip H. Sheridan and General Winfield S. Hancock, within a matter of a few days. Light age toning and wear. 


<u>General Philip H. Sheridan</u>: (1831-88) A prominent Civil War commander, he graduated in the West Point class of 1853. Appointed brigadier general of volunteers, on September 13, 1862, and major general, on March 16, 1863. He fought in the battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, the Chattanooga campaign, Missionary Ridge, Yellow Tavern, Trevilian Station, the 1864 Shenandoah Valley campaign including the battles of Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek, and in the 1865 Appomattox campaign which resulted in the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia commanded by General Robert E. Lee, to name but a few of his battle honors. General Ulysses S. Grant summed up Sheridan's performance in the final days of the Civil War as, "I believe General Sheridan has no superior as a general, either living or dead, and perhaps not an equal." During the Indian Wars General Sheridan saw much action against the Plains Indians in the 1870's. Upon the retirement of General William T. Sherman in 1884, Sheridan became commanding general of the United States Army.

Autograph, General Joseph Hooker $150.00

 

General Joseph Hooker $15.00

 

CDV, Confederate Civil War Soldier $125.00

 

Cover Sent by General Philip H. Sheridan

Best described by our photo illustrations we offer this <I>if only it could talk</I> earlier to mid-1800s hat with some trepidation as we have had it for some time as witness to our weakness for such colorful old headgear. Time to move it on though, as we continue our attempt in <I>weeding out</I> a 50 + year accumulation.  Measuring 13 inches across the brim front to back with an 8 inch diameter crown standing 7 ¼  inches high this character rich old <I>stove pipe</I> shows a good amount of period wear and age while remaining sound and with no holes, tears or separations.  The extra wide split leather sweat band indicative of the period remains intact.  An eye pealing classic, the clearly period red, white and blue cockade sets this piece of as a most appealing example of classic Americana.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Best described by our photo illustrations, this attractive period used tobacco pipe will make an attractive  personal item addition set in with any quality Civil War / Indian Wars grouping.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


<b>150th Anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg


President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address</b>


6 1/2 x 3 1/2, envelope. First Day of Issue of the Gettysburg Forever U.S. postage stamp with vignette of the battle of Gettysburg (Pickett's Charge) and date Gettysburg July 1-3, 1863. The Gettysburg Forever postage stamp is tied on with a printed vignette of the 5 cents, 1963 U.S. postage stamp honoring the centennial of the 1863 battle. Printed below that is a quote from President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, "We can never forget...what they did here," and the postmark date of the first day of issue of the Gettysburg Forever stamp, November 19, 2013, Gettysburg, PA 17325. At the left is a vignette of President Lincoln delivering his immortal Gettysburg Address. Printed below the vignette is, The Gettysburg Address, November 19, 1863. First Day Cover is stamped on the reverse flap. Excellent.     


<b>Served as an officer in the 101st Pennsylvania Infantry during the Civil War


Wounded and captured during the war!


Postmaster of Gettysburg</b>


8 1/2 x 4 3/4, imprinted form, filled out in ink. 


Gettysburg, Pa., Sep. 21, 1882. A.C. Creswell. To H.S. Benner, Dr., Produce Dealer And Forwarding Agent, Col. Buehler’s Warehouse, Carlisle Street. Terms Cash. To Freight. 200. 50. Recd. paymt. Signed at lower right by, H.S. Benner. Light age toning and wear. Very desirable item for collectors of material related to the town and citizens of Gettysburg, the site of the greatest battle of the Civil War.


<u>Henry S. Benner</u>: (1830-1904) Born in Straban Township, Adams County, Pa., he received a good education in the schools of Gettysburg. As a resident of Gettysburg, he learned the granite cutting trade which he worked in for 10 years, and then was employed as a railroad agent until the Civil War commenced in 1861. Benner enlisted into Co. K, 101st Pennsylvania Infantry, on September 28, 1861, and was commissioned 1st Lieutenant. He was wounded in action on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia. He was promoted to Captain, February 5, 1863, and captured on April 20, 1864, at Plymouth, North Carolina. Major Benner was confined in several Confederate prisons starting at Macon, Ga., for three months, at Savannah, Ga., for a month, two weeks at Charleston, S.C., five months at Columbia, S.C., then at Charlotte, N.C. where he escaped. Recaptured he was sent to Saulsbury, N.C., and paroled, March 1, 1865. He was promoted to Major, June 1, 1865, and mustered out of the Union service, June 25, 1865, at New Berne, North Carolina. In 1868, he worked as a teller at the Gettysburg National Bank, and served in this position for 5 years. He then went into the produce and warehouse business in Gettysburg. Appointed Postmaster of Gettysburg by President Grover Cleveland in 1885. Major Benner was a proud member of the Corporal Skelly, G.A.R. Post #9, in Gettysburg, Pa. He is buried in the famous Evergreen Cemetery in Gettysburg. Major Benner was esteemed and held in high honor by everyone who knew him.


<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: The 101st Pennsylvania Infantry suffered 14 killed, 60 wounded, and 4 were taken prisoner, at the battle of Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862. The regiment lost 7 killed, 24 wounded, and 429 captured at the battle of Plymouth, North Carolina, April 20, 1864.


Located just east of Gettysburg is Benner's Hill, which played a prominent role in the 3 day battle of Gettysburg. At the time of the battle, the hill was part of the 200 acre farm of Susan and Christian Benner, the parents of Major Henry S. Benner.

earlier through the Civil War era Beaver $495.00

 

19th century - brier & hard rubber TOBAC $55.00

 

Gettysburg First Day Cover $5.00

 

Gettysburg Merchant, H. S. Benner, Signed $35.00




<b>Block of four Confederate postage stamps</b>


Scott #13, green. Block of four Confederate postage stamps. Features a full face portrait of Revolutionary War General-in-Chief, and the 1st President of the United States, George Washington. These stamps were printed by Archer & Daly, in Richmond, Va., and their earliest known use was on June 1, 1863.

 


<b>Postmarked at Springfield, Illinois</b>


6 1/2 x 3 1/2, envelope. First Day of Issue, of the 42 cents U.S. postage stamp with large bust view of Lincoln at right, and vignette of Lincoln seated with General U.S. Grant & General W.T. Sherman. Stamped First Day Of Issue, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, February 9, 2009, Springfield, IL., 62703, with vignette of President Lincoln wearing his stovepipe hat. Choice condition.  


<b>Signature With Rank as Commander of the Mississippi Marine Brigade</b>


(1820-95) Brother of the celebrated engineer Charles Ellet. In 1861, he served as a captain in the 59th Illinois Infantry. The following spring when his brother was ordered by the War Department to purchase vessels and convert them into rams, Alfred was commissioned lieutenant colonel and aide-de-camp to his brother Charles. They completed their fleet at Cincinnati, Ohio, and steamed down the river to Memphis, defeating the Confederate fleet there on June 6, 1862, and sinking or disabling eight of the nine enemy ironclads. Charles received a mortal wound here and Alfred took over the command. With the Monarch and the Lancaster he steamed up the Yazoo River and discovered and reported the presence of the Confederate ram Arkansas. Promoted to brigadier general to rank from November 1, 1862, he was assigned to the Department of the Mississippi and placed in command of the Marine Brigade in 1863. After running the Vicksburg batteries in March 1863, Ellet was engaged for some time in moving General Ulysses S. Grant's troops to the east bank of the Mississippi. In retaliation for information furnished to the troops of Confederate General Chalmer's command, he burned Austin, Mississippi.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 3 3/4 x 1, in ink, Alfred W. Ellet, Brig. Genl., Comdg. M.[ississippi] M.[arine] Brigade. Light wear.


 


<b>Celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address</b>


6 1/2 x 3 3/4, envelope. First Day Of Issue, of the 3 cents, President Abraham Lincoln, U.S. Postage stamp celebrating the 72nd anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. Light blue U.S. postage stamp with a portrait of President Lincoln, and a quote from his immortal Gettysburg Address, "That Government Of The People, By The People, For The People, Shall Not Perish From The Earth." Tied on by stamped "First Day Of Issue," and C.D.S., Gettysburg, PA., Nov. 19, 1948- 9 AM. Excellent.


WBTS Trivia: President Abraham Lincoln gave his immortal Gettysburg Address during the dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery, on Thursday, November 19, 1863.

1863 Twenty Cents, George Washington, Co $125.00

 

President Abraham Lincoln First Day Cove $5.00

 

Autograph, General Alfred W. Ellet $125.00

 

Abraham Lincoln Gettysburg First Day Cov $8.00

A wonderful Civil War era display item in an especially desirable color, this all original and unopened textile dye packet measures approximately 2 ¾ X 1 ¾ X 1 inch thick  with classic patriotic graphic and nomenclature of <B> HOWE & STEVENS – Dye Color – MAIZE</B> with <B> Patented October 13, 1863</B> and the reminder that the content is for <I>Dyeing Silk, Woolen & Cotton Goods, Shawls, Scarfs, Ribbons, Dresses, Feathers, Bonnets, Hats and all kinds of Wearing Apparel, with perfect FAST COLORS.</I>   Pleasing with its period <I>Lady Liberty</I> patriotic graphic and <I>MAIZE</I> color (a subdued natural yellow) this every day relic of the Civil War period will make a nice companion in any 19th century textile related grouping. (see: Civil War vintage Boston Business Directories)   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Not a big deal and a bit out of our usual lane but worthy of a good home is this neat little sales sample miniature  W & B, rubber composition, padded horseshoe.  Founded in the third quarter of the 19th century the Whitman and Barns Co. soon became most well known as a hand tool and agricultural equipment manufacturer.   With good evidence of age yet remaining in decent condition our photos will offer the best description.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 


<b>War date signature with rank, place & date, plus photograph in uniform</b>


(1825-88) Born in Black River, Lorain County, Ohio, he graduated #1 in the West Point class of 1849. Appointed to the Engineer Department, of the U.S.A., he was engaged in constructing the fortifications at Hampton Roads, Virginia, 1849-1852. His next assignment was as instructor of Military Engineering at West Point where he also designed a new riding school. Gillmore was chief engineer of the Port Royal expedition in 1861-62, which affected an important Union lodgment on the Carolina coast. His greatest moment in the Civil War came when his brilliant plan reduced Fort Pulaski, Georgia, the Confederate stronghold which guarded the approaches to the Savannah River. A staunch advocate of the relatively new naval rifled guns, he was the first officer to effectively use them to knock out a stone fortification. More than 5,000 artillery shells fell on Pulaski from a range of 1,700 yards during the siege, which resulted in the fort's surrender after its walls were breached. The result of the efforts to breach a fort of such strength and at such a distance conferred high honors on the engineering skill and self-reliant capacity of General Gilmore. He then traveled to Lexington, Kentucky, where he supervised the construction of Fort Clay situated on a hilltop commanding the city. Gillmore commanded a division in the Army of Kentucky, and though long associated with engineering and artillery, Gillmore's first independent command came at the head of a cavalry expedition against Confederate General John Pegram. Gillmore defeated the Confederates at the battle of Somerset for which he was brevetted for gallantry. In 1863, he commanded the Department of the South and was in charge of the Charleston, S.C. campaign. It was said that his operations constituted a new era in the science of engineering and gunnery. In 1864, he served under General Benjamin F. Butler, and was involved in the Bermuda Hundred, Virginia campaign. In February 1865, he returned to the command of the Department of the South until the end of the war.


<u>Signature with Rank, Place & Date</u>: 3 3/4 x 5, in ink, Q.A. Gillmore, Maj. Genl., Memphis, Tenn., Dec. 14th, 1864. Comes with an antique portrait photograph, of General Gillmore, in uniform, with rank of Major General. 3 3/4 x 5 1/2.  Circa late 1800’s.


WBTS Trivia: The Gillmore Medal is a military decoration of the United States Army which was first issued on October 28, 1863. The medal is named after Major General Quincy A. Gillmore who commanded Union troops attempting to seize Fort Wagner, S.C. in 1863. Also called the Fort Sumter Medal, the Gillmore Medal commemorates the men who served in the fighting around Charleston, South Carolina, in 1863, and was presented to all Union soldiers who had served under General Gillmore's command.  


<b>Imprint of  Morse's Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tennessee</b>


(1826-86) Nicknamed "Black Jack," he served in the Mexican War as a lieutenant of Illinois Volunteers; and was perhaps the Union's premier civilian general during the Civil War. Elected to the U.S. Senate in 1858 and 1860, he attended the Democratic National Convention in Charleston as a supporter of Stephen A. Douglas. After fighting at the battle of 1st Bull Run, he returned to Illinois to recruit the 31st Illinois Infantry of which he was commissioned colonel. An instant success as a field commander, he saw action at Belmont, and Fort Donelson where he was wounded. Promoted to rank of brigadier general, March 21, 1862, and major general March 13, 1863, he fought at Corinth, Shiloh, Vicksburg, in the Atlanta campaign where he was wounded again, and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. After the war he returned to politics and served as U.S. Congressman and Senator from Illinois almost uninterruptedly until his death. He was greatly involved in veteran's affairs and was instrumental in founding Memorial Day.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of major general, Backmark: Morse's Gallery of the Cumberland, 25 Cedar St., opposite the Commercial Hotel, Nashville, Tenn. Excellent. Very desirable image with this Tennessee back mark. Scarce.

unopened - Howe & Stevens Civil War vint $75.00

 

19th century Salesman Sample PADDED HORS $45.00

 

Autograph, General Quincy A. Gillmore $125.00

 

CDV, General John A. Logan $150.00

Frequently referred to as <I>gold</I> scales and sometimes as <I>apothecary</I> or <I>medical</I> scales, these little balance scales, once relatively common, are like so many every day treasures of the 19th century, becoming quite difficult to acquire in complete original condition.  A nice display companion item in any number of period categories, this set is offered untouched and as found  leaving the decision to lightly clean or not (we wouldn’t) to the new owner. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  Illustrated here with a U S quarter for size comparison our photos will offer the best description of this  nice period staff grade hat insignia.  Of interest to the collector will be that we acquired the piece from Francis Lord from his personal collection. Veteran collectors who are fortunate to have known Dr. Lord will remember that Francis had a habit of gluing things to display boards for <I> show & tell</I> at the old Civil War shows.  Remnants of that glue remains on the back and can be easily removed but we’d leave it as is with the old man’s tracks on the back.   We acquired this relic several years ago when we were fortunate enough to purchase several groupings from the personal collection of our longtime friend.  A pioneer Civil War collector from a day when nearly no one else paid much attention to the details of many now valued Civil War collectable categories, Francis authored the  widely known, multi volume, pioneer reference,  <I>Lord’s CIVIL WAR COLLECTORS ENCYCLOPEDIA</I>.  While a lot of detailed knowledge has been gained as the interest and <U>value</U> of Civil War collectibles increased so dramatically over the years, Dr. Lord’s first and second volumes in particular and his <I>Civil War Sutlers & Their Wares</I> continue to offer valuable and reliable reference to Civil War collectors.  (Use <I>Lord</I> in our search feature to find other Lord collection items.) 



 A bit of a departure from our usual fare, we couldn’t resist the acquisition of this late 19th early 20th century classic Bobby Helmet.  All complete and in pleasing original condition while offering desirable evidence of period use and age, this <I>Kingston upon Hull</I> police helmet retains its original <B>HULL POLICE</B> plate and sports the classic London hatter marking <I>Christy’s London</I> embossed into the leather sweat band.   Now defunct for some years, the Hull police are most frequently remembered today for their public efforts during the catastrophic World War I  German Zeppelin attacks on their city. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient for gallantry in the battle of Franklin, Tennessee where he was wounded</b>


(1828-1902) Born in Cedar Valley, Wayne County, Ohio, he graduated in the West Point class of 1852. His first assignment was on the western frontier where he was engaged in surveying railroads which ultimately led to him fighting Indians. Promoted to captain in 1861, he was on duty at Fort Washita, Indian Territory when the Civil War broke out, and he thus led his men to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Stanley fought in the battle of Wilson's Creek, Missouri, on August 10, 1861, after which President Lincoln appointed him brigadier general. He also saw action at New Madrid; Island No. 10; Iuka; Corinth; Stone's River; Murfreesboro; Tullahoma; Chattanooga; and in the Atlanta campaign. Stanley was appointed major general to rank from November 29, 1862. He was wounded in the battle of Franklin, Tennessee, November 30, 1864, earning himself distinction, and  the Medal of Honor for gallantry. While leading a counterattack against the Rebels, General Stanley was wounded in the neck at the same time that he had his horse shot out from under him.  Stanley remained in the United States Army after the Civil War, serving throughout the postbellum years on the Indian frontier, commanding in the Dakota Territory, in the Yellowstone Expedition, in Texas where he crushed Indian raids, and in Santa Fe where he commanded the District of New Mexico. He later commanded the Department of Texas from 1884-92. From 1893-98 he was governor of the Soldiers' Home in Washington, D.C. General Stanley was interred at the United States Soldiers' and Airmen's Home, National Cemetery in Washington, D.C. His only son, David Sheridan Stanley, named after his friend General Philip H. Sheridan, and five of his grandsons would all graduate from The United States Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.


<u>Signature with Rank</u>: 4 1/4 x 2, in ink, D.S. Stanley, Major Genl. Comes with a 3 1/2 x 4 1/2, antique silver print (circa 1900) photograph of General Stanley in uniform.

earlier to mid-1800s BALANCE SCALES $65.00

 

Lord collection – Civil War Staff – HAT $235.00

 

late 1800s early 1900s British Bobby Hel $235.00

 

Autograph, General David S. Stanley $95.00




Stamped brass hat wreath insignia with G.A.R. [Grand Army of the Republic] in silver colored letters attached to the center of the wreath. These were worn by Civil War veterans on their slouch hats or kepis. Measures 2 1/2 inches in width. Complete with straight pin fastener on the reverse. Comes beautifully displayed in a 4 1/4 x 3 1/4 glass faced display case with blue velvet liner. Excellent piece of G.A.R. memorabilia.  


7 1/2 x 9 3/4, imprinted form.


By Authority of ___ a safeguard is hereby granted to ___ 


All officers and soldiers belonging to the Army of the United States are therefore commanded to respect this safeguard, and to afford, if necessary, protection to ___  


Given at Headquarters, the ___ day of ___ 1864.


By command of the General,


Asst. Adjt. General


"55th Article of the Rule and Articles of War"


"Whoever belonging to the Armies of the United States in foreign parts, or at any place within the United States or their Territories, during rebellion against the Supreme Authority of the United States, shall force a safeguard, shall suffer death."


Excellent condition. Uncommon. Very desirable 1864 blank Civil War document which includes the printing of the "55th Article of the Rules and Articles of War."   


<b>Civil War signature with rank of Major General


Wounded at Fort Donelson and in the Atlanta campaign!


General Logan was instrumental in founding Memorial Day!</b>




(1826-86) Nicknamed "Black Jack," he served in the Mexican War as a lieutenant of Illinois Volunteers; and was perhaps the Union's premier civilian general during the Civil War. Elected to the U.S. Senate in 1858 and 1860, he attended the Democratic National Convention in Charleston as a supporter of Stephen A. Douglas. After fighting at the battle of 1st Bull Run, he returned to Illinois to recruit the 31st Illinois Infantry of which he was commissioned colonel. An instant success as a field commander, he saw action at Belmont, and Fort Donelson where he was wounded. Promoted to rank of brigadier general, March 21, 1862, and major general March 13, 1863, he fought at Corinth, Shiloh, Vicksburg, in the Atlanta campaign where he was wounded again, and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. After the war he returned to politics and served as U.S. Congressman and Senator from Illinois almost uninterruptedly until his death. He was greatly involved in veteran's affairs and was instrumental in founding Memorial Day.


<u>Signature With Rank</u>: 3 x 1 1/2, in ink, John A. Logan, Maj. Genl.  Best dscribed by our photo illustrations, 18th early 19th century tobacco <I>box</I> measures 3 5/16 inches in diameter and stands 3 3/8 inches.  Wood pegged to its base with a unique cut and fitted side seam, the body of this wonderful old primitive is of birch bark with its original press fit wood cover.  All with an eye appealing deep age patina this attractive 1700s early 1800s container will make a wonderful companion set with any period tobacco pipe.  A desirable item for the early American primitives enthusiast.    <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

G. A. R. Hat Wreath Insignia $45.00

 

1864 U. S. Army Safeguard Pass $15.00

 

Autograph, General John A. Logan

 

early primitive BIRCH BARK TOBACCO BOX $135.00

<b>of Facts for an Award of a Cross of Military Service</b>


4 pages, 8 1/2 x 14, blank imprinted document. This was the form that was used by the UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY as a Memorandum of Facts for an Award of a CROSS OF MILITARY SERVICE, for the ancestor of a Confederate Veteran who served honorably in a Foreign War. Very fine. Nice document to pair up with one of these commemorative medals.



WBTS TRIVIA: The United Daughters of the Confederacy was established on September 10, 1894, in Nashville, Tennessee. These patriotic Southern women were responsible for organizing burials of Confederate soldiers, establishing permanent care of these cemeteries, organizing commemorative ceremonies, and sponsoring the erection of monuments. The Southern Cross of Honor was a commemorative medal established by the U.D.C. for members of the United Confederate Veterans, and was established in 1898.


The Cross of Military Service is awarded by the United Daughters of the Confederacy as a testimonial to the patriotic devotion of worthy descendants of Confederate Soldiers and Sailors, and is considered the most prestigious award presented by the U.D.C. It was originally issued to U.S. Veterans of Confederate lineage that fought in the Spanish-American War (1898-99), the Philippine Insurrection (1899-1902), and World War I (1914-19), all of which are printed as options to be filled in on page one of the document. This dates the form to be from the early 1900's. In later years, the U.D.C. extended the issue of this medal to include World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam Conflict, and the Global War on Terror.    


<b>LEE, LONGSTREET & PICKETT</b>


Includes 8 x 10, black & white advertisement photograph featuring stars of the movie, Martin Sheen, as General Robert E. Lee, Tom Berenger, as General James Longstreet, & Stephen Lang, as General George E. Pickett all wearing their Confederate uniforms. Advertising imprint below the images, GETTYSBURG, the Turner Pictures Civil War epic whose scale, drama and moving performances touched audiences and critics alike, comes to TNT in its full theatrical length as a two-part miniseries. The sweeping film adaption of Michael Shaara's Pulitzer Prize winning novel, The Killer Angels, stars Tom Berenger, Jeff Daniels, Martin Sheen and Sam Elliott. GETTYSBURG.  <u>PREMIER</u>: Part I, Sunday, June 26, 8:00 PM (ET). Part II, Monday, June 27, 8:00 PM (ET). 1992 Turner Pictures, Inc. Photos by Erik Heinila. TNT. Comes with a pair of large size Gettysburg note cards, 5 x 7, when folded in half, featuring the color image of the Confederate and Union battle lines, flags flying, facing off against each other. This was the advertising photo used inside the movie theaters, on posters, television ads, DVD's and CD's of the movie and film score. 2 blank interior pages give you plenty of room for writing notes. The back page of the card has the advertising imprint from the movie, GETTYSBURG, which includes the names of the star actors, producers, directors, screenplay writers, music credits, and much more. Group lot of three very nice Gettysburg items.


<u>Includes a bonus item</u>: Vintage postcard published by Blocher's, Gettysburg, Pa., of the Virginia Monument which features a bronze equestrian statue of General Robert E. Lee, Commander of the Army of Northern Virginia. General Lee sits proudly atop his gallant war horse, "Traveller," on a granite pedestal, with depictions below in bronze of the sons of Virginia represented by seven soldiers who came from various occupations to join the Artillery, Cavalry and Infantry of the Confederate Army. The statue was created by sculptor Frederick Sievers, and on June 8, 1917, Virginia governor Henry C. Stuart presented the completed memorial to the Assistant U.S. Secretary of War. This iconic equestrian memorial, the largest Confederate monument on the battlefield, is located on West Confederate Avenue, Gettysburg National Military Park.  


4 x 6 5/8, imprint.


War Department,

Adjutant General's Office,

Washington, August 1, 1863


GENERAL ORDERS,

No. 258


All applications of quartermasters, commissaries, and paymasters, for changes of stations, or to be exempted from the operation of orders of assignment to stations, on the score of ill health, will be hereafter taken as confessions of inability to perform official duty on account of physical incapacity, and equivalent to tenders of resignations. The officers concerned will, in ordinary course, be mustered out of service hereupon as in cases of accepted resignations.


BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:


E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Very fine 1863 War Department orders.  


(1826-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846, and fought in the Mexican War. Hailed at the beginning of the Civil War as the "Young Napoleon," he proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but an officer totally lacking in the essential qualities of successful command of large forces in battle. He saw action at Rich Mountain, in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and at the battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day in American military history. He was the Democratic nominee for president in 1864, and was defeated by President Abraham Lincoln. 


<u>Ellen Mary Marcy</u>: (1836-1915) Was the daughter of General Randolph B. Marcy, McClellan's former commander, and future subordinate. Ellen, known to her family and friends as "Elly," had turned down George's first proposal of marriage. A very popular young lady, she was courted by several young men and received some nine marriage proposals, one of which came from McClellan's West Point classmate and future Confederate General A.P. Hill. Nelly had actually accepted Hill's proposal in 1856, but her family did not approve of the Virginian, so he withdrew. Ellen and George B. McClellan were eventually married at the Cavalry Church, in New York City, on May 22, 1860.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. General McClellan, seated and holding a newspaper, is in uniform with rank of major general. His wife Ellen is standing behind him. Backmark: Published by Thurston, Herline & Co., Nos. 630 & 632 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Card is trimmed. Light age toning and wear.

United Daughters of the Confederacy Memo $12.00

 

Gettysburg Advertisement Lot $20.00

 

Change of Stations for Quartermasters, C $5.00

 

CDV, General George B. McClellan & Wife $75.00




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