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A really nice little piece for the Civil War personal item collector or period tin enthusiast, this individual size, one cup, coffee pot stands approximately 5 3/8 inches from base to top of the turned wood knob and offers good evidence of period originality by virtue of its classic mid 1800s construction with lead soldered lapped seams and flat bottom.  All in pleasing condition yet with the eye appeal of period use, this classic little coffee pot will set nicely in any quality Civil War grouping.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  


4 1/4 x 6 1/2 imprint.


War Department,

Adjutant General's Office,

Washington, October 4, 1862


General Orders,

No. 151


I..Captain George H. Johnston, Assistant Adjutant General, having sent a letter to a member of Congress censuring his superior officers, and enclosing a copy of an official report of a confidential character, in relation to the defence of his post, and asking that his communication be brought to the notice of the Secretary of War, thus doubly violating the Army Regulations and General Orders, is hereby publicly reprimanded.


His immediate Commander is not free from censure for permitting Captain Johnston to copy and transmit, out of the prescribed channels, official documents.


II..If any officer shall hereafter, without proper authority, permit the publication of any official letter or report, or allow any copy of such document to pass into the hands of persons not authorized to receive it, his name will be submitted to the President for dismissal. This rule applies to all official letters and reports written by an officer himself.


BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

L. THOMAS

Adjutant General


Light age toning and wear.  


By William R. Weiss, Jr., Copyright 1995, by William R. Weiss, Jr. 8 1/2 x 11 1/4, hardcover with silver imprinted front cover with vignette of a spread winged eagle on a shield with flags, stars and arrows in its talons. Silver imprinted title on the spine. 839 pages, profusely illustrated with over 6,000 designs. Brand new condition. Superb reference work on the subject of Union patriotic envelopes. Very difficult to find a copy of this privately published book, especially in this condition!  Best described here by our photo illustrations this attractive enameled  combination 9th Corps, 10th Corps and 24th Corps badge remains in excellent condition with the exception of its missing <I><B>T- back</B></I> pin shaft and offers a period scratch engraved identification to a  <I><B> C A Howard</I></B>.  Veteran collectors and those familiar with the authoritative publications of the pioneer Civil War collector will appreciate the fact that this item emanated from the collection of Dr. Francis Lord several years ago when we were fortunate enough to purchase several groupings from the personal collection of our longtime friend.  A Civil War collector from a day when nearly no one else paid much attention to the details of many now valued Civil War collectable categories, Francis authored the  widely known, multi volume, pioneer reference,  <I>Lord’s CIVIL WAR COLLECTORS ENCYCLOPEDIA</I>.  While a lot of detailed knowledge has been gained as the interest in Civil War collectibles increased so dramatically over the years, Dr. Lord’s  encyclopedia volumes and his <I>Civil War Sutlers & Their Wares</I> continue to offer valuable and reliable reference to Civil War collectors.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Civil War period personal size 1 cup COF

 

Union Officer is Reprimanded for Sending $8.00

 

The Catalog of Union Civil War Patriotic $150.00

 

Lord Civil War Collection 9th – 10th & 2 $375.00

Best described here by our photo illustrations this all original pair of early black iron shears measures approximately 11 ½ inches in total length.  With good evidence of age and considerable period use this attractive pair of shears remain in pleasing original condition with that deep chocolate patina only with the passing of decades.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Best described here by our photo illustrations this scarce little oil lantern is dated on the glass chimney <B> Pat. 5, April 1864</B>.  All complete and original just as it came from decades of storage, this wonderful little period lighting device stands approximately 7 ½ inches high  and remains in most pleasing condition with good evidence of period use and originality yet with no cracks, chips, dings or other issues.  Fashioned from spun brass with a tin bottom this little personal lantern even sports its original chain and ring for carrying or hanging. Especially difficult to find in this condition with  patent dated globe. A desirable item for the Civil War personal item enthusiast or period lighting collector.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  


<b>"Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!"</b>


(1801-1870) He entered the navy as a  Midshipman in 1810 after having been virtually adopted by Commodore David Porter. The friendship between the two families began when Porter's father was buried on the same day as Farragut's mother in New Orleans. He fought in the Mexican War and was awaiting orders at his Norfolk, Va. home when the Civil War broke out. Told that a person with Union sentiments could not live in Virginia, he packed up his family and Virginian wife and moved north. He was given command of the New Orleans expedition in December 1861, and helped capture the city in the spring of 1862. Promoted to Rear Admiral in July 1862 for his success in opening up the Mississippi River to Vicksburg, he spent the next year in operations against Port Hudson, La., and returned to New York City in August 1863 to a hero's welcome. He returned to the Gulf in January 1864 to prepare for the assault on Mobile Bay, taking the port on August 5th. It was during this attack that Admiral Farragut was to have coined the famous expression, "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead." He again returned to New York City, this time in failing health. The city gave him a public reception and $50,000 to purchase a home there, and on December 23, 1864, he was promoted to Vice Admiral, the rank just having been established. He was one of the first to enter Richmond, Va. after it's capture. On July 25, 1866, he was promoted to Full Admiral, the first in the United States Navy to ever hold that rank!


Wet plate, albumen cabinet card photograph, mounted to 4 1/4 x 6 1/2 card. Standing view wearing his United States naval uniform, naval cap, 2 piece belt plate, with sword attached to belt. Backmark: Sarony & Co., Photographers, 680 Broadway, N.Y.  Napoleon Sarony. Alfred S. Campbell. Light age toning and edge wear with a tiny thumbtack hole in the extreme upper border edge. Light scattered surface abrasions on the reverse of the card. Very desirable Union Civil War naval hero!  


<b>United States Congressman from Rhode Island</b>


(1791-1873) Born in Newport, R.I., he was an Internal Revenue Collector, 1812-15; served as Sheriff of Newport County, 1818-27; and was Postmaster of Newport in 1827. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1837-43; was a member of the Rhode Island State House of Representatives, 1843-47; and the Rhode Island State Senate, 1847-49. Cranston was a presidential elector on the Republican (Abraham Lincoln-Andrew Johnson) ticket of 1864. 


<u>Signature</u>: 5 x 3, in ink, "Robt. B. Cranston." Rhode Island has been written below in another hand.

1700s early 1800s hand wrought SHEARS $75.00

 

Civil War vintage Pat. 1864 personal siz $245.00

 

Photograph, Admiral David G. Farragut $50.00

 

Autograph, Robert B. Cranston $8.00




4 3/4 x 7 3/4, imprint, 1 1/4 pages.


Headquarters, Department of the South,

Hilton Head, S.C., May 3, 1865


General Orders,

No. 55


I. The following General Orders from the War Department are hereby published for the information and government of this command:


War Department,

Adjutant General's Office,

Washington, April 17, 1865


General Orders

No. 70


<i>Extension of the Military Lines of the United States</i>


Ordered: That the military lines of the United States be extended to include within them the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, North Alabama, and Tennessee, and that all military restrictions upon internal trade within said lines are annulled except in arms, ammunition, gray cloth, and all articles from which ammunition is manufactured, locomotives, cars, railroad iron and machinery for operating railroads, telegraph wires, insulators, and instruments for operating telegraphic lines, which articles are contraband of war, and all trade in, and importation thereof, within the limits aforesaid, is absolutely prohibited.


By order of the Secretary of War:

W.A. Nichols

Assistant Adjutant General


More content.


By Command of Major General Q.A. Gillmore


Signed in ink by T.D. Hodges above printed title of Capt. 35th U.S.C.T., Act. Asst. Adjt. Gen.


Light edge staining and two thin slits in the paper at left edge where this order was once bound. Very fine content from Headquarters, Department of the South, Commanded by Major General Quincy A. Gillmore.


Edge staining and light wear. Uncommon.


Thorndike D. Hodges, who signed this document, served in the 35th Massachusetts Infantry, and the 35th U.S. Colored Infantry, 1862-66.  


Multi-color lithograph done by Kurz & Allison, Art Publishers, 76 & 78 Wabash Ave., Chicago, U.S.A., Copyright 1888. Titled, "Battle Of Atlanta." Imprint below illustration at the lower left, "Death of Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson- July 22d, 1864, Army Of The Tennessee Engaged." Overall size is 24 x 18. This is a reprint of the original Kurz & Allison 1888 edition done on heavy paper stock with vivid colors. There are 1 1/2 inch borders on 3 sides and a 2 inch border at the bottom to allow room for the title and other imprinted information. (Copyright 1960, Pioneer Press-Civil War Publications, Inc.) These were printed at the time of the Civil War Centennial celebrations using the original plates to print these. There were other reprints done much later (1979) of these Kurz & Allison Civil War battle scenes which are much smaller in size (about 12 x 15). Very fine Atlanta campaign lithograph that would look great framed.   


Authentic, original circa 1800's sepia tone lithograph of The Old Manse, in Concord, Massachusetts. Executed by Ross Turner. 5 3/4 x 4, tipped to a 9 x 6 album page. Very fine.


This Georgian style home was built in 1770 for the Reverend William Emerson. The property is located in Concord, Mass., near the North Bridge and is part of Minute Man National Historical Park. The house is on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places, and is a U.S. National Historic Landmark. Reverend William Emerson, the original home owner, was chaplain to the Provisional Congress and later a chaplain to the Continental Army. He observed the fight at the North Bridge on April 19, 1775, from his farm fields while his wife and children witnessed the fight from the upstairs windows of their house. 


William Emerson's grandson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, the famous American essayist, lecturer, philosopher, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement, moved to Concord in 1834 and lived at The Old Manse where he wrote some of his early works. 


In 1842, the famous American writer, Nathaniel Hawthorne lived in the house where he published about 20 sketches and tales. 


In May 1845, future President Franklin Pierce visited Hawthorne at The Old Manse.  Best described here by our photo illustrations, this neat old gold headed walking stick is nicely engraved <I>J<B>E</B>C</I> in the traditional monogram style with the surname initial prominent in the center.  Acquired from an established collection where it was attributed to <I>James C. Egan</I> who served in the Spanish American War era in the <B>1st New York Infantry</B> which was  federalized for service in that war.  (see: service dates May 2, 1898 / Feb. 20,1899 <U>document copy provided</U>)  While the significance of the inscribed <I>30 – Mar. – 1920</I> date has been lost in time, aside from his military service we know that James C. Egan was born 14 November, 1869, lived in the Bronx, NY for a time and was listed as a <I>Taxi Cab</I> driver in the 1910 US Census.  He died in 1951 and is buried in the St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Middletown, New York.   Offered here in as acquired condition, nice original finish on the shaft with no breaks or cracks, the head is solid,  remaining pleasing condition while remaining in pleasing condition.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Extension of the Military Lines of the U $15.00

 

The Battle of Atlanta, Georgia $75.00

 

The Old Manse, Concord, Massachusetts $10.00

 

Spanish American War era Veteran – Gold $225.00




Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published in the January 24, 1863 issue of Harper's Weekly. Hand tinted in color. Illustrated by the renowned Civil War artist Winslow Homer. Caption: Winter-Quarters In Camp- The Inside Of A Hut. 15 1/2 x 10. Very nice content.  


<b>1st Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution and famous American scientist</b>


Born in Albany, New York in 1797, he attended The Albany Academy where he excelled at his studies. He was Secretary of the National Institute for the Promotion of Science, a precursor of the Smithsonian Institution, and was the first Secretary of the Smithsonian, serving from 1846-78. The Smithsonian Institution unit of inductance, "The Henry," is named in his honor.


in 1826, Henry was appointed Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at The Albany Academy where he conducted some of his most important research. His curiosity about terrestrial magnetism led him to experiment with magnetism in general. He was the first to coil insulated wire tightly around an iron core in order to make a more powerful electromagnet, improving on William Sturgeon's electromagnet which used loosely coiled un-insulated wire. Using this technique, he built the strongest electromagnet at the time. He also showed that, when making an electromagnet using just two electrodes attached to a battery, it is best to wind several coils of wire in parallel, but when using a setup with multiple batteries, there should be only one single long coil. The latter made the telegraph feasible. Because of his early experiments in electromagnetism some historians credit Joseph Henry with discoveries pre-dating Faraday and Hertz; however, Henry is not credited due to not publishing his work.


Using his newly developed electromagnetic principle, in 1831, Henry created one of the first machines to use electromagnetism for motion. This was the earliest ancestor of the modern DC motor. It did not make use of rotating motion, but was merely an electromagnet perched on a pole, rocking back and forth. The rocking motion was caused by one of the two leads on both ends of the magnet rocker touching one of the two battery cells, causing a polarity change, and rocking the opposite direction until the other two leads hit the other battery. This apparatus allowed Henry to recognize the property of self inductance. British scientist Michael Faraday also recognized this property around the same time. Since Faraday published his results first, he became the officially recognized discoverer of the phenomenon. 


From 1832-46, he served as the first Chair of Natural History at the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University. While at Princeton, he taught a wide range of courses including natural history, chemistry, and architecture, and ran a laboratory on campus. Decades later, Henry wrote that he made "several thousand original investigations on electricity, magnetism, and electro-magnetism" while a member of the Princeton faculty.


Professor Henry was introduced to Professor Thaddeus Lowe, a balloonist from New Hampshire who had taken interest in the phenomenon of lighter-than-air gases, and exploits into meteorology, in particular, the high winds which we call the jet stream today. It was Lowe's intent to make a transatlantic crossing by utilizing an enormous gas inflated aerostat. Henry took a great interest in Lowe's endeavors, promoting him among some of the more prominent scientists and institutions of the day.


In June 1860, Lowe had made a successful test flight with his gigantic balloon, first named the "City of New York" and later renamed "The Great Western," flying from Philadelphia to Medford, New York. Professor Lowe would not be able to attempt a transatlantic flight until late spring of 1861, so Henry convinced him to take his balloon to a place further west and then fly the balloon back to the eastern seaboard, an exercise that would keep his investors interested.


Lowe took several smaller balloons to Cincinnati, Ohio in March 1861. On April 19th, he launched a fateful flight that landed him in Confederate, South Carolina. With the Southern States seceding from the Union, during the winter and spring of 1860-61, and the start of the Civil War, Lowe abandoned further attempts at a trans-Atlantic crossing and, with Henry's endorsement, went to Washington, D.C. to offer his services as an aeronaut to President Lincoln and the Federal government. Henry submitted a letter to Simon Cameron, U.S. Secretary of War at the time, which carried his endorsement. On Henry's recommendation Thaddeus Lowe went on to form the United States Army, "Balloon Corps" and served two years with the Army of the Potomac as a Civil War "Aeronaut."


As a famous scientist and director of the Smithsonian Institution, Henry received visits from other scientists and inventors who sought his advice. Henry was patient, kindly, and self-controlled. One such visitor was Alexander Graham Bell, who on March 1, 1875 carried a letter of introduction to Professor Henry. Henry showed an interest in seeing Bell's experimental apparatus, and Bell returned the following day. After the demonstration, Bell mentioned his untested theory on how to transmit human speech electrically by means of a "harp apparatus" which would have several steel reeds tuned to different frequencies to cover the voice spectrum. Henry said Bell had "the germ of a great invention." Henry advised Bell not to publish his ideas until he had perfected the invention. When Bell objected that he lacked the necessary knowledge, Henry firmly advised: "Get it!" 


On June 25, 1876, Bell's experimental telephone, using a different design, was demonstrated at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia where Henry was one of the judges for electrical exhibits. On January 13, 1877, Bell demonstrated his instruments to Henry at the Smithsonian Institution and Henry invited Bell to demonstrate them again that night at the Washington Philosophical Society. Henry praised "the value and astonishing character of Mr. Bell's discovery and invention.


Professor Joseph Henry died on May 13, 1878, and was buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, in the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C. John Phillips Sousa wrote the "Transit of Venus March" for the unveiling of the Joseph Henry statue in front of the Smithsonian Castle. 


Bronze statues of Joseph Henry and Isaac Newton represent science on the balustrade of the galleries of the Main Reading Room in the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress, on Capitol Hill, in Washington, D.C. They are two of the 16 historical figures depicted in the reading room, each pair representing one of the 8 pillars of civilization.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 1/8 x 1 3/4, in ink, Very respectfully yours, "Joseph Henry," Secy. Smn. Instn. Very desirable American scientist. 

   


  





 


 


<b>Grandson of the famous Revolutionary War hero Paul Revere


Court-martialed for his actions at the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia</b>


2 pages, 4 1/4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department,

Adjutant General's Office,

Washington, August 11, 1863


General Orders,

No.282


I..Before a General Court Martial, which convened at the Headquarters, 3d Corps, May 13, 1863, pursuant to Special Orders, No. 128, dated Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, camp near Falmouth, Virginia, May 12, 1863, and of which Major General W.S. Hancock, U.S. Volunteers, is President, was arraigned and tried-


Brigadier General Joseph W. Revere, U.S. Volunteers,


Charge I- "Misbehavior before the enemy."


Specification- "In this; that Brigadier General J.W. Revere, U.S. Volunteers, commanding Excelsior (2d) Brigade, 2d Division, 3d Corps, while said Division was engaged with the enemy at Chancellorsville, Virginia, did march his command an unnecessary distance to the rear to reform it, and did then march with his Brigade, and such fragments of other Regiments of the said Division as he could assemble, to United States Ford, about five miles from the scene of action. All this without orders from his superior officers, about 8 o'clock on the morning of May 3d, 1863."


Charge II- "Neglect of duty to the prejudice of good order and military discipline."


Specifications- "In this; that Brigadier General J.W. Revere, U.S. Volunteers, commanding Excelsior (2d) Brigade, 2d Division, 3d Corps, did allow public property, to the amount of 189 muskets, 178 sets of accoutrements, 259 bayonets, 28,440 rounds of small arm ammunition, 1,779 knapsacks, 836 haversacks, 494 canteens, 2,000 shelter tents, and 55 pioneer tools, in the service of his command, to be abandoned, and to fall into the hands of the enemy. All this without orders from his superior officers, at Chancellorsville, Virginia, on or about May 3d, 1863."


To which charges and specifications the accused, Brigadier General J.W. Revere, U.S. Volunteers, pleaded, "Not Guilty."


The Court, having maturely considered the evidence adduced, finds the accused, Brigadier General J.W. Revere, U.S. Volunteers, as follows:


Charge I- Of the Specification, "Guilty, except the words, "while said Division was engaged with the enemy at Chancellorsville, Virginia, did march his command an unnecessary distance to the rear to reform it, and" "then," and to "United States Ford, about five miles from the scene of action," substituting for the latter clause, "To about three miles from the scene of action, towards United States Ford."


Of the Charge, "Not Guilty; but guilty of conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline."


Charge II- Of the Specification, "Not Guilty."


Of the Charge, "Not Guilty."


Sentence- And the Court does therefore sentence him, Brigadier General J.W. Revere, U.S. Volunteers, "To be dismissed from the military service of the United States."


II..The proceedings of the Court in the case of Brigadier General J.W. Revere, U.S. Volunteers, have been submitted to the President of the United States, who approves the sentence, and directs that it be carried into execution from the 10th day of August 1863.


BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:


E.D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant General


Excellent. Very desirable Civil War document regarding the court-martial of a famous Union general. 


<u>General Joseph W. Revere</u>: Born in Boston in 1812, he was named for one of his grandfather's friends, the patriot, Dr. Joseph Warren, who was killed at the battle of Bunker Hill, during the American Revolution. From 1852-61, he resided in Morristown, New Jersey, and entered the Union army as Colonel of the 7th New Jersey Infantry, on September 19, 1861. Commissioned brigadier general on October 25, 1862, he commanded a brigade in General Daniel E. Sickles, 3rd Corps, Army of the Potomac. At the battle of Chancellorsville, Va., on May 3, 1863, after General Oliver O. Howard's, 11th Corps, was overrun by the famous flank attack of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson, General Hiram G. Berry's division of the 3rd Corps, was ordered forward to prevent total disaster. However, General Berry was mortally wounded, so the command of his division went to the senior brigadier general, Joseph W. Revere, who instead of throwing everything against the charging Confederates, marched that portion of his command to the rear for the purpose of reorganizing and bringing them back to the battlefield relatively fresh. This ultimately led to his court-martial and dismissal from the U.S. service. President Abraham Lincoln most likely sympathetic to Revere's heritage, mitigated his sentence and instead allowed him to resign his command effective immediately. After the war Revere travelled abroad and wrote his memoirs. He died in Hoboken, New Jersey, in 1880, and is buried in Morristown.        


(1818-93) The 4th highest ranking officer in the Confederacy. Graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1838. Brevetted captain and major for gallantry in the Mexican War. He was in command at Charleston, S.C., in April 1861, during the bombardment and capture of Fort Sumter and rose to instant fame in the Confederacy. He also saw action at 1st Manassas, Shiloh, the 1863-64 Charleston, S.C. campaign, Bermuda Hundred and Petersburg. Beauregard was a railroad executive in the 1860's and early 1870's and later served as Commissioner of public works in New Orleans and Adjutant General of Louisiana.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform. No imprint. This portrait was taken in Charleston, S.C., on March 31, 1861, 2 weeks before General Beauregard fired on Fort Sumter. Very fine.

Winter Quarters in Camp $85.00

 

Autograph, Professor Joseph Henry $75.00

 

Court Martial of General Joseph W. Rever $45.00

 

CDV, General P. G. T. Beauregard $125.00




<b>General in chief of the U.S. Armies during the Civil War


Published by Mathew Brady & Co.</b>


(1815-1872) Graduated 3rd in the West Point class of 1839. An assistant professor while still an undergraduate at the Military Academy, he first worked upon the fortifications of New York Harbor, and in 1844 inspected those of France. Upon his return to the U.S., he wrote a Report on the Means of National Defence, which was published by Congress and won him an invitation from the Lowell Institute of Boston to deliver a series of lectures. These were published as Elements of Military Art and Science, a work which enjoyed wide circulation among soldiers for many years. He received a brevet as captain in the Mexican War. At the beginning of the Civil War, General Winfield Scott recommended to Abraham Lincoln that Halleck be appointed major general in the regular service. In November 1861, Halleck relieved General Fremont at St. Louis and in a demonstration of his talents as an administrator quickly brought order out of the chaos in which his predecessor had plunged the Department of the Missouri. A series of successes by his subordinates at Forts Henry & Donelson, Pea Ridge, Island No. 10 and Shiloh, caused Halleck to shine in reflective glory, and his domain enlarged to include Ohio and Kansas. President Lincoln later recalled him to Washington to serve as general in chief of the U.S. Armies. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: Brady & Co., Washington, D.C., and New York. Light age toning and wear.  


8 1/2 inch long coin silver serving spoon with maker's mark of Hyde & Goodrich in rectangle on the reverse, and monogrammed with initials in fancy script on the top of the handle on the reverse. Light wear and scattered tarnishing.


Hyde & Goodrich were superior silver retailers and importers of high quality goods in New Orleans, Louisiana from 1828-1861. Originally located on Chartres Street, they moved their business to a very prominent location on Canal Street in 1853 which was marked by the famous golden pelican. They were a supplier to the Confederacy in the early days of the Civil War.      


<b>Colonel of the 15th Alabama Infantry</b>


(1818-74) Born in Camden, S.C., he graduated from South Carolina College, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1840, and opened a practice in Camden. Cantey served two terms in the South Carolina House of Representatives. He fought as an officer in the "Palmetto Regiment" during the Mexican War, rising to the rank of captain. He was severely wounded and left for dead on the battlefield, but when his slave retrieved his body to send home for burial, he saw faint signs of life in Cantey and saved his life. Cantey was so grateful that he offered to give the slave his freedom, but he refused. After the war he settled in Russell County, Alabama where he became a plantation owner. In 1861, he helped form the 15th Alabama Infantry Regiment and was elected their colonel. At the First Battle of Winchester, on May 25, 1862, in Stonewall Jackson's Shenandoah Valley Campaign, Cantey's regiment fought in General Isaac Trimble's Brigade of General Richard S. Ewell's Division and helped turn back the Union Army's advance. At the Battle of Cross Keys, the 15th Alabama Infantry was nearly cut off from the main force but fought their way back. Later, as part of Trimble's attack, his regiment helped flank the Union forces and drove them back. They then fought with General Jackson in the Seven Days Battles around Richmond, Va. Afterwards, Cantey was transferred and sent to Mobile, Alabama, where he organized a brigade of three Alabama regiments and one Mississippi regiment. Joining the Army of Tennessee, he was promoted to brigadier general to rank from January 8, 1863. His brigade fought in the Atlanta Campaign and the Franklin–Nashville Campaign. He led the brigade with distinction when they held off a much larger Union force at the Battle of Resaca, Georgia. Cantey fought in General Joseph E. Johnston's 1865 North Carolina Campaign, and his brigade surrendered to General William T. Sherman's Army at Greensboro, although there has been no record found of Cantey's personal parole. After the war he returned to Alabama and died on his plantation near Fort Mitchell, Ala., June 30, 1874. 


Antique photograph, 2 5/8 x 3 5/8. Bust view in uniform taken at the time of the Mexican War. No imprint. Circa 1800's, post Civil War.      


8 1/4 x 10, imprinted document filled out in ink.


Headquarters Department of Massachusetts,

Grand Army of the Republic,

657 Washington Street, Room 18


Boston, May 23, 1892


Special Order

No. 15


In accordance with Chap. II, Section 3, Rules and Regulations, a dispensation is hereby granted to Gettysburg Post No. 191, G.A.R. of Boston to enable the Investigating Committee that may be appointed at the next regular meeting of the Post to report upon applications for membership that may be referred to them at the same meeting.


By Command of,

James K. Churchill

Department Commander


H.O. Moore

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning and wear. Minor mounting remnants at the top edge of the reverse of the document.


James K. Churchill, was a 24 year old resident of Charlestown, Mass., when he enlisted on April 19, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into Co. K, 5th Mass. Inf., a 90 day unit. He was mustered out of the regiment on July 31, 1861. On July 20, 1864, he re-enlisted and was mustered into Co. H, 5th Massachusetts Infantry, was promoted to sergeant date unknown, and mustered out of service, November 16, 1864. He was a member of George H. Ward, GAR Post #10, Worcester, Mass., and held rank of Dept. Commander of Massachusetts. He died on December 6, 1912. 


The 5th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, known as the "Minute Men," were ordered to report for active duty and to proceed to Washington by Special Order No. 35, issued by the Adjutant General of Massachusetts, April 19, 1861. On Sunday, April 21, the 5th entrained for Washington, where on May 1st, its members were mustered into the service of the United States Army. For nearly four weeks it remained in the city of Washington, then on May 25th it was transferred to Virginia where it remained in camp near Alexandria until it marched toward Bull Run, forming a part of General William B. Franklin's Brigade, General Samuel P. Heintzelman's Division, of General Irvin McDowell's Army. It was one of the three Massachusetts regiments that fought in the battle of 1st Bull Run, Va., on July 21, 1861, where it lost nine men killed, two wounded, and twenty three taken prisoner. After this engagement the regiment remained in Washington until the latter part of the month when it was sent back to Boston where it was mustered out of the service on July 31st.


Hubert O. Moore, was an 18 year old painter and resident of Lowell, Mass., when he enlisted on August 2, 1862, as a musician, and was mustered into Co. E, 36th Mass. Inf. He was mustered out of service on June 8, 1865. He was a member of General Frederick W. Lander GAR Post #5, in Lynn, Mass., and was the commander of Post #5. He died on March 13, 1912.


The 36th Massachusetts Infantry saw action at Jackson, Miss., Blue Springs, Tenn., Campbell's Station, Tenn., where they had 3 men killed, 16 wounded, and 4 captured, Knoxville, Tenn., the Wilderness, Va. where they had 10 men killed, 46 wounded, and 1 taken prisoner, Spotsylvania, Va., with 24 men killed, 46 wounded, and 3 captured, North Anna, Va., Cold Harbor, Va., where the regiment had 6 men killed, and 46 wounded, Petersburg, Va., with 10 men killed, and 46 wounded, and at Poplar Springs Church, Va., their casualties numbered 2 men killed, 20 wounded, and 16 taken prisoner.


Source:  Massachusetts Soldiers, Sailors & Marines in the Civil War

CDV, General Henry W. Halleck $125.00

 

Hyde & Goodrich, New Orleans, Silver Ser $85.00

 

Photograph, General James Cantey $15.00

 

Special Orders, Gettysburg Post 191 G. A. $15.00

Aside from its association with Dr. Noble, this desirable antique cane will best be described here by our photo illustrations.  The large boar tusk head remains solid with a rich age patina that comes only with lots of period handling and decades in time.  The  figured and monogramed <I>H<B>N</B>B</B></I> cap is of sterling silver and is so marked with a tiny stylized eagle and 1825 F.   While its ferrule tip has been lost the period classic natural malacca shaft remains in beautiful original condition again with that appealing age patina that early cane enthusiasts appreciate.  Of special interest to the Civil War historian especially the Ohio enthusiast will be that this attractive stick emanated from the Ohio estate of to Dr. Havvilah B. Noble (1833-1891).  Acquired some years ago the stick was set aside as a <I>rainy day</I> research project with only the knowledge that it had passed from a Dr. Noble late of New Vienna, Ohio.  Worthy of additional research, our own effort reviled that <I>H<B>N</B>B</B></I> (a.k.a. <I>HBN</I>) as inscribed on the silver cap (note that the large sir name <B><I>N</I></B> is placed in the center of the inscription with the first and middle initial on either side) was <B>Havilah B. Noble</B> who was a 28 year old physician in 1863 when he was commissioned on June 9th as <B>Assistant Surgeon</B> of the <B>2nd Ohio Cavalry</B>.  Noble was listed as having been taken by Confederates as a <B>POW</B> at Reams Station, Virginia, discharged for promotion on March 28, 1865 and commissioned as <B>Regimental Surgeon 196th Ohio Infantry</B> and mustered out on September 11, 1865 in Baltimore, Maryland. During his tenure with the 2nd Ohio Cavalry the regiment saw frequent and hard action to include such as at  Chickamauga, Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, Hanover Court House, White Oak Swamp, Ream’s Station, Winchester, Cedar Creek and many more. 

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 All original and in excellent condition yet with good evidence of age to include a pleasing natural patina with the expected short single age crack along the grain of each natural bovine horn grip; this rarely surviving matching set offers the strong cutler markings <B>J. ASHMORE PHILADELPHIA</B> with an <B>American Eagle</B> and <B>U. S.</B> on each knife blade.  Listed in Houston’s knife collectors guide as being in operation 1832 – 1858, John Ashmore crafted cutting implements to include razors, utility items such as axes and hatchets and all manner of cutlery to include bowie knives. (They give Ashmore’s work their highest <I>collectability</I> rating.)  Of most interest to American military historians will be that per Bazelon & McGuinn’s <I><B>Directory of American Military Goods Dealers & Makers </I></B> , delivery receipts for the <B>Schuylkill Arsenal</B> record numerous receipt of Ashmore’s goods to the well-known Army Quarter Master Depot.   Best known today as suppliers to the Lewis & Clark Expedition the Schuylkill Arsenal was built in 1800 to function as a quartermaster facility in support of the U.S. military.  The depot at Schuylkill Arsenal became a primary provider of military goods for the Civil War.   Seldom surviving in any condition, even as single knife and fork pair, a complete setting of four matching pairs is worthy of special notice and we hope to place this setting as such.  With this maker and US marking this set will be of special interest to enthusiasts of the Mexican War through Civil War use eras. 

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 Not to be confused with the post-Civil War vintage <I>nickeled</I> veterinary and general dentistry forceps of the same basic design (but considerably smaller) these earlier and seldom found, bare iron forceps measure a full 13 1/2 inches in length and are maker marked by Civil War dental and surgical instrument supplier <B>Codman & Shurtleff</B> of Boston, Massachusetts.   Appropriately marked for the Civil War period, this scarce instrument will set well in any period medical instrument grouping.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 


Full color print by H.A. Ogden titled, "Sheridan At Five Forks, April 1, 1865." Copyright 1912, by The War Memorial Association. 9 x 12. Excellent illustration of General "Little Phil" Sheridan leading the assault at the battle of Five Forks, Va. on his gallant black horse Rienzi as he jumps over the Confederate breastworks while the general is holding his guidon.

Antique Boars Tusk – WALKING STICK - 2nd $435.00

 

pre-Civil War 4 place setting - knife & $235.00

 

Civil War Veterinary- Codman & Shurtleff $95.00

 

General Philip H. Sheridan at Five Forks $15.00




<b>His troops killed the legendary Confederate General John Hunt Morgan</b> 


(1830-75) He graduated in the West Point class of 1851 and served against the Florida Seminoles and on the frontier of Texas. During the Civil War he served at the battles of Mill Springs, Ky., and Shiloh, Tenn. In May 1862, he became colonel of the 10th Tennessee Union Infantry and at the insistance of Andrew Johnson, Gillem was appointed brigadier general of volunteers to rank from August 17, 1863. In 1864, it was his troops that killed the celebrated Confederate guerrilla, General John Hunt Morgan. He later served under General George Stoneman in western North Carolina, commanding a cavalry division. In January 1865, he was vice president of the Tennessee convention and in April became a member of the state legislature. 


<u>Signature With Rank</u>: Partial document signed in ink sent to the head of the U.S. Quartermaster General's Office, Major General Thomas S. Jessup. Sir- I have the honor to enclose to you my Quartermaster papers for the month of January 1852. To Maj. Genl. T.S. Jessup, Quarter Master Genl, U.S.A. Very Respectfully, Your obt. Servant, A.C. Gillem, Lt. & A.A.Q.M. Docket on the reverse: 161. Lieut. A.C. Gillem, Fort Meade, Feb. 10/52. Recd. Feb. 28/52. 7 3/4 x 6 1/2. Light wear and staining at the fold at left edge. Very desirable Union General's signature with his connection to the killing of Confederate General John Hunt Morgan!


<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: 


The recipient of this document, Major General Thomas Sidney Jesup, was a United States Army officer known as the "Father of the Modern Quartermaster Corps." His 52 year military career was one of the longest in the history of the U.S. Army.


Fort Meade, Florida, where this document originated from, is the oldest city in Polk County, Florida dating its origins to 1849 when it was established along a new military road from Fort Brooke to Fort Pierce following the 2nd Seminole War. The town and road were originally sited by then Lieutenant George G. Meade of the U.S. Corps of Topographical Engineers, whose commander named it for him. Meade went on to become a famous Union Major General during the Civil War defeating Confederate General Robert E. Lee during the epic 3 day battle of Gettysburg, July 1,2,3, 1863.   Confederate General Stonewall Jackson was stationed at the fort in 1851. The town was burned by Union forces in 1864.   


2 x 4 1/4, cream colored ribbon with vignette at the center of an American flag with blue imprint, 18th Conn. Vols. Reunion Sept. 26th, 1862-1868. Light age toning and typical wear. No pin, ribbon only.


The 18th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry Regiment saw their share of action participating in the battles of Winchester, New Market, Harrisonburg, Piedmont, Lexington, Buchanan, Liberty, Quaker Church, Lynchburg, Salem, Hedgeville, Snicker's Ford, Kernstown, Martinsburg, Cedar Creek, Stony Point, Middletown, Opequon, Hallstown and Charlestown, Va.    All in nice condition with no chips, cracks or other condition issues this neat old Irish Malt Whiskey  bottle will make a nice companion piece for the ethnic collector, 19th century saloon, gambling hall or Frontier West enthusiast.  (see: 1860s 1870s Liverpool Directories ) <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Measuring 36 inches in total length this all original 19th century walking stick offers a silver band inscribed <I>Jera Mansfield</I> and is topped by an age cracked and nicely age patinated ivory head.  While missing its tapered ferrule tip, the rosewood shaft remains in pleasing to the eye condition with no cracks, repairs or major dings and retains its original finish while offering good evidence of age and originality with period use and carrying.  Good fodder for additional research, this descendent acquired cane is attributed to <B><I>Jera Mansfield</B></I> who was born in Dudley, Massachusetts in 1825, immigrated to California in 1849 and passed away in Napa, California at age 71 in 1896.  Upon his passing the <I>Sacramento Daily Record-Union</I> advised under the heading <B><I>DEATH OF A PIONEER</B></I> that <I>’Mr. Mansfield <U>came to California in 1849, and was a member of the Society of Pioneers</U>, was a director of the Bank of Napa and <U>one of the wealthiest citizens of Napa County</U></I>.  The Napa Valley newspaper further advised that <I> His estate is estimated to be worth several hundred thousand dollars.</I>  A tidy sum in 1896, our perusal of the years of U.S. censes material while Mansfield was a Californian simply show him as a <I>’farmer’</I>.   Good fodder for the collector / historian who enjoys research, one wonders how Jera Mansfield acquired his millions in today’s money?  Known today for its expanse of fine vineyards which began producing wine in quantity a short time following his arrival in Napa one wonders if Mansfield’s amassing of wealth was in connection with the budding wine industry that began in the Napa Valley just a short time after the Massachusetts Yankee’s arrival or was he one of the fortunate gold rush immigrants to California who found wealth in the gold fields?   Set aside for some years in our own early cane accumulation it is time to offer this historic 19th century stick to an appreciative new home.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

General Alvan C. Gillem $75.00

 

18th Connecticut Volunteers Reunion Ribb $10.00

 

Mid 1800s W & J FLETT Irish Malt Whiske $75.00

 

Massachusetts to California ‘49er’ - in $185.00

      A bit of a departure from our usual but in the spirit of <I>something for everyone</I> we could not resist the opportunity to acquire this period authentic pair of bronze Spanish Conquistador stirrups.  Offered here as found, and unpolished with an attractive natural age patina, this authentic matched pair of Conquistador saddle stirrups measure a full 11 ¼ inches in length, are 4 inches wide by 5 ½ inches high and <U>should not be confused with later, popularly cast smaller <I>display</I> examples.</U>  Most likely evolving in Europe to aid rider stability under the weight of protective armor, utilization of these heavy enclosed stirrups not only offered protection but provided a solid base from which the advancing horseman could stand while wielding sword or lance.  While widely thought to have been introduced to this continent by Spanish Conquistadors  it is believed that such were also subsequently produced on this continent.   A nice display item on the shelf, the shape and construction of these stirrups would lend themselves well to wall display.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 

 Of most interest to the advanced percussion era accessories collector, black powder cartridge enthusiast, or fine period arms collector who would view this offering as an outstanding companion pair to accompany a <I>minty</I> percussion firearm, our photographs will likely offer the best description.  Unmarked as to maker, this fine condition percussion capper offers good evidence of age and originality while showing minimal evidence of period use.   External surfaces retain a nearly full complement of its original clear lacquer finish still preserving a period original bright finish and internal surfaces remain clean and operable with natural age patina.  Acquired together as a pair, this offering includes a rarely found in any condition  <B>COX’S BEST WATERPROOF PERCUSSION CAPS </B> marked percussion cap tin retaining an impressive amount of its original lustrous period lacquer finish while offering complement of Cox’s percussion caps.  A rare find in any condition this fine all original pair will brighten any quality collection.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 This outstanding hand blown Master Cologne bottle stands approximately 11 1/8 inches and features a distinctly mid 18th century / first quarter 19th century sheared and applied lip top with a deep broken pontil base.   The deep amber color of its heavy glass is set off by the remains of its French cologne label.  A really nice early bottle in fine condition.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  Not for the razor enthusiast seeking fine condition examples of the category, but a desirable period <I>used and carried</I> personal item of the time for the historian / collector who covets the eye appeal and character of the everyday item so frequently <I>used up</I> and cast away in the period.  This well used straight razor offers a pleasing condition whale baleen grip while the tang of the razor bares the barely legible marking of the HOBSON, HOUGHTON & CO LTD Steel Works who commenced work in Sheffield in 1863.  The period paper mache case offers the considerable attention of the original owner who covered the case in cotton cord macrame.  A popular hand craft of the period, while macrame is most frequently attributed seafarers the skill was a pastime of many a coastal born Civil War volunteer.  With considerable evidence of period ware and carrying, this example remains in solid condition.    <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

period authentic – Spanish Conquistador $125.00

 

rare! near as new condition! original $525.00

 

hand blown - blob top Master Cologne BOT $55.00

 

mid-19th century baleen STRAIGHT RAZOR $65.00

These seldom found original 18th century Liverpool Transfer Ceramic Buttons remain in excellent original condition and will be best described by our photo illustrations.  A special find when offered individually, a set of five of these desirable buttons presents a special opportunity. An especially nice grouping for the 1700s button and sewing item enthusiast, these buttons are photographed with a US quarter fore size comparison.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>        Best described here by our photo illustrations, we purchased this attractive hand carved peach pit watch fob from the personal collection of Dr. Francis Lord.  The piece <U>is illustrated</U> in his <I>Lord’s Civil War Collector’s Encyclopedia</I> Vol. V page 217 where the author identifies the fob simply as once the property of <I><B> T. Williams, 1st Maine Infantry</I></B>.  Recently rediscovered as we peruse long set aside Maine related items we find that some in depth research will be necessary to nail down our <I>T. Williams</I> of the <I>1st Me. Inf.</I>. as our initial check of Maine rosters did not produce a 1st <U>Infantry</U> T. Williams.   As there were four Mainers by that name serving in 1st Maine designated units, (1st Me. SS, 1st Heavy & two in the 1st Me. Cav.) we assume the <I>Infantry</I> reference was in error in the book or more likely that one of the four served in the three month 1st Maine Infantry prior to enlisting in one of the above.  

      Veteran collectors and those familiar with the authoritative publications of the pioneer Civil War collector will appreciate the fact that this item emanated from the collection of Dr. Francis Lord several years ago when we were fortunate enough to purchase several groupings from the personal collection of our longtime friend.  A Civil War collector from a day when nearly no one else paid much attention to the details of many now valued Civil War collectible categories, Francis authored the  widely known, multi volume, pioneer reference,  <I>Lord’s CIVIL WAR COLLECTORS ENCYCLOPEDIA</I>.  While a lot of detailed knowledge has been gained as the interest in Civil War collectibles increased so dramatically over the years, Dr. Lord’s  encyclopedia volumes and his <I>Civil War Sutlers & Their Wares</I> continue to offer valuable and reliable reference to Civil War collectors.  

 H 42in. x D 10in.

Great old glass    set of 2  H 24in. x D 13in.

rarely offered set of 5 - 18th Century L $295.00

 

Dr. Francis Lord collection – published $225.00

 

COOL pendant lights from the 50's $0.00

 

Old brass pendant light w / blue swirl sha $0.00

H 36in. x W 52in. x D 14in.  H 22in. x D 36in.  H 42in. x D 30in.  H 19in. x W 12in. x D 21in.

INDUSTRIAL TRIPLE LIGHT $0.00

 

MCM art glass pendant light w / Vienne gla $0.00

 

COOL INDUSTRIAL LIGHTS IN QUANTITY $0.00

 

EXTERIOR WALL SCONCES CA 1920 $0.00

H 36in. x D 14in.  H 17in. x D 16in.  


<b>One of the most desirable flags in War Between The States history!


The Last Confederate Flag That Flew Over Fort Sumter, South Carolina!</b>


A fragment of the 2nd National Confederate flag that flew over Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, South Carolina until it was evacuated by the Rebels on February 17th, 1865, once owned by General Thomas Abram Huguenin. He was present at the capture of Fort Sumter on April 12th & 13th, 1861 and commanded the rear guard at the evacuation of Morris Island. He was in command of Fort Sumter from July of 1864 to February 17, 1865 and was the last to leave the fort. Two months after the evacuation of Fort Sumter Huguenin surrendered at Greensboro and would later be paroled at the end of the war. During the war he was wounded on four occasions never incapacitating him from performing his duties. The Second National Flag of the Confederacy, also known as the "Stainless Banner," was adopted on May 1, 1863. This flag caused confusion because its long white field often made it look like a surrender flag while lying limp. It was replaced with the Third National Confederate Flag on March 1st, 1865. The 2nd National flag was the type that was removed from the fort by General Huguenin when he evacuated the fort. An example of that style of flag is shown above. This small remnant was part of the entire remnant that is accompanied by a copy of the note attesting that the remnant was once part of the last Confederate flag that flew over Fort Sumter that was given to the previous owner by General Thomas Abram Huguenin, and a copy photo of the interior of Fort Sumter. This very handsome 11 x 14 display is double matted in Confederate gray and trimmed in red. The cloth remnant of this famous Confederate flag in the center of this display measures approximately 1/2 x 5/8. A letter of provenance and authenticity is included. Shrink wrapped and ready to frame. Rare and very desirable Fort Sumter relic.  


Celluloid pin back button with a full color bust view illustration of President Abraham Lincoln with gold background on the obverse. This is what is known as the famous $5 bill pose. The original image was taken by Anthony Berger, of Mathew Brady's Gallery, in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, February 9, 1864. The button measures 1 1/4 x 1 1/4. Complete with the original pin on the reverse. Circa early 1900's. Very fine condition.


WBTS Trivia: Thirty years after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, his eldest son, Robert Todd Lincoln said, "I have always thought this Brady photograph of my father to be the most satisfactory likeness of him."

RUSTY CAGE LIGHTS X4 $0.00

 

Pair of classic pendant lights in brass / $0.00

 

Last CSA Flag to Fly Over Fort Sumter $350.00

 

President Abraham Lincoln Celluloid Butt $15.00




<b>Confederate salt print photograph</b>


(1825-1901) A native of Kentucky, he saw action in the Mexican War as a lieutenant in the 3rd Kentucky Infantry. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Taylor was appointed lieutenant colonel, of the 1st Kentucky Infantry, and colonel to rank from October 14, 1861. After service in the Virginia Peninsular campaign, the 1st Kentucky, one of the state's 12 months regiments, was mustered out in the summer of 1862. Taylor then reported to General Edmund Kirby Smith in East Tennessee and commanded a brigade in Stevenson's division at Cumberland Gap and in Kentucky. While serving under General John C. Pemberton at Vicksburg, he was captured and paroled, and after his exchange he commanded the District of South Mississippi and East Louisiana. At the end of the war he was post commander at Mobile, Alabama.


Wet plate, salt print, carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 1/8 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform taken after his November 1862 appointment to brigadier general. Very tiny chip out of the photographic paper at the bottom edge well away from the subject. Light age toning. No imprint. This is a rare, war time Confederate salt print image. Very desirable.

 


(1807-1870) Born at Stratford, in Westmoreland County, Va., he was the son of the legendary Revolutionary War hero, "Lighthorse Harry" Lee. Graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1829 without a single demerit to his name in 4 years! He emerged from the Mexican War with one wound, three brevets for gallantry, a brilliant reputation, and the ever lasting esteem of the commanding General of the United States Army, Winfield Scott, who said Robert E. Lee was "the very best soldier that I ever saw in the field." Served as Superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy, at West Point, 1852-55, and he commanded the detachment that captured John Brown at Harper's Ferry in 1859. Lee turned down President Lincoln's offer for him to command the Union Army in 1861, as he said he could never raise his sword against his native Virginia. Instead he was appointed commander of all military forces of Virginia, and soon after general in the Regular Army of the Confederate States of America. During the War Between The States, he commanded the Army of Northern Virginia at such battlefields as 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Petersburg, Richmond and Appomattox. His reputation became legendary and he might very well be the most famous soldier in American history! In the last years of his life, he served as president of Washington College at Lexington, Va. (now Washington & Lee University) where he is buried in the chapel.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform. No imprint. Excellent portrait.        A bit of an enigma to us as we had not encountered such before we uncovered this <B>ARNOLD & SONS London</B> marked instrument in a small cash of Civil War and earlier medical / surgical instruments, our familiarity with the maker and Confederate use of their wares by way of blockade runner meant we’d have to take it home.   While we have not been able to locate another for study and comparison  we were successful in acquiring an image of the torturous looking thing from a period Arnold & Sons instrument catalogue.  Aside from dimensions and construction information our photos will likely offer the best description.  This and an appreciation of the 19th surgeon’s  emphasis on speed when accomplishing field <I>bite the bullet</I> amputation, leaves little to the imagination.  Surely faster than a surgical saw, one would think splintering would have been an issue and likely the reason the later would have been preferred to this instrument.  

      Measuring approximately  17 inches in total length this 7/8 inch thick instrument is fashioned from now darkly patinaed surgical steel blade component and mated receiver, each constructed with a stoutly tapered integral 12 inch arm.  Each of the two pivoting steel components is sandwiched between slabbed rosewood held firm with heavy iron pins.  All components remain solid and in pleasing condition with an eye appealing age and good evidence of period use. 

      <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 This scarce all original 19th century <I><B>DOUBLE 9</I></B> bone and ebony domino set is complete with 55 dominos housed in their original 8 11/16 x 5 11/16 x 2 1/8 inch walnut case. Offering good evidence of age with period use and wear, the large 1 x 2 x ¼ inch game pieces sport an attractive natural patina with telltale 19th century construction in the form of play worn saw marks on the slabbed bone, slightly irregular brass <I>spinners</I> and virgin ebony backs.  In the scarce 55 piece, Double 9 format as opposed to the more common 28 piece Double 6 domino set, this game will set well in any Civil War period grouping.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

CDV, Confederate General Thomas H. Taylo $250.00

 

CDV, Confederate General Robert E. Lee

 

rare! 19th Century Arnold & Sons / Londo $875.00

 

antique - bone & ebony Double 9 - 55 pie $195.00

Just acquired from an old collection put together when such quality could be found, this classic style of the Civil War era, pine framed oval travel mirror measures approximately 6 ¾ X 4 7/16 inches wide and remains in excellent original and untouched condition with no cracks, stains or other condition issues.  The original antique mercury backed mirror remains in place with no cracks or scratches and only some age blemishes to the mirror backing as occurred with this period process. Still retains its original brass loop for hanging.  A desirable piece for the Civil War personal item collector.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  This pleasing malacca wood cane with the gold monogramed <B>R. B. P.</B> band will best be  described here by our photo illustrations except to advise that it was acquired from an established collection where it was attributed to late <B>Major General Robert B. Potter</B>.  Potter enlisted on October 12, 1861 as a Major , Field & Staff <B>51st New York Infantry</B>.  He was quickly promoted to Lt. Colonel on November 1, 1861 and was awarded command  as Colonel of the 51st N. Y. Infantry on September 20, 1862.  Col. Potter was promoted to Brig. General on March 29, 1863 then Bvt. Major General, August 1. 1865 and Major General on September 29, 1865.  He took part in Burnside's expedition to North Carolina, led the assault at Roanoke Island, was wounded at New Berne, and participated in the battles of Cedar Mountain, 2nd Bull Run, Chantilly, Antietam where he took part in the assault on the stone bridge and was wounded and Fredericksburg.  Potter commanded a  division at Vicksburg, the siege of Knoxville and commanded a division in the Wilderness campaign and was severely wounded during the final assault on Petersburg.  ( see: <I>The Battle of the Crater: A Complete History</I> by John F. Schmutz)    Affiliated with the Atlantic & Great Western Rail Road after the Civil War, Gen. Potter died in Newport R. I> in 1887 and was buried in Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Available in reprint for reading, nothing will set off a nice old primitive hunting, fishing and <I>gunning</I> display like a well-used and rarely surviving original printing of the anonymously authored classic <I>The Art of Hunting, Trapping & Fishing</I>.  In addition to information on these subjects the title page boasts material on <I>the art of training dogs – using the gun and rifle – the best known methods of preserving, tanning and dying all kinds of skins and furs</I>.  This rarely surviving period example offers the remains of the attractive green paper on board cover and retains the original paper label of the Union Publishing Co. of Newark, New Jersey.  Offering eye appealing field ware with original boards and a period <I>make do</I> jute cord binding  this attractive old outdoorsman guide remains tight and complete in 68 pages with no loose, torn or otherwise damaged pages, the 14 wood cut illustrations will offer pleasant entertainment and reference.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Long considered one of the most significant personal records of the Civil War, this hard to find original 1886 printing of  Washington Davis’s <I> Camp-Fire Chats of the Civil War</I> offers firsthand accounts of <I> ‘Adventure and Wayside Exploit of the Bivouac and Battle Field, as Related by Veteran Soldiers Themselves : Embracing the Tragedy, Romance, Comedy, Humor and Pathos in the Varied Experiences of Army Life’</I> and has been considered a <I>must have</I> on the book shelf of the GAR collector for its <I><B>History of the Grand Army of the Republic</B> from formation to the 1886,  20th National Encampment at San Francisco</I>.   Widely reprinted for its depth of information and reflections of <I>personal</I> experiences as well as activities of the Civil War veteran’s grand old G. A. R., original printings are seldom offered in nice condition.  This 420 page <I>illustrated</> original remains in pleasing condition with minimal evidence of period handling while remaining tight at the binding and complete with no missing, marked up or otherwise damaged pages.  A nice addition to any Civil War library.

Civil War vintage Travel - SHAVING MIRR $135.00

 

19th century walking stick of Mjr. Genl. $245.00

 

original! 1874 edition – The Art of Hunt $65.00

 

scarce original 1886 printing! Camp-Fi $65.00

Said to be a favorite with late 1800s / early 1900s <I>bunkhouse</I> cowboys with their Western <I>pull off</I> boots, this hard to find all original and period example of Nellie remains in excellent condition with its original paint save a bit of wear to the <I>high spots</I>.  Not to be confused with the plethora of late copies out there, there is little need for further description beyond a look at our photo illustrations. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 H 5in. x W 6in. x 12in.  H 32in. x D 14in.  H 32in. x D 10in.

original antique - Naughty Nellie Boot J $135.00

 

Vintage hall light fixture w / fler de li $0.00

 

Decorative vintage art glass pendant lig $0.00

 

Vintage deco pendant lights / pair $0.00

H 4in. x W 4in. x D 10in.


A PAIR  H 19in. x D 19in.  H 6in. x D 16in.  H 24in. x D 8in.

DECO WALL LIGHTS $0.00

 

Classic light fixture w / Edison bulbs $0.00

 

classic brass flush light fixture $0.00

 

Hall pendant light w / star cut glass $0.00




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