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(1823-73) Graduated in the West Point class of 1843. He fought in the Mexican War earning two brevets (Monterey & Cerro Gordo) for gallantry. He was appointed lieutenant colonel in the Regular Confederate Army in early 1861. Commanded a cavalry brigade at the battle of Shiloh, and was promoted to brigadier general, April 11, 1862. During Bragg's invasion of Kentucky, he commanded a brigade in General Polk's corps. Gardner was placed in command of the Mississippi River stronghold, at Port Hudson, La., which he was forced to surrender in July 1863. After his exchange in August 1864, he served in Mississippi under General Dick Taylor. He spent his post war years as a planter in Louisiana.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. No backmark. Tiny piece of the top left corner of the mount is chipped off. Small ink mark at upper right corner well away from the subject. There are several very tiny pin pricks to the card's surface some of which do touch upon Gardner's face and beard. They are bearer visible to the naked eye but seen under magnification. There is an old mid 1900's ink ID on the reverse, "Gen. Hood" which is incorrect. Age toning, light soiling and wear. Scarce view.  


<b>United States Civil War Congressman


One of the managers appointed to conduct the impeachment proceedings against President Andrew Johnson!


United States Senator from Iowa</b>


(1828-95) Born in Newark, Licking County, Ohio, he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1851, and practiced in Newark, Ohio, and in Fairfield, Jefferson County, Iowa. He was a member of the constitutional convention of Iowa in 1857; served in the Iowa State House of Representatives in 1857, and the State Senate, from 1859-61, being its president in 1861. He was a U.S. Congressman during the Civil War and Reconstruction, serving from 1861-69. Served as chairman on the Committee on the Judiciary. He was one of the managers appointed by the U.S. House of Representatives in 1868 to conduct the impeachment proceedings against President Andrew Johnson. He declined the appointment of U.S. Secretary of State in the administration of President Ulysses S. Grant. Instead he accepted Grant's appointment as government director of the Union Pacific Railroad serving in this position for 8 years. Served as U.S. Senator, 1883-95, being the chairman of the Committee on Mines and Mining. He also served as a member of the Committee on Expenditures of Public Money; the Committee on Revision of the Laws of the United States; and the Committee on Education and Labor.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 x 3/4, in ink, James F. Wilson. Cut slightly irregular. Very desirable President Johnson impeachment related autograph.         


<b>United States Senator from Michigan</b>


(1826-94) Born in Bath, Maine, he attended the common schools, and later moved to Chicago where he opened a lumber yard. He moved to Saugatuck, Allegan County, Michigan in 1851 where he operated sawmills. He moved to Kalamazoo, Mi. during the Civil War in 1863 where he once again was engaged in the lumber business. He served as a member of the Michigan State House of Representatives in 1869, and the Michigan State Senate in 1871. He served as a U.S. Senator from 1887-94, and was the chairman of the Committee on Fisheries.


<u>Signature</u>: 3 5/8 x 5/8, in ink, F.B. Stockbridge.  

 


<b>2nd Maine Infantry


Colonel 80th U.S. Colored Troops


Autographed carte de visite</b>


(1837-99) Born in Northport, Maine. He enlisted on May 28, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into the 2nd Maine Infantry. Promoted to 1st lieutenant, Sept. 9, 1861; captain, July 15, 1862; mustered out of the regiment on June 9, 1863. Commissioned lieutenant colonel, 80th U.S. Colored Troops, on Sept. 1, 1863; promoted to colonel, Mar. 7, 1865, brevet brigadier general, Mar. 13, 1865; mustered out of the service on Mar. 1, 1867.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 x 4 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of 1st lieutenant, and wearing gauntlets and U.S. eagle belt plate. Boldly signed in ink on the front mount, With the regards of W.S. Mudgett. No backmark. Corners of the mount are trimmed. Small piece of the albumen print has chipped off at the upper right corner. This does not affect the subject. Light age toning and wear. Very fine content. Rare.

CDV, General Franklin Gardner $50.00

 

Autograph, James F. Wilson $25.00

 

Autograph, Francis B. Stockbridge $10.00

 

CDV, General William S. Mudgett $150.00

H 14in. x W 59in. x W 11in.  H 64in. x D 24in.  Still housed in its poplar wood backed period frame this 11 ¾ X 13 9 1/6  sampler was stitched by nine year old Emma Andrew in 1864.  Remaining in pleasing condition while showing convincing age and originality, our photo illustrations will speak best for condition and eye appeal.  Carefully stitched with the alphabet in upper and lower case, and a set of numerals 0 through 9, Emma documented her work with her name and <B>Age 9 years – 1864 – Ketton School</B>.  Found in New Hampshire, a rudimentary search offered a U. S. Census record of Emma listed as <I>Emma Jane Andrew</I> born <I>about</I> 1853 in Sutton, New Hampshire to George and Mary Andrew.   It appears that Emma remained in New Hampshire all her life passing away at New London, N. H. in 1929.    Her needlework sampler remains as a staple of mid 1800s America as while boys (with parents of some means and priority) were taught the <I>three Rs</I>,   their sisters might be tutored in the barest rudiments of reading and arithmetic while the focus of their education was on an assortment of skills necessary to family feeding, clothing and<I>keeping house</I>.  Popular among antique Americana and textile enthusiasts, in the day the 19th century child’s sampler offered tutorial, final exam and future family heirloom.  This Civil War dated example will be of special interest to collectors in that popular venue.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Found in a period paper ephemera lot, these approximately 2 5/8 X 3 3/8 inch <B><I>Sheffield Superior Patent Cutlery</I></B> and 2 13/16 inch <B><I>SAMUEL BAILEY & Co. - SHEFFIELD Superior - POCKET KNIVES</B></I> labels are entirely original and remain in fine, unused condition.  A rare find from one of the several British cutlers who made the name Sheffield synonymous with quality in early and mid-19th century America, these labels will be of special interest to knife collectors and will display well applied to a proper period pasteboard box or simply laid out or framed just as they are.   A bit of an enigma as a cutler Samuel Bailey (1791-1870) is best known as a controversial British philosophical writer.  Born to Joseph Bailey and Mary [Eadon] Bailey, upon finishing his education Samuel entered the family firm, <B>Eadon, Bailey & Co.</B>   As a member of his uncle and father’s cutlery business <U>Samuel Bailey  was one of the first Sheffield merchant cutlers to visited America in order to establish business connections in this country.</U>  It was after the firm of Eadon, Bailey & Co. was dissolved in 1813 that the cutlery firm of Samuel Bailey & Co. came into being, marketing <I>Superior Patent Cutlery</I> such as pocket knives, razors, scissors &c.  Little known today, Samuel Bailey & Co. existed only between sometime after 1813 and the later 1820’s  when Samuel Bailey cashed in his accumulated  fortune as a cutlery merchant and founded the Sheffield Banking Company in 1831.  After his failed effort to gain a place in parliament in 1835 Bailey turned to a reclusive life and is primarily remembered today as an author of books on political and ethical subjects valued by a select few.  He was never married and died in 1870 leaving his property to the town.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

H 14in. x W 59in. x W 11in. $0.00

 

H 64in. x D 24in. $0.00

 

1864 Dated – SCHOOLGIRL SAMPLER $225.00

 

two c. 1820 / early 1830 era Samuel Bail $65.00

This work is  taken from a massive multi volume hand written and illustrated daily account set down by Major John Mead Gould of the  1st, 10th & 29th Maine Volunteer Infantry.  Carefully  transcribed  by historian Wm. Jordan from the originals in our personal collection  with extensive footnotes, chapter introductions and index by nationally noted Civil War scholar Richard A. Sauers,   this quality 8 ½ X 11inch, 574 page hard bound book is extensively illustrated with Major. Gould’s period drawings and vintage photographs from our personal collection and the regimental collection of Nicholas Picerno.    In his Civil War News review  Ethan Rafuse states in part:   Researchers looking for a common soldier’s perspective on life in camp, Banks retreat from Winchester, the battle of Cedar Mountain, Maryland and Red River Campaigns and Sheridan’s 1864 operations in the Shenandoah Valley will be hard pressed to find primary sources, published or unpublished that match the value of this observant (and quotable) young staff officer’s writings.   In our thirty (plus) years of avid interest  and almost daily contact with Civil War material,  we have considered  acquisition of Major Gould’s journals from his descendant, the sharing of his colorful first hand  account via this quality publication by Butternut & Blue and finally placement of the originals in the Maine Historical Society collection, a highlight  of our years in the field.  An enjoyable read and a wonderful reference with limited availability.  


 Offered here untouched and pure, just as it came after decades storage, this beautiful early Victorian side saddle offers good evidence of age and originality while remaining in exceptional original condition.  Set off by an attractive cream colored buff leather seat and ornately stitched safe, in combination with the light brown saddle leather skirt assembly and classic, decoratively stitched slipper stirrup, this beautiful old later 1840s, with popular use through the Civil War era, saddle will be a show stopper in any early Victorian equestrian grouping.  While this exceptional saddle remains in most pleasing condition as is, a knowledgeable collector will want to give it a soft brushing and may choose to properly treat the already quite pliable saddle leather.  We’ll leave that decision appropriately with the new owner.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  H 72in. x D 56in.  Remaining in nice condition save a small <I>scuff</I> in the emulsion (above the tree line on the right) were calling this 1/2 plate tintype <I>post</I>-Civil War simply because the ambulance wagon is unmarked and seems to be in civilian surroundings.  Though the scene may be Civil War vintage, it seems more likely that the wagon is a, period common, post war repurposing via army surplus.  A second wagon visible behind the first appears to be of the same design though of lighter color.   An interesting outdoor view who’s history and circumstance has unfortunately been lost in time.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

CIVIL WAR JOURNALS OF JOHN MEAD GOULD 18 $50.00

 

c. 1840s - 1850s extra quality - Side Sa $495.00

 

H 72in. x D 56in. $0.00

 

½ plate post-Civil War era tintype – ARM $175.00

This attractive Civil War private contract rain cover was fashioned from coarsely woven cotton textile, tarred and designed for use with the classically  high Civil War issue <I>bummer</I or McDowell pattern forage cap.  A private contract variation of the few legitimately period rain covers that have survived in that the material is a bit heavier and the tarred finish offers a flat tone rather than the gloss of common <I>oilcloth</I>.  A pleasing example to look at as in offers good evidence of age, period use and originality yet remains in exceptional condition, solid seams with no rips or tears save an small period stitched repair to one of the side button holes.  (see illustrations)  This impressive original rain cover remains supple as original yet maintains its shape and character when set out for display.  Would go nicely over an original <I>bummer</I> or simply displayed adjacent to a forage cap.  It is not an overstatement to say this is the most pleasing original Civil War rain cover we have seen in our nearly 55 years of visiting museums, viewing some of the finest private Civil War collections and seeking out such treasures <I>in the wild</I>.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Well documented by Civil War site <I>digger</I> historians and period print advertisement, it seems that these little die stamped tin containers saw common use once the original content was used up.  Seldom seen in any kind of condition save partial excavated examples, these little boxes made handy containers for stamps, thread, salt or anything that would fit.  Listed in Civil War vintage Boston directories, <I>Redding & Co.</I> marketed their <B>RUSSIAN SALVE</B> (composed of bee wax, perfumed oil and glycerin) as <I> a <I>pain extractor</I> that <I> reduces the most angry-looking swellings and inflammations, heals sores, wounds, burns, scalds, etc. as if by magic.</I> [ 1864 Harpers Weekly ] This original example with its military motif REDDING & Co. lid remains in excellent condition and will make a nice addition to any Civil War personal or medical cure groping.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  A product of Sheffield cutler <B>Joseph Lingard</B> whose name is seen on all manner of quality mid 19th century cutlery from the finest American market bowie knives to medical and special purpose tools from sheers, tweezers and a number of specialized combination tools such as this knife, thread cuter, seam pick, and textile tweezer, tailor / seamstress tool.  An especially nice companion piece in any period sewing basket or Civil War vintage textile / tailor grouping.  A specialized piece seldom seen.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!


 H 20in. x D 12in.

original! Civil War McDowell Pattern For

 

original! Redding & Co. Boston – RUSSIA $65.00

 

mid 1800s -Joseph Lingard, Sheffield – $55.00

 

Classic pendant copper fixture $0.00

H 24in. x D 8in.  44in. x D 10in.  H 22in. x D 12in.  H 36in. x D 24in.

Foyer light $0.00

 

Deco pendant light $0.00

 

Petite porcelain light $0.00

 

Classic pendant fixture with art glass $0.00




<b>Signed by soldier of the 12th Massachusetts Infantry who was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg!</b>


8 1/4 x 9 3/4, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Headquarters Department of Massachusetts,

Grand Army Of The Republic,

657 Washington St. (red rubber stamp address) stamped on top of the crossed out address of 12 Pemberton Square, Room 18.


Boston, May 20th, 1890


Special Order

No. 23


In accordance with Chap. II, Art. II, Section 3, Rules and Regulations, a dispensation is hereby granted to Gettysburg Post 191 G.A.R. to enable the investigating committee that may be appointed at the next regular meeting of the Post to report upon application for membership that may be referred to them at the same meeting. 


By Command of

George H. Innis

Department Commander


A.C. Moore

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning and wear.


George H. Innis was a 21 year old baker from Boston, when he enlisted as a private, on August 16, 1862, and was mustered into the 10th Massachusetts Light Artillery. He was mustered out of the U.S. service on June 9, 1865.


Alfred C. Monroe, was a 20 year old shoemaker from Weymouth, Ma., when he enlisted on June 26, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into Co. H, 12th Massachusetts Infantry. He was seriously wounded in action during the battle of Gettysburg, on July 1, 1863. The wound to his left arm was so severe that it resulted in the amputation of his arm. He was discharged as a result of his wound on October 19, 1863.   H 60in. x D 46in.  Found in among our accumulated <I>cultch</I> this neat old bar set is clearly out of our usual time period but full of character such that we couldn’t resist it.  All in nice condition yet with good age, while the figures depict an earlier time, we’d guess this hand carved from native white pine bar set dates to the 1920s or 30s.  The tallest figure stands approximately 7 ¼ inches.  Aside from the above, our  photo illustrations will speak best for this wonderful folk art carved and painted bar set.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Popularly used into the early post-Civil War years, primarily due to inexpensive and readily available fuel in the form of animal fat, lard and even strained cooking grease, the Ufford <I>GREASE</I> lamp clearly saw considerable use in many a country farmhouse and undoubtably offered up lighting on more than a single Civil War winter camp table.  It would be there that the obtainable fuel would be especially appreciated.  Fashioned from tinned sheet iron with a 6 3/4 inch diameter base the lamp stands approximately 7 inches with an applied brass label; <B> S. N. & H. C. UFFORD. / 113 COURT ST. / BOSTON / KINNEARS PATENT / FEB. 4. 1851</B> this example offers good evidence of age with plenty of period use yet remains solid and in pleasing condition.  As is our usual practice we have left this neat old lamp as found, leaving the decision to carefully clean it up to the new owner.  (We’d leave it pure, just as put away.)  .  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Headquarters Department of Massachusetts $25.00

 

H 60in. x D 46in. $0.00

 

folk-art carved BAR SET $245.00

 

Pat. 1851 GREASE LAMP by S. N. & H. C. U $165.00

A scarce <U>first patent example</U> of the much more frequently encountered later Pat. 1861 / 1864 variation with pen holder, this earlier <B>Patent June 4, 1861</B> inkwell remains in excellent all original and as found condition after decades of attic storage.  The spun brass base measures approximately 5 inches in diameter with a glass ink reservoir set in with a patent dated hinged pewter top.  With pleasing evidence of period use and an attractive age patina that comes to brass only with time this piece even retains its original plaster base filling.  A nice piece for display or use this piece will go especially well as a period writing instrument companion. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  This  neat looking Civil War vintage stoneware master ink is approximately 2.25 inches in diameter and stands about 5.5 inches high.  It remains in excellent condition with no cracks or damage and retains all of its’ original glaze.  This master ink is nicely maker marked GEORGE SKEY – WILNECOTE – TAMWORTH.  George Skey established his stoneware works in Tamworth in 1860 and quickly became a world leader in the manufacture of all manner of stoneware containers.  His stoneware beer bottles will offer Civil War collectors the most prevalent example of his product.  Of special interest is the period label <B>SUPERIOR BLACK INK  PREPARED BY E. S. CURTIS, BOSTON</B>. The Society of Inkwell Collectors advises that E. S. Curtis appears in historical directories for the years 1847-1848 and made powdered ink only. Its customers were given instructions for mixing and filling stoneware and glass containers. E. S. Curtis also supplied labels to be applied to their customers' bottles.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants.  A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  H 42in. x D 6in.  H 89in. x W 38in. x D 35in.

Civil War era Pat. June 4, 1861 – INKWEL $135.00

 

mid 19th century E. S. CURTIS - MASTER I $125.00

 

Pendant lights. . . pair $0.00

 

OTIS ELEVATOR VINTAGE $0.00

H 22in. X D 12in.  H 7 in. X D 12in.  


<b>1864 Democratic Presidential Candidate</b> 


(1826-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846 and fought in the Mexican War. Hailed at the beginning of the Civil War as the "Young Napoleon," he proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but an officer totally lacking in the essential qualities of successful command of large forces in battle. He saw action at Rich Mountain, West Virginia, in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and at the battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day in American history. He was defeated for the presidency in 1864 by Abraham Lincoln.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Seated view in uniform wih rank of major general. Artistic pose of "Little Mac" seated with his back to the camera. Backmark: J.W. Black, 163 & 173 Washington Street, Boston, and So. Turo St. Opp. Naval Academy, Newport, R.I. Period ink inscription [not in McClellan's hand] on the reverse, Mg. Gen. G.B. McClellan, U.S.A. Light age toning. Very fine. Scarce pose.  


T-66. Richmond, Feb. 17, 1864. Bust view of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Fancy blue reverse. Crisp note that is in about uncirculated condition.

Pair hanging lights $0.00

 

Crystal flush mount light $0.00

 

CDV, General George B. McClellan $125.00

 

1864 Confederate $50 Note $75.00




<b>Colonel of the 25th & 96th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiments during the Civil War


Unites States Congressman from Pennsylvania


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1827-99) Born in Northumberland Co., Pa., he was the publisher of the Pottsville Mining Record. He enlisted on April 17, 1861, at Harrisburg, as a lieutenant, and was commissioned into the 25th Pennsylvania Infantry; promoted to colonel, May 1, 1861; mustered out of this regiment, August 1, 1861; commissioned colonel of the 96th Pennsylvania Infantry, on September 23, 1861; resigned on March 12, 1863. He served as a U.S. Congressman, 1867-71, including the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress; and was chairman of the Committee on Accounts.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 4 3/4, in ink, H.L. Cake, Tamaqua, Pa.  


<b>Journalist, Famous Poet and U.S. Army officer during the Civil War


Civil War Date Document Signed</b>


(1826-1904) Born near Penn Yan, New York, he moved with his parents to Ohio in 1840. He studied law with Thomas Corwin, was admitted to the bar in 1856, and practiced in Cincinnati as a partner of Thomas Spooner. However, a few years earlier, he had written a poem titled, "Rain on the Roof," which first appeared in the Cincinnati Great West. Its extraordinary merit was instantly recognized and the seeds of a literary pursuit had been sown in Kinney's heart. He gave up the law and became editor of The West Liberty Banner. He later became editor of a literary magazine called the Genius of the West. When the Civil War broke out he was elected captain of a company that was raised in Greene County, but before he could be mustered in, President Lincoln, through the recommendation of Salmon P. Chase, appointed Kinney, Major & Paymaster, U.S. Army. He was commissioned on June 1, 1861, and he served throughout the war being mustered out of service on November 15, 1865, with the rank of brevet lieutenant colonel. After the war he became owner and editor of the Xenia Torchlight, and was subsequently the editor of the Cincinnati Times, and he also wrote for the Ohio State Journal. He later became owner and editor of the Springfield Globe Republic. He was elected as a delegate of the Republican National Convention in Chicago that nominated Ulysses S. Grant for president, and served as the Ohio State Secretary for the convention. He served as an Ohio State Senator, 1882-83. Kinney's career in civil and military life entitles him to the high rank that Ohio has given him among her distinguished sons. His attainments as a classical student, critic and thinker, exhibited by his strong, clear writings in prose, and his eloquent speeches, give him a high position among American scholars, writers and orators. But his reputation rests mainly on his extraordinary originality as a poet. His "Rain on the Roof," "Emma Stuart," "End of the Rainbow," "Discontent," "Threnody," belong to popular literature. A volume titled, "Lyrics of the Ideal and the Real," contain some of his best productions. Source: Dictionary of American Biography. 


<u>Civil War Date Document Signed</u>: 8 x 3, imprinted check with female figure holding sword and shield, filled out in ink.


Cincinnati, Ohio, Octr. 15, 1864. Third National Bank of Cincinnati, Designated Depositary of the U.S. Pay to W.H. Scott, Jr., or bearer, One Hundred & Twenty seven and 30/100 Dollars. $127.30. Coates Kinney, Paymaster, U.S.A. Small punch hole cancellation at the center. Very fine.      A desirable find for the Confederate collector or collector / historian who especially appreciates the interestingly historical side of Civil War collectables, this <U>all original to the period</U> offering was a purchase of arms buyer Caleb Huse who, at the outbreak of the Civil War, traveled through Portland, Maine to Europe with orders from the Confederate States Government to buy all the long arms and accoutrements he could arrange. This nice old <B> B 44th Mass.</B> marked <B>Potts & Hunt</B>  <I>forager</I> began its evolution into the American Civil War as part of a shipment intended for Confederate issue but when the steamer was captured passing through the tentacles of the Union <I><B>Anaconda Plan</I></B>, the British made Pattern of 1853 Rifled Musket was taken as <I>spoils of war</I> and brought as part of the captured blockade runner cargo before prize court for adjudication.   In accordance with prevailing wartime Prize Law for ship captures at sea, if the court ruled in the Navy’s favor, the ship and cargo would be sold at auction, with half of the proceeds going to a fund for disabled sailors and the other half awarded to the officers and crew of the vessel that captured the blockade runner.  

      While it would require research, if one wished it is quite likely that prize court records exist that would establish the precise identity of the Confederate blockade runner that our Potts & Hunt Enfield was taken from on its way to prize court and purchase for issue to the 44th M V M.  ( There are several references in the Civil War years New York Times to presiding Judge Sprague and activities before the Boston District U. S. Prize Court. )  Thanks in part to 44th Mass. Vols. regimental historian Cpl. James B. Gardner’s firsthand account (<I> RECORD OF THE FORTY-FOURTH MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEER MILITIA IN NORTH CAROLINA </I> published in 1887), we know on page 44 that <I><U> The regiment is armed with Enfield rifles captured from an English steamer</U> and their belts, bayonet sheaths, and cap pouches were similarly obtained.</I>  A further, firsthand account is recorded in 44th M V M veteran John J. Wyeth’s   <I> Leaves from a Diary Written while Serving in Co. E, 44 Mass., Dep't of No. Carolina</I>  (Boston: L. F. Lawrence & Co., 1878) when on September 14, 1862 while still in camp at Readville, Mass. he writes; <I>Our guns are on the field somewhere, they are Enfields.</I>  Further that: <I>It is reported that our arms are a lot captured from a blockade runner and intended for the rebels.</I>  On September 24 Wyeth writes, <I>Our rifles have been delivered.</I>   

      Lost in time whether, as we suspect, this forager began its association with the 44th M V M as an <I>extra</I> of the Regiments Enfields that was altered for foraging in the field,  or was altered by its owner after mustering out.  Alteration work to 47 inches in overall length with a 31 inch barrel altered to 69 cal. smooth bore, is clearly period and of pleasing quality with a well contoured fore end utilizing the original brass nose cap with bead front site and notch cut barrel band rear site.    Utilizing the original Enfield ramrod rather than a lighter civilian style wooden ramrod, seems to lend credence to the likely hood that the alteration dates to military camp use.  Of interest with respect to the 44th Mass. forager is an account on page 123 of the earlier mentioned Regimental History by Cpl. James B. Gardner that points to a particular reliability the regiment placed on foraging while in North Carolina.   On the occasion of approaching a number of pigs, <I>lean and active as hounds</I> writes the 44th Veteran,<I> many were sacrificed to appease our hunger</I>.  He advises further that had it not been for their foraging success <I>we could hardly have gone so far into the enemy’s country.</I>  He states that <I>no meat was given out after our start</I>, that their five days rations were consumed in three days.  Indeed at one point in the march some received only a single piece of hardtack in a forty-eight hour period making the fruits of foraging a primary source of food.

      In deference to the intricacies of Confederate markings in this collecting field, we will rely here on our photo illustrations to describe markings that will be evident to the knowledgeable Confederate Tower collector.  We will point out the classic armorer chisel match markings frequently referred to as <I>roman numerals</I> on Confederate  arms and the bold <B>P&H</B> marking  of known Confederate supplier Potts & Hunt. (For reference to these and other Confederate Enfield characteristics we highly recommend the groundbreaking <I>The English Connection</I> by Russ Pritchard Sr. and C. A. Huey.)   Just visible in the wood adjacent to the butt plate tang is the small circle <I>viewer</I> marking as is referenced on page 115 of the above with a photo illustration and, <I>’This mark appears on the comb of the stock of a Pattern of 1853 by Potts & Hunt of London’</I>.  Not a critical piece of information in light of the obvious Confederate lineage demonstrated by this piece, it should be pointed out that the lock plate and hammer offer two incised  lines around the periphery.  Rarely observed on <U>Potts & Hunt London</U> marked actions, this feature seems indicative of early Civil War Confederate purchases Potts & Hunt arms.   Upon close inspection we find a lightly period inscribed <B>Masonic Device</B> on each side of the butt stock.  Saving the worst for last, the forward ramrod guide has some period solder reinforcement where it is fastened to the barrel. While clearly period the reinforcement is of lesser quality in workmanship thus worthy of mentioning.  (Could easily be remedied but we’d leave the <I>field repair</I> as part of the gun’s history.)

      As for the <B>44th Massachusetts Volunteer Militia</B> it can be said the unit was raised to fill the Massachusetts quota under Lincoln’s 1862 call for nine month troops. Its nucleus was the 4th Battalion of Infantry, M. V. M.  Organized at Readville, Mass. and mustered in September 12, 1862 the 44th moved North Carolina in late October.  Here the Regiment in Action at Rawl's Mills, the Demonstration on Newbern and Foster's Expedition to Goldsboro whereupon, <U>of particular interest with respect to our <B>Potts & Hunt forager</U></B>, Co. B of the 44th Mass. was detached for outpost duty at <B>Batchelor's Creek</B> until May when the Company rejoined the Regiment in Newburn eventually to participate in the Expedition toward Kingston then to Dover Road and finally return to Boston where it was mustered out on June 18, 1863.  Regiment lost during service 12 men killed and mortally wounded with an additional 29 by disease.

      An outstanding offering, pure period original with an appealing natural smooth chocolate brown patina on iron components and an attractive age sheen on brass and wood.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


<U>A note about firearms:</U>   WE EMPHASIZE HERE THAT THIS PIECE IS CONSIDERED AN ANTIQUE / COLLECTABLE.  IT IS OFFERED AS A HISTORICAL COLLECTABLE ONLY AND IS NOT TO BE CONSIDERED  FIREABLE UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES.  <U>PURCHASE OF THIS ITEM WILL CONSTITUTE A FULL UNDERSTANDING OF AND AGREEMENT WITH  THE ABOVE. </U>


 Fashioned from a stout tree branch, steamed and bent to form a classic cane grip, the significances of the natural shaft has unfortunately been lost in time baring some additional research.   Fortunate for the collector / historian though is a silver band classically engraved <I><B>Col. Jos. A. Gerk     St. Louis</I></B>.  Born in 1876 of German immigrants, the native Missourian recorded <I>No</I> in response to the 1930 US Census inquiry, <I>Attended School?</I> yet he owned a <I>Radio Set</I> and could record his occupation as <B><I>Chief of Police</I></B> St Louis, Missouri. Our research found that Gerk worked his way up through the ranks to serve as Chief of Police from April 9, 1925 to October 1, 1934. An outstanding piece of Americana from <I>The Gateway To The West</I> in a time when the Chief of Police would have had some stories to tell.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Autograph, Henry L. Cake $20.00

 

Autograph, Lieutenant Colonel Coates Kin $25.00

 

44th Mass. Inf. - Captured Confederate B $1295.00

 

Inscribed cane of Col. Joseph A. Gerk – $350.00

Another <I>find</I> from a corner cleanout, we have owned this wonderful old dovetailed Winchester Repeating Arms Co. ammo box for years using it at antique shows to hold <I>for sale</I> paper ephemera.  (It served as a TV stand on a bedroom dresser for the last 15 years or so.)  Any way this attractive old ammo box is constructed of 9/19 inch thick pine, dovetailed at the corners and measuring 11 ¾ x 9 3/8 x 6 5/8 inches high.  The eye appealing old ammunition box shows good natural age color with good evidence of originality and use while remining in eye pleasing, solid condition.   Marked on both sides; <B>Small Arms Ammunition / Metallic Cartridges / Winchester Repeating Arms Co. / New Haven, Conn. U. S. A.</B> and on both ends; <B>Winchester / 5,000 / .32 Short Rim. / Blank</B> all in that period <I>impressed</I> print that is pressed into the wood.  A classic round first introduced in 1861 for use in the popular new Smith & Wesson Number 2 revolver that was so widely used as a private purchase side arm in the Civil War, the .32 Short, Rim Fire remained popular as a revolver and light rifle cartridge for years.  Usually repurposed till they fell apart and ended up as kindling, the survival of these heavy old ammunition boxes was quite limited making them a popular but difficult to obtain favorite among antique and obsolete ammunition collectors.  An attractive display item.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 


<b>United States Senator from Michigan</b>


(1830-1913) Born in Detroit, Michigan, he attended Thompson's Academy and the University of Michigan. Served as a member of the Michigan State Senate, 1879-80; U.S. Senator, 1883-89. Was the Chairman of the Committee on Fisheries; also served on the Committee on Agricultural. He was appointed U.S. Minister to Spain in 1889 by President Benjamin Harrison serving two years at this post. Served as president of the National Commission of the World's Columbian Exposition at Chicago, 1890-93. He was one of the founders of the Detroit Museum of Art.


<u>Signature</u>: 5 x 1/2, in ink, T.W. Palmer.   Another product of last winter’s clean out, we have had this wonderful old period coffee pot for years but it is time to make some room.  Well documented in style and construction by Civil War site <I>diggers</I> and the existence of such in the Steamboat Berterand (sunk on the Missouri River in 1865) excavation collection, this example stands approximately 8 inches from base to mouth, offers period construction characteristics and good evidence of period originality and age by virtue of an attractive natural patina on outer surfaces that comes to tinned sheet iron only after decades.  Of particular note with all this is that when we remove the lid and inspect the interior, we find that it remains <U>nearly as new</U>!   With no dents, rust, or other condition issues yet with convincing evidence of age, this wonderfully preserved period pot appears never to have been used!  An outstanding addition to any period collection.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  With good evidence of having been well smoked in the period yet remaining in nice, all original condition with no chips, cracks or repairs, this period clay tobacco pipe features a gaming motif with figures of playing card suits in panels around its circumference.  Additional panel figures include drinking goblets, crossed baseball bats with balls and one panel offers <I>10-pin</> implements (a crude version of lawn or outdoor bowling of some popularity in the period).  All is set off by an age patina with original decorative lanyard, cherry wood stem and period classic horn mouth piece.  A neat item that will spark the interest of tobacciana, gaming and Civil War personal item collectors as well as enthusiasts of  early American baseball.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Winchester Repeating Arm Co. – 5, 000 - . $135.00

 

Autograph, Thomas W. Palmer $8.00

 

exceptionally nice condition! Civil War $125.00

 

Civil War era - gaming theme – Tobacco P $325.00




<b>Major 50th Wisconsin Infantry during the Civil War


United States Senator from Wisconsin</b>


(1843-1919) Graduated from the University of Wisconsin. During the Civil War he enlisted as captain and was commissioned into Co. A, 50th Wisconsin Infantry. He was brevetted major March 13, 1865. Was also the military secretary to the Governor of Wisconsin. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1867 and served as assistant attorney general of the State of Wisconsin until 1870. Elected as a Republican U.S. Senator in 1885, he served until 1891, and was reelected to the Senate in 1897 and served until 1907.


<u>Signature</u>: 5 x 3/4 in ink, John C. Spooner.  This unused 19th century paper box label is uncut measuring 7 ½ inches X 15 inches was printed for cutting to produce box end labels for the  <B>The Patent Expansion Lamp Shade</B><I> with White’s Improvements</I>, <B> Mfg. By Woodsum & Co., Boston, Mass.</B> The labels picture the lamp shade installed on an oil lamp and collapsed.  A neat item for the antique lighting enthusiast.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  This offering will fall in the <I>who cares?</I> category (especially at 50 bucks a pop!) for all but the antique writing instrument collector or the mid-19th century personal item enthusiast who appreciates the rarity of the many every day personal items, common in their day but seldom surviving.  This rare example remains <I>as new</I>and in out of the box condition while offering good evidence of age and period originality.  Guaranteed to please this rarely surviving writing instrument was fashioned from raw, unfinished, red cedar with the clearly period attachment of its vulcanized rubber eraser.  Our photo illustrations will offer the best description short of holding the pencil in your hand.  I suppose the origin of the common pencil, fitted with a rubber eraser has not been the subject of crushing interest but for those who care, it all began in 1839 when Charles Goodyear developed a method of curing raw rubber called vulcanization.  Aside from making his name common to today’s Civil War era rubber goods collectors, (see: <I>India-Rubber & Gutta-Percha In The Civil War Era</I> by Mike Woshner ) the application of Goodyear’s process gave the now durable product wide application potential with the rubber eraser becoming just one of innumerable uses for Goodyear’s vulcanized rubber.  The idea of permanently mounting a rubber eraser on the end of a common wood and graphite pencil first occurred just prior to the Civil War when in 1858 Hymen Lipman of Philadelphia received the first patent for attaching an eraser to the end of a pencil.  In 1862, Lipman sold his patent for $100,000 !  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 An outstanding example of a very scares Civil War sword, this quality, all original <U>war time</U> Ames Mod. 1860 General Staff and Staff Corps grade sword will please the most discriminating collector.   Offering good evidence of age, originality and light period use, yet remaining in exceptional condition, this impressive sword exhibits all of the distinctive Civil War characteristics that set it apart from later commonly seen models: elliptical blade, functional folding counterguard; plain browned (not nickeled) scabbard, plain scabbard drag and eye catching exceptional quality, <U>high-relief</U> cast and <U>chased</U> hilt. The ray skin grip and wire remain in fine all original condition and the folding counter guard exhibits early, plain features and is locked in place by a spring-loaded button which still functions perfectly.  All this and with strong blade etching of early quality, this Mod. 1860 exists as one of the rarest of Civil War swords. ( As demonstrated by the illustrative use of a <U>post-Civil War</U> version by Harold Peterson in his classic reference <I>The American Sword 1775 – 1945</I>.)  Established by War Dept. General Order #21 on August 28, 1860, the Mod. 1860 S & F sword was prescribed for <U>optional wear</U>buy General Staff and Staff Corps grade officers.  (Optional being the operative word here and likely why the unpopular early issue Mod. 1860 Staff grade sword was produced in limited numbers.) On June 11, 1861 Ames received the first order from the Ordinance Department for the new Mod. 1860 General Officers sword.  While the initial order was for 300 swords it was cancelled May 24, 1862 with only 55 swords having been completed and delivered.  Ordinance Departments records show that <U>Ames ultimately delivered only <B>249</B> swords of this model</U> the last delivery dated July 27, 1865 was for 24 swords.  While records indicate that contract arms were to be U. S. marked with date and inspector initials no so marked examples could be documented by the author who classified existence of marked Mod. 1860 S & F swords as <U><I>speculative</I></U> (see: Ron Hickox: <I>Collectors Guide to Ames U. S. Contract Military Edged Weapons</I>)  While the long use of the Mod. 1860 S & F, (made mandatory for all officers except Medical, Pay Department and mounted officers in 1872) and popularly utilized general design features have made the type a most commonly encountered type, the rarely seen early Civil War sword of this model is coveted by knowledgeable collector / historians and is most easily distinguishable from the later example by the configuration of its straight blade which is <U> elliptical in cross section</U> <B>()</B> while the later version is diamond shaped <B><></B> in cross section.  With all this said, our photo illustrations will provide the best physical description of this exceptional Civil War Mod. 1860 General Staff and Staff Corps grade sword.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Autograph, John C. Spooner $10.00

 

3rd quarter 19th century - Patent Expans $30.00

 

ultra-rare! original mid 1800s – wood / g $50.00

 

Rare! Civil War Production Ames - Genera $1750.00

H 36in. x D 12in.


set of 6  H 30in. x D 24in.  H 28in. x D 26in.  H 41in. x D 12in.

Classic pendants $0.00

 

Formal brass light circa 1930 $0.00

 

Circa 1950 pendant $0.00

 

Classic pendants $0.00

H 40in. x D 20in.  H 72in. x D 28in.

Set of 3 available  H 34in. x D 30in.  H 50in. x D 32in.

Quality foyer fixture circa 1910 $0.00

 

Ornate iron light. . . . hotel scale and qua $0.00

 

Formal crystal / brass fixture $0.00

 

Classic formal light $0.00

H 38in. x D 24n.        Hand stich bound in leather are original issues of  Robert B. Thomas’s <I>FARMER’S ALMANAC</I> 1807 through 1815.  A boldly penned period ink inscription advises: <B>Phinneas Howe   MARLBOROUGH   HIS BOOK </B>  Our research tells us that Phinneas How served in the American Revolution in Capt. William Brigham's Co. of <U>Marlborough Minuteman</U> then as a sergeant in Capt. William Morse's Co., Col. Jonathan Reed's Regiment of <U>6th Middlesex County Militia</U>.  As such our man Phinneas Howe would have been in action at the <B>Battles of Lexington & Concord</B> and would likely have participated in the <B>Siege of Boston</B>.  Howe was a lifetime resident of Marlborough, Middlesex County, Massachusetts where he died in 1832.

      Phinneas Howe’s bound collection of Farmer’s Almanacs were printed by West and Richardson in Boston and offer woodcut vignette illustrations with astronomical calculations with a Farmer’s Calendar for each month of the volume’s year all intended to aid the early 19th century farmer toward a successful and bountiful planting. The volumes include Stamp Tables, information on Military Fines, Tables of the value of Gold Coins, List of Stages running to New England locations, vital information on the 1813 / 1814 U. S. Navy and more to include poetry, wit and 19th century wisdom.  The volumes show good evidence of age, originality and period use while remaining in pleasing condition.  Considered the oldest continuously published periodical in America, these vintage volumes provide considerable interesting material as well as offering the collector / historian a neat relic from the personal effects of a veteran of the American Revolution.  

      <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>





 


<b>Sending the remains home of their gallant colonel who was mortally wounded at Vicksburg!</b>


2 pages, 8 x 12 1/4, in ink, written by Lieutenant Cyrus D. Kendall, 11th Missouri Infantry.


<b><u>Camp at Young’s Point, La., July 1, 1863</b></u>


Mrs. Rovilla Kendall,


Dear Rovilla,


I wrote you yesterday and I told you that I was going over to Gen. Grant’s Head Quarters, and that I would write as soon as I returned. Well I have returned so I will drop you a few lines as I have a few moments leisure. I did not start from there till dark last night. I waited all day for a boat. We have to go 15 miles up the Yazoo River & it is eight miles from the landing to Gen. Grant’s Head Quarters. I did not get there until 2 in the morning. I got a leave of absence for Lieut. Weber and Thomas Hackett (the orderly) (you will remember him) for 20 days. They will start up the River tomorrow with the remains of Col. Weber.* I will send this letter by them and it will be mailed at Cairo or St. Louis. Your letter bearing date June 17 came to hand today. All the letters you have written between the 5 & 17 I have not received. I think it very curious. I was somewhat surprised to hear that you would be off on a visit before I would receive your letter but strange things will happen. I have no objection to you going up north on a visit. I am perfectly willing for you to go but I would rather you had not gone in such a hurry. You said if I did not like it you did not want me to say so for you had too much trouble now. If I did not like it you could be certain that I would tell you so, but I guess I shall not find much fault with my little Pet about it for I want her to enjoy herself whether I do or not. I fear you will not get this as you will be far away before this gets to Louisville. I am not going to write you long letters after this for you will not tell me- you know what, so I am going to spite you a little for once. If you are so afraid of telling me what I asked you I will say no more about it. So I suppose I shall be deprived of that laugh. You say you want $150 more before you can pay for the house & lot. When you get back from the north let me know and I will send the money. I shall not write again until I hear where you are. No more. Good by. My love to all your friends at Louisville & up north. I hope they will get to see me some day.


C.D. Kendall

11th Mo. Vols.


P.S. I asked you in my last for some letter stamps. You said nothing about them. I have none. I have to borrow one for this letter. You are forgetful.


Dear Pet good by again,

Cyrus


Age toning, fold wear, and a small paper chip at one of the folds, with some archival tape repairs on the reverse. Neatly written letter with regimental ID. Very fine content. Missouri Civil War units are scarce to find material on.


Cyrus D. Kendall, enlisted on August 1, 1861, at St. Louis, Mo., as a 1st lieutenant, and was commissioned into the 11th Missouri Infantry Volunteers. He was promoted to captain however the date of his promotion is unknown. He was mustered out of the service on June 18, 1864.


*Andrew J. Weber, born in Springfield, Mo. in 1840, enlisted on August 1, 1861, at St. Louis, Mo., as a captain, and was commissioned into the 11th Missouri Infantry. He was promoted through the ranks as major, lieutenant colonel and colonel, and was mortally wounded in the fighting at Vicksburg, Miss., on June 30, 1863. He succumbed to his wounds and died the next day, and as mentioned in Lieutenant Kendall's letter the colonels remains were being sent home.  


WBTS Trivia: On the very day that Lieutenant Kendall wrote this letter the first day of the epic three day battle of Gettysburg was taking place on the farmlands of Pennsylvania.  





 With period pocket wear under a rich natural chocolate age patina this attractive 1836 dated R. & W. Robinson trade token was issued with the figure of an American Institute Excellence Medal on its face with the following on the obverse: <B><I>Awarded to</I> R. & W. ROBINSON<I> For the Best</I> MILITARY, NAVAL, <I>Sporting & Flat Buttons</I> 1836</B>  Catalogued as a <I>Hard Times</I> token in the Smithsonian national collection, the name of the Attleborough, Mass. button manufacturer is synonymous with period military uniform buttons, federal as well as state.   please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!

Glass chandelier $0.00

 

1807 through 1815 hand bound FARMER’S AL $95.00

 

11th Missouri Infantry Letter $100.00

 

1836 R. & W. Robinson / Military Button $55.00

Original Civil War vintage lighting commonly referred to as <I>donut</I> candlesticks because of their appearance and size when collapsed and screwed together for travel.  This offering is a complete four piece set from spun brass with the two screw together drip pans and two holder pieces.   These traveling candleholders are approximately 3 5/16 inches in diameter and remain in excellent condition, unpolished with good evidence of age, originality and careful period use and carrying.  A favorite of the space and weight conscious soldier who carried all he had on his back or in his haversack, original examples  have become equally prized by lighting, Americana and Civil War collectors wishing to round out a display with that special personal look.   Relatively available just a few years ago original. complete examples of these <I>donut</I> candlesticks have become difficult to find on today’s collector market. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 Shown here with a quarter for size comparison, we have the advantage of being able to unquestionably date the period of this pair of antique, hand cut, bone dice by virtue of the <U>faint but discernable*</U> <B>CROWN</B>&</B> G. R.</B> marking on each of the two gaming pieces.  These marks were placed on bone dice as proof that a tax had been paid as required by British law.   The significance of these all important markings to the collector / historian, particularly the Civil War enthusiast, is that the tax mandating the application of the CROWN & G. R. marking was repealed in 1862 thus, after that time, eliminating the use of the government stamp denoting duty payment.  (see: <I>A History of Taxation and Taxes in England : From the Earliest Times to the Present Day</I>  by Dowell, Stephen p. 326)   A staple of the Civil War camp or period saloon this original period pair remain in excellent condition and yet demonstrate all the characteristics of period hand cut bone gaming pieces.    [*Please note that the original CROWN & GR  marks were small and were impressed into the bone with red pigment rubbed into the light impression.  With time and use most if not all of the original red pigment has been worn away in most cases leaving the faintest trace of the original CROWN & GR.  We have taken care to illustrate the markings here as you will find them upon examination of the originals. ] <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>



 With a history of having been recovered from the Boston, Mass., Charlestown Prison, at the time of its closing in 1955, this prison guard baton retains its original, solid but stiff with age, leather lanyard bearing the name of Boston equipment supplier Henry K. Barnes & Co.   Well known as a supplier of police and fire equipment as early as the mid 1890s, the company reaching its zenith during the <I>roaring 20s</I>.  Turned from white oak, the baton measures  approximately 24 inches and was plainly constructed, as a no frills enforcement utility.  Surely a formidable weapon in the hands of a 1920s prison guard.  First opened in 1805 the Charlestown Prison had a long and infamous history stretching through the tumultuous mob activity of the 1920s on into the 50s housing an impressive roster of local Boston area notables in this period, until it was closed in 1955.  The last execution (1947) in Massachusetts occurred within the walls Charlestown Prison which also housed such well knowns as Sacco & Vanzetti with one Malcom Little holding fourth there from 1946 until he was paroled in 1952 and, under the name of <I>Malcom X</I>,  quickly became the public face of the Nation of Islam.   We will include our letter preserving the history of having emanated from the Charlestown Prison closure. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Described in period catalogue listings as <I> Portable gold scales, field use beam scales comprising of a central metal support and two metal dishes attached by three metal chain each to a metal beam</I> this beautiful set of c. 1830s gold scales still retains its original suspension cord for hand holding as was used <I>in the field</I>.  The iron balance beam is marked AVERY in two places and measures approximately 10 ½ inches in length and remains untouched and as found with a touch of fine surface rust with a rich chocolate patina over all.  Suspended from the beam by brass chain are two 5 3/16 inch diameter brass pans.  Unpolished with attractive natural age patina, each bears the all-important <B>W. & T. Avery / late T. Beach PATENTED</B> marking.      <B>Dating :</B> Founded in 1731 by James Ford the company passed to Thomas Beach and Joseph Balden, husband of Mary Avery.   In the early part of the nineteenth century the business was passed to the Avery family who expanded the firm from a small local business to worldwide sale. The firm name became synonymous with quality and their portable patent balance scales were used in gold fields around the world.  When Thomas Beach died in the <U>early to mid-1830s the firm used the name <B>W & T Avery / late T. Beach</B> in transition.</U> The partnership on W & T Avery was dissolved in 1865.  All original and as found this wonderful set of early field use, portable gold scales should not be confused with the general use and much smaller boxed <I>pocket</I> scales on the period.  This set will make a nice addition to any quality period display.

Civil War era ‘Donut’ TRAVELING CANDLE $225.00

 

original Civil War vintage - tariff mark

 

late 1800s / early 1900 Charlestown Pris $95.00

 

W. & T. Avery / T. Beach - PATENT BALANC $145.00




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