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A bit out of our usual period but we couldn’t resist this scarce all original and untouched Camillus mess combination knife and spoon.  Dating in the WWI era, we have left this superb example uncleaned and as found for the collector who will appreciate the originality of an example that remains tight at the joints with good <I>snap</I> and a blade that has never seen use or a whetstone.   With only natural age as testimony to its WWI era origin this old standby will clean to near <I>as new</I> in the proper hands (shudder) but we would leave it as is.  Well known to collectors, the Camillus Cutlery Company was one of the oldest knife manufacturers in the U. S. with roots dated to its founding in Camillus New York in 1876.  With its <B>CAMILLUS CUTLERY Co. / CAMILLUS N, Y. / U. S. A.</B> found on many working and defense knives the now defunct manufacturer is among the most widely collected of the type.  A <I>workhorse</I> in its day, nice uncleaned and unused <I>out of the box</I> examples of this knife and spoon mess combination are seldom found today.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  This outstanding vintage carved meerschaum tobacco pipe offers that eye appealing rich honey color that comes only with time, handling and lots of pleasant period smoking.  It’s intricate detail, quality of carving and immaculate condition, is set off by its natural amber stem and will best be described by our illustrations.  In addition to it’s fine condition with no breaks, chips or cracks this beautiful equine motif antique tobacco pipe remains in it’s original hinged, fitted case.  Left as found, the case remains in excellent condition and will show as fine with a light application of proper leather dressing (we would leave it as is).  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 The product of a <I>cleanout</I> as we go through our 50 year accumulation in an attempt at gaining some <I>drawer space</I>, this vintage tinned iron spoon will be especially appreciated by the Civil War era mess gear or personal item collector.  Unlike the usual personal size spoons, machine fashioned from thinner die struck sheet iron, this example was hand crafted in one piece from heavier iron stock with die struck bowl and hand wrought handle.  All hot dipped in molten tin, this example remains in pleasing condition with good evidence of age, hand construction and period use with an appealing natural age patina. please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  Printed on one side only, by D. Hooton, Merchants Hall, Boston, this original old medical cure broadside was published in the 1830s and measures approximately 12 X 8 ½ inches extoling the virtues of <B>Thomas Hollis’s OINTMENT FOR THE ITCH</B>.  With directions for use and pledging the virtues of the concoction  against all manner of <I>humours and eruptions of the skin</I> to include ring worm and <I>scald head</I>, this broadside is printed on <I>rag paper</I> and remains in excellent condition save an obviously period water stain.  (Easily removed but we would leave the piece as found and as is.)  No tears folds or separations and a nice size for display.  .  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

scarce original – Camillus Cutlery Co. - $165.00

 

antique natural amber stem - carved mee $235.00

 

especially nice Civil War vintage – hand $65.00

 

c. 1830s Thomas Hollis – OINTMENT FOR TH $65.00

Illustrated here with a period quarter for size comparison, this attractive handmade beef bone ring is embellished with 2nd, 3rd and 20th Army Corps devices set in red sealing wax.  A nice original example of a common folk art / hand craft utilizing readily available bone from a <I>foraged</I> beef roast or stew, many an hour of dreary in winter camp was expended in such crafting.  This example remains in excellent condition with no cracks and offers good evidence of age, originality and period ware.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>


 An original 5 1/8 X 10 1/8 inch, January 1861, <B>L. M. Hoffman & Co.</B> auction bid card complete with bidders penciled in notations on the back.  The commodities auction will offer 371 hogsheads of <B>PRIME NEW ORLEANS SUGAR</B> and <B>50 Barrels of Molasses</B> . A family busies founded in 1795 with the commission auction house of Hoffman & Seton doing business at No. 67 Wall Street.  Hoffman continued business with various partners until 1822 / 23 when L. M. Hoffman joined the house with the addition of & Co. to the firm name.  The old firm continued to grow under various partner combinations always including a Hoffman until 1834 when the firm became L. M. Hoffman & Co.  The auction house continued under that name under the watchful eye of L. M. Hoffman until his death in 1861.   (see: The Old Merchants of New York City: By Walter Barrett )  While early commodity auction catalogues appear rarely as they were sometimes preserved in firm records, bid cards utilized by bidders to manage and launch their bids very rarely survived as they were cast away at the closing.  This just pre Civil War auction of New Orleans Sugar represented one of the last before secession and one of the final auctions under the direction of L. M. Hoffman before his death in 1861. A rare piece of late antebellum Americana from one of the country’s earliest and most successful commission auction houses.  Entirely original with good evidence of age and originality the back bottom of the card shows some separation of the pasteboard and some tattering of one layer.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published in Harper's Weekly. Caption: Contraband News. Scene showing numerous slaves with correspondents writing stories and sketching illustrations of them. 6 1/2 x 8 1/2.  This outstanding Civil War era traveling ink pen has a shaft of natural shell with knurled gold plate grip and steel nib. The attractive writing instrument is approximately 6 ¼ inches in total length and remains nestled in its’ original two-tone leather covered carrying case.  Of special interest to the collector of writing instruments as well as the Civil War enthusiast, will be the <B>FAIRCHILD</B> maker name in the grip. Leroy W. Fairchild began manufacturing writing instruments in New York City somewhere between 1837 and 1843 and remained active through the Civil War era. The buyer will agree that the <I>mother of pearl</I> pen, steel nib and case all remain in exceptionally fine condition.  A nice item for the Civil War collector or writing instrument enthusiast.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

Civil War era beef bone – Corps Device D $145.00

 

1861 - L. M. Hoffman & Co. - AUCTION BID $95.00

 

Contraband News $12.00

 

Civil War era Fairchild CASED DIPPING P $135.00

Our photo illustrations will best describe this attractive <I>royal flush</I> from a selection of original Civil War era American <B> Samuel Hart & Co.</B> playing cards.  With good evidence of period use, these cards show careful wear and some expected soiling (could be removed with the delicate use of an art gum eraser but we would leave them as original.  With the charm of the original and with no folds, chips, tears or other of the expected maladies that befell period playing cards, this hand will lay in well with any period grouping of personal items, frontier saloon or gambling related items without the significant cost of a full deck. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Totally un-marked as to maker yet clearly the distinct work and unique design of Milton, Pennsylvania gunsmith, Samuel Morrison Sr. (1826 – 1844)  The forged lockplate, (measuring approximately 5 inches long X 1 inch wide) forged hammer <I> and <I>side-hammer</I> design with unusual <U>external</U> mainspring, sear spring and sear, will satisfy the knowledgeable Upper Susquehanna long rifle collector of the lock’s origin.  Best described by our photo illustrations, the lock remains complete and would likely be functional with application of a little gun oil.  We leave that decision to the new owner preferring to offer the piece here pure and as found with an untouched rich age patina.   A desirable example of the work of Samuel Morrison, by itself, hopefully someone will have one of these rare long rifles in need of an original lock.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 Our illustrations will likely do best to describe this beautiful Civil War vintage mourning / memorial ring except to advise that it is entirely original with a bold old English <B><I>IN MEMORY</I></B> over black enamel on the outer band with a hand engraved  <I><B>Elizabeth Baker obit. 2 Dec. 1864 a. 63 </I></B> inscription on the inner surface along with deep artisan markings.  The ring is a rather massive size 14 ½ and remains in excellent condition yet with good evidence of period wear.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 

 


<b>Prominent American newspaper correspondent


Major 8th Massachusetts Infantry during the Civil War</b>


(1820-87) Born in Newburyport, Mass., he was a prominent American newspaper correspondent, editor and author, and was considered to be one of the most prolific journalists of his era. He was editor of the Southern Whig, in Athens, Ga., served as the attache of the American legation at Brussels, was foreign correspondent of the Boston Atlas, and editor of the Boston Bee and Sunday Sentinel, and in 1854 he was a Washington correspondent where he earned national recognition. He also served as clerk of the committee of the U.S. Senate on printing records, where he edited the Congressional Directory and the Biographical Directory of the U.S. During the Civil War he organized a battalion of riflemen that formed the nucleus of a company in the 8th Massachusetts Volunteers, in which he served for a time as major. In 1885, he organized the Gridiron Club and served as its first president. Among his writings were Campaign Life of General Zachary Taylor; The Rise and Fall of Louis Philippe, Ex-King of the French; Early Life of Napoleon Bonaparte; The Conspiracy Trial For The Murder of Abraham Lincoln; Federal and State Charters; Life of Burnside; and Perley's Reminiscences of Sixty Years in the National Metropolis.


<u>Signature With Sentiment</u>: 5 1/8 x 1, in ink, Yours Very Faithfully, Ben Perley Poore.

original Civil War vintage poker hand of $65.00

 

early Pennsylvania Long Rifle - Samuel M $225.00

 

18K Gold memorial ring - IN MEMORY Eli $275.00

 

Autograph, Benjamin Perley Poore $35.00




<b>For a sergeant who served in the 2nd Regiment Maryland Volunteers</b>


8 1/4 x 11, imprinted form, filled out in ink, with a very nice vignette of the Maryland State seal at the top.


STATE OF MARYLAND


I, Eliza J. Latta, a resident of Balt. and wife of Saml. M. Latta, Comy. Sergt., belonging to Company of the Second Regiment Maryland Volunteers, who was enlisted 21st May 1861, and is now in the service of the United States, do solicit under the provisions of Act. No. 276, of the Legislature of Maryland, passed March, 1862, allowance for myself and two children under twelve years of age; and at the time of his enlistment and now, dependent upon him for support.


Signed, Eliza Jane Latta

April 22nd, 1862


This day, personally appeared before me the above Eliza Jane Latta and made oath for herself, and Husband that, on the 21st day of May 1861, the day of enlistment of the above mentioned Saml. M. Latta, was dependent upon his services, and still is so, for support.


W.H. Maynard, Justice of the Peace

April 22nd, 1862


We hereby make affidavit that we are acquainted with Eliza Jane Latta, the applicant above named, and that the facts alleged and sworn to by her are true. 


Mary E. Ball

Mary E. Cloke


Very fine. Maryland Civil War items are scarce.


Sergeant Samuel M. Latta, served in Company A, 2nd Maryland Infantry Volunteers, until his muster out of the Union Army on June 18, 1864.


<u>Civil War Service of the 2nd Maryland Infantry Volunteers</u>


Duty at Baltimore, MD., until March, 1862. Ordered to North Carolina March. Duty at Roanoke Island, N.C., until June. Expedition toward Trenton May 15 - 16. Skirmish at Young's Cross Roads May 15. Expedition to New Berne June 18 - July 2. Moved to Newport News, VA., July 6 - 10; thence to Aquia Creek and Fredericksburg, VA., August 2 - 7. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16 - September 2. Battles of Groveton August 29. Bull Run August 30. Chantilly September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6 -22. Battles of South Mountain, MD., September 14. Antietam September 16 - 17. Stone Bridge September 17. Duty in Pleasant Valley until October 27. Movement to Falmouth, VA., October 27 - November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, VA., December 12 - 15. Burnside's 2nd Campaign ("Mud March") January 20 - 24, 1863. Moved to Newport News February 11, thence to Lexington, KY., March 26 - April 1. Duty at Frankfort, KY., until September. Rejoined Corps September 10. March to Knoxville, TN., September 12 - 20. Action at Blue Springs October 10. Operations in East Tennessee until November 14. Knoxville Campaign November 4 - December 23. Loudon November 15. Campbell's Station November 16. Siege of Knoxville November 17 - December 4. Repulse of Longstreet's assault on Fort Saunders November 29. Pursuit of Longstreet December 5 - 29. Duty in East Tennessee until March, 1864. Moved to Annapolis, MD., March 30 - April 7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 4 - June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5 - 7. Spotsylvania May 8 - 12. Po River May 10. Spotsylvania Court House May 12 - 21. Assault on the Salient May 12. North Anna River May 23 - 26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26 - 28. Totopotomoy May 28 - 31. Cold Harbor June 1 - 12. Bethesda Church June 1 - 3. Before Petersburg June 16 - 18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864 to April 2, 1865, Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30, 1864. Weldon Railroad August 18 - 21. Poplar Springs Church September 29 - October 2. Boynton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27 - 28. Fort Steadman March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28 - April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. March to Farmville April 4 - 10. March to City Point April 20 - 24, thence moved to Alexandria April 24 - 28. Grand Review May 23. Duty in the Department of Washington until July. Mustered out July 7, 1865.  While our photo illustrations will do best in assessing condition, suffice it to say this regulation of 1839 US oval waist belt plate remains in exceptional, unissued condition, while offering good evidence of age and originality.  The die struck sheet brass face has never been polished or cleaned and retains its sharp edges with no dents, scratches or dings and offers a soft untouched natural age patina. The solder filled back is in compatible condition with an even natural age patina and sports the regulation die struck single arrow clasp and hook.  With federal and state use from inception through the advent of the more familiar and much larger <I>two arrow</I> US plate of the same basic design, most of these small sized plates were manufactured in the 1840’s and 1850’s.  With a rich history, this small US oval plate is most quickly associated with the Mexican War and frontier West yet a good many found their way into the Civil War by virtue of early war state issue from existing state arsenal stores. (see: <I>AMERICAN MILITARY BELT PLATES</I> by O’Donnell & Campbell) <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  A remnant of a time when horticultural grafting was a necessary aspect on the farm as nearly all had at least a small grove of fruit trees for personal use, the grafting knife was a necessary piece of equipment to the practicing craftsman many of whom traveled from farm to orchard practicing their specialized <I>art</I>.   As the practice of grafting was a major factor in sustaining productive apple, peach, pear and other fruit trees and as the success of getting grafts to <I>take</I> as they would say, could be an iffy effort taking some time before success could be determined, the <I>grafter</I> was a well-paid craftsman highly respected and much in demand in 18th and 19th century farm communities.  This good old grafting knife was, as was the case with many <I>grafters</I>, hand made with an eye toward their personal preferences.  This knife was hand forged from a period <I>single-cut</I>mill file, a favorite source that would take the keen edge necessary in accomplishing a successful graft.  This knife measures 10 inches in total length with a 5 inch blade mounted through a brass ferrule to a stout turned ash-wood grip.  Demonstrating desirable evidence of age, period use and originality, yet remaining untouched and in nice condition, this early grafting knife will go well in any number of period collecting categories.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Measuring approximately 50 inches in total length, this pair of <I>make do</I> with what is available, handcrafted crutches will stir the imagination as one ponders the circumstances of their creation.  Crafted from natural cherry wood staffs, each split with a hand saw to within approximately a foot from the end and left rough with the bark on, the sections of green and still supple wood each was reinforced at the end of the cut with strips of available sheet tin wrapped around the circumference.  The strips were spread with a board cut in the shape of a wedge and secured in place above the tin reinforcements.  About half way up a short section of the sapling is secured in place as a hand grip utilizing square iron nuts, classic of the period.  Finally a full round section of the cherry sapling is secured across the top end of the spread wood sections.  With a bit of common skill, ingenuity, and some work, a matched pair of crutches was created from what was available.  Remaining in excellent condition yet with evidence of period wear.  An eye catching companion item in any number of Civil War venues.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Application for Support by the Wife of M $75.00

 

exceptional! pattern of 1839 U. S. BELT $335.00

 

early 1800s handcrafted GRAFTING KNIFE $65.00

 

Civil War vintage handcrafted Cherry Woo $165.00

Measuring just under 6 inches, heel to toe, this pair should not be confused with child’s shoes as they demonstrate the qualities of stout work shoes or brogans by style, weight of construction and their Pat.1853 scuff plates, as are unearthed by Civil War site <I>digger</I>/ historians.   In a period when private purchase foot wear was most commonly made by order by local cobblers who were not eager to  expend labor and materials on inventory, such <I>sales samples</I> as are offered here were a common choice for the selection by <I>in the shop</I> buyers and were distributed to country stores, traveling sales persons and yes even sutlers who would measure the troop who would undoubtedly cherish a pair of private purchase shoes over the notoriously ill-fitting issue brogans and pass his order back to the cobbler for construction.  This sales sample pair likely started out as black however have turned a very dark brown with age.  They are without piercing for laces as would have been required of shoes for wear and even retain the cobblers heel string, one to the other, to keep the pair together.  These features offer further assurance that the pair came directly from the cobbler shop as sales samples.  Entirely original and remaining in excellent condition yet, with good evidence of age, this eye appealing pair will go well in any quality Civil War era collection.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 


Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1996. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 168 pages, illustrated, index. Like new condition.


This book is a mosaic of the daily life of soldiers during the American Civil War. Encamped in winter, on campaign, or in lulls between battles, soldiers wrote. Their letters and diaries, even their sketches, testify that survival required more than beating the odds in combat. It meant keeping body and soul together against a conspiracy of circumstances. Through this album of emotions and recollections, you can experience the idealism, tedium, petty grievances, jokes and gibes, camaraderie, and desolation of the boys and men who were now soldiers.


Whenever possible these excerpts- collected from hundreds of published and unpublished sources- have been painstakingly matched with photographs, sketches, or artifacts associated with the writer. To do this we had the assistance of an extensive network of expert consultants who have contributed to other Time-Life projects, notably our 28 volume series The Civil War and its companion work, Echoes of Glory. With these diverse resources and access to materials in libraries, archives, and historical societies across the country, we compiled a dramatic account of daily life in the army.


There are several reasons for the abundance of first-hand sources from the Civil War. Postage was relatively cheap, only three cents. And the mail systems were remarkably effective: Mail packets were even exchanged across enemy lines. Above all, a surprising number of soldiers, not only officers but recruits as well, could write, describing their plight with simple eloquence. From camp near Chattanooga, Tennessee, Private Benjamin F. Jackson of the 33rd Alabama wrote: "Ma, I want to see you all the worst I ever did before in my life, but I don't know when I can hear from you for we are fixing to take another march. We got orders yesterday to throw away all our clothing but one suit. We aren't allowed to have but one pair of pants and have them on, one pair of drawers, two shirts, and one pair of socks. We have been in a line of battle or fighting...for fifteen days and it has not missed but one day but what it rained. I have...waded creeks up to my arms without anything to eat for three days at a time. It has been hard times with us and worse a coming I am afraid."


Many soldiers were capable artists who recorded scenes in diaries and sketchbooks. And professional artists, employed by magazines such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly, traveled with troops to collect eyewitness views of events for readers. Besides battle scenes, these correspondents, or "specials," drew everything of possible interest to the people back home: soldiers busy at their mess, makeshift theatricals, field hospitals, the long wagon trains of armies on the march. These sketches were taken by courier to the publications, where small teams of engravers transferred them to woodblocks for printing. 


Contemporary photographs also bring these accounts to life, animating the voice on the page with an image. Technical innovations at midcentury enabled the fledgling craft of photography to record the Civil War extensively, the first such use of the camera for an event of this magnitude. Transporting cumbersome equipment and portable darkrooms mounted on wagon beds, men like Mathew Brady and his assistants spent months traveling with the army, recording with unforgiving faithfulness the ecpectant gaze of new volunteers and the haggard expressions of weary veterans. 


So between these covers is the enduring testimony of men trapped by war. Men who faced not merely enemy soldiers, but far more constant foes; boredom, hunger, disease, and fear. Here to is a cross section of society in the second half of the 1800's; boys barely in their teens, farmers, freed blacks, devout Presbyterians, plantation owners, mechanics, schoolteachers, deserters and malingerers, heroes and cowards.


As you read the words of individuals struggling to cope with the effect of events swirling around them- trying to make sense of an unknown and unknowable fate- perhaps it will be possible to understand better the shattering toll of the Civil War.


On the cover: Waging the soldier's never-ending struggle for comfort, three Union men capture what warmth they can from a small fire. The title above the photograph reads, "Fancy the comforts of such a life as this!"     


Civil War patriotic imprint with a full color vignette of a Union Zouave soldier holding an American flag and his musket with pistol and knife inside belt, and a sign post in the background, "To the end of REBELLION." The slogan, "REMEMBER ELLSWORTH" is printed below the illustration. Minor staining. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.    


WBTS Trivia: Elmer E. Ellsworth was famous before the Civil War for organizing the Chicago Zouaves and staging spectacular drill exhibitions throughout the country. In August 1860, he performed on the lawn of the White House. He later accompanied President elect Abraham Lincoln to Washington for the inauguration. He raised the "Fire Zouaves," the 11th New York Vols., and led them into Washington in May 1861. He was shot down and killed by James T. Jackson, the proprietor of the Marshall House Hotel in Alexandria, Va., on May 24, 1861, after having removed a Confederate flag from the roof of that building. It was claimed to have been seen from the White House and Ellsworth found it to be an insult to President Lincoln. Jackson was immediately killed by Private Francis E. Brownell. A correspondent of the New York Tribune was on the scene, and the episode caused an immediate sensation which contributed greatly to the war sentiment in the North. The Lincoln family, who had become close friends with the young Ellsworth, took his death extremely hard, and Colonel Ellsworth became the first national martyr of the Civil War.    


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a standing Union Zouave soldier holding his musket with fixed bayonet, bayonet scabbard on his belt, kepi, shoulder scales and gaitors. Motto: "Our Nation's Honor The Bond Of Union." Very minor corner staining. Published by J.E. Tilton Co., Boston. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

original Civil War vintage pair - BROGAN $295.00

 

Voices of the Civil War, Soldier Life $20.00

 

Remember Ellsworth $5.00

 

Our Nation's Honor The Bond Of Union $5.00

Worthy of a home in someone’s fire collectables, Civil War Alexandria or just <I>neat stuff</I> collection is this December 7, 1864 check issued and signed by war time <U>Mayor Charles A. Ware of Alexandria, Virginia</U> to <U>Richard F. Tatsapaugh</U> who was <U>Alexandria’s Fire Department Chief Engineer.</U>  The check is issued for $18.00 for repair of fire apparatus and is signed by Mayor Ware with the Fire Chief’s endorsement on the back.  Interestingly enough the check bears a Federal Revenue stamp complete with its <I>Dec. 7 / 64</I> penned cancellation. We have left the check as we acquired it, tipped at the top corners to art board.  An interesting war time South relic without spending a lot of money.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


      A candle holder as is with potential use as a finger lamp with the addition of a burner, this Civil War vintage <I>make-do</I> will occupy a special place in someone’s lighting device or personal item collection.  Fashioned from a now rarely seen period <I>condensed milk</I> tin that, while showing good age and period originality, remains in excellent condition with all the telltale construction features that knowledgeable antique tin collectors like to see.  Flat, lap seamed top and bottom with that telltale lead <I>spot</I> seal and lead soldered, side, lap seal, all offer good evidence of period construction of the Borden, Eagle Brand tin.  A true example of the ingenuity of some skilled mid 1800s <I>tin-knocker</I>, the light gauge of the tinned sheet iron used to fashion the neck and finger loop modification tells us that the material used was likely cut from another milk can.     

     As a bit of history regarding the significance of Borden’s then <U>ground breaking</U> process of preserving milk:  Gail Borden introduced Eagle Brand in 1856 to fight food poisoning and other illnesses related to lack of refrigeration and preservation techniques.  Borden’s method of producing vacuum packed (thus the lead solder spot seal applied to the heated tin of condensed milk) cows milk quickly became popular as it offered a wide range of nutritional uses while being easily transported and stored without spoilage.  The Civil War brought about Union Army contracts that made Borden’s condensed milk a nationally recognized commodity. With the vast majority having been used up and cast aside existing examples are a rare relic of 1850s / 1860s daily life.

As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

 With the exception of some age staining on its <B>EVANS</B> marked single blade, this tortoise shell mounted, folding medical fleam remains in excellent condition and remains in its original pressed paper mache case.  A nice addition to any Mexican War / Civil War era medical grouping.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  This attractive light aqua hand blown whiskey bottle stands approximately 9 1/4 inches and sports the patriotic figure of a Mexican War era militiaman on its face.   The calabash style flask sports a classic iron pontil  and is topped by an applied  mouth.   The calabash shaped whiskey flask saw considerable popularity in the 1840s through the Civil War era with most surviving examples emanating from the later period.  This early example with the Mexican War period military figure is offered as acquired with a painted collection inventory number on the base which could be easily removed.  All original and period with no chips, cracks or condition issues this colorful patriotic flask will set well in any period grouping.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

c. 1864 - Alexandria Virginia Mayor - Sig $65.00

 

Civil War vintage Condensed Milk Tin - $95.00

 

Earlier through mid 1800s - CASED MEDICA $55.00

 

c. 1840s - PATRIOTIC MILITIA figure - WH $225.00

All in the original board with leather spine binding, this volume is a collection of <I>Mother’s Assistant & Young Lady’s Friend</I> published in Boston by William C. Brown.   With good evidence of age and period handling yet remaining in pleasing condition over all, tight at the spine with no torn, missing or loose pages, this bound collection of issues spans from January 1843 through July 1850.  A nice collection of entertaining sonnets, poetry, illustrations, good advice and guidance for the Victorian young lady and mother. .  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Housed in a period turned oak dice cup, this pair of vintage hand cut bone gaming dice hold a secret advantage to the wily user as upon a close look each gaming piece offers two sided featuring 5 dots with the all important extra 5 panel set in place of the correct panel of six.  A neat original gaming item for the old West gambling collector or enthusiast of  the Civil War military camp <I>sharpie</I>.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Frequently referred to as a <I>gunsmith’s</I> or <I>clock maker’s,</I> vice or any number of specialty applications, the use of this handy old black iron hand vice was as broad as the imagination.  Age to is set at variations from the American colonial / Revolutionary War period through use into the Civil War era with specialty references documenting existence of such hand vises as this on through each time frame.  Examples such as this one are most accurately referred to simply as an <I>artisan hand vice </I> of the 18th through mid-19th century.  Easily distinguishable from the post mid-19th century examples by virtue of design and construction, this little artisan hand vice remains in all original, functional condition and will lay in well with any number of specialty period artisan groupings.  A nice period item without spending a lot of money. 

As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

 A remnant of the sand casting methods of earlier post Civil War iron and bronze casting foundries, this carved wood foundry pattern was for use in casting GAR markers so widely used to mark the graves on Civil War veterans.  Such <I>patterns</I> were hand carved by craftsmen who duplicated each component of a casting in wood.  The artisans finished component was then used to form an impression in fine damp sand then used as a mold in casting with molten iron or bronze.  Hard to imagine with today’s rapidly accomplished injection casting methods, in the time of traditional sand casting, even the multiple individual components of a cast iron stove would be first carved of wood, painted or shellacked and used over and over indefinitely in the process.  All original and period and in nice condition while offering good evidence of age, this pattern would have been used to cast the standard G.A.R. device measuring approximately 7 inches across.   Will display nicely on the wall or set in with other veteran items.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

Jan. 1843 through July 1850 bound - MOT $65.00

 

vintage hand cut bone DOUBLE FIVE / CHEA $95.00

 

1700s through early 1800s – Artisan’s HA $75.00

 

Rare! G. A. R. marker FOUNDRY PATTERN $195.00

A nice period <I>Double Eagle</I> one pint patriotic whiskey flask. All in pleasing condition with no chips, flakes, cracks or condition issues, this beautiful hand blown aqua flask with its classic hinged mold marks and applied top will sit well in any earlier to mid 1800s antique grouping. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 


Postal envelope addressed to James C. Mayer, 8th Company, 7th Regiment, N.Y.S.M., Washington, D.[C.]. Care Col. Lefferts. C.D.S. New York, May 27, with 3 cents rose (Scott #64) George Washington postage stamp. Rough edges where the envelope was opened. 


WBTS Trivia: The 7th New York State Militia was one of the America's most famous military units. Commanded by Colonel Marshall Lefferts, they were one of the first regiments to answer President Lincoln's call for troops after the bombardment of Fort Sumter and immediately left New York City (April 19, 1861) for Washington at the commencement of the Civil War. They also saw duty during the July 1863 New York City draft riots, and participated in the funeral cortege of President Lincoln through New York City.   As with so many utilitarian items common to the period the lowly sheet iron <I>cow-bell</I> with its distinctive dull <I>’thunk- thunk’</I>, found its way to the front.  As with so much of this neat <I>stuff</I> we can thank the modern day <I>digger</I>/ historian for verification of field use of such.  (The excavated bell shown here [NOT FOR SALE] is from our own collection. It was found in a Falmouth, Virginia, Maine camp.)    Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison, the sheet iron bell offered here remains in excellent plus condition with a deep natural age patina over a full complement of original finish.  Remnants of the original label remain on one side.  Not a big deal but the condition alone will make this piece a welcome addition to any quality Civil War grouping.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!


 


Criswell #124. Vignette of C.G. Memminger at top center and a cotton plant at the bottom. Authorized by the Act of Congress, C.S.A., February 20, 1863. Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, Columbia, S.C. Eight coupons still attached. Very ornate Confederate bond that is in excellent condition.

original! patriotic DOUBLE EAGLE WHISKE $135.00

 

Cover Addressed to Soldier in the 7th N. $20.00

 

Civil War vintage SHEET IRON BELL $50.00

 

1863 Confederate $500 Bond- C. G. Memming $125.00




<b>Includes Letters From General Andrew Jackson, President James Madison and Statesman James Mason</b>


16 pages, 6 x 9 1/2. 


New England Convention. Difference in favor of Southern States. The Olive Branch. Legislature of Massachusetts. Glorious News From New Orleans. 3 Letters From Major General Andrew Jackson to the Secretary of War Regarding Recent Action. Inspector General A.P. Hayne Reports the Killed, Wounded and Prisoners Taken at the Battle at Larond's Plantation. Proclamation From the President of the United States James Madison. Letter From James Mason. Military Report. Letter From Commodore J.H. Dent, U.S. Navy to the Secretary of the Navy Benjamin W. Crowninshield. Proceedings of Congress and more. Light age toning and wear. Very desirable New Orleans and General Andrew Jackson related issue.   


Trivia: The War of 1812 was fought between the United States and England from June 1812 to February 1815. One of the casualties of this war was the burning of the White House in Washington, D.C. by British forces on August 24, 1814.         Complete and original with all the brass fixtures, no breaks or weak spots but with some crackling in the surface finish as evidence of age and originality, this leather accoutrement is offered from a Bannerman Island military goods salvage sail of many years past.  Per text offered in their 1903 Francis Bannerman Military Goods Catalogue, the Mod. 1873 carrying brace was worn over the shoulders with straps for attaching haversack, knapsack or other load to be carried.  The piece is Rock Island Arsenal marked and offered as found after decades of storage.  While the new owner may want to apply a light coat of Lexol or other <U>appropriate</U> preservative we’d leave this now rare accoutrement just as it is, untouched and <U>still tied with hemp twine just as it came from Bannerman Island.</U>  An exceptional Indian War vintage item!   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !



 This rarely found battlefield recovered <B>pair</B> of Union issue spurs emanated from the late pioneer Civil War relic collector and authoritative  author, Stanley Philips. ( <I>Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War</I> Vol. 1 & 2 by Stanley Phillips)  Acquired years ago from the respected Phillips as a <I>Battle of the Wilderness</B> recovery, this rare pair of Union spurs is matching in all respects but most importantly with respect to being a legitimate pair, show a matching, <U>identical</U>, patina on each spur.  Experienced relic collectors will be appreciative of this as good evidence of a common recovery site.  As to condition, the spurs are in pleasing shape while the iron rowels show expected detrition from the elements.  An opportunity to acquire a rare matching pair of excavated spurs, knowledge of the conditions  and aftermath of the Wilderness battle, where so many casualties were never recovered, will only enhance the interest of the Civil War historian.  Upon request we will include our letter preserving origin as emanating from the Stanley Philips collection. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  


7 3/4 x 2 3/4, imprinted form, filled out in ink. $3.33 Received of Mary Oliver, Three dollars and 33 cents, Tax for the year 1831, her taxable property consisting of 160 Acres of land. Also lists 1 Slave at lower right just above the signature of C. Steele, the tax collector of Warren County, [Mississippi]. Endorsed by Mary Oliver on the reverse. Light age toning and wear. Very fine early 1800's tax receipt listing a slave as taxable property.

Niles' Weekly Register, Baltimore, Febru $75.00

 

U. S. Army Mod. 1873 KNAPSACK CARRYING B $145.00

 

Stanley Phillips collection - Battle of $225.00

 

1831 Mississippi Tax Receipt For Land & $50.00




<b>Depredations are being committed against Southern citizens in North Georgia by Confederate raiders!</b>


2 pages, 6 1/2 x 8 1/2, in ink, written by Captain J.M. Carden, Commanding Scouts, to General Joseph Wheeler, Commanding Cavalry Corps.


<b><u>Grahamville, Jany. 8th, 1865</b></u>


General,


I have the honor to inform you that whilst upon duty collecting stragglers & deserters under orders from Brig. Genl. Reynolds, in North Georgia, I have found twelve men with authority from Gov. Joseph E. Brown to raise Regts., Battalions, or Companies, who are using this authority to enlist men from other regular commands, thus offering a premium for desertion. These parties followed Genl. Sherman’s line of march robbing citizens of horses, mules, knives, forks, spoons, ladies dresses, bed clothing, &c, &c, whilst doing so claiming to belong to Genl. Wheeler’s Cavalry. I captured a number of these parties with all the kinds of stolen property specified above & know them to belong to the parties raised by the men having authority from Gov. Brown as specified above. Their custom is to retreat to North Georgia with their stolen effects.


I am General Very Respy.,

Your obt. Svt.,

J.M. Carden

Capt. Comg. Scouts


To:

Maj. Genl. Jos. Wheeler

Comg. Cav. Corps


Docket:

Grahamville, Jany. 8th, 1865

J.M. Carden

Capt. Comg. Scout

Depredations in North Ga.


Very bold and neatly written. Superb Confederate scouting report that was sent to General "Fighting Joe" Wheeler informing him of depredations that were being committed against Georgia citizens by Confederate deserters who have followed the infamous march of Union General William T. Sherman and they are using General Wheeler's name to commit these crimes! Knowing of  Wheeler's volatile personality it's a pretty safe assumption to say that the general was not pleased to learn of this news! This report was published in the book, "Campaigns of Wheeler and His Cavalry, 1862-1865," by W.C. Dodson. This rare Confederate document has been in a private collection for the last 25 years! Extremely desirable! 

 


<b>Letcher Light Artillery of Virginia


Wounded in action at the battle of Fredericksburg, Va. in 1862


Major General and Commander of the Virginia Division of the U.C.V.


With imprint of Anderson & Co. Richmond, Va.</b>


A resident of Henrico County, Brander was commissioned into the Letcher Light Artillery of Virginia, on February 17, 1862. He was wounded in action at the battle of Fredericksburg, Va., on December 13, 1862. Served as Commander of the Virginia Division of the U.C.V., with rank of major general. Buried in Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 x 4 1/8 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform with rank of major. Imprint on the front mount, Anderson & Co., Richmond, Va. Backmark: Anderson & Co., 1311 Main St., Richmond, Va.


In the official account from U.C.V. Headquarters, New Orleans, La., January 29, 1900, General Moorman states of General Brander:


A noble old Virginian, Major General Thomas A. Brander, commanding the Virginia Division of the United Confederate Veterans, has been gathered into the harvest of death.  The great soul of this brave old soldier, patriotic citizen, and good man passed into the land of beauty, where he will again enjoy the companionship and enlist under the banner of glory which waves over Lee and Jackson, and Stuart and Heth, and Early and Pickett, and others of his immortal comrades who have preceded him into eternity. The General Commanding joins with the Confederate survivors of the Old Dominion who mourn for the loss of the noble old Confederate soldier whom they so often honored as their beloved Division Commander. Brave, modest, gentle, and chivalrous, his life work is ended, his name is inscribed upon the Roll of Honor, and his story is eloquently told in the annals of his State and of the Confederacy.


The following tribute is by his personal staff:


Richmond, Va., January 29, 1900.


Among those who today mourn the death of General Thomas A. Brander, late Commander of the Virginia Division of the United Confederate Veterans, perhaps none will do so more sincerely, or feel his loss more keenly, than we, the members of his personal staff. All of us were his old comrades, his lifelong friends and companions, and thus linked to him by ties which could be broken only by the rude hand of death. Deeply impressed with our sorrows, we cannot allow this occasion to pass without conveying to his family this imperfect testimonial of our appreciation of our chief, our comrade, and our friend, as well as of the loss sustained by us in his death. The old saying, "The bravest are the tenderest," was rarely more perfectly exemplified than in the life and character of our dead friend. 


At the outbreak of the late civil war he entered the ranks of the Confederate army, and on almost every field on which the Army of Northern Virginia was engaged he bore a noble part. He returned from the war a major of artillery in Peagram's Battalion, a body conspicuous for gallantry even in that splendid army, and among all that host of patriot "braves" there was none accounted braver or truer than he whose loss we mourn today. We cannot here recount either the stirring and stormy scenes of war which shaped his military life, or those through which he passed as a citizen, so often checkered by experiences both of sunshine and of sorrow; but suffice it to say thar throughout his eventful life he bore himself as only the brave, true man and Christian gentleman that he was could have done, and the epitaph of one of England's bravest and best soldiers might well be his; "He feared man less because he feared God more." As the ranking officer of the United Confederate Veterans in this department, he was at the head of all the movements and of all the processions formed and led to do honor to the Confederate cause, and to the memory of those who died for that cause, and we cheerfully bear testimony to the fidelity and ability with which he performed every duty imposed by these often recurring and sometimes mournful events in our city. 


In short, no man loved the Confederate cause or did more, as far as was able, to attest that love, both during and since the war, than he; therefore, be it 


Resolved: 1). That in the death of General Thomas A. Brander the survivors of the Confederate armies have lost a comrade as conspicuous for fidelity to duty and bravery in war as he was for fidelity to principle and manly bearing in times of peace; that our city has lost one of its best citizens, one who exemplified in all the walks of life that nobility of character which marks the true man and Christian gentleman; and that we, the members of his personal staff, feel with peculiar poignancy the grief now universal in our midst occasioned by his death. 


2). That we hereby tender to his family our deepest sympathies, together with the assurance that in the sorrow which death has brought to the household of our comrade, friend, and chief we, and each of us, share a common grief, akin to that only of those who were "nearest and dearest" to him in life.


Signed: George L. Christian, George J. Rogers, James H. Capers, Joseph V. Bidgood, J. Taylor Ellyson, William M. Evans, Joseph Bryan.   


Full color H.A. Ogden print titled, "McClellan at Antietam, September 17, 1862." Copyright 1912, by The War Memorial Association. Measures about 9 x 12. Very fine.  


8 pages. THE SIEGE OF CHARLESTON. Arrival of the Arago, with Advices to the 10th. The Grand Assault Expected to be Made Yesterday. Reports of a Deserter from Fort Wagner. Guns Removed from Fort Sumter to James Island. The Fall of Sumter Regarded as a Certainty. Great Improvements in the Health of Our Troops. Progress of the Siege Operations. The Rebel Works. List of Deaths in Hospital from Port Royal Including Colored Troops From the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. Military News to be Suppressed; A Stringent Order From General Gillmore. The Big Gun; What the Three Hundred Pound Parrot is Expected to do. News From Fortress Monroe. Reports of an English Doctor Escaped from Richmond. A Mass Convention of Unionist Called in North Carolina. A Delegation to be Sent to Washington. The Draft. It Will Re-Commence on a Week from Next Monday. The Metropolitan Police; Their Services During The Riot Week, Their Honorable Record. The Hanging of the Negro in Clarkson Street. How the Rebels Carry on War. Gerritt Smith on the War. Affairs at Vicksburg. The Task of Cleaning the City of Confederate Nastiness. Usefulness of the Contrabands, and more news. Edge wear.

Confederate Scouting Report Sent to Gene $595.00

 

CDV, Major Thomas A. Brander $250.00

 

General George B. McClellan at Antietam $15.00

 

The New York Times, August 14, 1863 $35.00




<b>Colonel of the 26th North Carolina Infantry, 1861-62


Civil War Governor of North Carolina


U.S. Senator from North Carolina


With Raleigh, North Carolina backmark</b>


(1830-94) Born in Buncombe County, N.C., he was the younger brother of C.S.A. General Robert B. Vance. He studied law and began a practice in Asheville, N.C., in 1852. When North Carolina passed the ordnance of secession, in May 1861, Vance was a captain commanding a company known as the "Rough and Ready Guards," that was part of the 14th North Carolina Regiment. In August 1861, he was elected colonel of the 26th North Carolina Infantry which he led in the battle of New Bern, N.C., in March 1862, and in the battles around Richmond, Va. in the spring of 1862. In September 1862, Vance was elected Governor of North Carolina, and he was re-elected for a second term in 1864, earning the sobriquet, "War Governor of the South."  He was arrested by Federal forces on his birthday in May 1865, and confined in prison in Washington, D.C., until he was paroled in July 1865. He served once again as Governor of North Carolina, 1877-79, and was a United States Senator, from 1879-94.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 x 4 1/8 card. Chest up view. Backmark: J.W. Watson, Raleigh, N.C. Light age toning, with a couple of surface scratches and minor abrasions. Desirable to find with a North Carolina backmark.   


<b>Lieutenant Colonel, 15th New Hampshire Infantry


Twice wounded during the battles at Port Hudson, Louisiana


United States Congressman & Senator from New Hampshire


Dwight M. Sabin, United States Senator from Minnesota</b>


<u>Henry W. Blair</u>: (1834-1920) Born in Crampton, Grafton County, N.H., he attended the common schools and private academies, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1859 and commenced practice in Plymouth, N.H. He was appointed prosecuting attorney for Grafton County in 1860. He enlisted in the Union army at Plymouth, N.H., on October 2, 1862, and was commissioned major of the 15th New Hampshire Infantry. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on April 8, 1863, and was severely wounded on May 27, 1863, and again on June 14, 1863, during the battles of Port Hudson, Louisiana. He was mustered out of the service on August 13, 1863, at Concord. In 1866, he served as a member of the New Hampshire State House of Representatives; and was a member of the state senate, 1867-1868. He served as a U.S. Congressman from 1875-1879; and was a member of the U.S. Senate, from 1879-1891. He was the chairman of the Committee on Education and Labor. He was appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to China by President Benjamin Harrison, on March 6, 1891, but he was objected to by the Chinese Government as being persona non grata, and subsequently tendered his resignation which was accepted on October 6, 1891. He served once again as a U.S. Congressman, 1893-1895. 


<u>Dwight M. Sabin</u>: (1843-1902) Born near Marseilles, La Salle County, Illinois, he moved to Connecticut with his parents in 1857; attended the country schools and Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. He served in the Union Army during the Civil War; employed as a clerk in Washington, D.C. He returned to Connecticut in 1864 and engaged in agricultural pursuits and also in the lumber business. He moved to Stillwater, Minnesota in 1868, engaged in lumbering and the general manufacture of railroad cars and agricultural machinery. Served as a member of the Minnesota State Senate, 1872-1875; and in the Minnesota State House of Representatives, 1878 and 1881. He was chairman of the Republican National Committee, 1883-1884. Served as a U.S. Senator from Minnesota, from 1883-1889, serving as the chairman on the Committee to Examine Branches of the Civil Service, and was also on the Committee on Railroads.


<u>Signatures</u>: Both senators have signed a 3 3/4 x 1 1/8 slip of paper in ink, H.W. Blair and below D.M. Sabin.   


<b>Famous Union Cavalry Commander during the Civil War</b>




(1824-1897) Graduated from West Point in the class of 1844. In 1846, he was awarded the brevet of first lieutenant for gallantry in the Mexican War. He later served on the Indian frontier and in Florida against the Seminoles as an officer of the United States  dragoons. Distinguished service in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign gained him notoriety and a promotion to brigadier general. He commanded a division of the Cavalry Corps in the Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville campaigns. Promoted to major general in June 1863, he took over command of the Cavalry Corps and directed 10,000 Federal horsemen in the battle of Brandy Station, Va., the biggest cavalry fight of the Civil War. The battle was said to have made the Union Cavalry. He served in the Gettysburg campaign, and also led the cavalry corps at Beverly Ford, Aldie, Middleburg, Upperville, Culpeper Court House and went west in 1864 to the Department of Missouri. Pleasanton resigned from the U.S. Army in 1868 and served as Commissioner of the Internal Revenue under President Ulysses S. Grant.


<u>Signature With Title</u>: 4 3/4 x 1 5/8, in ink, Very respectfully, A. Pleasanton, Commissioner. Very neatly written autograph.  

 


Full color H.A. Ogden print titled, "Sherman At Kenesaw Mountain, October 4, 1864." Imprint below the illustration, "Copyright 1912, by The War Memorial Association." Signature of H.A. Ogden is in the print at lower right. 9 x 12 1/2. Very fine.

CDV, Zebulon B. Vance $75.00

 

Autographs, Henry W. Blair $25.00

 

Autograph, General Alfred Plesanton $75.00

 

General William T. Sherman at Kenesaw Mo $15.00




<b>United States Senator from Nevada</b>


(1829-1912) Born in Herefordshire, England, he immigrated to the United States with his parents who settled in the northern part of Ohio. He attended the public schools in Cleveland and later moved to California and engaged in mining and farming in Trinity County where he was elected sheriff of the county. He served as a California State Senator from 1863-1867, then moved to Gold Hill, Nevada in 1868 where he again pursued mining. He was a Republican United States Senator from Nevada serving 1873-1903; was the chairman of the Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses; and he also served on the Committee on Epidemic Diseases. 


<u>Signature</u>: 4 x 3/4, in ink, Jno. P. Jones.   Measuring just under 10 inches in total length with a double edged 5 5/16 inch blade, this attractive old knife offers good evidence of age by virtue of  construction with its nicely shaped, repurposed file blade, set into a stag grip and secured with a pewter casting and copper rivet.  These typically 19th century  construction features in combination with a pleasing natural age patina over period wear offer good evidence of age and originality.  Attractive scrimshawed fouled anchor and sea-horse figures demonstrate good age but may have been added some time in the past postdating the earliest days of this classic old belt knife.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Not a big deal but worthy of continued preservation is this delicate aqua glass cologne bottle.  A nice example of the make do culture of the 1700s, this little bottle offers a period sealing wax repair of a fractured corner as the original owner thought enough of what was likely a gift, to repair the piece for continued use.  Of significance lost in time is the fact the repaired bottle never was cast aside but found its way through the years to now serve as an attractive addition to someone’s 18th century collection.  A neat little piece without spending a lot of money. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  This all original brown ink penned and docketed Confederate document was executed on December 31, 1861 by the hard fighting Confederate Captain <B>William K. Bachman</B> in command of <B> BACHMAN'S Company of GERMAN LIGHT ARTILLERY, HAMPTON'S LEGIONS</B> and bears his signature.  

<CENTER> Our transcription of the document is as follows: </CENTER>


<I>I hereby certify that a quart of oil recd. Of Capt. Baldwin act. Ord.  officer in Richmond in Sept. /61 was used for cleaning and keeping in order the small arms in my possession  up to  Nov. q, 1861, also that the packing box received Sept. 7, 1861 from Capt. Child’s ord. officer at Charleston was used in a ___?____-superfluous accoutrements and was left behind by me for want of transportation.  December 31, 1861    Wm. K. Bachman    Capt. Co. B. Art. Bat. H. Legion    S. C. V. </I>


Before the close of the Civil War this battery commander would lead his South Carolina company as Hampton’s Legions left their mark on such battlegrounds as the Seven Days Battles, Second Manassas, South Mountain, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg and at <FONT COLOR=#FF0000 ><I><B> GETTYSBURG</B></I></FONT> where as part of Hood’s Division 1st Corps, Capt. Bachman’s battery fought gallantly firing toward <U>Meade's Union center in support of Pickett and Pettigrew.</U>     In the fall of 1863 Bachman’s Co. of ‘German Light Artillery’ returned to South Carolina.  Here Capt. Bachman and his brave mounted artillerists would fight out the war  participating in the Carolina Campaigns with Wright’s Div. Dept. of S.C., Ga. & Fla.   A desirable Confederate document in pleasing condition with no tears, stains or repairs and with a hard to find signature.  (see: Confederate Military History, The Official Records, The Confederate Veteran, Time / Life’s – The Civil War, Sifakis’ Compendium of the Confederate Armies and more.)  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Autograph, John Percival Jones $10.00

 

nautical theme – hand crafted Antique Be $295.00

 

18th century COLOGNE BOTTLE $35.00

 

Capt. Wm. K. Bachman – SIGNED - S. C. V. $155.00

How often have those of us who enjoy such things read a Civil War soldier’s letter, a page from a winter camp journal or other first-hand life account, where the writer  phrases the arrival of a carefully got up package of home preserves, or has lamented the fact that he received such but alas the glass preserve jar had been broken in transit spilling the content?  This offering of a quart size preserve jar, boldly marked <B> MILLVILLE ATMOSPHERIC FRUIT JAR</B> on one side and  <B>WHITALL’S PATENT JUNE 18th 1861</B> on the other will make a wonderful companion piece in any Civil War collection and will go especially well in any winter camp, medical and sanitary fair grouping.  Much more difficult to find than the more common MASON preserve jar of the period, this nicely marked and dated Whitall jar retains its equally well marked and dated glass lid and its cast iron lid clamp.  All in nice condition with that pretty light aqua bubbled glass the jar remains in fine condition with no chips.  A scarce collectable complete with original components each as collectable as the jar its self.   An exceptional example of period everyday life seldom seen today.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 This little handmade pocket note book measures approximately 4 X 4 ¾ inches and is made up of a 12 page, brown ink penned personal record of the 1853 muskrat hunting and trapping record of three hunting buddies identified only as William, Edward and John.  A wonderful relic of country Americana, the pages record such statistics as <I>DAY OF THE MONTH – NUMBER OF SHOTS</I> and</I><I> NUMBER KILLED</I> by each of the three.   A record of the number shot and the number trapped by each is augmented by a record of <I>NUMBER OF SHOTS – NUMBER KILLED – EACH WEEK</I> and <I>NUMBER SHOOT – NUMBER KILLED</I> December through May of 1853.  Finally a list of total <I>SHOTS & NUMBER KILLED</I> by each in the season.  Not a bug deal but a really nice piece of hunting and trapping Americana worthy of an appreciative home. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  


Criswell #120. February 20, 1863. Vignette of a Confederate officer leaning against a tree and gazing into a valley. Steamboat at the bottom. Lithographed by Archer & Daly, Richmond, Va. Black ink printed on pink paper. Seven coupons still attached below. Very fine.  


<b>Ran for president against Abraham Lincoln in 1864</b>


(1826-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846 and fought in the Mexican War. Hailed at the beginning of the Civil War as the "Young Napoleon," he proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but an officer totally lacking in the essential qualities of successful command of large forces in battle. He saw action at Rich Mountain, W.V., in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and at the battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day in American history. He was defeated for the presidency in 1864 by Abraham Lincoln.


Wet plate, albumen cabinet card photograph, mounted to 4 1/4 x 6 1/2 card. Bust view in civilian attire. Warren's imprint on the front mount. Period ink inscription below the portrait, "Genl. George B. McClellan, U.S." Backmark: Warren's Portraits, 465 Washington St., Boston. Excellent.

Pat. 1861 - MILLVILLE ATMOSPHERIC FRUIT $135.00

 

hand crafted - season of 1853 MUSKRAT HU $55.00

 

1863 Confederate $100 Bond $125.00

 

Photograph, General George B. McClellan $45.00




<b>United States Senator from New Hampshire


U.S. Secretary of the Navy</b>


(1835-1917) Born in Concord, New Hampshire, he graduated from Harvard Law School in 1854, was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Concord. Was a member of the New Hampshire State House of Representatives, 1862-1864, serving as speaker of the house. He was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln solicitor and judge advocate general of the Navy Department. Appointed First Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, serving 1865-1867. Was a member of the New Hampshire State constitutional convention in 1876. Served again as a member of the New Hampshire State House of Representatives in 1881. Appointed by President Chester Arthur as Secretary of the Navy serving 1882-1885. Served as a U.S. Senator, 1887-1889, and 1889-1901. He was the chairman of the Committee on Immigration, and also served on the Committee on Census, and the Committee on Privileges and Elections. President William McKinley appointed him as president of the Spanish Claims Treaty Commission, 1901-1908.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 x 1/2, in ink, W.E. Chandler.  


<b>Civil War Senator from Nevada


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1827-1909) Born in Wayne County, N.Y., he attended Yale College in 1849-50, moved to San Francisco in 1850 and was engaged in gold mining in Nevada County, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1852, and commenced practice in Nevada City. He served as district attorney in 1852; attorney general of California, 1854; moved to Virginia City, Nevada, in 1860; involved in early mining litigation and in the development of the Comstock lode; was a member of the Territorial council in 1861; member of the state constitutional convention in 1863; upon the admission of Nevada as a State into the Union was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 1864, serving until 1875; was re-elected in 1887 and served until 1905. Served as chairman of the Committee on Pacific Railroads; and chairman of the Committee on Mines and Mining.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 x 1/2, in ink, Wm. M. Stewart.

 <b>and the fall of Vicksburg, Mississippi</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by J.N. McBee, to his children.


<b><u>Putnam, O.[hio], July 8, 1863</b></u>


Dear Children,


Yours of week before last was received on Wednesday and the letter to Harry mailed the same day. We had one from Newton about the date of yours- none from John since I wrote you last. We are well though Mother has just recovered from an attack of neuralgia. Mother & I were at Dillson Monday last from noon till night. I guess it was that cured her though she was better when she went. They have fruit in abundance. The wholesale merchant Scott is said to be a Copperhead. I didn’t go to Columbus on the 17 cause I was sick in the forenoon. I finished enrolling two Townships yesterday week ago. I had no serious trouble with anyone, but was somewhat annoyed by a few Butternuts with lies & evasion, but I believe I got them all. I was 22 days employed. That colt Etta wrote about is about 2 months old, very beautiful. I have a halter for it & lead it when I ride or drive. Tell Harry to come & see it. I am at a great loss for pasture for them. <b><I>We have had stirring times here for a week past especially since last Saturday. Gen. Meade who superseded Gen. Hooker fought Lee’s whole force, 100,000 strong, on the 1, 2, 3 & on the 4 [July] utterly routing him or at least driving his whole force capturing 30,000 prisoners & 118 guns. On Sunday night at Church it was our Quar. Meeting when I was reading the closing hymn, and a dispatch was handed me saying Gen. Meade had taken 15,000 prisoners & 108 guns. The J. Elder stopped us to sing the Doxology.  After prayer we closed amid general rejoicing and joyful greetings. Yesterday about 2 P.M. a Herald drove furiously through town [he is referring to a Herald newspaper wagon] saying Vicksburg is fallen- surrendered on the glorious fourth- so the 4th is now rendered thrice glorious. Some were afraid we might be deceived, but I got our flags out & the bells ringing & the steam whistle we kept up for over half an hour. Last night we had some sky rockets. Tonight we are to have more. I wish Harry was here to see the sights. About noon today we had a dispatch saying another great fight is going between Lee & our forces. Meade is driving them again with great slaughter. The Potomac is up & there are hopes that Meade will capture or disperse Lee’s whole army. That would naturally end the rebellion. There is intense interest to hear the result of these terrible battles. Over 12,000 wounded Rebels are in our possession. This news drives the Copperheads to their dens, not one of them can rise again.</b></I> We had heavy rain on Friday-Saturday last. The first thorough rain since you left. Don’t be so slow about writing. Our love to you all. Here is a paper for Harry by Etta & the magazine.


As Ever,

J.N. McBee


J.N. McBee, is an Ohio enrolling officer who is enlisting soldiers to fight for the Union cause. Great account of the news from Gettysburg and Vicksburg as battle reports are coming into Ohio with the glorious news of the catastrophic Rebel defeats at Gettysburg and Vicksburg which was the turning point of the war! Also has some very interesting content regarding Copperheads in Ohio. Great event letters like this one regarding General Lee's defeat at the battle of Gettysburg are getting rarer and rarer to find. Once these letters get into private collections or institutional archives they seldom come back on the market again.  

 


<b>United States Congressman and Senator from Illinois</b>


(1823-1903) Born in Steuben County, New York, he attended Elmira Academy, moved to Illinois in 1838, and settled in Mount Morris. He was employed in government surveying and farming until 1844, when he engaged in the real estate business and banking in Chicago. Served as clerk of Cook County, 1853-61. Was chairman of the Board of Supervisors of Cook County in 1868. Served as a U.S. Congressman, 1871-75, and was chairman of the Committee on Manufacturers. Served again in the U.S. Congress, 1875-76, and 1881-83. Served as U.S. Senator 1887-91, serving on the Committee on Enrolled Bills.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 x 1/2, in ink, C.B. Farwell.

Autograph, William E. Chandler $15.00

 

Autograph, William M. Stewart $15.00

 

Letter, Great News of Rebel Defeat at th $350.00

 

Autograph, Charles B. Farwell $10.00




<b>"damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!"</b>


(1801-1870) He entered the navy as Midshipman in 1810 after having been virtually adopted by Commodore David Porter. The friendship between the two families began when Porter's father was buried on the same day as Farragut's mother in New Orleans. He fought in the Mexican War and was awaiting orders at his Norfolk, Va. home when the Civil War broke out. Told that a person with Union sentiments could not live in Virginia, he packed up his family and Virginian wife and moved north. He was given command of the New Orleans expedition in December 1861, and helped capture the city in the spring of 1862. Promoted Rear Admiral in July 1862 for his success in opening up the Mississippi River to Vicksburg, he spent the next year in operations against Port Hudson, La., and returned to NYC in August 1863 to a hero's welcome. He returned to the Gulf in January 1864 to prepare for the assault on Mobile Bay, taking the port on August 5th. It was during this attack that Farragut was to have coined the famous expression, "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead." He again returned to NYC, this time in failing health. The city gave him a public reception and $50,000 to purchase a home there, and on Dec. 23, 1864, he was promoted to Vice Admiral, the rank just having been established. He was one of the first to enter Richmond after it's capture. On July 25, 1866, he was promoted to full Admiral, the first in the U. S. Navy to ever hold that rank!


Wet plate, albumen cabinet card photograph, mounted to 4 1/4 x 6 1/2 card. Standing view wearing his United States naval uniform, naval cap, 2 piece belt plate, with sword attached to belt. Backmark: Sarony & Co., Photographers, 680 Broadway, N.Y.  Napoleon Sarony. Alfred S. Campbell. Light age toning and edge wear with a tiny thumbtack hole in the extreme upper border edge. Very desirable Union naval hero.  


<b>The second son of General Robert E. Lee, he was severely wounded at the battle of Brandy Station, Va., and captured</b>


(1837-1922) The second son of General Robert E. Lee, nicknamed "Rooney." A Harvard educated gentleman, he promptly entered the Confederate service upon the secession of his native Virginia, and became colonel of the 9th Virginia Cavalry. He served with the famous Confederate cavalry General J.E.B. Stuart through virtually all of the cavalry campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia. He was promoted to brigadier general to rank from September 15, 1862. He was severely wounded during the battle of Brandy Station, Va., and was captured while he was recuperating. He was not exchanged until March 1864. Promoted to major general on April 23, 1864, the youngest in the Confederate service, he continued to play an important role in the Army of Northern Virginia until the army's surrender at Appomattox Court House, Va., on April 9, 1865.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. Brig. Gen. W.H.F. Lee, C.S.A., is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York. Excellent. Very desirable.  


(1814-1879) Graduated in the West Point class of 1837. He displayed a gallant record in the Mexican War. A solid combat officer, Hooker fought in the Peninsular campaign, the Seven Days battles, 2nd Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, where he commanded the Army of the Potomac, and the Atlanta campaign. His sobriquet was, "Fighting Joe" Hooker.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery, with 2 cents orange revenue tax stamp. Age toning and light edge wear to bottom of the mount.  


8 pages. European News. Three Days Later by the Persia at this Port. A Suspicious Sale of Three of Her Majesty's War Steamers. Another Privateer---Perhaps. Aspect of the Mexican Question. The Archduke Maximilian Accepts the Crown of Mexico. The Polish Revolution. The Draft. List of Names Drawn Yesterday in the Fifth, Eighth and Ninth Districts. The Rebel Privateers. Destruction of the Brig W.E. Nash by The Florida. The Lawrence Massacre. Account of the Terrible Tragedy. Another Guerrilla Trapped. North Carolina and the Union. A Rebel General Captured; Jeff Thompson and His Staff Captured at Pocahontas, Arkansas. The Siege of Charleston. Detailed Reports From Our Own Sources and From Rebel Papers. Shells Passing Through Fort Sumter. Interesting Statements by Deserters. The Rebels Preparing to Evacuate the Place. Beauregard Given 48 Hours to Remove the Women and Children From Charleston. Interesting From the South. Operations on the North Carolina Coast. A Rumored Raid of Our Forces Towards Staunton, Va. Important From the Southwest. Large Capture of Confederate States Cotton Near Natchez. General Herron on an Expedition up the Red River. Reported Death of General Pemberton, and more. Edge wear.

Photograph, Admiral David G. Farragut $75.00

 

CDV, General William Henry Fitzhugh Lee $200.00

 

CDV, General Joseph Hooker $50.00

 

The New York Times, August 27, 1863 $35.00




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