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Pair of wet plate photographs, mounted to 7 x 3 1/2, card stock. Group of negro slaves working in the cotton fields picking cotton. The group consists of men, women and a young girl standing in the foreground next to a cotton basket. Negro man at upper left is carrying a basket full of cotton on his back. An overseer on horseback is visible at the upper center of the view. Title imprint on the front mount: Cotton is King. Plantation Scene, Georgia, U.S.A. Copyright 1895 by Strohmeyer & Wyman. Imprint at edge of mount, Strohmeyer & Wyman, Publisher, New York, N.Y. Imprint on the opposite edge reads: Sold by Underwood & Underwood, New York, London, Toronto, Canada, Ottawa, Kansas. Copy photograph of an earlier slave plantation image. Imprint on the verso, Cotton is King- A Plantation Scene, Georgia, U.S.A. Corner wear to mount. Very fine. Excellent content.  


<b>General-in-Chief of the U.S. Armies during the Civil War, 1861-62


Democratic Presidential Candidate that was defeated by President Abraham Lincoln in 1864


Governor of New Jersey</b> 


(1826-85) Hailed as the "Young Napoleon," McClellan was thought to have of the greatest military minds of his generation. He was born in Philadelphia, the son of a prominent surgeon, Dr. George McClellan, the founder of Jefferson Medical College. One of McClellan's great-grandfathers was General Samuel McClellan of Woodstock, Connecticut, a brigadier general who fought in the Revolutionary War. George Brinton McClellan graduated 2nd in his class of 59 cadets at West Point in 1846, where he was an energetic and ambitious cadet, deeply interested in strategic principles.  He was commissioned a brevet second lieutenant in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. His closest friends at the Academy were southerners George Pickett, Dabney Maury, Cadmus Wilcox, and A.P. Hill. After graduation, he served with distinction in the Mexican War, as an engineering officer who was frequently subject to enemy fire, and was appointed a brevet first lieutenant for his services at Contreras, and Churubusco, and to captain for his service at Chapultepec. He performed reconnaissance missions for General Winfield Scott, a close friend of McClellan's father. McClellan's experiences in the Mexican War would shape his military and political life. He learned that flanking movements that were used by General Scott at Cerro Gordo are often better than frontal assaults, and the value of siege operations against Veracruz was another well learned lesson. He witnessed Scott's success in balancing political with military affairs, and his good relations with the civil population as he invaded, enforcing strict discipline on his soldiers to minimize damage to civilian property. In the fall of 1852, McClellan published a manual on bayonet tactics that he had translated from the original French. He also received an assignment to the Department of Texas, with orders to perform a survey of Texas rivers and harbors. In 1853, he participated in the Pacific Railroad surveys, ordered by Secretary of War Jefferson Davis, to select an appropriate route for the planned transcontinental railroad. Because of his political connections and his mastery of French, McClellan received the assignment to be an official observer of the European armies in the Crimean War in 1855, as part of the Delafield Commission, led by Richard Delafield. Traveling widely, and interacting with the highest military commands and royal families, McClellan observed the siege of Sevastopol. Upon his return to the United States in 1856, he requested an assignment in Philadelphia to prepare his report, which contained a critical analysis of the siege and a lengthy description of the organization of the European armies. He also wrote a manual on cavalry tactics that was based on Russian cavalry regulations. Capitalizing on his experience with railroad assessment, he became chief engineer and vice president of the Illinois Central Railroad, and then president of the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad in 1860. At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, McClellan was appointed major general, and he played an important role in raising the Army of the Potomac, and proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but as the war developed he proved to be an officer totally lacking in the essential skills and qualities of successful command of large forces in battle. He served as the Commanding General of the United States Army, 1861-62. General McClellan organized, and led the Union Army in the 1862 Virginia Peninsula campaign in southeastern Virginia which was the first large-scale offensive in the Eastern Theater of the war with the capture of the Confederate capital of Richmond, Va., as their objective.  McClellan was somewhat successful against Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston, but the emergence of General Robert E. Lee to command the Army of Northern Virginia turned the subsequent Seven Days Battles into a Union defeat, but Lee failed to destroy McClellan's Army of the Potomac, and suffered a bloody repulse at Malvern Hill, Va. General McClellan and President Abraham Lincoln developed a mutual distrust for each other, and McClellan was privately derisive of Lincoln. Lincoln on the other hand accused McClellan of being too cautious in the field and once asked "Little Mac" if he was not going to use his army if he (Lincoln could borrow it). Lincoln removed him from command in November 1862, in the aftermath of the bloody battle of Antietam, Md., fought on September 17, 1862, which was the single bloodiest day in U.S. military history. A contributing factor in this decision was McClellan's failure to pursue Lee's army following the tactically inconclusive, but strategic Union victory at the Battle of Antietam outside of little town of Sharpsburg, Maryland. McClellan went on to become the Democratic Party's nominee in the 1864 presidential election against the incumbent Republican President Lincoln. The effectiveness of his campaign was damaged when General McClellan repudiated his party's platform, which promised an end to the war, and negotiations with the Confederacy. Consequently he was beaten by Lincoln. He later served as the Governor of New Jersey from 1878-81. The concluding chapter of his political career was his strong support in 1884 for President Grover Cleveland. He was interested in the position of Secretary of War in Cleveland's cabinet, but did not get it.  McClellan devoted his final years to traveling and writing; producing his memoirs, 'McClellan's Own Story," in which he stridently defended his conduct during the war. He died unexpectedly of a heart attack at the age of 58 at Orange, New Jersey. He was buried at Riverview Cemetery in Trenton.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank</u>: 2 3/4 x 1, in ink, Geo. B. McClellan, Maj. Gen. Com., U.S.A. Very bold autograph of "Little Mac." Always a very desirable Civil War autograph, one of the Union army's first major field commanders in the war, who was forever linked with President Abraham Lincoln, first for their squabbles in Washington, D.C. in 1861-62, after the bloody battle of Antietam, Md., in 1862, and in the 1864 presidential election. 


 


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient for conspicuous gallantry at the Battle of Wilson's Creek, Missouri in 1861


United States Secretary of War


Commanding General of the U.S. Army</b>


(1831-1906) Born in Gerry, Chautauqua County, New York, he graduated in the West Point class of 1853, and was commissioned brevet second lieutenant in the artillery. Schofield returned to West Point as assistant professor of natural and experimental philosophy from 1855-60. At the start of the Civil War, he was major of the 1st Missouri Infantry, and chief of staff to General Nathaniel Lyon at the battle of Wilson's Creek, where he served gallantly, and was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions. On November 21, 1861, he was appointed brigadier general of volunteers and charged with the command of all Union militia regiments in the state of Missouri. From October 1862, to April 1863, he commanded the Army of the Frontier. He commanded a division of the 14th Corps in Tennessee from May 1863 until January 1864, and fought in the Atlanta campaign in command of the Army of the Ohio. He inflicted a bloody and crippling repulse of General John Bell Hood at Franklin, Tennessee, and again virtually destroyed General Hood at Nashville. He then participated with General William T. Sherman in the 1865 Carolina's campaign which terminated with the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston. After the war, President Andrew Johnson sent General Schofield on a special diplomatic mission to France, urging withdrawal of French troops in Mexico. During Reconstruction, President Johnson appointed Schofield to serve as military governor of Virginia and of the First Military District. Thus, he oversaw the elections, in which blacks and whites voted, which resulted in the Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1868. Schofield served as U.S. Secretary of War, 1868-69. He was promoted to major General in the Regular Army on March 4, 1869, the same day General Ulysses S. Grant was sworn in as president of the United States. He then served for a year as head of the Department of Missouri, the Army's second largest military department, and after the death of General George H. Thomas, he succeeded him in commanding the Military Division of the Pacific, the country's largest department. Schofield served as the Superintendent of the United States Military Academy, 1876-81. He was the Commanding General of the United States Army, 1888-95. General Schofield died at St. Augustine, Florida on March 4, 1906, at the age of 74. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery. 


<u>Card Signature With Rank</u>: 4 x 2 1/2, in ink, J.M. Schofield, Lieut. Genl., U.S.A. Beautiful, bold and large. Very desirable Medal of Honor autograph.    This antique brass chandelier, an Oversized ballroom  light fixture is ready to hang in a prominent  setting deserving of the best home or venue.

Only ONE available

H 44in.plus chain. x D 60in.

Stereo View, Slaves Picking Cotton on a $35.00

 

Autograph, General George B. McClellan

 

Autograph, General John M. Schofield

 

Monumental antique multi arm light fixtu $12500.00




<b>War Date Document Signed


Report of the shooting death of a negro servant while General Couch's troops were guarding the property of a Virginian!</b>


(1822-97) Born on a farm in Putnam County, New York, he graduated in the West Point class of 1846, along with George B. McClellan, Stonewall Jackson, and 46 other graduates who fought in the Civil War including 19 who became full generals for either the Union or Confederate armies. Couch fought in the Mexican War and was brevetted to 1st lieutenant for gallantry at the Battle of Buena Vista. He next participated in the Seminole Indian Wars of 1849-50. On June 15, 1861, shortly after the outbreak of the Civil War, Couch was appointed Colonel of the 7th Massachusetts Infantry, and he was promoted to brigadier general on August 9, 1861. He compiled a distinguished record in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign as a division commander in the 4th Corps, serving at Yorktown and Williamsburg, and during the Battle of Seven Pines, Oak Grove, and Malvern Hill during the Seven Days battles. He was promoted to major general on July 4, 1862. He then commanded his division at Antietam, and the 2nd Corps at Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. Couch commanded the Department of the Susquehanna during the Gettysburg Campaign in 1863, and later was transferred to the western army commanding a division of the 22nd Army Corps with distinction in the Franklin & Nashville, Tennessee campaign, and in the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Couch returned to civilian life in Taunton, Mass., after the war, where he ran unsuccessfully as a Democratic candidate for Governor of Massachusetts in 1865.  Couch moved to Connecticut in 1871, where he served as the Quartermaster General, and then Adjutant General, for the state militia. He joined the Aztec Club of 1847 by the right given him for his Mexican War service, and he also joined the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. He died in Norwalk, Connecticut, on February 12, 1897, at the age of 74, and was buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Taunton, Mass. 


<u>1862 War Date Document Signed</u>: 7 3/4 x 10, in ink. 


Hd. Qrs., Couch’s Division


Aug. 21, 1862


Capt. C.C. Suydam


Assist. Adjt, Gen.


Hd. Qrs. 4th Corps



Sir:


I have the honor to state that while my Division lay near Lebanon Church, on the 19th inst., a black man employed as servant to one of the officers of the 102d Penna. Vol., was shot dead by the accidental discharge of a carbine in the hands of one of my Sentinels placed over the property of a Mr. Bryan, living in that vicinity, and having a safe guard from Gen. Van Allen.


I am Sir,


Your obt. Servant,


D.N. Couch


Major General

 

Commanding 


Very bold and neatly written, with a nice large signature, "D.N. Couch," above his rank of Major General Commanding. The letter sheet shows some minor age toning and wear. Very fine. The content of this letter is extremely scarce as it reports the death of a black servant of a Union officer who was shot and killed by fire coming from the carbine of one of the Sentries of General Couch's Division as he was safe guarding the property of a Virginian!


Docket on the reverse: Hd. Qrs. Couch's Div., Aug. 22, 1862. D.N. Couch, Maj. Gen. Reports accident which occurred near his Hd. Qrs. of the 19th inst.


<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: The recipient of this document was Charles Crooke Suydam, Assistant Adjutant General, Hd. Qrs., 4th Corps. Suydam was 25 years old, when he enlisted at New York City, on September 27, 1861, and was commissioned a 1st lieutenant, in Co. L, 5th New York Cavalry. He was promoted to the U.S. Volunteers Adjutant General Depart, on March 6. 1862. He later served in the Field and Staff of the 3rd New Jersey Cavalry, until his resignation on November 15, 1864. He ended his Union Army service with the rank of lieutenant colonel.

 


3 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written on a  patriotic letter sheet. The edges are trimmed in red and blue, and it has an embossed vignette of an American flag with stars, and olive branches, and "UNION" within. Comes with its original envelope which has a patriotic theme on the verso. It is trimmed in red and blue and has an embossed vignette of a spread winged eagle perched on an American shield with the motto, Union & Constitution. Addressed to George Cooke, Esq., Le Roy, Genesee Co., N.Y., with postmark, Washington, D.C., Apr. 10, 1862, with three cents, George Washington, U.S. postage stamp.


<b><u>Washington, Apl. 9th, 1862</b></u>


Friend George,


I now seat myself to address you a few lines to let you know that I have arrived at Washington all safe & sound. We got here last Sunday morning about 3 o’clock. We had a gay old time coming down. You can bet we staid in New York from Tuesday until Friday, so you see we had a good chance to see the city. I went to Barnum’s Museum, and also went to the theatre, and some other places that would not be prudent to mention here, but let it suffice to say that we had a good old time. We are having a nasty cold storm here now. It is snowing quite hard now. The people here say they never knew such a storm at this time of the year before. Well George, I am corporal of the guard today, and am wading around in the mud up to my knees, but never mind, Johnny’s gone for a soger. They are playing the devil with the Seceshers now, but you will probably get the news about as quick as we do. I went to the Capitol yesterday, and went all over it, and then went up & saw some Rebel prisoners. They are pretty rough looking Rubes I tell you. They are regular Plug Ugly’s. We are now in 7th St. Barracks about a mile out of the city. There is lots of soldier boys around Washington you can hardly kick over a chip but what there will be a soldier run out. They are disbanding some of the cavalry and sending them home. Well George, I can’t write any more tonight. Give all of your folks my compliments, and tell them I’m right side up with care. Give Frank H. my undying love. I will now close hoping to hear from you soon. 


I remain as ever your friend,


Reate


Direct your letters to Washington, D.C., Co. A, 105 Regt. N.Y.S.V., and the letter will follow us if we should leave here before I get it. Now let me here from you soon.


Very neatly written. Very fine condition. Nice New York soldier letter as he begins his Civil War journey.


<u>105th New York Infantry</u>: This regiment, was known as the Le Roy or Rochester regiment, and it was recruited in the counties of Cattaraugus, Genesee, Monroe and Niagara, and was organized on March 15, 1862. They left the state on April 4, were stationed for a month at Washington, D.C., then as part of the 1st brigade, 2nd division, 3d corps, Army of Virginia, it participated in its first battle at Cedar Mountain, Va., where 8 men were  wounded. A week later it fought under General John Pope in his 1862 Virginia campaign culminating in the second battle of Bull Run, its loss in the campaign being 89 killed, wounded and missing. In the ensuing Maryland campaign under General George B. McClellan, it fought in the same brigade and division, but the corps was now called the 1st and General Joseph Hooker had succeeded General Irvin McDowell in command. The regiment had slight losses at South Mountain, but suffered severely at Antietam, where the 1st corps opened the battle, losing 74 killed, wounded and missing. It was prominently engaged at Fredericksburg, where General John Reynolds commanded the 1st corps, with the 105th New York Infantry losing 78 killed, wounded and missing. It had become much reduced in numbers, and in March, 1863, was consolidated  and transferred to the 94th New York infantry. Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2.  


<b>General "Stonewall" Jackson was mortally wounded at Chancellorsville, Virginia on May 2, 1863</b>


(1824-1863) Born in Clarksburg, Virginia (now West Virginia), he graduated in the West Point class of 1846, a class that furnished 24 general officers to the Union and Confederate armies during The War Between the States. He earned the brevets of captain and major during the Mexican War distinguishing himself at the Battle of Chapultepec. He was an instructor at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Va., from 1851-61. When Virginia seceded from the Union in May 1861, Jackson joined the Confederate Army, and distinguished himself as a brigade commander at the 1st Battle of Manassas, on July 21, 1861. He appeared on the field of battle just in the nick of time to furnish crucial reinforcements to the Confederate forces, and beat back a fierce Union assault. Confederate General Barnard E. Bee, shouted encouragement to his men by saying, look there stands Jackson like a stonewall, rally around the Virginians! From that July day forward, the sobriquet "Stonewall" stuck with General Jackson forever! He waged a magnificent campaign of surprise and maneuver in the spring of 1862, against the Federal Army in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, in such places as Kernstown, Front Royal, Winchester, and Port Republic, in what became known as "Jackson's Valley Campaign. Using a combination of great audacity, excellent knowledge of the terrain, and the great ability to inspire his troops to great feats of marching and fighting, his men earned the nickname of "Jackson's Foot Cavalry." General Jackson was regarded by many military historians to be one of the most gifted tactical commanders in U.S. military history. He would go on to fight in the Seven Days Battles in Virginia, the Battles of Cedar Mountain, 2nd Manassas, Chantilly, Harpers Ferry, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. It was at the Battle of Chancellorsville, one of General Robert E. Lee's greatest victories that Stonewall Jackson would have his date with destiny, and be mortally wounded by friendly fire on the evening of May 2, 1863. While returning from a night reconnaissance, Jackson and his staff came upon sentries of the 18th North Carolina Infantry, who mistook the group for a Union cavalry unit. In the confusion shots were fired and General Jackson was struck by 3 bullets, two in the left arm, and one in the right hand. Jackson's personal surgeon, Doctor Hunter Mc Guire, amputated his arm, and he was placed in an army ambulance and brought to a farmhouse at Guinea Station, Va., where he died 8 days later, on May 10, 1863, of complications from pneumonia. When General Robert E. Lee first learned of Jackson's wounding and the amputation of his left arm, he famously said you have lost your left arm, but I have lost my right arm, illustrating the place that Jackson held in Lee's eyes, and in his gallant Army of Northern Virginia. Lee wrote to Jackson after learning of his injuries: "Could I have directed events, I would have chosen for the good of the country to be disabled in your stead." Lee had not only lost a good friend, but his best tactical general. The loss of Jackson was catastrophic to the Confederacy. Historians believe that if Stonewall Jackson had been with Lee at Gettysburg, less than 2 months after Jackson's death, the epic 3 day battle in Pennsylvania may very well have had a much different outcome. General Jackson's body was moved to the Governor's Mansion in Richmond for the public to mourn, and then was brought back to his beloved Lexington, to be buried in Oak Grove Cemetery. Lexington, Va., was the town where Jackson taught at V.M.I., and owned the only house he ever owned in his lifetime. In 1870, his commander General Robert E. Lee, would join his old comrade in eternal rest, as Lee was interred not far away in the chapel of Washington College, in Lexington.  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view of Jackson as general wearing a double breasted Confederate uniform coat. Period ID on the front mount, with a couple of little surface dings. The back mark is that of E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, but it is partially hidden by a 2 cents blue George Washington U.S. Internal Revenue Playing Cards tax stamp, that has been hand cancelled in ink, B & Co., Oct. 9th, 1865. Enough of the back mark is visible to positively identify this image as being published by E. & H.T. Anthony. Light age toning and wear. Very fine. One of the most popular Confederate generals that fought in the War Between the States, General Stonewall Jackson is always a very desirable image to have.   


<b>The legendary Confederate raider who was killed in Tennessee in 1864</b>


(1825-64) Born in Huntsville, Alabama, he was the brother-in-law of Confederate Generals' A.P. Hill, and Basil W. Duke. Morgan grew up on the family farm outside of Lexington, Kentucky, and attended Transylvania College for two years, but was suspended in 1844 for dueling with a fraternity brother. In 1846, during the Mexican War, Morgan enlisted with his brother Calvin, and his uncle Alexander, in the U.S. Army as a private in the cavalry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant, fighting in the Battle of Buena Vista. He organized the "Lexington Rifles" in 1857, and spent much of his time drilling his men. When the War Between the States broke out, he led his command to join the Confederacy. From then until his death his exploits made him one of the most legendary figures of the Confederacy. He was promoted to colonel of the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry on April 4, 1862, and brigadier general on December 11th. His series of raids into Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio earned him a vote of thanks from the Confederate Congress and the undying hatred of a large segment of the frightened Northern population. On his most famous raid north of the Ohio in 1863, he was captured near New Lisbon and imprisoned in the Ohio State Penitentiary with several of his officers. But no prison could hold the notorious Confederate raider as he soon escaped! On the night of September 3, 1864, while en-route to attack Union forces near Knoxville, Tennessee he camped near Greenville. Early the next morning he was surprised by a detachment of Union cavalry and was killed in the garden of the house where he had been sleeping. General John Hunt Morgan was only 39 years old.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Seated view of Morgan wearing a kepi and a double breasted Confederate frock coat with rank of brigadier general. He poses with his legs crossed which show off his high black cavalry boots. Standing at his side is his 21 year old bride, Martha (Mattie) Ready, of Murfreesboro, Tenn., wearing a heavy winter overcoat. This view was taken around the time of their wedding, or shortly afterwards, dating the time this image was taken to mid December 1863, or early 1864. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York. Light age toning and wear. Very fine, and an extremely desirable image of Morgan with his wife.


<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: Martha "Mattie" Ready, was the daughter of United States Congressman Charles Ready, of Tennessee, and a cousin of William T. Haskell, another former U.S. Congressman also from Tennessee. Haskell fought in the Florida Seminole War in 1836, and during the Mexican War, he served as colonel of the 2nd Tennessee Infantry Regiment.

Autograph, General Darius N. Couch $495.00

 

105th New York Infantry Soldier Letter & $125.00

 

CDV, General Thomas J. Jackson $250.00

 

CDV, General John Hunt Morgan & Wife $350.00

Best described here as to eye appeal and condition by our photo illustrations, this desirable photo case remains in pleasing condition, tight at the hinges and clasp with only the most minor evidence of careful period use and handling.  Referred to by collectors as <I>end of the day</I> cases as such less frequently found, front to back, mismatched examples are thought to be the product of end of the day work bench <I>cleanup</I>, this example offers not one but <U>two</U> of the most desirable designs. On one side we see the figure of Sir Henry Havelock in the distinctive later 1850s through early American Civil War issue headgear that he popularized and that bore his name<B>*</B>, while the side offers the armed view of hunter and stag.   Marked <I>Littlefield Parsons / Union Cases</I> and patent dated 1856 & 1857, this is desirable photo case will be of special interest, not only to the early photography collector, but to the Civil War military collector and period hunting buff.

Best described here as to eye appeal and condition by our photo illustrations, this desirable photo case remains in pleasing condition, tight at the hinges and clasp with only the most minor evidence of careful period use and handling.  Referred to by collectors as <I>end of the day</I> cases as such less frequently found, front to back, mismatched examples are thought to be the product of end of the day work bench <I>cleanup</I>, this example offers not one but <U>two</U> of the most desirable designs. On one side we see the figure of Sir Henry Havelock in the distinctive later 1850s through early American Civil War issue headgear that he popularized and that bore his name<B>*</B>, while the side offers the armed view of hunter and stag.   Marked <I>Littlefield Parsons / Union Cases</I> and patent dated 1856 & 1857, this is desirable photo case will be of special interest, not only to the early photography collector, but to the Civil War military collector and period hunting buff.

 

<B>*</B>Commissioned in 1815 Henry Havelock served it British army with distinction until his death in 1857 raising to the rank of quartermaster general in 1854.

 An outstanding Civil War medical display item, this  original Civil War vintage <U>surgical splint and accompanying period bandage roll</U> was acquired some years ago when we were fortunate enough to find a Civil War vintage slide top box containing it’s period content of a small number of rolled <I>home spun</I> bandages with original splints.   The rolled bandage measures approximately 4 1/ 2 to 5 inches in width and is of period loomed cotton sheeting  as was commonly utilized by home front volunteers who came together, particularly in the Eastern textile mill region, to tear and roll strips of available textile for use as bandages.   Bandage rolls are secured by an ink stamped and sealed paper band.  The splint is fashioned from birch wood ( see: <I>National Civil War Medical Museum</I> in Frederick, Marylandand) with good evidence of period originality and is maker marked <I>E. J. Cutter</I>

     The collector / historian will be interested that we were curious enough to sacrificed one of the bandage rolls, opening the paper band to reveal that they are repurposed  from Odd Fellow Lodge dues certificates.  The one we opened was dated 1849 and was from a Newburyport, Mass. I.O.O.F. chapter.  Oddly enough the wood box containing the bandages bore a stenciled Masonic device.  Obviously repurposed to band the bandage rolls, it seems more than likely the then obsolete dues certificates were pressed into service by volunteers gathered in the local lodge hall.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 This rare original, 1st edition of <B><I>The Loyalist’s Ammunition </B></I> by Isaac Funk  was  published in wraps in 1863 by the Union League of Philadelphia.  ( Widely republished even today as an important but infrequently discussed Civil War political commentary, we suggest that full appreciation of the content will best be appreciated with a Google search and a read of the original text.)   Remaining complete and solid with no condition issues, while offering good evidence of period originality, the 16 page political pamphlet offers some <I>fiery</I> commentary on what aggressive <I>loyalists</I> saw as a challenge to the Union cause, even traitorous interference, emanating from factions within the Union this pamphlet  offers seven individual works including a speech given at the Illinois Legislature, resolutions from a meeting of the <U>150th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers</I>, and several newspaper excerpts. The topics include traitors in the Illinois legislature, protest against foreign interference, and opposition to the government .


<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>



 


Pair of wet plate photographs, mounted to 7 x 4, gray card stock. Large group of negro slaves posing in front of a wooden shanty. The group consists of a man and a women standing in the door way with the man holding an infant. The rest of the group includes many boys and girls of various ages and sizes. Several of them are wearing hats, with a few of them being barefooted. The girl standing against the shack at the far right can clearly be seen holding a doll. Title imprint on the front mount: 5019. "Dars ben tree two times, two tree times, an one Lawd kno' how ma' times." Copyright 1901 by H.C. White Co. Imprint along the side of the mount: H.C. White Co.,  Genl. Offices N. Bennington, Vt., U.S.A. Branch Offices, New York, Chicago, London. Copy photograph of an earlier slave image. Blank verso. Sharp image. Excellent content.

scarce pattern! ‘end of the day’ - Hav $235.00

 

original! Civil War era - BANDAGE ROLL $195.00

 

rare original! 1863 Civil War Union Lea $65.00

 

Stereo View, Negro Slaves Posing in Fron $25.00

MERCURY GLASS OLD-STYLE PENDANT LIGHTS FOR OVER YOUR ISLAND OR STORE COUNTER....THEY GIVE SUPER BRIGHT TASK LIGHTING



H 31in. x D 13in.


priced per item  engraved antique glass globes mounted as a ceiling fixture.



H 17in. x W 18in. x 6in.  Large vintage dining room fixture with classic detail and original finish


H 32in. x D 16in  H 10in. x W 5in. x D 6in.

Priced per pair.

set of 4 mercury glass vinage pendant li $950.00

 

FINELY ENGRAVED GLOBES on 2 LIGHT PENDAN $1500.00

 

VINTAGE BARE-BULB CHANDELIER $1600.00

 

H 10in. x W 5in. x D 6in.
Priced per $1200.00

H 12in. x W 19in. x D 5in.  


<b>War Period Signature With Rank and Title


Attorney General of the State of New York</b>


(1815-81) Born in Sandy Hill, Washington County, New York, he was the son of U.S. Congressman Henry C. Martindale. He graduated #3 in the West Point class of 1835, and was appointed a brevet second lieutenant, but he resigned from the Army the next year to pursue a law career. He was admitted to the bar in 1838, and commenced practice in Batavia, New York. He served as District Attorney of Genesee County, N.Y., 1842-46, and 1848-51. On August 9, 1861, Martindale was commissioned a brigadier general of volunteers in the Union Army, and was appointed to command a brigade in the Army of the Potomac. He fought throughout the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and in November 1862, he was appointed to the post of Military Governor of Washington, D.C., a position he held until May 1864. He then returned to the battlefield commanding a division of General "Baldy" Smith's 18th Corps, at the Battles of Cold Harbor, Bermuda Hundred, and Petersburg, Va., subsequently commanding the corps itself until health problems forced him to resign in September 1864. At the end of the war he received promotion to brevet major general for his gallantry at the Battle of Malvern Hill, Va. After the war, Martindale was the Attorney General of New York State from 1866-69. In 1877, one of his clients tried to shoot him at his law office in Rochester, New York. He served as Vice President of the National Asylum for Disabled Volunteer Solders for 11 years. He died on September 13, 1881, at the age of 66, in Nice, France, while on a trip abroad for his health. His remains were returned to the United States, and General Martindale was buried at the Batavia Cemetery, in Batavia, New York.


<u>War Period Signature With Rank and Title</u>: 3 x 1 1/2, in ink, J.H. Martindale, Brig. Genl. & Mil. Gov., Washington, D.C. Light age toning. Very fine autograph, circa 1862-64, while he was serving as the Military Governor of Washington, D.C.  


<b>Wounded at Fort Donelson, Tenn., and in the Atlanta, Ga. campaign!


General Logan was instrumental in founding Memorial Day to honor our war veterans!


United States Senator and Congressman from Illinois</b>




(1826-86) Nicknamed "Black Jack," he served in the Mexican War as a lieutenant of Illinois Volunteers; and was perhaps the Union's premier civilian general during the Civil War. Elected to the U.S. Senate in 1858 and 1860, he attended the Democratic National Convention in Charleston, S.C., as a supporter of Senator Stephen A. Douglas. After fighting at the battle of 1st Bull Run, Va., he returned to Illinois to recruit the 31st Illinois Infantry and he was commissioned as their colonel. An instant success as a field commander, he saw action at Belmont, and Fort Donelson where he was wounded. Promoted to rank of brigadier general, March 21, 1862, and major general March 13, 1863, he fought at Corinth, Shiloh, Vicksburg, in the Atlanta campaign where he was wounded again, and in the 1865 Carolina's campaign. After the war he returned to politics and served as U.S. Congressman and Senator from Illinois almost uninterruptedly until his death. He was greatly involved in veteran's affairs and was instrumental in founding Memorial Day.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/4 x 4 card. Bust view of Logan as general displayed within fancy embossed medallion with spread winged at the top, stars, cannon, musket, American shield, etc. Imprint on front mount, Alden, Artist. Back mark: Photographed by A.E. Alden, Nos. 59, 60, 61 & 65 Arcade, Providence, R.I. Light age toning. Very fine.  


<b>Colonel 1st Michigan Infantry


Medal of Honor Recipient for distinguished gallantry at the 1st Battle of Bull Run where he was wounded and captured</b>


(1823-1907) Born in Detroit, Michigan, he graduated in the West Point class of 1847. He was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant in the 4th U.S. Artillery, and would subsequently serve in the United States Army in various capacities over a period of forty years. Willcox fought in the Mexican War, he fought against the Indians on the frontier, and he fought in the Third Seminole Indian War. At the commencement of the Civil War in 1861, he was commissioned colonel of the 1st Michigan Infantry. At the 1st Battle of Bull Run, he was wounded and captured while in command of a brigade, remaining a prisoner for more than a year, part of the time as a hostage for Rebel privateers who the U.S. government had threatened to hang as pirates. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for distinguished gallantry at 1st Bull Run, where he voluntarily led repeated charges until he was wounded and taken prisoner. On the day of his release he was commissioned a brigadier general, and he led a division at the Battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, Knoxville, and in General Grant's Overland campaign against Richmond in the summer of 1864. President Lincoln nominated Willcox for promotion to brevet major general, August 1, 1864. Following the Siege of Petersburg, Va., he led the first troops to enter Petersburg, before ending the war fighting in the North Carolina campaign. He was mustered out of the U.S. Volunteers on January 15, 1866. After the war, Willcox returned to the Regular U.S. Army serving as Colonel in the 29th U.S. Infantry Regiment, and as brevet brigadier general in the 12th U.S. Infantry, and Commander of the Department of Arizona. It was in this capacity that he put down the raids of the Apache Indians. For his service in the West, he was awarded a Vote of Thanks by the Arizona Legislature. From 1886-87, he was head of the Department of the Missouri, and he retired on April 16, 1887. After his retirement, Willcox was Governor of the Soldiers' Home in Washington, D.C., from 1889-92. He was a member of the District of Columbia Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. He died in Cobourg, Ontario, Canada, at 84 years of age, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 5/8 card. The card mount has been trimmed. Standing view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Back mark: E. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, From a Photographic Negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very sharp image. Light age toning. Very desirable. Scarce view.

H 12in. x W 19in. x D 5in. $650.00

 

Autograph, General John H. Martindale $75.00

 

CDV, General John A. Logan $75.00

 

CDV, General Orlando B. Willcox




<b>Colonel 14th Indiana Infantry


Severely wounded at the Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia 


Signature with rank</b>


(1822-98) Born in Fredericksburg, Indiana, he attended what is now DePauw University, and then taught school in Independence, Missouri. Shortly after, he studied medicine under his wife's brother, serving in this profession until being called into action as a captain of the 2nd Indiana Volunteers during the Mexican War. After the war he returned to Indiana where he practiced medicine at Loogootee. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Kimball was commissioned colonel of the 14th Indiana Infantry and saw action at Cheat Mountain, in western Virginia in the fall of 1861. In March 1862, Kimball was commanding one of General James Shields' division at the battle of Kernstown, Va., where he inflicted a defeat on the celebrated Confederate General Stonewall Jackson, one of the few defeats suffered by General Jackson during his military career. Kimball was promoted to brigadier general, on April 16, 1862, and led the 1st Brigade of General William H. French's division of the 2nd Corps in the bitter fighting at Antietam, where he lost 600 men killed and wounded. During the battle of Fredericksburg, Va., on December 13, 1862, he was severely wounded. By the summer of 1863, he was commanding a division of the 16th Corps during the Vicksburg campaign. In 1864, during the Atlanta campaign, he held brigade command, and then after the battle of Peach Tree Creek, he commanded a division of the 4th Corps. He was active in suppressing the activities of the disloyal Knights of the Golden Circle in southern Indiana, and then moved on to join in the fighting at the battles of Franklin and Nashville, Tennessee. After the war he became Indiana State Commander of the Grand Army of the Republic; served two terms as State Treasurer; and one term in the State Legislature. President Ulysses S. Grant appointed him Surveyor General of the Utah Territory in 1873, where he thereafter made his home. President Hayes later appointed him Postmaster of Ogden, Utah, an office he held until his death in 1898. Kimball was buried in Ogden, Utah. A bronze bust of General Nathan Kimball was erected in the Vicksburg National Military Park in 1915.  


<u>Signature With Rank</u>: 4 1/4 x 2 5/8, in ink, Very Respectfully, Your Obt. Servt., Nathan Kimball, Brig. Genl., U.S.V. Large and bold autograph. Excellent. Very desirable.  


<b>Commanded the 2nd Corps, Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg where he was seriously wounded repulsing Pickett's Charge!


United States Presidential Candidate in 1880</b>


(1824-1886) Winfield Scott Hancock and his identical twin brother, Hilary Baker Hancock, were born in Montgomery Square, Pennsylvania, a hamlet just northwest of Philadelphia. Winfield was named after Winfield Scott, a prominent U.S. general in the War of 1812, and the Mexican War, and who was commander-in-chief of the Union armies at the beginning of the Civil War. He graduated in the West Point class of 1844, and earned a brevet for gallantry in the Mexican War. Hancock played a gallant role in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and in the 1862 Maryland campaign which climaxed with the bloody battle of Antietam, Maryland. He greatly distinguished himself in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. During the battle of Gettysburg, General Hancock commanded the 2nd Corps, Army of the Potomac. His decisive actions on July 1, 1863 helped to save the strategic position of Culp's Hill for General George G. Meade's army. On July 3rd, his corps became the focal point for the celebrated Pickett's Charge in which he was seriously wounded, but refused to leave the battlefield until the victory was secured. After his recovery, he went on to fight in the battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania and Cold Harbor, Va., and earned the sobriquet of "Hancock The Superb." At the close of the war, Hancock was assigned to supervise the execution of the conspirators in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. After the executions, Hancock was assigned command of the newly organized Middle Military Department, headquartered in Baltimore. In 1866, on General U.S. Grant's recommendation, Hancock was promoted to major general and was transferred, later that year, to command of the military Department of the Missouri, which included the states of Missouri, and Kansas, and the territories of Colorado and New Mexico. He reported to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, where he took up his new position. Soon after arriving, he was assigned by General William T. Sherman to lead an expedition to negotiate with the Cheyenne and Sioux, with whom relations had worsened since the Sand Creek massacre. The negotiations got off to a bad start, and after Hancock ordered the burning of an abandoned Cheyenne village in central Kansas, relations became worse than when the expedition had started. In 1872, General Meade died, leaving Hancock the army's senior major general. In 1880, he was the Democratic nominee for the Presidency of the United States. He was narrowly defeated by another ex-Civil War General, the soon to be assassinated President James A. Garfield. The last public act performed by General Hancock was his oversight of the funeral of Ulysses S. Grant in 1885, and his organizing and leading of Grant's nine mile funeral procession in New York City. From Grant's home at Mount McGregor, New York, to its resting-place in Riverside Park, the casket containing Grant's remains was in the charge of General Hancock. He died in 1886, at Governors Island, New York, while in command of the Military Division of the Atlantic. He is buried in Montgomery Cemetery, near Norristown, Pa.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Seated view wearing a double breasted frock coat with rank of major general. Back mark: Philadelphia Photographic Co., 730 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Light age toning and wear. Very desirable Union Gettysburg general.

 


<b>"The Rock of Chickamauga"


Native born Virginian and confidant of Robert E. Lee who fought for the Union which cost him his family!</b>


(1816-1870) He was born at Newsom's Depot, Southampton County, Virginia, which was five miles from the North Carolina border, and his family led an upper-class plantation lifestyle owning 685 acres and slaves. George Thomas, his sisters, and his widowed mother were forced to flee from their home and hide in the nearby woods during Nat Turner's 1831 slave rebellion. He taught as many as 15 of his family's slaves to read, violating a Virginia law that prohibited this. 


He graduated in the West Point class of 1840, and was known to his fellow cadets as "Old Tom," and he became instant friends with his roommates, future Union Civil War generals' William Tecumseh Sherman, and Stewart Van Vliet. He was appointed a cadet officer in his second year, and graduated 12th in a class of 42 and upon his graduation was appointed second lieutenant, Company D, 3rd U.S. Artillery. 


His first assignment out of the academy began with his artillery regiment serving at the primitive outpost of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, during the Seminole Indian Wars, and Thomas was appointed a brevet first lieutenant for gallantry while successfully leading his men. From 1842 until 1845, he served at posts at New Orleans, La., Fort Moultrie in Charleston Harbor, and Fort McHenry in Baltimore harbor where Francis Scott Key wrote our national anthem, "The Star Spangled Banner." His regiment was ordered to Texas in 1845, and in the Mexican War, he led a gun crew with distinction at the battles of Fort Brown, Resaca de la Palma, Monterrey, and Buena Vista, receiving two more brevet promotions to captain and major. At Buena Vista, General Zachary Taylor (future U.S. President)  reported that "the services of the light artillery, always conspicuous, were more than unusually distinguished" during the battle. General John E. Wool wrote about Thomas that "without our artillery we would not have maintained our position a single hour." Thomas's battery commander wrote that Thomas's "coolness and firmness contributed not a little to the success of the day. Thomas more than sustained the reputation he had long enjoyed in his regiment as an accurate and scientific artillerist." During the Mexican War, Thomas served very closely with an artillery officer who would become a principal antagonist in the Civil War, Captain Braxton Bragg, a future Confederate General. He returned to West Point as a cavalry and artillery instructor, where he established a close professional, and personal relationship with another Virginia officer, Lieutenant Colonel Robert E. Lee, the Academy superintendent, and future commander of the famous Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. His appointment at the academy was based in part on a positive recommendation from Braxton Bragg. Two of Thomas's students who received his recommendation for assignment to the cavalry, J.E.B. Stuart and Fitzhugh Lee, became prominent Confederate cavalry generals. On May 12, 1855, Thomas was appointed a major of the 2nd U.S. Cavalry, later re-designated the 5th U.S. Cavalry, by Jefferson Davis, then U.S. Secretary of War. Once again, Braxton Bragg had provided a recommendation for George H. Thomas's advancement. There was a suspicion as the Civil War drew closer that Jeff Davis had been assembling, and training a combat unit of elite U.S. Army officers who harbored Southern sympathies, and Thomas's appointment to this regiment implied that his colleagues assumed he would support his native state of Virginia in a future conflict. Thomas resumed his close ties with the second-in-command of the regiment, Robert E. Lee, and the two officers traveled extensively together on detached service for court-martial duty. In October 1857, Major Thomas assumed acting command of the cavalry regiment, an assignment he would retain for 2 1/2 years. On August 26, 1860, during a clash with a Comanche warrior, Thomas was wounded by an arrow passing through the flesh near his chin area, and sticking into his chest at Clear Fork, Brazos River, Texas. Thomas pulled the arrow out and, after a surgeon dressed the wound, he continued to lead the expedition. Thomas's antebellum career had been distinguished and productive, and he was one of the rare officers with U.S. Army field experience in all three combat arms of service; the infantry, cavalry, and artillery. On his way home to southern Virginia, he suffered a mishap in Lynchburg, Virginia, falling from a train platform and severely injuring his back. This accident led him to contemplate leaving military service and caused him pain for the rest of his life. Continuing to New York to visit with his wife's family, Thomas stopped in Washington, D.C., and conferred with General-in-Chief Winfield Scott, advising Scott that General David E. Twiggs, the commander of the Department of Texas, harbored secessionist sympathies, and could not be trusted in his post. Twiggs did indeed surrender his entire command to Confederate authorities shortly after Texas seceded, and later served as a general in the Confederate Army. 


At the outbreak of the Civil War, 19 of the 36 officers in the 2nd U.S. Cavalry resigned, including three of Thomas's superiors; Albert Sidney Johnston, Robert E. Lee, and William J. Hardee. Many Southern-born officers were torn between loyalty to their states, and loyalty to their country. George Thomas struggled mightily with the decision, but decided to remain loyal to the United States. His Northern-born wife probably helped influence his decision. In response, his family turned his picture against the wall, destroyed his letters, and never spoke to him again. During the economic hard times in the South after the war, Thomas sent some money to his sisters, who angrily refused to accept it, declaring they had no brother! Thomas was one of the ablest Union commanders during the Civil War, and he saw action at Mill Springs, Shiloh, Corinth, Perryville, Stone's River, and Franklin & Nashville. However, his finest moment came during the battle of Chickamauga. His heroic stand on Horseshoe Ridge earned him the sobriquet of "The Rock of Chickamauga." Thomas had succeeded General William S. Rosecrans, in command of the Army of the Cumberland, shortly before the Battles for Chattanooga, on November 23–25, 1863, a stunning Union victory that was highlighted by General Thomas's troops taking Lookout Mountain, and then storming the Confederate line on Missionary Ridge. During General William Tecumseh Sherman's advance through Georgia in the spring of 1864, the Army of the Cumberland numbered over 60,000 men, and Thomas's staff did the logistics, and engineering for General Sherman's entire army group, including developing a novel series of pontoon bridges. At the Battle of Peachtree Creek, on July 20, 1864, Thomas's severely damaged General John Bell Hood's army in its first attempt to break through the siege of Atlanta. When General Hood broke away from Atlanta in the autumn of 1864, and menaced Sherman's long line of communications, and endeavored to force Sherman to follow him, but Sherman cut his communications, and embarked on his infamous "March to the Sea." General Thomas stayed behind to fight Hood in the Franklin-Nashville Campaign, and with a smaller force, raced with Hood to reach Nashville. At the Battle of Franklin, on November 30, 1864, a large part of Thomas's force, under command of General John M. Schofield, dealt Hood a strong defeat, and held him in check long enough to cover the concentration of Union forces in Nashville. General Thomas attacked General Hood on December 15, 1864, and the Battle of Nashville effectively destroyed Hood's army in two days of fighting. Thomas, sent the following telegram, "We have whipped the enemy, taken many prisoners and considerable artillery." Thomas was appointed a major general in the regular army, with date of rank of his Nashville victory, and received the Thanks of Congress in the following message: 


"to Major-General George H. Thomas and the officers and soldiers under his command for their skill and dauntless courage, by which the rebel army under General Hood was signally defeated and driven from the state of Tennessee. General George H. Thomas also received another nickname from his victory, "The Sledge of Nashville." 


After the end of the Civil War, General Thomas commanded the Department of the Cumberland in Kentucky and Tennessee, and at times also West Virginia and parts of Georgia, Mississippi and Alabama, through 1869. During the Reconstruction period, Thomas acted to protect freedmen (ex-slaves) from white abuses. He set up military commissions to enforce labor contracts since the local courts had either ceased to operate or were biased against blacks. Thomas also used troops to protect places threatened by violence from the Ku Klux Klan. 


In a November 1868 report, General Thomas noted efforts made by former Confederates to paint the Confederacy in a positive light, stating: The greatest efforts made by the defeated insurgents since the close of the war have been to promulgate the idea that the cause of liberty, justice, humanity, equality, and all the calendar of the virtues of freedom, suffered violence and wrong when the effort for southern independence failed. This is, of course, intended as a species of political cant, whereby the crime of treason might be covered with a counterfeit varnish of patriotism, so that the precipitators of the rebellion might go down in history hand in hand with the defenders of the government, thus wiping out with their own hands their own stains; a species of self-forgiveness amazing in its effrontery, when it is considered that life and property—justly forfeited by the laws of the country, of war, and of nations, through the magnanimity of the government and people—was not exacted from them. George Henry Thomas, November 1868. 


President Andrew Johnson offered Thomas the rank of lieutenant general—with the intent to eventually replace Grant, a Republican and future president, with Thomas as general in chief—but the ever-loyal Thomas asked the Senate to withdraw his name for that nomination because he did not want to be party to politics. 


In 1869, he requested assignment to command the Military Division of the Pacific with headquarters at the Presidio of San Francisco. He died there of a stroke on March 28, 1870, while writing an answer to an article criticizing his military career by his wartime rival John M. Schofield. Sherman, by then general-in-chief, personally conveyed the news to President Grant at the White House. None of Thomas's blood relatives attended his funeral as they had never forgiven him for his loyalty to the Union. He was buried in Oakwood Cemetery, in Troy, New York.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of major general. Back mark: Morse's Gallery Of The Cumberland, 25 Cedar St., opposite the Commercial Hotel, Nashville, Tenn., with 3 cents green, George Washington Internal Revenue Proprietary tax stamp on the reverse. Excellent, and desirable image of "The Rock of Chickamauga" with a Gallery of the Cumberland imprint.  H 60in. x D 44in.

MORE AVAILABLE....ASK

Autograph, General Nathan Kimball

 

CDV, General Winfield S. Hancock $150.00

 

CDV, General George H. Thomas $225.00

 

H 60in. x D 44in.
MORE AVAILABLE. . . . A $2400.00

MCM pendant lights

Priced per pair. MCM pendant lights

H 36in. x D 6in.  


<b>He became a Northern hero after arresting Confederate diplomats Mason & Slidell in what became known as the famous "Trent Affair"</b>


(1798-1877) Born in New York City, he was a very distinguished United States naval officer. He entered the U.S. Navy as a midshipman in 1818, was prominent in the department of charts and instruments, and in 1838 he commanded a squadron of 6 ships and scientists to Antarctica, where an area there is named "Wilkes Land." Promoted to captain in 1855, at the outbreak of the Civil War, he was assigned to the command of U.S.S. San Jacinto to search for the Confederate commerce destroyer C.S.S. Sumter. He gained national notoriety when he arrested Confederate Commissioners James M. Mason & John Slidell on November 8, 1861. The two Southerners were bound for England on a diplomatic mission aboard the British mail packet "Trent," when they were captured. This episode brought about what is known as the "Trent Affair," which convinced many that war between the United States and England was now inevitable. Wilkes was officially thanked by Congress "for his brave, adroit and patriotic conduct." Promoted to commodore on July 16, 1862, he served with the James River flotilla and later against blockade runners in the West Indies. He was promoted to the rank of rear admiral on July 25, 1866. In addition to his contribution to United States naval history and scientific study in his official "Narrative of the Exploration Squadron," (6 volumes), Wilkes also wrote his autobiography. He died in Washington, D.C., with the rank of Rear Admiral, and his remains were eventually buried in Arlington National Cemetery. His gravestone reads, "he discovered the Antarctic Continent." 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Corners of the card mount mount have been slightly trimmed. Seated view of Wilkes wearing his double breasted naval frock coat, with epaulets, oval belt plate, piping on the cuffs of his sleeves, and holding his naval hat on his lap. His sword can be seen hanging from his belt. "Commodore Wiles, U.S. Navy" is written in period ink on the front mount. Back mark: Charles D. Fredricks & Co., "Specialite," 587 Broadway, New York. Period ink inscription on the verso, "Commodore Wilkes, U.S. Navy." Light wear and age toning. Very fine and desirable United States naval image.

 


 State of Georgia, The Merchants and Planters Bank, Savannah, Ga., $3 note. Large vignette at the center of a  steamship, with bust of famous American Statesman Henry Clay at the lower right. Georgia State Arms at bottom center. Large "THREE" in red overprint at bottom. This is an unissued remainder note, and does not have a serial number, date or signatures on it. Corner and edge chipping, with a couple of very small holes at left of the note. Worn condition. This obsolete $3 Georgia bank note is very rare, and is much more expensive in a higher condition grade. ($200 and up). Circa 1850's. Desirable note to have because of its scarcity.  


<b>She was the only civilian killed during the Battle of Gettysburg!</b>


Wet plate photograph, 5 1/2 x 3 7/8, on thick 7 x 5 card mount. Shows a portrait of Jennie Wade at the upper right, the house where she was killed on July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg in the center, and her grave site monument in Evergreen Cemetery, Gettysburg, Pa., at left. Jennie Wade was 19 years old when she was killed in the kitchen of her sister's house, while baking bread for the Union soldiers. A stray Confederate sharpshooter's bullet pierced through two wooden doors and killed Jennie instantly. Surprisingly she was the only civilian fatality of the epic three day battle of Gettysburg. Some light creasing at the right edge, and light chipping to the edges and corners of the card mount. Verso of mount shows wear. Very popular and desirable Gettysburg photos.

VINTAGE PENDANT FIXURES $850.00

 

CDV, Commodore Charles Wilkes, U. S. Navy $125.00

 

Merchants and Planters Bank, Georgia $3 $25.00

 

Photograph, Jennie Wade of Gettysburg $40.00




<b>Wounded in the Mexican War battles of Cerro Gordo and Chapultepec


Earned the Thanks of Confederate Congress for his heroic actions at the Battle of Belmont, Missouri</b> 


(1806-78) Born in Williamson County, Tennessee, he graduated from the University of Nashville, and was a law partner of James K. Polk, future President of the United States, in Columbia, Tennessee. He was active in Democratic politics, and was floor leader in support of the nomination of fellow Tennessean James K. Polk at the 1844 Democratic National Convention. Pillow was commissioned Brigadier General of Volunteers and fought in the Mexican War. He was wounded in the battles of Cerro Gordo and Chapultepec, and promoted to Major General. After the Mexican War, he served as a delegate to the Nashville Convention of 1850. Pillow supported the candidacy of Senator Stephen A. Douglas in the presidential election of 1860. With the election of Abraham Lincoln as president, Pillow ultimately supported secession as was the will of the majority of people in Tennessee. In addition to his law practice and management of the family farm, Pillow engaged in highly profitable land speculation. By 1860, he was one of the largest landholders in the South and possibly the wealthiest man in Tennessee. Pillow was commissioned a Brigadier General in the Confederate Army in July 1861, and he received the Thanks of the Confederate Congress for driving off the Union forces at the Battle of Belmont, Missouri. At Fort Donelson, in February 1862, Pillow managed to personally escape with a few aides before General Simon B. Buckner formally surrendered the remaining garrison to the Union Army commanded by General Ulysses S. Grant. Pillow later commanded a brigade at the Battle of Stones River, Tennessee in 1863. Afterwards, he was assigned to the conscript bureau in Tennessee, and was Commissary General of Yankee Prisoners of War. In his post war career, he returned to his law practice, this time in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was a partner of former Tennessee Governor Isham G. Harris.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view in civilian attire. "Genl. Pillow, C.S.A." is written in period ink on the front mount. Sharp image. Back mark: an early "E.A." E. Anthony, [New York] imprint on the verso. There is only one known war time image of Gideon Pillow in Confederate uniform which is next to impossible to obtain. This is an excellent from life image of Pillow that is usually the one found in almost every Confederate general's image collection! Very desirable. 

 W 56in. x D 13in.  W 62in. x D 18in.  W 66in. x D 16in.

CDV, General Gideon Pillow $150.00

 

W 56in. x D 13in. $450.00

 

W 62in. x D 18in. $400.00

 

W 66in. x D 16in. $250.00

W 74in. x D 15in.  W 53in. x D 14in.  W 46in. x D 14in.  W 55in. x D 18in.

W 74in. x D 15in. $450.00

 

W 53in. x D 14in. $450.00

 

W 46in. x D 14in. $400.00

 

W 55in. x D 18in. $400.00




<b>Signature With Rank


Severely wounded at the battle of Chattanooga, Tennessee


He was the hero of the Battle of Allatoona Pass in the Atlanta campaign. Corse telegraphed General Sherman, "I am short of a cheekbone, and one ear, but am able to whip all hell yet!"</b>


(1835-93) Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, he moved in 1842 with his family to Burlington in Iowa Territory. His father, John Lockwood Corse, served six terms as the mayor of Burlington, and established a prosperous book and stationery business. He was appointed to the United States Military Academy, and studied there for two years, but decided to leave West Point in 1855. Instead he decided to attended law school in Albany, New York, where he passed his bar exam. He later returned to Iowa and was nominated as the new state's lieutenant governor by the Iowa Democratic Party. In July 1861, he was appointed major of the 6th Iowa Infantry, and served on the staff of General John Pope during the Battle of Island No. 10, and in the early operations in Mississippi. Promoted to colonel, he demonstrated gallantry at Corinth, and in the Vicksburg campaign, after which he was promoted to brigadier general. Corse was badly wounded at the battle of Chattanooga, but returned in time to participate in the Atlanta campaign. He was the hero of the battle of Allatoona Pass in which General S.G. French's Confederate division attempted to dislodge Corse's men from blockhouses designed to protect the Western and Atlantic Railroad. According to many accounts, no more severe fighting was ever experienced by men in General Sherman's army; leaving 1,500 dead and wounded. Corse telegraphed Sherman, "I am short of a cheekbone, and one ear, but am able to whip all hell yet!" He went on to take part in "Sherman's March to the Sea," the capture of Savannah, and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Following the Civil War, Corse served in a variety of posts including Collector of Internal Revenue, with his office in Chicago, chairman of the Massachusetts Democratic committee, and Postmaster of Boston. Corse died on his 58th birthday, in Winchester, Massachusetts, and his body was transported to Burlington, Iowa, and interred in Aspen Grove Cemetery. The large red brick, and limestone mausoleum is plainly visible from the entrance of the cemetery, and is one of the cemetery's landmarks. 


<u>Signature With Rank</u>: 4 x 2 1/4, beautifully signed in ink, Jno. M. Corse, Bvt. Maj. Genl., U.S.V. Mounted to slightly larger piece of an autograph album page. The signature is large and boldly written. Excellent. Very desirable autograph.  



 


<b>1862 dated image


Commanded Union troops at the Battles of Shiloh and Perryville</b>


(1818-1898) Born in Lowell, Ohio, he graduated in the celebrated West Point class of 1841 which contributed 20 general officers to the Civil War.  He was a first cousin of Union General George P. Buell, who also served as Colonel of the 58th Indiana Infantry. He was seriously wounded in the Mexican War at the battle of Churubusco, and earned the brevets of captain and major. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he was in San Francisco as adjutant of the Department of the Pacific. He was commissioned brigadier general, on May 17, 1861, and upon his arrival in Washington, he helped to train and organize the Army of the Potomac. Buell was selected to lead the Army of the Ohio from Kentucky into eastern Tennessee, but because of the lack of railroads he urged an alternate route via the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers towards Nashville. His plan may have been a contributing factor to the victories of General U.S. Grant at Forts Henry and Donelson which enabled Buell to march unopposed into Nashville. He arrived at the battle of Shiloh in time to stem the Rebel assault of the first day and turn almost certain defeat into a Union victory. He served under General Henry W. Halleck in the Corinth campaign, and on March 22, 1862, was promoted to major general. In June he was detached with four divisions to advance on Chattanooga and to repair the Memphis & Charleston Railroad. In September, he moved into Kentucky to resist the invasion by General's Braxton Bragg and Edmund K. Smith, and occupied Louisville. On October 8, 1862, he fought the bloody battle of Perryville, Kentucky. Following the war Buell lived in Indiana, and then in Kentucky, employed in the iron and coal industry as president of the Green River Iron Company. By 1898, Buell suffering from poor health became an invalid, and he died on November 19, 1898, at the age of 80. He was buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery, in St. Louis, Missouri. General Ulysses S. Grant wrote in his memoirs about General Don Carlos Buell; "General Buell was a brave, intelligent officer, with as much professional pride and ambition of a commendable sort as I ever knew." 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Full standing view wearing a double breasted frock coat with epaulets, gauntlets, holding his Hardee hat with insignia pinned up at the side, with sword attached to his belt. He is posing in a studio with column and drape. Imprint on the front mount: Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1862, by Chas, D. Fredricks & Co., in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York. Back mark: Charles D. Fredricks & Co., "Specialite," 587 Broadway, New York. Light age toning and wear. Very fine image. 

 


<b>Colonel 58th Indiana Infantry</b>


(1833-83) Born at Lawrenceburg, Indiana, he graduated from Norwich University, in 1856, and was a civil engineer before the Civil War. He enlisted on December 4, 1861, and was commissioned lieutenant colonel, of the 58th Indiana Infantry. During the winter of 1861-62, Buell's regiment served in central Kentucky in the army commanded by his first cousin, General Don Carlos Buell. They arrived on the field of Shiloh on the second day in time to save the Union army from disaster, and participated in the siege of Corinth, Mississippi, with Buell being promoted to colonel of the regiment on June 23, 1862. He led the 58th Indiana during the Battle of Perryville, Ky., on October 8th; and in October, his regiment pursued General Braxton Bragg's Confederates as they left Kentucky; in late December they charged the enemy at Lavergne; and they fought in the bloody three day battle of Stone's River. After the battle, George P. Buell was elevated to brigade command, and led several different brigades in the Army of the Cumberland throughout 1863 and 1864. He also led a brigade during the Battle of Chickamauga, on September 19–20, 1863, where they suffered 171 men killed, wounded and missing, out of 400 engaged. They saw action on November 23rd in the battle at Chattanooga, and participated in the gallant charge on Missionary Ridge, Tennessee. They made a forced march to Knoxville where they helped to lift the siege of the city from General James Longstreet's Confederate army. They suffered immensely during the winter of 1863-64, as they were forced to camp on the hills of eastern Tennessee without tents or provisions other than what they could forage in an already impoverished country. In the Atlanta campaign, Buell's men did all the bridge building from Chattanooga to Atlanta, a most dangerous job as they were constantly subjected to the enemy's fire. In November 1864, they were assigned to the Army of Georgia, commanded by General Henry W. Slocum, and did all the bridge work and road repairs for that army on General William T. Sherman's March to the Sea, from Atlanta to Savannah, including the rebuilding of King's bridge, 1,000 feet long, across the Ogeechee River. After the capture of Savannah, they did all the bridging from Savannah to Goldsboro, N.C., including building a pontoon bridge over the Savannah River, where the men worked for six days in water up to four feet deep. In this campaign, they did yeoman's work, much of the time in close proximity to the enemy and under fire. Buell was promoted to rank of brevet brigadier general on January 12, 1865, and mustered out of the volunteer service on July 25, 1865, having been cited for conspicuous gallantry in the battle of Missionary Ridge, and for most valuable management of the pontoon trains in General Sherman's campaigns. After the war, he joined the Regular U.S. Army as lieutenant colonel, serving in the 29th, 11th, and 15th infantry regiments respectively, dying on May 31, 1883, at Nashville, Tennessee with the rank of colonel.


We plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view of Buell wearing a double breasted frock coat with rank of brigadier general, and holding his slouch hat. He poses next to a studio column. No back mark. Light age toning, and corner wear. Very scarce and desirable image. 

 A neat Civil War vintage advertising broadside for HOLLIS’ BALM OF AMERICA, a cure for bronchitis, asthma, coughs, colds & ALL LUNG COMPLAINTS. (see: 1863 Boston Business Directory)  In an easy to display 8 X 7 inches and in fine original condition after decades of storage, this boldly printed (one side only for posting) broadside will set well in any period grouping.  An especially poignant reminder of the wide concern of thousands of country boys who, when gathered together in military camps, found they were particularly susceptible to frequently deadly repertory  maladies.   A popular item at the sutler’s tent, Hollis’ Balm Of America was a <I>sure cure</I>.. We are pleased to offer a "no questions asked" three day inspection with return as purchased  guarantee ! please note:  ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!.  If you are new to Gunsight Antiques and wish additional information or just to learn who we are, please check out our home page.   Thanks for visiting our on-line store !!

Autograph, General John M. Corse $175.00

 

CDV, General Don Carlos Buell $150.00

 

CDV, General George P. Buell $225.00

 

Civil War era MEDICAL CURE – BALM OF AME $50.00

Illustrated with a US quarter for size comparison, our photos will offer the best description of this neat personal artifact except to advise the obvious.  Simple in its form and heavily smoked in the period, this every day common man’s pipe offers good evidence of considerable period use and handling with an attractive natural age patina as testimony to its age and originality.   With the well-worn period scratch engraved first initial and last name <I>E. Kuar</I> on one side and three initials <I>E. H. K.</I> with <I>25th Inf.</I> on the other we are able to identify the period owner as <B>Pvt. Elijah H. Kuar </B>.  An East Bend, Illinois resident, Kuar  enlisted on August 5,1861 as a Private of Co. I <B> 25th Illinois Infantry</B> and was mustered out with the 25th on September 5, 1864.   During Pvt. Kuar’s tenure with the 25th Infantry his hard fought Regiment saw action at the battles of Pea Ridge, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta and Peach Tree Creek.   A really nice personal item, this piece will display well in any quality Civil War grouping.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Illustrated here with a U. S. quarter for size comparison, our photos will do best to describe this old spun brass travel spittoon except to advise that it remains as found, untouched and uncleaned with good evidence of age and period originality yet remaining in pleasing condition.   Hard to find on today’s market as this small travel size seems to have seldom survived.  A neat Civil War grouping personal item!

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 


Imprinted fractional note, with vignette of South Carolina State Seal, the palmetto tree, at the center. The Bank of the State of South Carolina 15, 15, Will Pay Bearer On Demand "In Current Funds." Fifteen Cents over print in blue. Feb. 1, 1863. Signed in ink at the bottom. Fifteen, Issued under Act Feb., 1863, is printed in red on the reverse. VG.  


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient for gallantry at the Battle of Gaines's Mill, Virginia


He was wounded at Gaines's Mill, Va., and Gettysburg, Pa.</b>


(1831-1901) Born in Utica, New York, he was mustered into the Federal service as colonel of the 12th New York Infantry, on May 2, 1861, the first Union regiment to set foot on Virginia soil. He was appointed brigadier general to rank from September 7, 1861; commanded a brigade and division of the 5th Corps; he fought at the First Battle of Bull Run on July 21, 1861; in the Seven Days Battles; was wounded at Gaines's Mill, Va. in 1862, and was awarded the Medal of Honor for his gallant actions there; he fought at 2nd Bull Run, Antietam, and Fredericksburg; later became the chief of staff of the Army of the Potomac under Generals' Hooker and Meade; he was severely wounded at Gettysburg; and commanded a division in the Atlanta campaign. One of his most noteworthy claims to fame was the bugle call "Taps," which he composed at Harrison's Landing in 1862. He also wrote the 1862 Army field manual, "Camp and Outpost Duty for Infantry." After the war, President Ulysses S. Grant appointed Butterfield as the Assistant Treasurer of the United States. General Daniel Butterfield died on July 17, 1901, and was buried with an ornate monument in the West Point Cemetery at the United States Military Academy, although he had not attended that institution. Taps was sounded at his funeral.  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of major general. "Gen. Butterfield" is written in period ink on the front mount. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, From a Photographic Negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very fine and desirable Civil War MOH recipient's image.

25th Illinois – Civil War Soldier’s Meer $325.00

 

antique - hand held traveling Spittoon $65.00

 

1863 State of South Carolina 15 Cents No $20.00

 

CDV, General Daniel Butterfield




<b>Mortally wounded in the battle of Antietam, Maryland in 1862</b>


(1815-62) Born in Fairfax, Vermont, he graduated in the celebrated West Point class of 1841 which produced 23 generals that fought in the Civil War. Richardson served as a second lieutenant in the Second Seminole Indian War in Florida, and he was promoted to first lieutenant on September 21, 1846. He distinguished himself during the Mexican War fighting under General Winfield Scott and earned the brevets of captain and major at Contreras, Churubusco and Chapultepec and the nickname of, "Fighting Dick," which would stick with him throughout the rest of his military career. Living in Michigan when the Civil War broke out, he enlisted in the Union Army, and recruited and organized the 2nd Michigan Infantry, and on May 25, 1861, Richardson was commissioned their colonel. When he reported with his regiment to Washington, D.C., General-in-Chief Winfield Scott greeted him with "I'm glad to have my "Fighting Dick" with me again." He was assigned command of the 4th Brigade, 1st Division, in the newly organized army of General Irvin McDowell, taking part in the 1st Bull Run campaign. He was promoted to brigadier general, to rank from May 17, 1861. He held brigade command in the Army of the Potomac, and then the 1st Division of the II Corps during the 1862 Virginia Peninsula Campaign fighting at the battles of Yorktown, Seven Pines, and the Seven Days. He was particularly distinguished in sharp fighting near the Chickahominy River, and was promoted to major general after the Seven Days Battles. General Richardson's 1st Division played a key role during the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862, attacking the Confederate positions in the center of the Sunken Road in support of the 3rd Division of General William H. French. After stubborn fighting, by 1:00 pm, Richardson had gained control of the high ground in front of the apex of the defensive line, and his men enfiladed the remaining defenders in the road, which would gain the nickname "Bloody Lane" for the carnage. Richardson pushed forward beyond the road and was directing the fire of his artillery and organizing another attack when he was struck by a shell fragment. Carried to the rear, Richardson was treated at a field hospital. His wound was not considered life-threatening, and he was given a room in General George B. McClellan's headquarters, the Pry House. President Abraham Lincoln paid his respects to the wounded Richardson during a visit to the battlefield in October. However, infection set in, and then pneumonia, which claimed the life of the popular general on November 3, 1862. He was among six generals to be killed or mortally wounded at Antietam. His body was escorted to Detroit where large crowds lined the streets during his funeral procession to nearby Pontiac, where he was buried in Oak Hill Cemetery.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Superb seated view in uniform with brigadier general shoulder straps, wearing gauntlets, and holding his sword. His hat with plume sits on the table at his side. Back mark: E. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, From  Photographic Negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. There is a thin strip of archival mounting tape on the reverse of the card from when this excellent image was once framed with his autograph. Scarce and extremely desirable Antietam related image. 

 


<b>Killed at the Battle of Wilson's Creek, Missouri in 1861


He was the first Union general to be killed in the Civil War!</b>


(1818-61) Born in Ashford, Connecticut, he graduated in the West Point class of 1841. After graduation he was assigned as a 2nd lieutenant in the 2nd U.S. Infantry with whom he fought with in the Florida Seminole War in Florida. In the Mexican War, he was promoted to first lieutenant for "conspicuous bravery in capturing enemy artillery" at the Battle for Mexico City, and received a brevet promotion to captain for the battles of Contreras and Churubusco. After the Mexican War, Lyon was posted to the western frontier, where forces under his command perpetrated the massacre of Pomo Native Americans, at Clear Lake, California, known as the 1850 "Bloody Island Massacre." Afterwards he was assigned to Fort Riley, Kansas, where he became a staunch antislavery man in a state where many residents were divided about slavery and their loyalty to the Union. In February 1861, Lyon was appointed commander of the Union arsenal at St. Louis, Missouri, another divided state. Suspicious of Governor Claiborne F. Jackson, who was working with Jefferson Davis on a secret plan for secession, Lyon forced the surrender of the pro-Confederate militia. Some of the Missouri civilians rioted, and Lyon's troops fired into the crowd, injuring at least 75, and killing 28. This became known as the "Camp Jackson Affair." When the Civil War broke out President Abraham Lincoln asked the state of Missouri to supply four regiments for the Union cause, and Governor Jackson refused to honor Lincoln's request, and instead ordered the Missouri State Guard to muster themselves outside of St. Louis to be in readiness to support the Confederacy. Lyon was promoted to brigadier general, on May 17, 1861, and given command of the Union troops in Missouri, and was soon afterwards named commander of the Department of the West. On June 12, 1861, General Lyon, accompanied by U.S. Congressman, Colonel Francis P. Blair, Jr., met with Governor Jackson and General Sterling Price, of the Missouri State Guard, at the Planter's House hotel in St. Louis, to discuss the implementation, and potential continuation of a truce between Federal forces and the Missouri State Guard. The discussions were conducted largely between Lyon and Jackson, who were generally intransigent in their respective positions. Lyon's view was that the U.S. forces had the right to move anywhere in the state they wanted to, while Jackson believed that Federal forces should be restricted to the St. Louis area only. After four unproductive hours, General Lyon halted the meeting, informing Governor Jackson and General Price that Jackson's demanded limitations on federal authority "means war." Lyon then allowed Jackson and Price to leave St. Louis for Jefferson City by train, in accordance with their safe conduct pass. Governor Jackson fled first to the capitol, at Jefferson City, ordering the railroad tracks destroyed behind him, and then retreated with the Missouri State Guard to Boonville, Mo. Lyon moved up the Missouri River by steamer and occupied Jefferson City without a fight on June 13th. He continued the pursuit and on June 17th he defeated a portion of the State Guard at the Battle of Boonville. The governor, his administration, and the Guard retreated to the southwest. General Lyon was subsequently supported by the reconvened Missouri State Convention which reconvened on July 22, 1861, and declared that the office of Governor and other Missouri state officials were now vacant, and appointed a Unionist provisional state government under former Missouri Chief Justice Hamilton Gamble. Lyon assumed command of the Army of the West on July 2nd, and he reinforced his army before moving southwest in pursuit of Governor Jackson, Price and the State Guard. By July 13th, Lyon was encamped at Springfield, Missouri, with about 6,000 Union soldiers. The Missouri State Guard, was situated about 75 miles southwest under the command of General Price, who linked up with troops under the command of General Benjamin McCulloch, near the end of July. The combined Confederate forces numbered about 12,000, and they formed plans to attack Springfield, and marched northeast on July 31st. The armies met at dawn a few miles southwest of Springfield on the morning of August 10th in the Battle of Wilson's Creek. General Lyon was wounded twice in the fighting; shot in the head and leg and had his horse shot out from under him. He returned to Union lines and commandeered a bay horse and although badly outnumbered by the Confederate forces, General Lyon dramatically led a counter charge with the 2nd Kansas Infantry on Bloody Hill, where he was shot in the heart and killed at about 9:30 am. Although the Union Army was defeated at Wilson's Creek, Lyon's quick action neutralized the effectiveness of pro-Southern forces in Missouri, allowing Union forces to secure the state. In the confused aftermath of the Union retreat from Wilson's Creek, General Lyon's body was mistakenly left behind on the battlefield, and discovered by Confederate forces. It was briefly buried on a Union soldier's farm outside Springfield until it could be returned to Lyon's relatives. Eventually the remains were interred at the family plot in Eastford, Connecticut, where an estimated crowd of 15,000 attended the funeral. A monument stands in memory of General Lyon in the Springfield National Cemetery, Missouri. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Full standing view wearing a single breasted frock coat with epaulets, and holding his hat and sword. Studio setting with column and drape behind him. "Lyon, U.S.A.," is written in period ink on the front mount. No back mark. Very fine. Historical figure being the first Union General to be killed in the Civil War.  


<b>Killed at the Battle of Wilson's Creek, Missouri in 1861


He was the first Union general to be killed in the Civil War!</b>


(1818-61) Born in Ashford, Connecticut, he graduated in the West Point class of 1841. After graduation he was assigned as a 2nd lieutenant in the 2nd U.S. Infantry with whom he fought with in the Florida Seminole War in Florida. In the Mexican War, he was promoted to first lieutenant for "conspicuous bravery in capturing enemy artillery" at the Battle for Mexico City, and received a brevet promotion to captain for the battles of Contreras and Churubusco. After the Mexican War, Lyon was posted to the western frontier, where forces under his command perpetrated the massacre of Pomo Native Americans, at Clear Lake, California, known as the 1850 "Bloody Island Massacre." Afterwards he was assigned to Fort Riley, Kansas, where he became a staunch antislavery man in a state where many residents were divided about slavery and their loyalty to the Union. In February 1861, Lyon was appointed commander of the Union arsenal at St. Louis, Missouri, another divided state. Suspicious of Governor Claiborne F. Jackson, who was working with Jefferson Davis on a secret plan for secession, Lyon forced the surrender of the pro-Confederate militia. Some of the Missouri civilians rioted, and Lyon's troops fired into the crowd, injuring at least 75, and killing 28. This became known as the "Camp Jackson Affair." When the Civil War broke out President Abraham Lincoln asked the state of Missouri to supply four regiments for the Union cause, and Governor Jackson refused to honor Lincoln's request, and instead ordered the Missouri State Guard to muster themselves outside of St. Louis to be in readiness to support the Confederacy. Lyon was promoted to brigadier general, on May 17, 1861, and given command of the Union troops in Missouri, and was soon afterwards named commander of the Department of the West. On June 12, 1861, General Lyon, accompanied by U.S. Congressman, Colonel Francis P. Blair, Jr., met with Governor Jackson and General Sterling Price, of the Missouri State Guard, at the Planter's House hotel in St. Louis, to discuss the implementation, and potential continuation of a truce between Federal forces and the Missouri State Guard. The discussions were conducted largely between Lyon and Jackson, who were generally intransigent in their respective positions. Lyon's view was that the U.S. forces had the right to move anywhere in the state they wanted to, while Jackson believed that Federal forces should be restricted to the St. Louis area only. After four unproductive hours, General Lyon halted the meeting, informing Governor Jackson and General Price that Jackson's demanded limitations on federal authority "means war." Lyon then allowed Jackson and Price to leave St. Louis for Jefferson City by train, in accordance with their safe conduct pass. Governor Jackson fled first to the capitol, at Jefferson City, ordering the railroad tracks destroyed behind him, and then retreated with the Missouri State Guard to Boonville, Mo. Lyon moved up the Missouri River by steamer and occupied Jefferson City without a fight on June 13th. He continued the pursuit and on June 17th he defeated a portion of the State Guard at the Battle of Boonville. The governor, his administration, and the Guard retreated to the southwest. General Lyon was subsequently supported by the reconvened Missouri State Convention which reconvened on July 22, 1861, and declared that the office of Governor and other Missouri state officials were now vacant, and appointed a Unionist provisional state government under former Missouri Chief Justice Hamilton Gamble. Lyon assumed command of the Army of the West on July 2nd, and he reinforced his army before moving southwest in pursuit of Governor Jackson, Price and the State Guard. By July 13th, Lyon was encamped at Springfield, Missouri, with about 6,000 Union soldiers. The Missouri State Guard, was situated about 75 miles southwest under the command of General Price, who linked up with troops under the command of General Benjamin McCulloch, near the end of July. The combined Confederate forces numbered about 12,000, and they formed plans to attack Springfield, and marched northeast on July 31st. The armies met at dawn a few miles southwest of Springfield on the morning of August 10th in the Battle of Wilson's Creek. General Lyon was wounded twice in the fighting; shot in the head and leg and had his horse shot out from under him. He returned to Union lines and commandeered a bay horse and although badly outnumbered by the Confederate forces, General Lyon dramatically led a counter charge with the 2nd Kansas Infantry on Bloody Hill, where he was shot in the heart and killed at about 9:30 am. Although the Union Army was defeated at Wilson's Creek, Lyon's quick action neutralized the effectiveness of pro-Southern forces in Missouri, allowing Union forces to secure the state. In the confused aftermath of the Union retreat from Wilson's Creek, General Lyon's body was mistakenly left behind on the battlefield, and discovered by Confederate forces. It was briefly buried on a Union soldier's farm outside Springfield until it could be returned to Lyon's relatives. Eventually the remains were interred at the family plot in Eastford, Connecticut, where an estimated crowd of 15,000 attended the funeral. A monument stands in memory of General Lyon in the Springfield National Cemetery, Missouri. 


<u>Signature With Rank</u>: 3 x 1 1/4, in ink, Your obt. sevt., N. Lyon, Capt. 2 Inf. The top of "Your Obt. Sevt." is slightly trimmed at the very top of the paper. The signature of Lyon, and his rank are extremely bold and beautifully written. Very rare! An extremely desirable autograph of the first Union General killed in the Civil War!   


 


<b>Signature With Rank</b>


(1807-82) He was born in East Greenwich, Rhode Island, and graduated in the West Point class of 1826. He fought in the Second Seminole Indian War under General William J. Worth from 1837-42. Casey distinguished himself during the Mexican War battles of Contreras, Churubusco, Molina del Rey, and Chapultepec, where he was severely wounded on September 13, 1847, earning the brevets of major and lieutenant colonel for gallantry. He was appointed a brigadier general of volunteers on August 31, 1861, and at the battle of Seven Pines, Va., in 1862, he was a division commander in General Erasmus B. Keyes 4th Corps, and his troops bore the brunt of the Confederate attack by General A.P. Hill. "Casey's Redoubt" was named for him. He was promoted to Major General on May 31 of 1862, and he later commanded a brigade in the Washington defenses. He also served as president of a board to examine candidates for officers of Negro Troops. He wrote the three-volume manual "System of Infantry Tactics," including "Infantry Tactics" volumes I and II, published by the army on August 11, 1862, and "Infantry Tactics for Colored Troops," that was published on March 9, 1863. The manuals were used by the armies of both sides during the Civil War. General Casey retired from the army on July 8, 1868, at the age of 61, having served over 40 years on active duty. He was a veteran member of the Aztec Club of 1847 composed of U.S. officers who had fought in the Mexican War. General Casey was also a member of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States as were all three of his sons. He died in Brooklyn, New York, on January 22, 1882, and is buried at Casey Farm in Saunderstown, Rhode Island.


<u>Signature With Rank</u>: 5 1/4 x 1 1/2, in ink, "Silas Casey." Written below Casey's autograph in an adjutant's hand is his rank, Brevet Major Genl., U.S.A. Very fine.

CDV, General Israel B. Richardson $250.00

 

CDV, General Nathaniel Lyon $125.00

 

Autograph, General Nathaniel Lyon

 

Autograph, General Silas Casey




<b>Free frank signature with rank on Engineer Department cover


Totten had the distinction of being the longest tenured of any Chief Engineer in the U.S. Army</b>


(1788-1864) Born in New Haven, Connecticut, he was the tenth person to ever graduate from the U.S. Military Academy being one of three graduating members of the class of 1805. He was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers on July 1, 1805. He helped build Castle Williams, and Castle Clinton in New York harbor. During the War of 1812, he was chief engineer of the Niagara frontier and Lake Champlain armies under General Stephen Van Rensselaer. At the Battle of Queenston Heights, he fought alongside Winfield Scott, who used Totten's cravat as a white flag to signal the American surrender. He was brevetted lieutenant colonel for gallant conduct in the Battle of Plattsburgh, N.Y. From 1825 until 1838, Totten oversaw the construction of Fort Adams, in Newport, Rhode Island. Fort Adams was the second-largest construction project attempted by the army in the 19th century, after Fort Monroe, Virginia. Totten employed recent graduates of West Point as assistant engineers at Fort Adams, and taught them advanced engineering techniques. Totten's apprentices included John G. Barnard, George W. Cullum, P.G.T. Beauregard, and Alexander D. Bache, all of whom earned distinction during the Civil War. Totten was appointed Chief Engineer of the United States Army in 1838, and served in that position until his death in 1864, the longest tenure of any chief engineer. As chief engineer, he was intimately involved with every aspect of the Army Corps of Engineers activities, from fortifications to harbor improvement. During this period, Totten invented an iron-reinforced embrasure for cannon. Known as "Totten shutters," the hinged swinging doors were installed on the cannon openings of the fort between the mortar and brick facade. Balanced to swing freely, the iron shutters would be forced open by the gasses expelled from the cannon, and then rebound shut immediately afterwards, shielding the gunners from incoming fire. First installed in American forts in 1857, the design was incorporated in such locations as Fort Montgomery, Fort Delaware, Fort John C. Calhoun, Fort Wool, and Fort Jefferson, Dry Tortugas, Florida. Totten was greatly admired by General Winfield Scott, for whom he directed the siege of Veracruz as his chief engineer during the Mexican War. He later served as a Civil War General, being promoted to Brigadier General, U.S. Army, on March 3, 1863, and he was promoted to Brevet Major General on April 21, 1864, having served almost six decades in the army. He died suddenly of pneumonia in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Congressional Cemetery.    


<u>Free Franked Engineer Department Envelope</u>: 5 1/2 x 3 1/8, imprinted cover, "Engineer Department, Official Business" signed in ink, J.G. Totten, Chf. Eng. Addressed to Jno. S. Putnam, Eqr., Cornish, N.H., with postmark, Washington, D.C., FREE, Mar. 14. Light age toning and wear.  


6 x 8 pamphlet, 11 pages. History Of Chr.[istian] Woerner Camp, No. 1, S.O.V. [Sons of Union Veterans], Dept. of N.J., U.S.A., From 1882 to 1919. Includes a history of Camp No. 1, Sons of Veterans of the Civil War since its organization, lists the Post Commanders with appropriate dates served, lists officers of the camps with information, members of the camp with number of years involved, mentions events they participated in such as taking part in the Parade of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the City of Hoboken, March 28, 1905, etc. Light wear and age toning.


Camp No. 1, Sons of Veterans of the Civil War, was organized on October 6, 1882, in John Evans Hall, corner of First and Bloomfield Streets, in Hoboken, New Jersey, where they operated until July 31, 1919. The camp was named after the late Major Christian Woerner, who was the organizer of the famous Hexamer Battery which did valiant service during the Civil War. [this paragraph is from the history of the Woerner Camp as taken from this pamphlet].


Christian Woerner, who the camp is named for, fought in the Civil War from 1861-65, as a lieutenant, captain, and brevet major, and commanded Battery C, 1st New Jersey Light Artillery. Woerner was described as an officer with marked gallantry, and efficiency. The 1st New Jersey Light Artillery saw action at White House Landing, Charles City Court House, Deep Bottom, Petersburg, Reams Station, and Fort Haskell. Several of Captain Woerner's battle reports can be read in the Official Records of the Union Army.   


<b>Honoring the 125th Anniversary of his immortal address at Gettysburg</b>


7 3/8 x 4, commemorative envelope, with vignette of President Lincoln at left, and imprint at center, Commemorating the 125th Anniversary, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, 1863 November 19 1988, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Postmarked, Gettysburg, Pa., 17325,  Nov. 19, 1988. There are 2 U.S. postage stamps at the upper right with one of them being the 3 cents commemorative stamp issued to honor the Gettysburg Address, and the second one depicting an American flag with a star burst above. Beautifully tied on with the postmark and an illustration of Abraham Lincoln, with imprint Address Station. The envelope has a typewritten local Gettysburg address on it indicating who this envelope was mailed to in 1988 when it was originally issued. The envelope is complete with its back flap. Light age toning and wear. Very fine.  




Antique celluloid pin back button with a full color bust view illustration of President Abraham Lincoln. This is what is known as the famous $5 bill pose. The original image was taken by Anthony Berger, of Mathew Brady's Gallery, in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, February 9, 1864. The button measures 1 1/4 x 1 1/4. Complete with the original pin on the reverse. Manufacturer's imprint on the reverse: Wm. Lehmberg & Sons, 138 N. 10th St., Phila., Pa. Very fine condition, and nice to have one of these pins with the manufacturer's imprint still in place. These celluloid buttons of President Lincoln are extremely popular.


WBTS Trivia: Thirty years after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, his eldest son, Robert Todd Lincoln said, "I have always thought this Brady photograph of my father to be the most satisfactory likeness of him."

Autograph, General Joseph G. Totten $75.00

 

History Of Woerner Camp, No. 1, S. O. V. ,

 

President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address C $8.00

 

President Abraham Lincoln Celluloid Butt




<b>A leading Union cavalry commander during the Civil War


Captured in 1864 while leading a raid attempting to free the Union prisoners at Andersonville, Georgia


Governor of California</b>


(1822-94) He was born in the western New York hamlet of Bustion, and graduated from the United States Military Academy in the celebrated class of 1846. His classmates were future Civil War Generals Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, George B. McClellan, Ambrose Powell Hill, Darius N. Couch, George E. Pickett, and Cadmus M. Wilcox. Stoneman served in the 1st U.S. Dragoons, and the 2nd U.S. Cavalry, from 1846-1861. At the  outbreak of the Civil War, Stoneman was stationed at Fort Brown, Texas, where he was in command of the fort. He refused to follow the orders of former U.S. General David E. Twiggs, a big southern sympathizer, now in the Southern army, to surrender his forces to the newly established Confederate authorities in Texas. Instead Stoneman stood strong, and escaped with most of his command to the north. He was appointed Chief of Cavalry, of the Army of the Potomac, with the rank of brigadier general, on August 13, 1861. He saw action in the 1862 Virginia Peninsula campaign, at Yorktown, and Williamsburg; at the battle of Fredericksburg, Va.; in the famous cavalry raid that took on his name, "General Stoneman's 1863 Richmond Raid," during the Chancellorsville campaign; he commanded the Cavalry Corps, of the Army of the Ohio, during the Atlanta campaign, until he was captured on July 31, 1864, while on a raid designed to free the Union prisoners that were confined at the notorious Andersonville, Georgia Prison, known in the North as the "hellhole." After his exchange, which was due to the personal request of General William T. Sherman, he operated in southwestern Virginia, East Tennessee and North Carolina in cooperation with General  Sherman's advancing army. In March 1865, General Stoneman took roughly 4,000 troops out of Knoxville, Tennessee, and led them on a raid into Virginia and North Carolina, with the intentions of crippling the Confederate infrastructure, and to demoralize the Southern civilians. Within a week, they had sacked the towns of Hillsville, Asheville, and Christiansburg, among others, and destroyed several bridges, lead mines and railroads. General Stoneman mustered out of the U.S. Volunteer Service on September 1, 1866. In 1869, the Army transferred him out west to command the District of Arizona, and subsequently the Department of Arizona. He was eventually relieved of his command in 1871 due to controversies that were created surrounding his handling of the region's Indians. He settled in what is present day San Marino, California, and served as Railroad Commissioner of California, and he was elected Governor of California in 1882, serving in that position for 4 years. Stoneman was a First Class Companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Stoneman died in Buffalo, New York, on September 5, 1894, at the age of 72, and he was buried at Bentley Cemetery, in Lakewood, New York. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. Standing view wearing a double breasted frock coat with rank of brigadier general. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, From a Photographic Negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Bottom of the card mount is trimmed. Very sharp view of General Stoneman striking a Napoleonic pose. Very fine, and desirable image.

 


<b>Wounded in 1864 at the Battle of Mansfield, Louisiana refusing to leave the field of battle</b> 


(1823-1903) Born in York, Pennsylvania, he graduated #1 in the West Point class of 1843, and he joined the elite U.S. Corps of Topographical Engineers. He fought in the Mexican War earning a brevet for gallantry at the Battle of Buena Vista. As an engineer officer, he was in charge of the construction of the new U.S. Capitol dome in Washington, D.C. He commanded a brigade at the 1st Battle of Bull Run, and led a division, and subsequently the 6th Corps, with distinction in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign. During the fall 1862 Maryland campaign, he commanded the forces which penetrated Crampton's Gap at South Mountain, and his corps at Antietam. Franklin was a staunch ally of General George B. McClellan, part of the reason he was not considered for command of the Army of the Potomac following the latter's dismissal in November 1862. At the battle of Fredericksburg, Va., Franklin commanded the "Left Grand Division" who ran straight into General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson who was commanding the Confederate right flank, across the Rappahannock River to the south of Fredericksburg. Afterwards, when General Joseph Hooker took over command of the Army of the Potomac, whom Franklin refused to fight under, he was reassigned to the Department of the Gulf in New Orleans, under General Nathaniel P. Banks. In September 1863, he tried to capture Sabine Pass, but the operation ended abruptly after the combined Union Army and Navy invasion force of four gunboats, and seven troop transports under General Franklin's command lost two warships. He later commanded the 19th Corps in the ill fated Red River campaign, and on April 8, 1864, he was wounded in the leg at the Battle of Mansfield in Louisiana, but stayed on the field with his troops. While on medical leave, he was captured by Major Harry Gilmore's Confederate partisan rangers in a train near Washington, D.C., but he managed to escape from his captors. The remainder of his army career was limited by disability from his war wound. Following the Civil War, General Franklin relocated to Hartford, Connecticut, and became the vice-president of the Colt Firearms Manufacturing Company serving in that capacity until 1888. Between 1872, and 1880, he supervised the construction of the Connecticut State Capitol at Hartford. In 1872, Franklin was approached by a Pennsylvania and New Jersey faction of the Democratic Party to run against Horace Greeley for the party's nomination as President of the United States, a task he declined, citing a need for party unity. He was a delegate to the 1876 Democratic National Convention. During the 1876 presidential election, he served as an elector for Samuel J. Tilden. He was made a grand officer of the Legion of Honor, and between 1880 and 1899, he was president of the Board of Managers of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers. William B. Franklin died in Hartford, Connecticut, on March 8, 1903, at the age of 80, and he was buried in Prospect Hill Cemetery, in York, Pennsylvania. He was one of a relatively few general officers who fought in the Civil War to live into the 20th century. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Back mark: R.W. Addis, Photographer, McClee's Gallery, 308 Penna. Avenue, Washington, D.C. Excellent image.   


<b>Commanded the 1st Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia


Severely wounded in the Battle of the Wilderness, Virginia</b>


(1821-1904) Born in Edgefield District, South Carolina, he was one of the foremost Confederate generals of the Civil War, and the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his "Old War Horse." An 1842 graduate of West Point, Longstreet fought in the Mexican War, and was wounded in the Battle of Chapultepec.  Throughout the 1850s, he served on the western  frontier.  In June 1861, he resigned his U.S. Army commission, and joined the Confederacy. He commanded Confederate troops during an early victory at Blackburn's Ford in July, in action at the First Battle of Manassas. Longstreet made significant contributions to most major Confederate victories, primarily in the Eastern Theater with the Army of Northern Virginia. He played an important role in the Confederate success during the Seven Days Battles in the summer of 1862, where he helped supervise repeated attacks which drove the Union army away from the Confederate capital of Richmond. Longstreet led a devastating counterattack that routed the Union army at the Second Battle of Manassas in August. He also played vital roles at the battles at Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. Longstreet's most controversial service was at the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863, where he openly disagreed with General Lee on the tactics to be employed, and reluctantly supervised several unsuccessful attacks on the Union forces who held the high ground. Sent to the Western Theater to aide General Braxton Bragg, his troops launched a ferocious assault on the Union lines at Chickamauga that carried the day. Returning east, he ably commanded troops during the Battle of the Wilderness in May 1864, where he was seriously wounded by friendly fire. He later returned to the field, serving under General Lee in the Siege of Petersburg, and in the Appomattox campaign. Longstreet enjoyed a successful post-war career working for the U.S. government as a diplomat, civil servant, and administrator. His support for the Republican Party, and his cooperation with his old pre-war friend, President Ulysses S. Grant, as well as critical comments he wrote about General  Robert E. Lee's wartime performance, made him anathema to many of his former Confederate colleagues.  Consequently, his detractors focused on Longstreet's  actions at Gettysburg as a principal reason for why the South lost the Civil War turning him into their personal scapegoat, actions that would prove unjustified. Longstreet's reputation has undergone a reassessment, and many Civil War historians now consider him among the war's most gifted tactical commanders.  General James Longstreet died in Gainesville, Georgia, on January 2, 1904, six days before his 83rd birthday. Bishop Benjamin Joseph Keiley, who had served under Longstreet during the war, said his funeral Mass. Longstreet's remains are buried in Alta Vista Cemetery in Gainesville.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York. Slightly bumped at edges. Light wear at the top of the reverse of the mount. Very fine. Extremely desirable Confederate general. 

  H 116in. x W 72in. x D 6in.

CDV, General George Stoneman

 

CDV, General William B. Franklin

 

CDV, General James Longstreet $250.00

 

H 116in. x W 72in. x D 6in. $4800.00

H 67in. W 60in.  H 47in. x W 144in. x D 10in.  H 36in. x W 144in. x D 8in.  


<b>Colonel of the 4th New Mexico Infantry


Severely wounded in the head and eye at the Battle of Gettysburg resulting in him becoming blind</b>  


(1813-86) Born in St. Louis, Missouri, he graduated from West Point in the class of 1834. He saw service in the Southwest, and against the Seminole Indians in Florida as a lieutenant in the 7th U.S. Infantry. While fighting in the Mexican War, he was wounded at the Battle of Cerro Gordo, but he recovered in time to serve in the campaign to capture Mexico City. He then led an assault party that captured a Mexican flag during the storming of Chapultepec earning a brevet for gallantry, and he was presented with a sword by the citizens of his hometown of St. Louis. He next served on the Indian frontier in the Department of New Mexico. In December of 1861, he was appointed colonel of the 4th New Mexico Infantry, which was later merged into the 1st New Mexico Cavalry. The following spring while in command of Fort Union, and the District of Southern New Mexico, he helped to repel the invasion of Confederate General Henry H. Sibley. Promoted to brigadier general, Paul was transferred to the eastern theater of war where he commanded a brigade in General Abner Doubleday's division, of General John F. Reynold's 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac, at the Battles of Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsvile. On July 1, 1863, during the first day of the crucial 3 day battle of Gettysburg, General Paul, who was commanding a brigade, of General John C. Robinson's division, was severely wounded by a rifle ball which entered his right temple, and passed out through his left eye leaving him totally blinded. He was later placed on the retired list with rank of Brigadier General, United States Army. General Gabriel R. Paul, died in Washington, D.C., on May 5, 1886, at the age of 73. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


<u>Signature With Sentiment</u>: 3 x 1 1/4, in ink, "Very truly yours, G.R. Paul." Very desirable Gettysburg autograph. Extremely rare signature, the first one I've owned in over 20 years, and only the 3rd one I have had in 50 years!!

H 67in. W 60in. $350.00

 

H 47in. x W 144in. x D 10in. $2400.00

 

RAINBOW RESTAURANT SIGN $2400.00

 

Autograph, General Gabriel R. Paul $395.00




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