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<u>John J. Ingalls</u>: (1833-1900) Born in Middleton, Essex County, Mass., he graduated from Williams College, Williamstown, Mass., in 1855, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1857, and moved to Kansas in 1858. Member of the State constitutional convention in 1859. Was Secretary of the Territorial Council in 1860. Served as Secretary of the Kansas State Senate in 1861. During the Civil War he was judge advocate of the Kansas Volunteers. Served as a Kansas State Senator in 1862. He was the editor of the Atchison Champion, 1863-65, and helped to found the Kansas Magazine. Served as U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1873-91, being President pro tempore of the Senate during the 49th, 50th and 51st U.S. Congresses. He was the Chairman of the Committee on Pensions, and served on the Committee on the District of Columbia.


<u>Jonathan Chace</u>: (1829-1917) Born at Falls River, Mass., he was engaged in the cotton manufacturing business. Served as Rhode Island State Senator, 1876-77. Was U.S. Congressman from Rhode Island, 1881-85, and U.S. Senator, 1885-89. Chairman of the Committee on Civil Service and Retrenchment. 


<u>Signatures</u>: 4 1/2 x 2, in ink, John J. Ingalls, Jonathan Chace. The paper has been irregularly cut.   


<b>Signed by Medal of Honor Recipient, Lieutenant James S. Casey</b>


7 3/4 x 10, printed form, filled out in ink.


Fort Columbus, N.Y.,

New York, Jany. 8, 1863


Received, from SIMEON DRAPER, Provost Marshal General, the following described person, a deserter, viz.:


Rank, Private

Name, James M. Newbury

Company, H

Regiment, 156th

State, N.Y.


James S. Casey

1 Lt. 5 Inf.


Light age toning and wear. Uncommon and very desirable deserter related document signed by a U.S. Medal of Honor recipient.


<u>James S. Casey</u>: (1833-99) Born in Philadelphia, he joined the 7th New York State Militia at the outbreak of the war, in April 1861. He was commissioned 2nd lieutenant, in the 5th U.S. Infantry, on August 5, 1861. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant, September 25, 1861; captain, December 1, 1863; and brevet major, March 25, 1865, for his gallantry in action at the battle of Fort Stedman, Virginia. After the war he became a Companion of the New York Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Casey served under former Civil War General Nelson A. Miles, in the Black Hills War, earning the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry in leading his command in an assault against a superior number of Indians in the battle of Wolf Mountain, Montana, on January 8, 1877. He was promoted to major of the 17th U.S. Infantry, on June 27, 1884; lieutenant colonel, of the 1st U.S. Infantry, on April 23, 1890; colonel, of the 22nd U.S. Infantry, on January 21, 1895; and he retired from the army on January 28, 1897. Colonel Casey was buried at Vale Cemetery, in Schenectady, New York.


<u>James M. Newbury</u>: He was 18 years old when he enlisted as a private, on August 21, 1862, at Marbletown, N.Y., and was mustered into the 156th New York Infantry. Apparently released as a deserter, he rejoined his regiment, and died of disease, on February 11, 1863, at New Orleans, Louisiana.


<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: Fort Columbus, N.Y., played an important role in the military life of New York City as the largest army post defending the city. As the closest major army post to the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, Fort Columbus for many years served as a first posting or a major departure point for newly graduated cadets shipping to army posts along the Atlantic or Pacific coasts. Many future generals in the Civil War were posted to or passed through Fort Columbus as young junior officers. Among them were Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant, Thomas J. Jackson, Joseph E. Johnston, John Bell Hood, Theophilus H. Holmes, Abner Doubleday, Henry W. Halleck, James B. McPherson, John G. Barnard, Horace Brooks, and others. 


In December 1860, and April 1861, the Federal Army secretly dispatched troops and provisions from Fort Columbus to relieve the besieged garrison at Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. In the early years of the Civil War, the north barracks were used to hold Confederate officers taken as prisoners of war pending transfer to other Union prisons such as Johnson's Island, near Sandusky, Ohio, Fort Delaware, Delaware, or Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. Major General William H. C. Whiting died of dysentery in February 1865 in the post hospital shortly after his surrender at the Battle of Fort Fisher, North Carolina. He was the highest ranking Confederate officer to die as a prisoner of war at Fort Columbus.         



 


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient for gallantry at Port Hudson, Louisiana


Earned the Gold Lifesaving Medal of Honor for saving drowning sailors


He is the only person in American history to have received both the Medal of Honor and the Gold Lifesaving Medal</b>


(1842-1921) Born in Bristol, Maine, Marcus A. Hanna, was living in Rockport, Massachusetts, when the Civil War broke out. He enlisted as a landsman, at Boston, on May 9, 1861, and was mustered into the U.S. Navy. He was discharged on June 20, 1862 having served on the U.S.S. Ohio, the U.S.S. Mississippi and the U.S.S. Niagara respectively. He then decided to join the Union army and enlisted on September 15, 1862, and was mustered into Co. B, 50th Massachusetts Infantry. During the regiment's service at Port Hudson, Louisiana, Sergeant Hanna, was awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantry when he exposed himself to a heavy Rebel fire in order to get water for his comrades who were pinned down in their rifle pits. He was mustered out of the 50th Massachusetts Infantry on August 24, 1863, and was then mustered into Co. K, 2nd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. He served in this unit until his discharge at Wilmington, N.C., on September 3, 1865. In 1869, Hanna was appointed keeper of Pemaquid Point Light in his hometown of Bristol, Maine. In 1873, he was transferred to Two Lights in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he served as head light keeper. He was awarded the Congressional Gold Life Saving Medal in 1885 for single handedly rescuing sailors of a wrecked schooner while serving at Two Lights, Cape Elizabeth, Maine. According to the Official Coast Guard records Hanna braved a blizzard and freezing temperatures and risked his own life to save the doomed men.  He successfully got the sailors off the ship and brought them to the nearby signal house where they were able to be warmed to save them from exposure and frostbite.   



Marcus A. Hanna

Port Hudson, Louisiana

July 4, 1863


<u>BRAVE AND RESOURCEFUL</u>


"VOLUNTARILY exposed himself to a heavy fire to get water for comrades in rifle pits."  This is the inscription on the Medal of Honor, the proud bearer of which is Marcus A. Hanna, sergeant of Company B, Fiftieth Massachusetts Infantry.


The incident occurred at Port Hudson, on July 4, 1863, and serves not only to illustrate the hero's feeling for his suffering comrades, but his courage and resourcefulness as well.  Sergeant Hanna gives a detailed description of the occurrence, as follows:


"While our forces were closely investing Port Hudson, four days before its surrender, the Fiftieth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was ordered into the rifle-pits to support a New York battery.  It was early in the morning, and we had just been relieved from similar duty, performed during the night.  The men went back to the pits without having time to replenish their haversacks or canteens.  The day was intensely hot and by noon the men were suffering from thirst.  How to get water was a  problem, with the enemy on the alert and posted on works but a short distance from and considerably higher than our position.


"At about 2 or 3 o'clock P.M. the thirst of our men had become almost unbearable and Lieutenant William H. Hurd, in command of our company, gave some of us permission to go to the rear for water.  Orderly Sergeant Blatchford and myself were the only sergeants present that day.  I at once volunteered to go, and asked for a file of men to assist me.  No one responded.  I decided to try it alone.  I took twelve or fifteen canteens-all I could conveniently carry-hung them about my neck, and placed them about my body to afford protection from rebel bullets.  A dummy, made by rigging up a musket with a blouse and cap, was prepared, the idea being to raise it above our pit and, if possible, draw the fire of the enemy, and then, before they had time to reload, I was to take my chances.  Carefully we raised the dummy until the cap only could be seen, then we ducked it out of sight, to 

hoist it again at once, this time showing the head and body.


"The deception was a success, for at once there came a heavy volley, and before the smoke had cleared away, I was up and off as rapidly as my light but bulky load would permit. I steered across the level plains for the nearest cover some 600 yards away, but I had not gone far, before I could hear the patter of bullets all around me, and knew that I was within sight and range. Yet, I kept on my course, until about half the distance was covered when I realized that I could not escape being hit, and bethought myself of the ruse of throwing myself prostrate, as if killed or badly wounded.  The trick was successful. The firing ceased, and, after lying prone until I was well rested, I sprang to my feet and ran like a deer for the blackberry hedge. In this second race, no further shots were sent after me by the enemy."


"I went about half a mile further to a spring, filled my load of canteens, not one of which, in spite of the firing, had been punctured, and began cautiously to work my way back to my company in the rifle-pits.  Instead of making a bee-line for the pit, I made a detour to the left, in order to bring one of our batteries between myself and the enemy.  After I had reached the battery I had still some sixty or seventy yards to go to the right, wholly exposed to the enemy's fire.  However, I covered this distance 

unmolested.  Lieutenant Hurd and the men warmly congratulated me, and expressed gratitude for the partial relief I had brought them."


Source:  "Deeds of Valor"


<u>Autograph Document Signed</u>: 6 x 8 3/4, in ink. 


"Served in U.S. Navy from May 5th 1861 to June 20, 1862 [on] Frigates, Ohio, Mississippi and Niagara, rate landsman. 


Served in Army, 50th Mass. Vols. from Aug. 15, 1862 to Aug. 24, 1863. Rank private, corporal, sergeant. Reenlisted as veteran Sept. 1st, 1863 as 1st Sergeant, Co. K, 2d Mass. H.[eavy] Arty. Mustered out as 2d Lieut. October 1st, 1865.


After the war he served for a period of 20 years in Light House service. 


Awarded Congressional gold Medal of Honor for rescuing single handed crew of wrecked schooner Australia, Jan. 5th, 1885, Cape Elizabeth Lt. Station.


Awarded Army Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry before Port Hudson, July 4th, 1863.


For details of Life Saving Medal see Life Saving Report 1885, page 42.


For Army Medal, see (Circular) by War Dept. Medals of Honor published by direction of Secretary of War. 

    

Marcus A. Hanna


I never saw President Lincoln." 


Light age toning and wear. Very fine. Extremely desirable A.D.S. from this Civil War Medal of Honor recipient, who was also awarded the Gold Life Saving Medal, the only person in American history to receive both of these heroic awards!! Rare to find in this particular format detailing his military career and awards.      This outstanding heavy cast and turned bronze mortar and pestle set dates to the earlier through mid-1800s and remains in eye appealing condition with good evidence of age and period use while remaining in excellent condition with a nice untouched natural age patina.  This small <I>doctor’s bag</I> size bronze mortar stands approximately 2 1/8 inches high , is 2 1/8 inches in diameter at the mouth and 1 7/16 inches across the base.  The bronze pestle measures about 3 1/8 inches in length.  Not to be confused with more frequently encountered later examples or the common Chinese castings, this rarely found 19th century bronze apothecary mortar & pestle set will make a nice addition to any quality medical grouping or will go well simply as a period decorative piece. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Autographs, U. S. Senators John J. Ingall $15.00

 

1863 Receipt For Deserter of the 156th N $75.00

 

Autograph, Marcus A. Hanna $150.00

 

vintage – personal travel size - bronze $95.00

Most popularly seen from the earlier1800s through the 1870s, the wearing of these hand woven shirt cuff protectors was, in their time, nearly synonymous with clerking and bookkeeping with service pressed into all manner of continual activity where a reasonably well dressed gentleman was charged with repetitive writing or the handling of material before a desk or table.  In their prime many a pair of these cuffs saw use at the gambling table as a <I>well got up</I> dandy protected the cuffs of his best shirt from wear.  Seldom seen today as most were used up and cast aside in the period, this pair remain in excellent original condition and are sure to please the most discriminating antique collector.  Measuring just under 7 inches in length and 2 ¾ at the wrist flaring to approximately 4 ¾ inches in diameter, these period cuff guards will set in well in any writing instrument, country store of gambling grouping.  A scarce piece of Americana seldom surviving, this is the only pair of such cuffs we have seen outside of museum collections in over fifty years of paying attention to such treasures.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Mounted on its musket shaped oak parade staff and remaining in outstanding original condition, this wonderful old parade lantern retains its original camphene burner with patriotic red, white and blue glass panels. (With its frost etched glass panel, this offering mirrors the design and color configuration of a Lincoln / Hamlin red, white and blue parade lantern documented in the Smithsonian National Museum collection.)  Retaining its original burner still fitted with the telltale extra length small diameter, tapered brass burner tubes specifically designed to handle the clean burning and especially bright but volatile camphene fuel.  Popular in the 1850s with the use of camphene (a mixture of turpentine and alcohol) as a lighting fuel waning in the early 1860s, this lantern easily dated in the Civil War period.  Measuring approximately 4 feet, 9 inches in overall length mounted on its oak <I>musket</I> staff, the 5 inch square sheet iron lantern body measures about 11 ¼  inches in height from base to the top of its brass chimney cap.  An outstanding piece of Civil War vintage patriotic / political Americana, this rare parade lantern will be of special interest to the Lincoln and Wide Awake enthusiasts as well as Civil War historians. 

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 H 108in. x D 32in.  H 20in. x D 42in.

antique - PALMETTO CUFF GUARDS $125.00

 

c. late 1830s / early 1860s Red – White $1250.00

 

CUSTOM PENDANT 9 FT LONG $0.00

 

HUGE CUSTOM LIGHT FIXTURE $0.00

H 106in. x D 12in.


ONE PAIR  circa 1910  H 60in. x D 72in.  H 17in. x W 12in. x D 17in.  H 21in. x W 44in.

LAMP POSTS $0.00

 

HUGE BALLR0OM CHANDELIER SOLID BRASS $0.00

 

CASH REGISTER $0.00

 

WHITE OWL CIGAR TIN SIGN $0.00

H 20in. x W 26in.  H 31in. x W 23in.  H 23in. x L 60in. x W 27in.  H 17in. x W 24in. x D 5in.

PEPSI TIN SIGN $0.00

 

SILVERWOODS ICE CREAM SIGN $0.00

 

TIN BATH TUB $0.00

 

BUDWEISER NEON SIGN $0.00




<b>Son of President Lincoln's Secretary of War & U.S. Senator Simon Cameron


U.S. Secretary of War in the Cabinet of President Ulysses S. Grant


United States Senator from Pennsylvania</b>


(1833-1918) Born in Middletown, Dauphin County, Pa., he graduated from Princeton College in 1852, and received a graduate degree in 1855. President of the Northern Central Railroad Company, 1866-74. Secretary of War in the cabinet of President Ulysses S. Grant, 1876-77. Chairman of the Republican National Committee in 1880. Elected to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of his father, Simon Cameron, serving 1877-97. Was Chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs, and served on the Committee on Revolutionary Claims.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/4 x 5/8, in ink, J.D. Cameron.  H 40 in. x D 22in.  


<b>Colonel of the 13th Kansas Infantry during the Civil War


Governor of Idaho Territory


United States Senator from Colorado</b>


(1835-1906) Born near the present day site of Burlington, Iowa, he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1853. Served as a member of the Iowa State House of Representatives in 1856. On June 24, 1861, he enlisted as a captain, and was commissioned into Co. F, 1st Nebraska Cavalry. He resigned on February 4, 1862. He was commissioned captain of Co. K, 9th Kansas Cavalry, on July 30, 1862, and was discharged for promotion on September 20, 1862, and commissioned colonel of the 13th Kansas Infantry. Served as brigade commander in the District of the Frontier, 1863-64; and of the Department of Arkansas, 1864-65. Promoted to brevet brigadier general, February 13, 1865. He was mustered out of service on June 28, 1865. Residing in Arkansas after the war, he was president of the Arkansas constitutional convention in 1866, and justice of the Arkansas Supreme Court, 1867-71. He was appointed governor of the Idaho Territory by President Ulysses S. Grant, in 1871. Moving to Colorado in 1875, he resumed his law practice, and upon the organization of the State government, was elected judge of the fourth judicial district, 1876-80. Served as a member of the Colorado State House of Representatives, in 1882, and U.S. Senator, 1883-89. He was chairman of the Committee on Mining. 


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/4 x 1 1/8, in ink, Thos. M. Bowen. There is a small hole below the signature which has been repaired on the reverse with archival document tape. This defect does not affect the autograph.        


<b>United States Senator from Oregon</b> 


(1835-1905) Born in Washington County, Pa., he attended Witherspoon Institute, taught school, studied law, admitted to the bar in 1857, and began a law practice. Moved to California and then to Portland, Oregon, in 1860, where he again practiced law. Was in the Oregon State Senate, 1862-66, serving as president the last 2 years. Served as U.S. Senator, 1873-79, 1885-97, and 1901-05. Was Chairman of the Committee on Railroads, and Chairman of the Committee on Transportation Routes to the Seaboard. He also served on the Committee on Privileges and Elections, and the Committee on Coast Defenses, and the Committee on Interoceanic Canals.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/4 x 1/2, John H. Mitchell.

Autograph, James D. Cameron $35.00

 

H 40 in. x D 22in. $0.00

 

Autograph, General Thomas M. Bowen $25.00

 

Autograph, John H. Mitchell $10.00

Standing approximately 1 ¾ inches with a 3 3/8 inch diameter this untouched and as found turned wood inkwell will be a classic in any American Colonial / Revolutionary War era surrounding and with a turkey quill, will make a nice addition to any antique writing instrument collection.  Best described by our photo illustrations good reference may be found in Neumann’s  <I>EARLY AMERICAN ANTIQUE COUNTRY FURNISHINGS</I> and Newmann & Kravic’s <I>COLLECTOR'S ILLUSTRATED ENCYCLOPEDIA of the AMERICAN REVOLUTION</I>  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Our photo illustrations will likely do best to describe this desirable Civil War vintage coat except to advise that while demonstrating qualities of age and originality with the most minimal of staining and mothing, the vest remains in excellent condition throughout and is guaranteed to please per our below stated no questions return policy.  With showy floral brocade, gold wash, <I>ball</I> buttons and classic polished cotton back with quilt padded chest and fine leather inner waist band, this rarely surviving period gentleman’s vest will be a pleasing addition to any period vintage clothing grouping.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 


<b>United States Senator from New Jersey</b>


(1800-1862) Born in Morris County, N.J., he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1823, and commenced a law practice in Morristown, N.J. Served in the New Jersey State Assembly in 1832, and in the New Jersey State Council, 1838-40. Was U.S. Senator, 1841-53; serving as the Chairman on the Committee on the District of Columbia. 


<u>Signature With State</u>: 7 x 1 1/2, in ink, New Jersey, J.W. Miller. The signature only is in the hand of Senator Jacob W. Miller.  


<b>Colonel of the 19th Ohio Infantry during the Civil War


Wounded at Lovejoy Station, Ga. during the Atlanta campaign


United States Senator from Nebraska</b>


(1837-1911) Born in Philadelphia, Pa., he moved to Canton, Ohio, in 1856, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1859, and commenced practice in Canton. Manderson was elected captain of the 19th Ohio Infantry, on May 30, 1861. He was promoted to major, April 7, 1862; lieutenant colonel, February 28, 1863; colonel, April 14, 1863; he was wounded in action during the Atlanta campaign on September 2, 1864, at Lovejoy Station, Georgia; and was promoted to brevet brigadier general, March 13, 1865, for gallantry, and faithful and meritorious service during the Civil War. After the war he continued with his law practice in Canton, and then moved to Omaha, Nebraska in 1869, where he continued to practice law in that city. Served as a member of the State Constitutional Conventions in 1871 and 1875. Elected to the U.S. Senate in 1883 serving until 1895. He was President pro tempore of the Senate during the 51st, 52nd and 53rd Congresses. Was Chairman of the Committee on Printing. Appointed general solicitor of the Burlington system of railroads west of the Missouri River. Served as Vice President of the American Bar Association in 1899, and President in 1900.


<u>Signature</u>: 5 1/4 x 5/8, in ink, Chas. F. Manderson. Light staining spot at right. Cut slightly irregular at the top edge which does not affect any of the handwriting.

18th early 19th Century Treen INKWELL $75.00

 

original mid 1800s Gentleman’s Vest $185.00

 

Autograph, Jacob W. Miller $10.00

 

Autograph, General Charles F. Manderson $20.00

Constructed from soldered, lap seam, sheet iron, this period tinder box fire starter is of classic period design measuring approximately 4 1/2 inches in diameter and stands about 1 13/16 from rim to rim with an applied candlestick holder and finger loop.  Solid with good evidence of age and period use this <I>box</I> contains its period carbon residue under the original sheet iron <I>damper</I> with finger loop, period beeswax fragment, two flints (one of which is clearly is a discharged musket flint), and a period maker marked <I>striker</I> or steel.  All is set off by the retention of a period candle stub.  A <I>must have</I> 18th early 19th century utility, the tinder box fire starter required some skill, experience and effort to create a usable fire in a time when the open flame was essential to the giving of light, heat from the cold and fire for cooking.  Quickly falling out of favor upon the advent of the common match, the tinder box all but disappeared with few examples to survive into today’s antique market.  Those few original tinder boxes existing today seldom contain, as does this offering, the period content essential to creating fire.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Another piece carved out of our own accumulation of Civil War vintage <I>stuff</I>, this neat old hand crafted mess plate measures a full 10 inches in diameter and remains in  pleasing condition yet with good evidence of age and originality.   Hand formed of sheet-iron then geometrically hand decorated using hand punches or dies* the plate is finished with rolled over and flattened rim.  A classic process of the period <I>tin-smith</I> as he plied his trade without benefit of more efficient sheet metalwork equipment found in commercial shops. (* The punches used were handmade resembling stencil cutting or wood working chisels but rather than a cutting tool, were dulled at the edge so as to create a shaped indentation in sheet iron.) A lot to say about a mess plate I suppose but we sell what we like and as an old Maine Mill, Master Journeyman I do get caught up in the intricacies of the old trades.   

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 


<b>A Pictorial Review Of The Individuals In The Confederate Armed Forces</b>


By William A. Albaugh, III. Broadfoot Publishing Company, Wilmington, North Carolina, 1993. 229 pages. 8 1/2 x 11 1/4, hardcover with illustrated dust jacket. Light wear to the dust jacket. Brand new condition. Very valuable reference work on Confederate images. A must have for all Confederate photograph collectors and Civil War libraries!  A rare find for the late 1700s early 1800s pewter or Americana collector is this scarce small <I>sugar</I> spoon mold.  A classic period bronze mold used in the casting of small (4 13/16 long) pewter spoons with 15/16 inch wide by 1 5/8 inch long bowl, this rarely encountered sugar spoon mold measures 5 9/16 in total length.  Emanating from an old collection dating from the days when such treasures could be found, this all mold offers a deep natural patina with complete period originality to include an unusual <I>half funnel</I> design as opposed to the usual full funnel as provided by a half funnel at the mouth of each of the two pieces.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

1700s early 1800s Tinder Box with conten $295.00

 

unusual decorated Civil War era sheet-ir $75.00

 

Confederate Faces $45.00

 

rare! late 18th century early 19th centu $125.00

A desirable 19th century pharmacist’s <I>tool of the trade</I>, this brass bound walnut pill machine is best known by collectors as a <I>pill roller</I> and will fit nicely in any collection of Civil War medical items.   (see: <I>Pictorial Encyclopedia of Civil War Medical Instruments & Equipment</I> by Damman ) In the period the making of pills entailed the creation of a dough like material containing the necessary <I>medication</I>, rolling out that dough to form an appropriately sized quarter inch thick sheet. The pharmacist placed the dough sheet on the machine base and pressed the top or <I>paddle</I>over the sheet drawing the paddle back and forth cutting and forming the material into cylindrical strips which were cut to appropriate length to afford the proper dosage and rolled into pills.  The base of this this all original and period pill machine measures approximately 13 7/8 X 7 ¾  inches with a 16 inch paddle.  All complete and functional this device offers good evidence of age and period use yet remains in excellent condition with a pleasing untouched age patina. We have left the brass <I>as found</I>, uncleaned and unpolished just as it came out of decades of storage. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Untouched and as found after decades of attic storage, our photos will offer the best description of this offering except to advise that this set of blacksmith wrought ice creepers is completely original even to  retaining their <U>period leather fasteners.</U>  Classic period repurposing seems evident here as the tops of <I>used up</I> boots saw additional usefulness on these creepers.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Acquired directly from the Vermont estate and offered at auction some years ago with a number of inscribed books from his personal library (2 included here as additional provenance) this historic Civil War folk art bone ring of <U>Congressional Medal of Honor</U> winner <B>Major Charles G. Gould</B> remains in pleasing original condition with eye appealing natural age patina, good evidence of period wearing and, most importantly, convincing provenance.  Initially acquired by us to be retained in our personal collection of Civil War vintage folk art carved bone, (see: www.MaineLegacy.com) we have decided to offer the piece to another  appreciative home as our own Civil War collection is focused on Maine related artifacts.  With a myriad of resource material in print and on the internet (see: <I> Roster of Vermont Volunteers During the War of the Rebellion 1861-66 - Deeds of Valor /  How our Soldier-heroes won the Medal of Honor - The Medical and Surgical History of the Civil War </I>)  suffice it to say here that Charles Gould, a resident of Windham, Vermont, was a mere three months into his seventeenth year on August 13,1862 when he enlisted as a Private of Co. G <B>5th Vermont Volunteer Infantry</B>.  Promoted to Corporal, December 27, 1863, Gould was commissioned as Lieutenant of Co. F of the 5th Vermont Infantry before transferring on December 22,1864 to be commissioned into  Co. E  <B>11th Vermont Vol. Infantry</B>.   Wounded April 2,1865 at Petersburg, Virginia, Gould was awarded the Medal of Honor for Gallantry in assault and capture of Petersburg on that date.  Per his Medal of Honor citation Gould was <I><B>Among the first to mount the enemy's works in the assault, he received a serious bayonet wound in the face, was struck several times with clubbed muskets, but bravely stood his ground, and with his sword killed the man who bayoneted him. </I></B>  Promoted Major by Brevet  for his gallantry at Petersburg, Virginia, Gould mustered out on June 19, 1865.  After the Civil War he lived and worked in Washington D. C. returning to the family home in Vermont in retirement.  He died at age seventy-one and is buried in the Windham Central Cemetery, Windham, Vermont.  

     While the circumstances of the carving of the bone ring and exactly when he started wearing it have been lost in time, considerable period wear, (significantly heavier on the right side indicating that it was likely worn on the left little finger), and the usual history of these period popular pieces among the lower enlisted ranks, would indicate the ring was likely acquired early in Gould’s service and worn throughout the War.   As such, this wonderful personal artifact of the hard fought New England Congressional Medal of Honor recipient would have been worn through action at the Battle of Crampton's Gap, <U>Antietam</U> and <U> Fredericksburg</U>, Salem Church, <B>Gettysburg</B>, <U>Battle of the Wilderness</U>, Spotsylvania Court House, <U>Cold Harbor</U>, Cedar Creek and finally Petersburg on April 2, 1865 where despite being  cut on the head by a sword and bayoneted in both the spine and mouth Gould managed to kill the man who had bayonetted him in the face he was credited with being the first man of the Sixth Corps over the Confederate works.  (see: Don Troiani’s limited edition print of Gould in action <I>Medal Of Honor Petersburg, April 2, 1865</I>.

     Provenance will include our own letter attesting to our knowledge of the estate auction, a copy of the advertisement published by the auctioneer holding the Gould estate sale and a signed statement of provenance by the auction worker / collector who acquired the Gould ring from the estate.  Additionally the ring will come with Gould’s signed volume of the  <I>Gettysburg National Military Park Commission - Annual Reports to the Secretary of War, 1893-1901</I>.  While included here simply as  remnant of the estate sale, this signed by Gould, hardbound government edition is a nice Gettysburg item in and of itself .   Also included as a memento from Charles Gould’s Vermont estate will be a copy of Kennon’s <I>MANUAL OF GUARD DUTY</I> published by the War Department and inscribed to him in 1891.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>



<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things to include personals, carved bone & more, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>


 H 10in. x D 24in.

antique pharmaceutical PILL ROLLER $225.00

 

1700s early through mid 1800s HANDWROUGH $135.00

 

Civil War personalized bone ring of MEDA $895.00

 

H 10in. x D 24in. $0.00

Too small for anything but single serving <I>camp</I> use, these little 3 ½ high by 3 ¼ inch mouth diameter, pottery bean pots must have lost favor for all else as period examples have disappeared from the scene even here in Maine where the little native red-ware pot was a natural to the baked kidney bean eating <I>Yankee</I>.  Easy to carry and high in protein, dried beans were plumped by soaking in water prior to being place in the pot with, if one were so fortunate, a healthy portion of molasses, touch of brown sugar, pinch of dried mustard then topped with a cube of salt pork.  Buried to the rim in the coals of a campfire with a flat stone to cover the mouth and hold in heat, the little pot would soon offer a tasty, trail hardy meal.  Emanating from a Maine farm attic, this little gem remains in excellent, unused condition and offers good period characteristics to include the telltale raw outer surface with interior glaze.   Consistent with the field practice of using a stone, there is no inner lip for a cover as was common to larger <I>home</I>bean pots.  Surviving in as new and unused condition with no chips, cracks, or other issues this little period Maine baked bean pot will be a nice find for the Civil War era personal item enthusiast!  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>


 Measuring approximately 19 inches  around the curve from tip to mouth this beautiful old steer horn vase offers an unusually appealing grain figure set off by an attractive natural age color that comes to <I>old breed</I> white steer horn with the passing of decades.  Still retaining the original protective brass finial at the tip, the mouth is fitted with applied, scalloped sheet brass with a brass eye such that the vase may be hung in use or simply utilized as a shelf or table setting centerpiece with a floral or greenery spray.  A popular 1800s ranch or country home decoration frequently serving as a remembrance of a favorite steer.  Solid and in pleasing condition with no cracks or holes, this all original country steer horn vase offers exceptional color and grain.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>   This 6th Corps, Army of the Potomac device is approximately 1 5/8 inches  square and is constructed in the style referred to in the period as <I>extra rich</I> with heavy bullion surmounted over its’ crimson velvet center of the 1st Division.  The piece came to us years ago from the personal collection of Dr. Francis Lord  who authored the old standard <I>Lord’s Civil War Collector’s Encyclopedia</I>. The badge has a classic cotton gauze backing and as you can see remains in fine condition.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient


The Founder and President of Howard University for African-Americans in Washington, D.C.</b>


(1830-1909) Graduated #4 in the West Point class of 1846. Was Colonel 3rd Maine Infantry, June 1861. He saw action at 1st Bull Run, Yorktown and Fair Oaks where he received two serious wounds resulting in the amputation of his right arm, and was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. He also fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, where he was voted the Thanks of Congress, and in the Atlanta campaign. He founded Howard University for African-Americans in Washington and served as it's president from 1869-74. Continuing in the Regular Army after the Civil War, he was peace commissioner to the Apaches, participated in Indian fighting and served as superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.


Authentic, antique portrait engraving, in uniform with rank of major general, with printed facsimile autograph with rank beneath his likeness. Published by C.B. Richardson, J.J. & W. Wilson, Printers. 5 1/4 x 9 1/4.

scarce ! period Maine redware - single $75.00

 

19th century Steer Horn - VASE $95.00

 

Civil War vintage 6th ARMY CORPS DEVICE $245.00

 

General Oliver O. Howard




History in 3-D. By Bob Zeller. Chronicle Books, San Francisco, 2000. Hard cover, 10 x 9 3/4, 120 pages, index, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition.


Incidents of The Rebellion. Civil War Photographs Seen As They Were Meant To Be Seen. In 3-D. View The Tangle Of The Wilderness; The Lost Cyclorama; The Rarest Gettysburg Photo; A Slave Church; The Civil War In Color; The CSS Florida; The Western Theater. Complete with Viewer. 


Superb, scholarly reference work that is a must have for all Civil War photograph collectors. Many of the images in this book were never published before which includes a rare portfolio of color Civil War images! Comes with an easy to use stereoscopic viewer, which unveils each image in glorious 3-D as it was originally taken and meant to be seen. Never has the Civil War been seen with such extraordinary clarity.   


Unused, 3 1/2 x 5 1/2, linen postcard, with full color illustration of the President Lincoln Statue At the Entrance To Grandview Park, Sioux City, Iowa. Descriptive text on the reverse. Very minor edge wear. Excellent color and subject matter. Circa 1930-1945. Very desirable President Abraham Lincoln philatelic related collectible.  


(1798-1879) Joined the U.S. Army in 1813. Was New York Secretary of State, 1833-39, and was elected to the Senate in 1845. In January 1861, President Buchanan appointed him Secretary of the Treasury, and on Jan. 29, 1861, he made his famous American flag dispatch to a treasury official in New Orleans, "If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot," which became a clarion call to the North! Commissioned a Major General by Abraham Lincoln, on May 16, 1861, he was first on this list, thus outranking all other volunteer officers during the Civil War. He commanded the following military departments: Dept. of Pa.; Middle Dept.; Dept. of Va.; Dept. of the East. He made an important and distinguished contribution to the Union cause when he suppressed the 1863 New York City draft riots. Was elected Governor of New York in 1872. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view in uniform with epaulettes and rank of major general, holding his sword. 1861 M.B. Brady imprint on the front mount. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Light age toning and wear. Top corners of the mount are slightly rounded.  


<b>Imprint of Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries</b>


(1823-1874) Graduated 4th in the West Point class of 1846. He won two brevets and was severely wounded in the Mexican War. As chief engineer of the fortifications of Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, he was a leading participant in the bombardment of Fort Sumter which were the opening shots of the Civil War. He later took part in General Ambrose E. Burnside's North Carolina expedition, and commanded the Department of North Carolina, the Department of Ohio, the Department of the South, and the Department of Florida respectively.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 7/8 card. Mount is trimmed. Half view pose in uniform with rank of major general. He is wearing a kepi with a U.S. hat wreath insignia and two stars clearly visible at the center representing his rank of major general. Backmark: Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries, Broadway & Tenth Street, New York & No. 352 Pennsylvania Ave, Washington, D.C., with 2 cents orange George Washington U.S. Internal Revenue tax stamp on the reverse. Light age toning, discoloration and minor wear. Very fine Mathew B. Brady image.

The Civil War In Depth, Volume II $25.00

 

President Abraham Lincoln Statue, Sioux

 

CDV, General John A. Dix $100.00

 

CDV, General John G. Foster $85.00




<b>Signed by a North Carolina private who was wounded and captured at the battle of Gettysburg!</b>


8 1/2 x 11, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


March 30th, 1901


To the United Daughters of the Confederacy:


The undersigned, residing at Washington, N.C., who is an Ex-Confederate Soldier, but not a member of any Camp, hereby makes application for a Confederate Cross of Honor. Applicant entered the service of the Confederate States on the 10th day of M[ar]ch. 1864, as a private in Company A of the 67th Regiment of North Carolina Volunteers, C.S.A., and was at that time a resident of Beaufort County, N.C. Your applicant was honorably discharged from said service by Col. Jno. N. Whitford, Col. 67th Regt. N.C. Vol. on the 10th day of May 1865, at which time he held the rank of private.


Respectfully,

T.J. Harding

Applicant


We endorse the above application,


W.C.[?]

Member Co. K, Regt. 10 Vols., C.S.A.


W.L. Dudley

Member Co. E, Regt. 55 Vols., C.S.A.


Light age toning and wear. There are two punch holes at the top of the document which do not affect any of the content. Any document signed by a Confederate soldier who was wounded and captured at the battle of Gettysburg is always popular and in demand.


William L. Dudley, who signed this document at the bottom, was a 30 year old farmer from Pitt County, North Carolina, when he enlisted as a private on April 22, 1862, and was mustered into Co. E, 55th North Carolina Infantry. He was wounded in action at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, and captured on July 3, 1863. After being confined as a prisoner of war, he was exchanged at City Point, Va., on August 20, 1863. The date of his discharge is unknown.


The 55th North Carolina Infantry fought in the Army of Northern Virginia from Gettysburg to Cold Harbor, in the Petersburg trenches, and in the Appomattox campaign. They were in the brigades of Generals' Joseph R. Davis and John Rogers Cooke. From July 1-3, 1863, at Gettysburg, they suffered 41 men killed, 210 wounded, and 259 captured. During the Wilderness campaign the regiment lost 59% of the 640 men engaged, and when they surrendered at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, there were only 4 officers and 77 men left of the gallant 55th N.C. Infantry.  


5 x 7 3/8, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, June 6, 1861


General Orders,

No. 30


I--The State of Missouri is added to the Military Department of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and portions of Western Pennsylvania and Virginia. Major General McClellan will extend his command accordingly.


II--The Headquarters of the Department of the West are removed from St. Louis to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.


III--The three months' militia and the three years' volunteers will be paid at once to include the 31st of May, 1861. With this view, Commanding officers of these troops will cause duplicate muster rolls to be made out immediately, which they will forward to the Paymaster General in this city; and upon these rolls the officers of the Pay Department will pay in full, leaving any stoppage to be deducted at a future payment.


IV--The names of the following officers will be stricken from the Rolls of the Army:


Captain Charles H. Tyler, 2d Dragoons, for abandoning the command of, and deserting his Post, Fort Kearny.


1st Lieutenant Charles H. Rundell, 4th Infantry, for continued disobedience of orders, absence without leave, and failing to render his accounts as required by the Act of January 31, 1823.


1st Lieutenant Andrew Jackson, 3d Infantry, for absenting himself from his company without permission, and failing to make any report.


And 2nd Lieutenants Charles E. Patterson, 4th Infantry; Olin F. Rice, 6th Infantry, and Charles C. Campbell, 1st Cavalry, for tendering their resignations in the face of the enemy.


BY ORDER:

L. THOMAS

Adjutant General


There is a light vertical fold crease in the paper which does not really detract from the overall appearance of the document. Very fine 1861 U.S. War Department imprint.  


<b>Morse's Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tennessee imprint</b>


(1808-75) Congressman, Senator and Governor of Tennessee. He was nominated and elected vice president on the Union Republican ticket in 1864. Upon Abraham Lincoln's assassination in April 1865, he became our 17th president and resolved to follow Lincoln's plans for reconstruction without bitterness or malice. His reconstruction plan clashed drastically with that of the Radical Republicans in congress, and Johnson's term was one humiliation after another, culminating on Feb. 24, 1868 with a resolution of impeachment against him. This failed by one vote to pass, and he served out his term.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view pose. Backmark: Morse's Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tenn. Light horizontal crease below the subject that is hardly noticeable. Scarce imprint for an Andrew Johnson image.  


<b>United States Congressman from Massachusetts</b>


(1758-1808) Born in Dedham, Mass., he graduated from Harvard College in 1774, studied law, was admitted to the bar,  and practiced in Dedham. He served in the Massachusetts State House of Representatives in 1788, and was a member of the Massachusetts convention that was called for the ratification of the Federal Constitution. Elected as a Pro-Administration candidate for the First through the Third U.S. Congresses and as a Federalist to the Fourth Congress, he served from 1789-1797. He was the chairman of the Committee on Elections. He served as a member of the Governor's Council, 1798-1800. Chosen as the president of Harvard University in 1804, he was forced to decline the prestigious position because of failing health. Ames was an important leader in the U.S. House of Representatives, and was highly noted for his oratorical skills, and was a very influential figure of his era.


Original mid 1800's period engraving, 4 x 6 3/4, tipped to a 6 x 9 1/4 album page with black border around his portrait. Imprint of Stuart Pinx. Light age toning. Very fine. Desirable early U.S. Congressional leader.

Application for Confederate Cross of Hon $75.00

 

War Department Orders Issued by Adjutant $10.00

 

CDV, President Andrew Johnson $95.00

 

Fisher Ames $10.00




<b>From Seven Days to Second Bull Run</b>




By The Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1984. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on horseback surrounded by some of his top generals including Jackson, Longstreet and A.P. Hill. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition.


The Cover: Astride his gray mount Traveller, General Robert E. Lee pauses beneath an oak tree with his senior officers to reconnoiter an enemy position. The aggressive strategy Lee embraced after taking command of the Army of Northern Virginia reversed for a time the tide of war in the East.  


<b>The "Little Giant" opposed Abraham Lincoln in the 1860 presidential election


1861 Chicago imprint on the front mount</b>


(1813-1861) An outstanding legislator, and orator, he was one of the founders of the Democratic Party in Illinois. Served as U.S. Senator, 1843-61. He is best known for his debates in 1858 against Abraham Lincoln. He was narrowly defeated for the Democratic nomination for president by Franklin Buchanan in 1856. He did gain the Democratic nomination in 1860, but was defeated for the presidency by his old friend and rival Abraham Lincoln. Upon secession, and the outbreak of the Civil War, he supported Lincoln and his policies. He died of typhoid fever in 1861.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Imprint on the front of the card mount, Douglas' Grave, Born April 23, 1813. Died June 3, 1861. From Carbutt's Gallery, 131 Lake Street, Chicago. Written in pencil on the reverse of the card is "Grave of Senator Stephen A. Douglas taken shortly after his death in 1861." Light age toning and wear. Slightly rounded corners.  Very fine.  


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color and published in Harper's Weekly. General Grant is the central figure of this battle scene as he rallies his troops with his sword upraised over his head. Several other Union soldiers are prominent in the scene. This is a double page centerfold that measures 14 1/4 x 22 1/4. Caption: Major-General Ulysses S. Grant Before Vicksburg. Circa 1863. Light age toning and fold  wear. Very desirable General U.S. Grant illustration.  


1861 Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of Columbia holding a sword and an American flag, etc. Motto at left edge, "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" and above, "Conquer we must, for our cause it is just. Let this be our motto. In God is our trust." "Copyright 1861" imprinted below the illustration. Light staining at the corners. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

Lee Takes Command $15.00

 

CDV, The Gravesite of Senator Stephen A. $95.00

 

General Ulysses S. Grant on Horseback $75.00

 

Conquer We Must For Our Cause it is Just $5.00




By Jerry Korn and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1985. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of Union gunboats on the Mississippi River. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 175 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition.


The Cover: A Federal flotilla under Rear Admiral David Porter braves a storm of fire from Confederate batteries along the shore and atop the high bluffs at Vicksburg on the night of April 16, 1863. The transports and barges, lashed to the sides of Porter's gunboats for protection, carry troops and supplies downriver for Major General Ulysses S. Grant's campaign to assault Vicksburg from the south.   A bit late for our usual fare but representative of our affinity for surviving utilitarian items of gone bye everyday life, this neat old worker’s dinner bucket remains untouched, as found and apparently unused.  Not a big deal unless you appreciate such things, this old time dinner pail is complete and original even to its tin cup on the lid.  It stands just under 10 inches base to the top of its cup and is about 7 inches  in diameter.   Retaining an original bright shiny tinned finish on internal surfaces, the outer portions offer that desirable natural age patina that comes to tin with decades of natural exposure.  Now an attractive Americana collectable these sturdy dinner pails were used by , miners, factory workers, dock hands, and other laborers from the mid-19th century to hold hard-boiled eggs, vegetables, meat, pie, and other hardy fare until 1904 when the advent of the <I>thermos</I> vacuumed bottle brought about a change in design of the common <I>lunch-box</I> still popular today. A nice old piece of Americana on the fringe of our usual time period but scarce in this condition and worthy of appreciation.  .  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, August 18, 1863


General Orders

No. 288


<i>Order in relation to Seizure of Goods</i>


In every case of seizure of goods by officers acting under the authority of this Department, a true and perfect inventory thereof shall be taken in triplicate by the officer making the seizure, one copy of which shall be given to the person from whom the goods were taken, one copy retained by the officer, and the third copy will be forwarded with a report of the seizure, which will be immediately made to this Department. The officer making the seizure will be held accountable for the goods while they are under his charge, and until they are disposed of according to orders from this Department.


BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Very fine.  


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, August 7, 1863


General Orders

No. 275


By an act of the General Assembly of the State of Iowa, approved September 11, 1862, the right to vote for certain State officers is given to Volunteers or soldiers from that State in the military service of the United States, and provision is made for the appointment of one commissioner to each regiment of Iowa Volunteers for the purpose of carrying out this act. It is hereby ordered that all such duly accredited commissioners from Iowa be furnished with proper facilities for visiting the Volunteers from that State, and allowed access to them for the purpose indicated.


BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:


E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Very fine.

War on the Mississippi, Grant's Vicksbur $20.00

 

classic tin – DINNER PAIL $95.00

 

1863 Order in Relation to Seizure of Goo $8.00

 

Order Regarding the Voting Rights of Iow $8.00




By James I. Robertson, Jr. and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1984. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with black and white photograph of a Civil War camp scene. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. There are a couple of small scratches on the front cover just above the camp kettle hanging at the center of the view. Otherwise the book is in new condition and looks like it has never been read. Excellent content pertaining to the everyday officers and men who fought in the Civil War.


The Cover: On a cold, drizzly day early in the War, Federal soldiers bivouacked near Washington, D.C., boil coffee and cook their rations over a campfire, while officers in a rain-drenched tent share a meal.   


<b>1864 letter written by General Whipple regarding the current state of affairs in Chattanooga, Tennessee during the winter of 1864. Comes with the original signed stamped envelope!</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by General William D. Whipple, to his wife Caroline. Comes with the original cover addressed by General Whipple in ink as follows: Mrs. Gen. W.D. Whipple, 56 Joralemon Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. Partial blue military C.D.S., Chattanooga, Ten., Jan. 18/64, with 3 cents rose George Washington postage stamp (Scott #64) with blue bulls eye cancellation. The envelope which is completely addressed in the hand of the general, to his wife, Mrs. Gen. W.D. Whipple, qualifies it as his war time autograph with rank.


<b><u>Chattanooga, Jan. 15, 1864</b></u>


My Darling Caro[line],


I would like to write to you oftener than I do, but there is no time that I can do so until late at night when I feel so completely tired out and my hand aches so that even if I wrote I think my letters must be exceedingly stupid. Your description of the delights of the children at Christmastime was very vivid and made me wish more than ever that I could have been there to have seen them. I ride every afternoon upon a white mare which I have bought. She has great speed and bottom, but is very timid and every dead mule and horse, and every mound of earth and frequently logs of wood cause her to wheel about in a twinkling so that my rides afford me not only exercise for my muscles, but exercise for my horsemanship. Day before yesterday a piece of paper came in with the name of H.M. McShields, Norristown written thereon. I do not remember ever seeing Mr. McMiller before, but I received him politely, invited him to dinner, and to come and stay at my house which I am glad he did not stay long enough to avail myself of and gave him a free pass to Knoxville where he was going. I wish I was with you to fix you in some place and then remain with you. I am very tired of this drudgery and intend making a desperate effort to get relieved from a portion of it. Otherwise I have visions of carbuncles and paleness and a general feeling of leanness and worthlessness. I am much obliged to you for the segars and sugar plumbs. They have not arrived. He was granted leave upon his mother’s "wailing appeal" as she called it in her letter to Gen. [George H.] Thomas. When you get an opportunity to send me something again you may if you please send a few collars 15 inches long, a white shirt or two, or a pair of woolen socks with the toes in them or a few napkins. If you have any of my old collars you can get new ones of the same size or I will send you one. All my old ones have serrated edges and threaten to saw my neck off. Day before yesterday our cars were greeted by the whistle of a locomotive engine for the first time since our occupation of Chattanooga. We have now a continuous line of railroad from here to New York and starvation no longer stares us in the face. No person except those connected with the army knows what our troops have suffered from, want of food and clothing, and as for our animals hundreds and hundreds of them are lying everywhere dead, and the living are but walking skeletons. As I was going to my quarters last night I saw an old horse attempting to make a meal off the pine weather boards of a house. He would gnaw off a few fine splinters, and then crunch them between his teeth. He is probably dead by this time. We came to the conclusion long since that the Rebs were starving and that we could starve as long.


Affectionately yours,


W.D.W. [signed by General Whipple with his initials]. [William D. Whipple]


Very neatly written letter in excellent condition. Very interesting content from General Whipple regarding the current state of affairs in Chattanooga, Tennessee during the winter of 1864.


<u>General William D. Whipple</u>: (1826-1902) Graduated in the West Point class of 1851, and then served on the Indian frontier in New Mexico and Texas. In 1861, he was on duty at Indianola, Texas, when the post was captured by the Rebels. He made his escape through the enemy's lines and managed to get to Virginia in time to take part in the 1st battle of Bull Run. Promoted to brigadier general, July 17, 1863, he served in the Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, the Middle Military Department, and the Department of the Cumberland. In late 1863 he was appointed chief of staff to General George H. Thomas and took part in all the operations of the Chattanooga, Atlanta, Franklin and Nashville campaigns.  

   


<b>United States Congressman from Pennsylvania</b>


(1793-1851) Born in Norristown, Pa., he attended Norristown Academy, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1820, and commenced practice in Norristown. He served as a Whig U.S. Congressman from 1847-51.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/8 x 3/4, in ink, John Freedley.  Illustrated here with a U.S. quarter for size comparison, this neat little period pewter whistle remains in pleasing condition with good evidence of pewter casting methods of the period with natural age patina that comes to this material with time.  Difficult to find nowadays, Civil War site digger/historians have well documented examples of the period style and material. Will lay in well in any period personal grouping. (see: <I>Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War</I> by Phillips)  As with all direct sales, we are pleased to offer a no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased! Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

Tenting Tonight, The Soldier's Life $10.00

 

Autograph, General William D. Whipple $200.00

 

Autograph, John Freedley $5.00

 

Civil War vintage PEWTER WHISTLE

A nice all original Patent June 4, 1861 / Nov. 5, 1864 desk pen stand and inkwell.  The spun brass base measures approximately 5 inches in diameter and is fitted with a pen stand of cast iron.  A glass ink reservoir is set in with a patent dated hinged pewter top.  All in nice original condition with natural age, uncleaned and with evidence of period use while remaining in nice original condition. A neat piece for the Civil War personal item and antique writing instrument collector.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

  

 H 23in. x W 31in. x 8in.  H 64in. x D 16in.  


5 1/2 x 8 1/2, imprint, with vignette of a spread winged eagle on a shield with the motto, National Union, State Sovereignty. Includes a handwritten A.N.S. at the bottom of the document by Adjutant General Hiram Hilliard who also signed the document in print.


General Headquarters, State of Illinois,

Adjutant General's Office,

Springfield, July 20, 1877


General Order

No. 5


I. Notice is hereby given to the present organized companies of the Illinois National Guard, that their Muster Rolls and Enlistment Blanks as required by law, must be forwarded to the Adjutant General's office on or before the 1st day of September proximo.


II. This order is rendered necessary for the reason that a General Inspection is about to be ordered by Gen. Wm. E. Strong, Inspector General, to take place in the month of September, and the Commander-in-Chief is desirous of completing the organization of the forces of the State prior to the above date.


III. Commanding officers of Brigades, Regiments, or Companies, are notified that no excuse will be received for a non-compliance with this order. The arms of all old companies not complying will be ordered in and the commissions of the officers revoked.


By order of the Commander-in-Chief,

H. HILLIARD

Adjutant General


Handwritten in a bold pencil hand by Hilliard at the bottom of the document is the following note: "Colonel I am holding on to your resignation. I believe you had better reconsider. Hilliard."


Very minor edge chipping to the bottom and left edge of the paper which does not affect any of the content.


Hiram Hilliard was a resident of Chicago, Illinois, when he enlisted on January 23, 1864, and was commissioned major in the field and staff of the 17th Illinois Cavalry. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on October 30, 1865; and mustered out of the service on December 15, 1865, at Leavenworth, Kansas. After the war he had a prominent career as an officer in the Illinois National Guard.

Civil War era Pat. 1861 - 1864 DESK PEN $175.00

 

CUSTOM LIGHTING $0.00

 

INDUSTRIAL LOOK FLOOR LAMP $0.00

 

Orders From Hdqtrs. of the State of Illi $10.00




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