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Their mark under the Continental Can Company name consists of three concentric letter Cs. So, these glasses were made between 1957-1978. The Continental Can Company purchased the Hazel Atlas Glass Company in 1957 but in 1964 12 of the 14 plants of Hazel-Atlas were acquired by the Brockway Glass Company. This mark thus dates these glasses are from the 1957- 1964. Continental Can retained the Clarksburg, West Virginia plant where they continued to produce the Hazelware product line until 1972 but I don't know if they included the CCC mark. In 1978, Brockway Glass Company announced the closure of the glass tableware division that it had purchased from Continental Can Company just six years earlier. Brockway Glass Company sold the Clarksburg, WV plant to Anchor Hocking Corporation, of Lancaster, Ohio. Anchor Hocking did not manufacture any of the Hazelware product lines.


Each glass stands 5 1/2 inches tall and holds 12 ounces. It has a 1/2 inch solid glass base which gives it great stability. The design is done in real gold. The three pheasants on each glass , both male and female are depicted in great detail. Know a hunter who likes a good cocktail? Buy a set now and save it to give it as a gift! 


So, which classic American cocktail would you make and serve in it?  This set was made by the New Martinsville Glass Manufacturing Company between 1932-1940. It is pure Art Deco included the characteristic stepped base and circles around the stem. This pattern was made in this deep green, red, amber, cobalt blue, pink, and clear.


I bought this set very reasonably so I intend to pass them on reasonably. In the 1999 book "Mauzy's Depression Glass" book, the are valued at $15-$20 each. My price for this great American Art Deco set is $40 for the set.  Though I normally post and sell more Midcentury glassware, I could not pass up picking up this set of gorgeous glass. It is interesting to note that in the "Midcentury" period, there was still an enormous amount of more "elegant glass" being produced by great American companies such as Fostoria, Cambridge, Heisey, Duncan & Miller, New Martinsville, and more. Typically this glass was also available in a full set of dinnerware and serving pieces as well. Growing up, each of my aunt's had their "pattern" of "good glass" which normally was only used for special occasions. 


The shapes of the barware were more traditional as were the designs on them. The expertise required by the workers at those glass factories to produce the designs on these glasses was paramount. In particular the etched patterns required a high degree of technical acumen. 


For every person who was buying "modern" glass in the 1950s, there was an equal even probably greater number of people buying these more formal glasses, now referred to in the antique trade among glass dealers and collectors as "elegant glass". This pattern, the Chintz pattern, produced from 1940-1973 was one of Fostoria's longest running and popular patterns. It came in astonishing variety of shapes and sizes. The stem used on these glasses is its 6026 stem. The etch is its 338 etch. On a popular replacement china and glass site, each of these glasses is listed at $14 each. I priced mine much lower in the hopes of getting it to someone perhaps whose family used this elegant pattern and it will evoke memories for them.


In any case, if you want an "elegant" glass to use for your cocktail needs, here you go.  Each of these glasses in this set of Russel Wright American Modern glass measures 5 inches and holds exactly t15 ounces to the brim. The color is seafoam, one of the four colors in which this line was produced by Morgantown circa 1951, but never marked. Excellent condition. No chips, flakes or cracks. See a description of the items in this line illustrated and priced in second edition Kerr, p. 238-239.


This line can also be seen in the 2000 Keller and Ross book titled Russel Wright, Dinnerware, Pottery and More on pages 183-185. Though this line of Russel Wright glass designs may indeed be the easiest to find today, it is still relatively difficult to locate examples in excellent condition. 

I purchased these glasses very reasonably so I am able to offer them at less than a 50% discount from the prices listed in Keller/Ross price of $22 each. The set is priced at $40 and will be at Barge Canal Market later today. Exact shipping from 05452 is available.


Add them to your Midcentury glassware collection or Russel Wright collection today. Price is for the set.

Vintage Midcentury signed Continental Ca

 

Set of 4 green New Martinsville Art Deco

 

Set of Fostoria Glass Company Chintz 4

 

Set of four Midcentury Russel Wright des

 Elizabeth graduated from the University of Vermont. She lives in Lincoln Vermont She founded York Hill Pottery in 1980. Susan Kuehnl joined her at York Hill Pottery in 1990. Prior to that, Susan had her own studio working as a painter. Susan lives in Starksboro Vermont. Because this piece is signed only with "E. Saslaw, Lincoln VT", I believe it was made between 1980-1990 before Susan joined York Hill Pottery.


Elizabeth throws and trims the pottery items. Susan then formulates the glazes, applies them, and paints on the decorative brushwork. Susan loads the pottery into the kiln; Elizabeth is in charge of the weekly firing.


It is a great example of the creativity and versatility of Vermont studio potters. It is in excellent vintage condition.  These four 4 3/4 inch tall vintage Midcentury tall champagne glasses features a geometric stem and a bowl and foot in gorgeous purple. 


The stem is Bryce's Symphony 1A stem.  Bryce made this line staring in 1955-57. Bryce stopped producing glass in 1965.


They would be a great choice for your classic or craft cocktails!  All in excellent condition.  IKEA?? I was surprised when I turned these glasses over and saw an etched IKEA 16918 Made in Poland stamp.


These rocks glasses are a very good copy of the original Midcentury size rocks glasses. They have a slight flare to them. The pattern of green diamonds circles the glasses and is connected. At four equidistant places along the pattern it swells to form a spriograph design. Think Etch-a-Sketch!! Although these are not yet vintage, they are attractive and practical.  The Impromptu Line was introduced around the same time as the Accent Line. It too was designed by Freda Diamond who was Libbey's head designer from 1942-1979. She was brilliant in her understanding of the American giftware market. It was produced in plain glass and with decorations on it from 1971-1982. 


Here is how it was described in the original 1971 catalog geared for wholesale dealers who carried Libbey glass: "The look of the future for the lifestyles of today. Casual, contemporary glassware design. Handsome, sculptured sidewalls feel comfortable …. easy to hold …. and look good, too! Offered in tasteful shades of Tawny, Olive, and new Dusky Blue. Put them on your shelves, Watch them move." 


It is hard to find this line in Dusky Blue color glass as it was only offered in this color in 1971-1973. I think cocktails look great in clight colored glass. Time to look up some vintage cocktail recipes and fill up these rocks with some vintage goodness!

Elizabeth Saslaw (Lincoln Vermont studio

 

Set of vintage Midcentury cocktail glass

 

pair of IKEA retro avocado green spirogr

 

Set of 4 Dusky Blue vintage Midcentury s

Set of four 4 1/4" Holly Leaves and Berries rocks glasses : Green holly leaves interspersed with red berries in a windowpane design form the decoration on these vintage rocks glasses! Yup, it is that time of year to dig out those eggnog based cocktails perchance. These glasses hold a lot! 13 ounces of liquor.....er, liquid. 


 Time to stock up not only the booze for your Holiday cocktail parties, but also why not go full retro and serve your guests in some American made barware, a real blast from the past. I guess the "blast" depends on what goes in the glass!


Is it too early for these? It is December 2. We have entered what we call "stick season" here in Vermont. The leaves are off the trees. The dominant colors of the landscape are brown, green, white, and blue. The dark green of the conifers are the main color now on the hillsides of Vermont. So.....it is time to bring some color indoors.   Oh, how I wish someone would love these elegant glass pieces as much as the original owner who bought them or received them as gifts, likely engagement or wedding gifts.

I rescued both of these 7 inch tall 10 optic goblets yesterday from the local thrift. They did not deserve to be there looking so elegant amid the riff riff. The connector is three sided and reminds me of a Greek column. The wafer connecting the stem to the foot is clear and has no pattern. The design is an etch and not wheel cutting. Hopefully when I add them to my mall booth or my online store for a very reasonable, someone will take them home. They are in excellent vintage condition.


Please. I would like them to go to someone who appreciates the artistry and craftsmanship it took to make them.  Elizabeth graduated from the University of Vermont. She lives in Lincoln Vermont She founded York Hill Pottery in 1980. Susan Kuehnl joined her at York Hill Pottery in 1990. Prior to that, Susan had her own studio working as a painter. Susan lives in Starksboro Vermont. Because this piece is signed only with "E. Saslaw, Lincoln VT", I believe it was made between 1980-1990 before Susan joined York Hill Pottery.


Elizabeth throws and trims the pottery items. Susan then formulates the glazes, applies them, and paints on the decorative brushwork. Susan loads the pottery into the kiln; Elizabeth is in charge of the weekly firing.


The piece is decorated with a pink flower with 4 green leaves on the diagonally place design with horizontal bands of green and light pink on a light pink background. 


It is a great example of the creativity and versatility of Vermont studio potters. It is now for sale for $18 at 5 Corners Antiques in Essex Junction, Vermont.  The Impromptu Line was introduced around the same time as the Accent Line. It too was designed by Freda Diamond who was Libbey's head designer from 1942-1979. She was brilliant in her understanding of the American giftware market. It was produced in plain glass and with decorations on it from 1971-1982. 

Here is how it was described in the original 1971 catalog geared for wholesale dealers who carried Libbey glass: "The look of the future for the lifestyles of today. Casual, contemporary glassware design. Handsome, sculptured sidewalls feel comfortable …. easy to hold …. and look good, too! Offered in tasteful shades of Tawny, Olive, and new Dusky Blue. Put them on your shelves, Watch them move." Time to look up some vintage cocktail recipes and fill up these smoky grey glass rocks with some vintage goodness!

Set of four Midcentury 4 1 / 4" Holly

 

Pair of 7" tall 1936-1953 Cambridge

 

Elizabeth Saslaw Vermont Potter floral d

 

Set 4 smoky gray vintage Midcentury sign

This 5 3/4 inch tall mixing glass with 7 vintage cocktail recipes and measuring scale was made by the Federal Glass Company most likely in the 1950s. The seven vintage recipes are: Gibson, Martini (of course), Tom Collins, Daiquiri, Bacardi, Manhattan, and Whiskey Sour. Above the recipes is a band of different types filled goblets or glasses for each recipe. I like the fact that all have bubbles coming out of them! On the side of the 12 ounce measuring scale it says: " Multiply Ingedients by Number of Drinks". Sure, I bet that sounds logical and easy until you make and consume one or two shakers full of cocktails..... I believe this mixing glass might have had another metal part when used as a set that fit over the top so that you can shaker it OR perhaps you transferred the contents into a cocktail shaker to shake and pour.


In any case, these are not hard to find but are a great American made Midcentury bar collectible. Excellent vintage condition.  This Kensington Deco #7032  16 1/4 inch tall  Kingston vase is another Lurelle Guild stunning design. It was designed in 1934 by Guild. The designs in the base perfectly complement the brushed Kensington aluminum. 


It can be seen on p. 35 of the 1997 Art Deco Aluminum: Kensington book by Paula Ockner & Leslie Pina. It was designed for medium-stemmed flowers. It was valued by the authors at $25-30 in 1997. 


It is in very good vintage condition. Although there are no dents, there are some minot marks  consistent with its age and use.  The piece is marked with the Kensington stag logo on its base. 


Add it to your Art Deco metal collection today.  This 8 1/2 tall cylinder vase was made by the Bitossi company of Montelupo Italy and imported into the US by the Rosenthal-Netter company as can be seen with the original paper label still attached to the bottom of this vase. 


I really like the way the orange flowers with red centers are painted on both the sunny yellow glaze portion and the brown glazed portion of the lid. It is in excellent vintage condition. Time to pass it along to a Bitossi Midcentury Italian pottery collector


It would look stunning on a Midcentury modern coffee table, teak wall unit or end table.  Noritake Viewpoint grey 1978-1983 set four 4 1/2 inch champagne tall sherbet:


Champagne or cocktails ... or dessert for four? Well, apparantly this is the very situation which the Noritake Company chose to address with the introduction of their 1978-83 Viewpoint line in this smoky gray color. This elegant line is highlighted by the use of a smoke gray glass bowl on top and a one piece body of the glass. They are simply stunning.


The smoky gray color was very popular in the late 1960s through the 1970s. It was used by Holmegaard in Denmark in Per Lutken's iconic line as well as by the Libbey Glass Company of Toledo Ohio and Morgantown in West Virginia. For Noritake, I believe this line was their attempt to stay current with the times.


This shape was marketed as a "champagne/tall sherbet" glass. Each stands 4 1/2 inches tall and the bowl is 3 7/8 inches across. It would look stunning in the right Midcentury decor. Add it to your vintage barware collection today.

Federal vintage red letters and graphics

 

Kensington Lurelle Guild design #7032 Ki

 

Bitossi Mid century yellow orange flower

 

Noritake Viewpoint grey 1978-1983 set fo

Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from designed by Gloria Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermon which was started by David & Gloria Gil in 1948. It is from the post1962 period when the mark included only the words Bennington Potters or only a shape number and the words Bennington Vermont.


This square 8 inch diameter trivet / plaque was advertised in the 1964 catalogue as 1563, a trivet which could also be hung on the wall as a plaque as it had a built-in wire on the back. This piece has no wire attached to it though I believe it once did have one. This piece is shown in the 1964 catalogue as and is titled there Fighting Cock. Its original 1964 price was $3.00. This was designed by Gloria Gil.


It features a Rooster proudly displaying. The green, gray and yellow glazes used for color on this piece pop because the background is a semi matter white glaze.


It two of the four original rubber feet which protect the flat surface upon which one sets it. It displays beautifully in a plate stand. It is signed 1563 only, marking it from the post 1962 Bennington Potters production.  It is in excellent vintage condition.  Couroc of Monterey History: Couroc was formed in 1948 by the husband and wife team of Guthrie Sayle Courvoisier (? - 1969) and Moira Wallace (~1910-1979) . Wallace was a gifted artist, whose early work included mosaic designs built from inlaid metal and plastic materials. Guthrie developed the technology further, and began Couroc company, which produced heavy, durable plastic trays with inlaid designs.


Guthrie Courvoisier had learned about plastic during World War II, when he was a contractor who manufactured certain plastic parts for airplanes. Like nearly all wartime plastics, Courvoisier's were probably jet-black, unlike the multicolored bakelite of decades prior.


In the mid-1950's the company's sales picked up, and it already had a few different designs in its product line. Sales seem to have been mostly in the California area at this time.


As the company slowly grew, it created numerous designs, and began expanding its product line beyond merely trays, so that customers could buy matched sets of trays, glasses, ice buckets, and even napkins. In the 1970's Couroc exploded in popularity, selling well in stores across the nation.


By the mid-1980’s, Couroc's popularity had dropped, and the company was shifting from producing items for the general public, to making promotional items (for sales to corporations or organizations commemorating special events.) In the 1990's, it turned almost exclusively to promotional items.


This Couroc 7 3/4 inch wide low bowl is in the famous Roadrunner pattern. It features one bird running around the center of the bowl. On the back is the original gold foil paper label which reads: "Couroc serving pieces are cherished gifts because of their variety and beauty of design. Hand inlaid by master craftsmen, shells, coins, woods, and metals are fused into satin black phenolic. They are impervious to alcohol or boiling water. Wash with mild soap and water."  toothpick holder: Crider 1987 threaded 


Terry Crider started his glasswork in 1976. He is self taught. This studio glass artist has put out a limited amount of work over the past 39 years. He uses NO MOLDS and his only help has been his wife Donna. I had an email from Terry and Donna a few years ago stating that he doesn't think it would be fair to the collectors to make any of the same things again. They have decided, if they do make glass again, they are not going to make anything that they have made in the past. He made glass part time from 1988-2000. In 2005, he began again to produce a limited amount of glass. He's a great artist with VERY few early pieces out there. This toothpick is in mint condition and is signed Crider and dated 1987 on the base. 


This Crider 1987 amethyst base glass with applied threaded decoration is in a bulbous base shape. It's hard to imagine the amount of work that went into this beautiful, hand made toothpick holder. 


This little toothpick holder stands 2 inches high. It is a fantastic piece of American art glass! It is in perfect condition.  This Georges Scatchard set of 4 early 4 inch tall coffee mugs is a good example of the work that Scatchard was doing in the 1970s and early 1980s before he decided to concentrate primarily on lamps. The inside is glazed in a white glaze. You can see all the ridges of the hand thrown object. The outside of the goblet is done in his signature blue glaze and one can see both inclusions and the horizontal rings from the throwing. Each mug is signed on the  bottom G. SCATCHARD. A beautiful set. 


Currently located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960. An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42. According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


His current website, gslamps.com, shows his current production and gives a brief history of his work.

Bennington Potters Gloria Gil 1563 Fight

 

Couroc Roadrunner 7 3 / 4 inch low dish $15.00

 

toothpick holder: Crider 1987 threaded

 

Scatchard set 4 monogrammed blue coffee

Made in the style that Fantoni often used, this charming little 4 1/4 inch diameter hanging plate is marked "Made in Italy".  


It features a design of a still life of a purple and orange wine bottle and a yellow piece of fruit or perhaps a round loaf of bread.


Much ware in this style was made in the San Marino area of Italy in the 1950s-1970s for the tourist trade.  It is in excellent condition.    


Put it up on the wall of your Midcentury bar  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. It is from the 1955-1960 period. Bennington by Gil started in 1948 . They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. They made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores but this is an earlier more studio inspired piece. 


Marked #1540 this is a stylized owl in a highly abstract style. David Gil designed a series of animal banks, including a hippo, an owl and a lion. Like Glidden Parker under whom he studied at Alfred University in the early 1940s, Gil used various animal motifs often on his ware, though most are two dimensional representations. This fun and funky owl stands 5 1/2 inches tall to the tip of its ears. the lower portion of the bank is unglazed with some impressed triangles to symbolize the rest of the owl's body. The head is glazed in one of the original Cooperative Design glazes. It has the original red plastic cork to seal the opening on the bottom. It is signed Cooperative Design Bennington VT which places it before 1960-61 as that was the time when Gil included the new Bennington Potters name in a transitional mark.  


this bank is in excellent condition with no damage.  I have priced this Sitting Owl bank very fairly. It would make a stunning sculptural piece on a McCobb or Eames era credenza or coffee table.


 David Gil was featured in the publication Vermont Life in its Winter 1961 issue. In an eight page spread with one full color image and 13 black and white images, there is a full history of the founding of the pottery along with great visual references of the ware being made at that time. One can see the iconic designs of Yusuke Aida, especially the double trigger mug and coffeepot along with other fascinating items. A great reference!  Annemarie Davidson (1920-2012) learned her enameling craft first from the great Doris Hall (1907-2001) in Cambridge, MA in 1957. In California she continued her studies with Curtis Tann. Her combination of geometric and organic form in her designs culminated in her most celebrated abstract designs, her Jewel line which features pieces of glass used to create free-form organic shapes which she calls Jewels. She also uses a sgraffito technique, incising straight lines from the center of her plate with the sharp point of a dart. This plate is highly unusual as it does not feature the radiating lines of many of her plates. Instead there is a speckled background of pink and white.


This 5 3/4 inch plate, most likely from the 1961-1962 time period, is unusual for its color and type of jewels used. This plate features 9 oblong clear jewels around a larger rectangular jewel with rounded corners. The shape of the plate mirrors the central jewel with its rounded corners. It is very unusual to have a plain background. The use of clear glass for the jewels is highly unusual. 


What is interesting about this particular plate is the geometric placement of the jewels.  


The back of the plate is signed with her charcteristic AD interwined initials. Due to the very square corners of the letter D, I feel this plate is from the 1961-1964 time period. Every piece was handcrafted by her alone, from start to finish. Excellent condition. 


The work of Annemarie Davidson was included in the seminal exhibit titled Painting with Fire which opened in Jan 2007 at the Long Beach Museum of Art. She was one of 30 enamelists included with a one page entry on her life and work. Her page is page 266 of the catalogue.  This large Noritake Nippon cake plate measures 9 1/2  inches across from the tip of the handle to the other handle. It is a standard Noritake shape, but it is unusual to see it NOT signed with the post-1921 Noritake mark but with lesser known green cherry mark. I would place this piece in the 1925-1930 time period as it is an interesting mix of Victorian flowers with the scarce pearl luster. The most interesting part of the decoration is on the rim where the use of negative space creates designs in white which is really the underglaze. Notice the way the flowers start in the blue luster rim and continue onto the pearl luster center ground.


It is very practical and functional piece of china and is ready for your holiday table.  The three floral cartouches are all hand-painted. 


It is in fair vintage shape. One can see a good amount of wear on the center ground when one tips the plate to the light. No chips or cracks though.  Add it to your Nippon or Noritake collection today.

Midcentury Italian small hanging retro p $20.00

 

Bennington Potters David Gil #1540 Owl b

 

Annemarie Davidson unusual pink jewel pl

 

Noritake Deco pearl luster cake plate

scarce signed 1972 Mark Peiser art glass vase.  Each of the four glasses in this set stands6 7/8 inches tall x 2 1/2 inches across the top.  Each holds 16 ounces.  Each has frosted glass on the sides and a clear bottom.  Each is signed with the F in the shield mark of the Federal Glass Company.


There are three different decorations visible on this set of four. Two have a pear, cherry, orange over a cluster of grapes. One has pineapple slices and three cherries over an orange slice over a basket of berries. The third variation is a lime and a lime slice over strawberries and cherries over a lemon slice over some leaves and a grapefruit and slice.


What a fun funky and festive set of glasses.  Wipe up a pitcher of sangria or just some iced tea, grab a tray and head for the patio or veranda. All are in excellent condition with strong colors and no damage to the silkscreened designs.  Price is for the set.


Go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of the past. It is ready for your home today.

 Made by well-known San Francisco artist Win Ng and signed with his name and San Francisco, this beautiful 4 3/8 inch wide low bowl is a masterpiece of enamel. A Chinese American gay artist, Win Ng (1936-1991) was the subject of a recent 2005 retrospective at the Chinese Historical Society of America.  


Win Ng worked in enamel early on in his career. His primary work was in ceramics and fine art. He later partnered with Taylor to create the well-loved and collectible series of Animal Orgy mugs as well as high end kitcheware which carried the Taylor Ng mark.


This particular bowl has a deep blue and gold flecked background onto which various sized jewels in shades of cobalt blue, pink, green and red.  What is unusual is that the red and blue jewels were fired as a second layer over the first, giving the piece incredible depth. The rim and the back was left in its original copper with no counter-enameling and carries his cursive Win Ng signature as well as the letter number combination B4. The piece is signed San Francisco as well, much like the way pioneer California enamelist Jade Snow Wong signed her pieces. There are some areas on the back of enamel loss due to rubbing, but the front is in excellent condition and is a good early example of Win Ng's career. Add it to your Mid Century enamel collection today.  This cute little fellow is a pin dish made by the Noritake Company in the 1935-1931 time period.  One can see it pictured in plate D.236 on page 130 of David Spain's 2004 Art Deco Noritake & More book.  this particular example has a white dog with red mouth and black nose and facial features.  The tray part of the dish is the harder-to-find Noritake yellow luster and the rim is done in matte black paint, a typical Noritake Art Deco treatment.


It is in excellent condition.  It is signed with the standard green Wreath mark.  Add it to your Noritake collection today.  In Spain's book, it is valued at $100-$180 but my price is much lower as I bought it extremely reasonably last summer.

scarce signed 1972 Mark Peiser art glass $400.00

 

set 4 Federal Fruit Slices zombie glasse

 

Win Ng 4. 5 inch blue jewel small dish

 

Noritake Deco figural dog pin dish

Annemarie Davidson (1920-2012) learned her enameling craft first from the great Doris Hall (1907-2001) in Cambridge, MA in 1957. In California she continued her studies with Curtis Tann. Her combination of geometric and organic form in her designs culminated in her most celebrated abstract designs, her Jewel line which features pieces of glass used to create free-form organic shapes which she calls Jewels. She also uses a sgraffito technique, incising straight lines from the center of her plate with the sharp point of a dart. Now in her late 80s, she no longer produces work today as of 2011 I have been told.


This 7 3/4 inch diameter low bowl, most likely from the 1960-1961 time period, is a good example of an earlier Ghostline piece. This plate features 3 large yellow gold jewels and 3 smaller pumpkin orange jewels, all symmetrically arranged on the plate. The lines are under the Jewels. A prominent Palm Springs CA dealer James Elliot-Bishop on his website has named this pattern as Ghostline. This particular example is unusual in that the two colors of jewels used are not in high contrast to each other as on many of her pieces. Also, this shape bowl was often used in the earlier 1958-1959 period.


The back of the plate has the gold paper label and is signed with her charcteristic AD interwined intiial. I believe this particular version of the label predates the more common one with the black line.  It reads Annemarie Davidson handcrafted enamels Sierra Madre California. Every piece was handcrafted by her alone, from start to finish. 


It is in excellent condition. 


The work of Annemarie Davidson was included in the seminal exhibit titled Painting with Fire which opened in Jan 2007 at the Long Beach Museum of Art. She was one of 30 enamelists included with a one page entry on her life and work. Her page is page 266 of the catalogue.  Made between 1895 - 1902, this Cosmos pattern cased pink glass pepper shaker is among those started while Consolidated was still in Fostoria, Ohio prior to their move to Pennsylvania. Excellent overall condition. 


This pattern was made circa 1895-1902. It is shown on page 43 of the Lechner Volume 2 book. It is in excellent condition.  It is listed as very scarce. Standard roughness on the neck under the original metal lid. 


Buy it for your antique glass salt shaker or early Consolidated collection today.


Find out more about collecting Phoenix and Consolidated Glass at our club website: www.pcgcc.org



I am a long time member of the Phoenix & Consolidated Glass Collectors Club and past President (1988) of the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Club. I guarantee the authenticity of this piece of Consolidated Glass. For more info on toothpick holders as a great collectible, visit the National Toothpick Holder Collectors Society web page at (www.nthcs.org)  Nancy Wickham signed modernist A507 numbered crystalline glaze vase with blue crystalline glaze on a tan base glaze background measuring 4 inches tall x 3 1/8 inch wide top opening.   


This vase dates to the early 1940s when she worked for Lee Rosen's firm Design Technics in New York City. It is considered to be very scarce.


Per the authoratative website vasefinder, Nancy Wickham Boyd studied at Alfred University from 1943-1945. She was later a designer for Design Technics. In 1949, she set up her studio in Woodstock, Vermont. This gorgeous vase is in excellent condition, no chips, cracks or breaks. Signed on bottom WICKHAM and A507. Add it to your Vermont Midcentury or Studio pottery collection today  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this single candleholder uses the stanard #74 wave underplate onto which a candleholder was sprigged. It measures 4 1/4 inches wide and stands 1 1/2 inches tall. It is most likely from Ballard's later production period. It carries the standard S. Ballard signature and the shape number 74. It is in excellent condition.

Annemarie Davidson 8 inch wide low bowl

 

Consolidated Cosmos pink cased pepper sh

 

Nancy Wickham signed Midcentury Vermont

 

Ballard #74 green candleholder

Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this 2 lite candleholder measures 6 1/4 inches long x 3 1/4 inches wide x 2 3/4 inches tall. 


It is from Ballard's midde period, I think, as it has heavy mottling of the blue overglaze and chocolate brown underglaze. It is signed S. Ballard and shape number 82. It had a matching console bowl in this wave shape.  It is in excellent condition. Add it to your Ballard or American Midcentury studio art pottery collection today.  Annemarie Davidson learned her enameling craft first from the great Doris Hall (1907-2001) in Cambridge, MA  in 1957. In California she continued her studies with Curtis Tann.  Her combination of geometric and organic form in her designs culminated in her most celebrated abstract designs, her Jewel line which features pieces of glass used to create free-form organic shapes which she calls Jewels. She also uses a sgraffito technique, incising straight lines from the center of her plate with the sharp point of a dart. 


This 6 inch shallow bowl features another of her celebrated designs. This design uses overlapping leaves of brown over orange on a gold background.   It can be seen in the seminal article by Alan Rosenberg in the Spring 2003 issue of David Rago's fine Modernism magazine on page 71. The dish shown in the magazine article is cobalt blue over a lighter blue and is circa 1960.  


The back of the plate is signed with her charcteristic AD interwined intiails and her paper label which reads Annemarie Davidson handcrafted enamels Sierra Madre California.  Every piece was handcrafted by her alone, from start to finish. It is in excellen condition.  It is an impressive enamel of Mid-Century enamel art! Add it to your Davidson or Mid-Century enamel collection today.


The work of Annemarie Davidson was included in the seminal exhibit titled Painting with Fire which opened in Jan 2007 at the Long Beach Museum of Art. She was one of 30 enamelists included with a one page entry on her life and work. Her page is page 266 of the catalogue.  

 This great example is most likely from the Raymor line of imported articles made in Italy for the American market.  Marked on the bottom in gold ink is B56 Italy. The covered cigarette box is extremely heavy. The bottom is a matte black glaze. The top has a tan background with yellow and black horizontal lines through it .  A very striking combination of colors and a very good Mid Century piece of pottery! There are some small chips to the black base on the inside of the box where the lid comes into contact with it, thus the reasonable price.  The top is undamaged .  Add it to your Raymor or Italian Mid-Century pottery collection today  Dating most likely from the Mid-Century era in California this little gem is made by the Freeman-McFarlin company mostly known for its ceramics. As you can see by the photo, it is clearly marked F Mc F and Calif USA along with what looks like the number 202. It is metal most likely copper with enamel highlights. It stands only 1/2 high and is  3 3/4 inches in diameter. It stands on three feet which are part of the body. It is in excellent shape. One can see a very similar piece on page 114 of Jack Chipman's excellent 1999 book called Collector's Encyclopedia of California Pottery Second Edition.

Ballard #82 2 lite blue brown candlehold

 

Annemarie Davidson enamel Starburst dish

 

Bitossi Italy covered cigarette box

 

Freeman-McFarlin Space age small vase $25.00

Annemarie Davidson learned her enameling craft first from the great Doris Hall (1907-2001) in Cambridge, MA  in 1957. In California she continued her studies with Curtis Tann.  Her combination of geometric and organic form in her designs culminated in her most celebrated abstract designs, her Jewel line which features pieces of glass used to create free-form organic shapes which she calls Jewels. She also uses a sgraffito technique, incising straight lines from the center of her plate with the sharp point of a dart. 


This 7 1/2 inch 3 rest ashtray, most likely is from the 1961-1962 time period. This ashtray features 3 large yellow and 6 smaller orange jewels arranged in pairs between the larger yellow jewels. The underlying copper color can be seen near the edges. A prominent Palm Springs CA dealer James Elliot-Bishop on his website has named this pattern as Ghostline.


The back of the plate is signed with her charcteristic AD interwined intiails and her paper label which reads Annemarie Davidson handcrafted enamels Sierra Madre California.  This is what I think is her earliest label with the black line separating the words handcrafted enamels and the words Sierra Madre, California. Every piece was handcrafted by her alone, from start to finish. Excellent condition. 


The work of Annemarie Davidson was included in the seminal exhibit titled Painting with Fire which opened in Jan 2007 at the Long Beach Museum of Art. She was one of 30 enamelists included with a one page entry on her life and work. Her page is page 266 of the catalogue.  

 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard, a student of Glidden Parker at Alfred University in the 1940s who worked in the Burlington area,  this signed number 6 with an underline under it to clearly indicate the number 6 instead of a 9 meaures 9 1/4 inches long x 4 1/4 inches wide at its widest point. Done in a turquoise glaze, it is most likely from his later 1960s production  period, as there is no chocolate rim band on the bottom of the piece. An unusual shape. Excellent condition.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this is a Ballard olive green  leaf shaped ashtray with the original label. The bottom appears to be unmarked or the mark is simply impossible to decipher. Early glaze.  Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard, a student of Glidden Parker at Alfred University in the 1940s who worked in the Burlington area, this unusual decorated #19 vase carried the standard incised Ballard signature and the original price in pencil of $2.50. 

 

It measures 5 1/2" tall.  The design on the front of the vase is of mountains and pine trees done in a dark blue glaze. The rim of the vase has also been traced over in the same blue glaze color, giving it an almost violet effect. The back is plain. This is the only item I have yet seen with this decoration. Excellent condition

Annemarie Davidson 7 1 / 2 Jewel enamel as

 

Ballard #6 low blue oblong bowl

 

Ballard #2 olive green leaf ashtray w / la

 

Ballard decorated #19 pine trees / mount

This cone shaped vase was made and decorated by Mark Bellaire, another great Californian Mid Century designer. 


This 9 inch tall vase features stripes of color, a chocolate brown and terra cotta red with a wild yellow blotch which could be the sun.  


It measures 3 inches in diameter at top and 5 inches in diameter at he bottom.


Signed with standard black signature. Two black outlined figures with raised arms  are on the vase. Excellent condition.  Ruba rombic smoky topaz 6' vase purchased at PCGCC convention auction. Excellent condition.  Sascha Brastoff 5.5't Abstract Original vase, signed F20 in with gold Rooster mark. Great combo of horizontal banding and crackle surface, all accented with horizontal gold banding. Excellent condition.  Royal Haeger #R1166 wild chartreuse biomorphic box done in a great chartreuse agate glaze. Box measures 10' long x 6' wide and 3' tall. Top has a  Russel Wright type early pinch handle recessed into lid to lift cover. Just a really funky Mid Century piece.

Mark Bellaire 9 inch abstract figures va

 

Ruba rombic smoky topaz 6 inch vase

 

Sascha Brastoff Abstract Original vase $125.00

 

Royal Haeger #R1166 wild chartreuse box.

Standing 3 inches tall, this lucite paperweight features a miniature roll of newspaper. Each end of the roll has a decal with the logo of the International Paper Co or Ticonderoga NY. It carries the words 'International Newsprint'. A great piece of Americana!   

International Newspaper 3 $50.00

  



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