Collector Online @ TIAS.com
  Register My Account
Shop Browse Sell Clubs Search Home
 
List of Items
Marcy Mayforth 1990s Purple Plumes vase:


Talented Vermont studio potter Marcy Mayforth of Lincoln has been creating colorful and practical pottery since the 1970s. I met her in a jazz dance class we were both taking in the late 1970s. She has exhibited in Frog Hollow for many years. Her wax technique outlines the elements of her design. 


This is a new design for me by Vermont studio potter Marcy Mayforth. It consists of four 2 section plumes, one in purple and one in light blue. I have never seen it before and I am very familiar with her wax designs. Marcy created these designs using the classical wax resist method. This 3 1/2 inch tall vase is signed simply with her MM initials. The background is a off white which really makes the design pop. 


This shape was also sold with a matching ceramic ball attached to a wick to use it as an oil lamp.  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from designed by Gloria Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermon which was started by David & Gloria Gil in 1948. It is from the post1962 period when the mark included only the words Bennington Potters or only a shape number and the words Bennington Vermont.


This square 8 inch diameter trivet / plaque was advertised in the 1964 catalogue as 1563, a trivet which could also be hung on the wall as a plaque as it had a built-in wire on the back. This piece has no wire attached to it though I believe it once did have one. This piece is shown in the 1964 catalogue as and is titled there Fighting Cock. Its original 1964 price was $3.00. This was designed by Gloria Gil.


It features a Rooster proudly displaying. The green, gray and yellow glazes used for color on this piece pop because the background is a semi matter white glaze.


It two of the four original rubber feet which protect the flat surface upon which one sets it. It displays beautifully in a plate stand. It is signed 1563 only, marking it from the post 1962 Bennington Potters production.  It is in excellent vintage condition.  Why not enjoy your bowl of hearty soup from a lug handled soup bowl created by one of the pioneers of the 20th century Vermont Studio Potters movement, working since 1960. 


This handled lug soup was created by George Scatchard in the 1970s. It stands 2 3/4 inches tall and measures 6 inches across from the tip of the lug handle to the other rim. 


He is located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960. An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42. According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


This lug soup is in excellent shape.


Add it to your American Studio pottery collection today.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard who worked in the Burlington area, this 4 1/4 inch high vase has a nice early green glaze on it. Excellent condtion.


It carries a #20 shape number. Add it to your American Art Pottery collection or Stanley Ballard collection today.

Marcy Mayforth 1990s Purple Plumes vase $20.00

 

Bennington Potters Gloria Gil 1563 Fight $25.00

 

Georges Scatchard 1970s lug soup bowl $16.00

 

Ballard #20 celadon green vase $26.00

This David Gil designed early ovoid striped mug Cooperative Design is signed with the 1960-1961 transition mark which includes both the words Cooperative Design and Bennington Vermont. It has five groups of vertical stripes (black, teal, tan). It stands 4 1/4 inches tall and 3 1/4 inches wide at the lip. Early mottled background glaze. Excellent condition.  Vermont studio potter Marcy Mayforth of Lincoln has been creating colorful and practical pottery since the 1970s. I met her in a jazz dance class we were both taking. She has exhibited in Frog Hollow for many years. Her wax techniques outlines elements of her design. 

This is one of my favorite designs by Vermont studio potter Marcy Mayforth. I own this design in two large mixing bowls and a very large low round platter. 

Marcy created these designs using the classical wax resist method. This 3 3/4 inch tall vase is signed simply with her MM initials. The background is a light celadon green which really makes the design pop.


This shape was also sold with a matching ceramic ball attached to a wick to use it as an oil lamp.  Made in  Bristol Vermont, this Moutain Kiln Pottery 5 inch tall blue maple syrup jug was made by either John F. Kennedy  or Paul T. Kennedy, brothers who formed Green Mountain Wood Crafters in Charlotte Vermont in 1937 and worked there until a fire in 1942. 


Post WWII, they were located in Bristol Vermont until 1959. They moved into the former Sheffield Farms building on Route 22A in Vergennes in 1960, adding a gift shop where tourists were able to watch the wood ware being made.  From 1960-1980 they had several retail locations in Florida, New York, New Hampshire but the most successful was in downtown Burlington at the corner of College and Church street, now Sweetwater's restaurant since 1980, though the Kennedy family still owns the building. 


The earliest piece I have heard of is a pitcher dated 1947. I do not yet know when the pottery stopped operating. I now know that whichever brother was not involved with the wooden ware Vergennes operation opened a store in New Haven, VT which was operating as late as 1971 when an acquaintance's grandmother stopped and bought some pottery marked as Pittsfield Potters there.


In excellent condition, it is glazed in a light blue glaze.  It is marked with the incised initials MKP and Bristol, VT.  Done by Lincoln Vermont potter Marcy Mayforth, this is a 1994 dated 5 1/4 inch tall pink tulip pitcher. The design is done in the sgraffito technique, then fill in as in an enamel piece. There are three pink and blue tulips blossoms on the piece, which is signed Mayforth 94 on the bottom. It is in excellent shape.


A beautiful piece by a well-respected Vermont potter whose work has been seen at Frog Hollow Crafts gallery in Burlington Vermont and Middlebury Vermont for many years.

Cooperative Design / Bennington Potters $45.00

 

Mary Mayforth wax resist Ying Yang circl $20.00

 

Mountain Kiln Pottery Vermont maple syru $18.00

 

Marcy Mayforth 1994 5 1 / 4 inch tulip pit $15.00

Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. It is from the 1955-1960 period. Bennington by Gil started in 1948 . They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. They made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores but this is an earlier more studio inspired piece. 


Marked #1541 this is a stylized pig in a highly abstract style. David Gil designed a series of animal banks, including a hippo, an owl and a lion. This was called Penurious Pig! Like Glidden Parker in the early 1940s, Gil used various animal motifs often on his ware, though most are two dimensional representations. 


This fun and funky pig stands 4 1/2 inches tall to the top of its back x 8 inches long. The main portion of the bank is unglazed with some impressed asterisks covering the pig's body. The asterisks are in turquoise, one of four colors possible. It has the original red plastic cork to seal the opening on the bottom. It is signed Bennington Potters Bennington VT which places it in the 1962-1968 time period. This particular example has very  thick glaze on the bottom so the marks are hard to see. This pig back was shown in a 1967-68 catalogue along with the other nine shapes. 


This bank is in excellent condition with no damage. I have priced this Penurious Pig bank very fairly. It would make a stunning sculptural piece on a McCobb or Eames era credenza or coffee table.


David Gil was featured in the publication Vermont Life in its Winter 1961 issue. In an eight page spread with one full color image and 13 black and white images, there is a full history of the founding of the pottery along with great visual references of the ware being made at that time. One can see the iconic designs of Yusuke Aida, especially the double trigger mug and coffeepot along with other fascinating items. A great reference!  Signed with her standard incised signature which uses only her last name, this 4 inch tall horizontally banded vase is glazed in purple on the inside and has two purple bands with blue highlights. The blue band around the widest part of the vase is a drip glaze. The body of the vase is actually a very pale green glaze. 


Judith, a Barnard College graduate,  lives in Lincoln Vermont and has been working in clay for over 35 years. She worked as Resident Potter at the Shelburne Craft School and at the Vermont State Craft Center when it was in Middlebury Vermont. She studied ceramics both in Boulder Colorado and Alfred, New York. 


Excellent condition. Add it to your Vermont studio pottery collection today.  Why not enjoy your tea or coffee from this hand-thrown beautifully glazed handleless mug or perhaps small vase created by one of the pioneers of the Midcentury 20th century Vermont Studio Potters movement?


This 3 1/2 inch tall handleless mug was created by renowned Vermont Midcentury studio potter George Scatchard. It has a deep cobalt blue interior glaze and his trademark brown glaze with 7 blue triangles on its exterior. 


It is signed with his characteristic G. Scatchard incised signature.


He was located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960. An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42. According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


Add it to your 20th century American Studio pottery collection today.  Why not enjoy your tea or coffee from this hand-thrown beautifully glazed handleless mug created by one of the pioneers of the Midcentury 20th century Vermont Studio Potters movement?


This 3 3/4 inch tall handleless mug was created by renowned Vermont Midcentury studio potter George Scatchard. It has a grey interior glaze and a blue glaze with brown tones on its exterior. 


It is signed with his characteristic G. Scatchard incised signature.


He was located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960. An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42. According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


Add it to your 20th century American Studio pottery collection today.

Bennington Potters David Gil #1541 Pig b $125.00

 

Vermont Studio potter Judith Bryant 4 in $40.00

 

George Scatchard Midcentury blue rings s $50.00

 

George Scatchard Midcentury blue rings s $40.00

Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. 


They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. They made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US by Raymore and sold in fine department stores.


This is #1463 and was called Crown Safety Ashtray in the 1964 catalogue. It measures 4 1/2 inches wide and stands 2 1/4 inches tall to the top of the crowns. This was produced in four colors: White, Turquoise, Charcoal or Brown. This is the charcoal color. It is marked with the Cooperative Design Bennington Vermont rectangle mark which is a transitional mark used from 1960 to perhaps 1961.  However this shape was still shown in the 1970-1971 catalog and I don't know if they changed the marks or kept the transitional mark on this piece.


David Gil, trained at Alfred University and profiled in the Winter 1961 issue of Vermont Life, started Bennington Potters in 1948 in Bennington, VT right after WWII. 


Condition is excellent -- no chips, cracks, nicks, flakes, stains or other damage / problems.  Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960), who graduated from Alfred University in 1939 and started his studio in the Burlington area in 1945, this #10 signed Ballard vase is a standard shape but done in one of his mottled glazes, this one being pink and black. The vase is glazed both on the outside and the inside in this mottled glaze.


The #10 shape vase stands10 1/8 inches tall and is 5 1/4 inches wide at top. The bottom tapers to a 3 1/2 inches square base. It is signed with Mark #10, putting it in the 1948-1956 time period in my opinion. 


The vase is in excellent condition. Add it to your American Art Pottery collection or Ballard collection today.  Ted Scatchard, along with his more prolific brother George, was profiled in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42. He graduated from Antioch College in 1962


He started from a converted horsebarn with his brother George in 1962, George having started producing in 1960. Both brothers used a "single firing" method.


According to the Vermont Life article on page 42, Ted "was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen. 


This four inch tall hand thrown vase features the standard brown gray glaze used by both Ted and George. He created three dots on the sides of vase by removing the glaze to reveal the chocolate brown unglazed surface below. 


The vase is in excellent condition. It is signed on the bottom with an incised signature: Ted Scatchard.


Add it to your Midcentury American Studio Pottery collection today.  Why not enjoy your bouquet of cut flowers in this hand-thrown beautifully glazed vase created by one of the pioneers of the Midcentury 20th century Vermont Studio Potters movement?


 This 6 1/4 inch tall conical vase was created by George Scatchard. It  measures  5 1/2 inches across.


He was located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960. An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42. According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


This conical vase is one of the most interestingly glazed Scatchard pieces I have seen this glaze is hard to find with its tones of blue and brown perfectly complementing the rings one can see that resulted from the throwing process. It is in excellent shape.


Add it to your 20th century American Studio pottery collection today.

Bennington Potters #1463 Crown Safety As $30.00

 

Ballard #10 square vase pink black mottl $125.00

 

Ted Scatchard 4 inch handthown studio va $50.00

 

George Scatchard Midcentury blue ring va $80.00

Why not enjoy your bowl of hearty soup from a lug handled soup bowl created by one of the pioneers of the 20th century Vermont Studio Potters movement. This handled lug soup was created by George Scatchard. It stands 2 3/4 inches tall and measures 6 inches across from the tip of the lug handle to the other rim. 


He was located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960. An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42. According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


This lug soup is one of the most interestingly glazed Scatchard pieces I have seen as the inside and outside have this mottled leopard-sking glaze to which he has added some blue glaze circles on the outside. It is in excellent shape.


Add it to your American Studio pottery collection today.  David Gil Coop Design 6 1/8 inch round x 3/4 inch deep plate with rough unglazed bottom and yellow tinted outside rim, signed with incised signature 'David Gil' and 'bennington'. The deeply incised mark and the dark base color of the clay seen on the back of the plate as well as the orange tinted rim place this plate into the early period for this 1240 shape series. Both the bottom and the bottom of the side rim are unglazed. 


The pattern of this plate is a very abstract one, depicting a Bull or Steer with horns. I have nicknamed this piece Lascaux Bull as it reminds me of the cave paintings there. In my 2013 interview with Gloria Gil, she stated that David Gil was inspired by the discovery of the Lascaux caves in France in 1940 and opened to the public in 1948, the same year David graduated from Alfred University and started Cooperative Designin Bennington Vermont.


The body is done in a simple line technique of blue and black. The eye is turquoise blue and there are two brown spots on the side of the animal. What is interesting about the brown spots is that you can also see hints of the turquoise blue color coming through them. The glaze over this must be a type of semi-matte glaze as the colors are muted.


This is a hard to find variation of this early period 1240 shape.


In addition to the standard early period david gil bennington signature, it also shows the outline of the original Raymor paper label which was placed right over the bennington signature. Excellent condition.  It was part of the Raymor line. Many of these early period 1240 plates are still found with an intact Raymor label or the shadow of the sticker. Gloria Gil told me that Raymor approached them in 1953. Their association with Raymor last 20 years until 1973.


David Gil started producing work in Bennington Vermont in 1948. They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters, then into the Bennington Potters company we have known since 1960 and still very much active today.


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.


In their 1964 catalogue, Gil described their creations as Art Objects in the Practical Realm" - Museum Honored, Hand-crafted, Modestly Priced.  Prior to changing the name to Bennington Potters around 1960, David Gil's company was known as Cooperative Design. There, he and other Alfred designers fashioned all sorts of interesting Mid-Century items. Having trained at Alfred University, Gil came to Bennington in 1948. His designs are included in many Mid-Century exhibits and catalogues. 


This is the #1342 rimmed covered casserole with metal bail handle. It is done in an early brown glaze. It measures 10 1/4 inches across x 7 inches wide. It has a lid which features a metal handle which was formed into the pottery. . It would make a great  baking and/or serving dish as. It's a good-sized practical dish. It would look great with your McCobb or Eames buffet.


The casserole bottom is marked 1342. The lid is marked 1342 C, most likely the C refers to it being the cover. It is in very good vintage condition. It was used to bake and cook in but there is no damage. There is a heat check on the bottom but that was there when it was made.  It  was there when I bought it and will be there when you buy it. I describe my items accurately. 


It is signed with the circular 1964-1968 mark which includes the words Bennington Potters.


Add it to your Bennington Potters or collection of Mid-Century pottery today.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


This signed and numbered #19 vase stands 5 5/8 inches tall. The glaze is a rich chocolate brown. Out of the 600+ pieces in my collection, I only own 5-6 pieces in this glaze.  In my opinion, this is a vase that was not glazed with an overglaze. There is no "chocolate brown band" at the bottom of the sides. The glaze is extremely mottled, particularly in the inside. 


Based on this mark I think it is closer to the 1948 date when Ballard started to use incised shape numbers as part of the bottom mark. 


This vase is in excellent vintage condition. 


Add it to your Stanley Ballard or American Studio Pottery collection today.

Georges Scatchard early glaze lug soup b $15.00

 

David Gil Bennington Bull Raymor #1240 p $75.00

 

Early Bennington Potters 1342 casserole $35.00

 

Ballard #19 early chocolate brown glazed $30.00

Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. 


They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. They made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US by Raymore and sold in fine department stores.


This is #1460 / #1460T and was called Crown Safety Ashtray in the 1964 catalogue. It is a two part design consisting of an underbowl that can be used separately and a top cover with the safety edge. The bowl measures 5 1/4 inches wide and stands 2 1/2 inches tall to the top of the rim.  The top crown sits on top of the bowl when it is used as an ashtray. 


This was produced in four colors:  White, Turquoise, Charcoal or Brown.  This is the iconic Turquoise  color. It is marked with the Cooperative Design Bennington Vermont rectangle mark which is a transitional mark used from 1960 to perhaps 1964.  


David Gil, trained at Alfred University and profiled in the Winter 1961 issue of Vermont Life, started Bennington Potters in 1948 in Bennington, VT right after WWII. 


Condition is excellent -- no chips, cracks, nicks, flakes, stains or other damage / problems.  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. It is from the the post-1960 time period when Gil began to use the words Bennington Potters on pieces after having used a transition mark which included both the words Design Cooperative and Bennington Vermont.


This fluted 9 5/8 inch diameter plate was advertised in the 1964 catalogue as B 1650 and titled "Greek Head", an ashtray which could also be hung on the wall as a plaque as it had a built-in wire on the back. Its original 1964 price was $5.00.


It features a very stylized Head with a stylized beard done orange. The 1964 ad states the this piece was available in white or turquoise with colored accents. The glaze I believe is an early white one as it is quite speckled with two shades of white. The eyes of the head have been painted green. and an orange stain used on the beard.


This is a confirmed David Gil design. It was confirmed by Gloria Gil in May 2012.


The back of the plate/plaque has a wire hanger which was embedded in the pottery. It is signed 1651 and has the spark mark on the forearm. I would guess it is from the 1960-1962 period. It is in excellent condition.


Bennington Potters are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard who worked in the Burlington area, this is an unusual shape for Ballard. It carries the shape number 24. The glaze is a green glaze which shows some of the chocolate brown underglaze at the rim. It is from his later period as there is almost no chocolate brown showing on the bottom rim of the vase. It is in excellent shape. 


Add it to your Ballard or American Art Pottery collection today.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard who worked in the Burlington area, this 10 inch long low planter was a typical shape of the 1950s, used to start bulbs or as a base for flower arranging or ikebana arrangements. It is in his earlier light green glaze. 


This piece carries the shape number 27 I think but the impression is a little bit unclear. It is in excellent condition and is from Ballard's middle production period as there is a band of chocolate brown underglaze visible at the bottom rim where it meets the bottom of the sides of the bowl.


Add it to your Ballard or American Midcentury studio art pottery collection today.

Bennington Potters #1460 Crown Safety As $50.00

 

Bennington Potters #1650 fluted plaque $80.00

 

Ballard midcentury green #24 oblong vase $35.00

 

Ballard #27 light green 10 inch low plan $18.00

This Georges Scatchard  4 3/4 inch handled jug is a good example of the work that Scatchard has been doing since the 1960s. The inside of the jug is a dark blue glaze. The outside resembles his standard glaze for which he is known but if you look closely there are some subtle undertones of purple in a few places. His handle is perhaps one of his trademark designs.


This piece is signed on the bottom G. Scatchard and the year 200?.  There is some damage to the bottom of the piece. I don't know if it was dropped or was a second.  It does not affect how the jug sits on a flat surface.


The outside of the goblet is done in a mottled blue glaze and one can see both inclusions and the horizontal rings from the throwing. A beautiful piece. 


His studio is located in Underhill, Vermont but he is currently no longer producing work as he recently sold his lamp business; he no longer has an open shop.


Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960. An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42. According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


So, go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of the past. It is ready for your home today.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


This signed and numbered #30/60 planter has an 4 3/4 inch square top rim and is attached to a plate which is 5 inches wide. The glaze is a soft aqua with the standard Ballard blended chocolate brown top rim. Excellent condition,


The attached underplate has a drain hole, making it perfect for your plants. Give your African violets a new Mid century home!


Add it to your Stanley Ballard or American Studio Pottery collection today.  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. It is from the 1959-1960 period when Gil  included both the words Design Cooperative and Bennington Vermont.


This square 8 inch diameter trivet / plaque was advertised in the 1964 catalogue as 1535, a trivet which could also be hung on the wall as a plaque as it had a built-in wire on the back. This piece is shown in the 1964 catalogue as and is titled there Eggs. Its original 1964 price was $3.00. I recently learned that the six 8 inch square flat tiles were all designed by Gloria Gil, David's first wife with whom he started the company in 1948.


It features 6 eggs in various stages. Done in an abstract stylized manner, the eggs are molded in relief and the incised areas are glazed in a very dark green and black. 


The back of the trivet/plaque has a wire hanger which was embedded in the pottery. It retains all four original rubber feet which protects the flat surface upon which one sets it. It is signed 1535 and has the spark mark on the forearm inside a rectangle made up of COOPERATIVE DESIGN and BENNINGTON POTTERS VERMONT. It is in excellent vintage condition.


Bennington Potters is among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.  Standing 3 3/4 inches tall x 4 3/4 inches wide at the base, this stunning piece of Vermont studio pottery was designed and made by Sally Duval, a longtime Vermont studio potters.  This 6 hole toothbrush potter has an underglaze of bluish gray, then two overglazes, one of a cream yellow color and the other a chocolate brown glaze.


It is in excellent condition. It is signed simply by her first name, Sally.


I have owned coffee mugs by Sally for 20+ years. I use them every day. They are sturdy and dishwasher friendly.

George Scatchard blue glazed signed jug $45.00

 

Stanley Ballard biomorphic Midcentury pl $35.00

 

Bennington Potters #1535 Trivet / Plaque $36.00

 

Sally Duval Vermont pottery toothbrush h $35.00

Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard who worked in the Burlington area, this #52 planter/vase measures 12 1/4 inches long x 3 1/4 inches wide. It uses his later turquoise blue glaze. This is the same basic shape of the earlier console center bowl but this shape does not have the three line stripes in the center. Excellent condition.


Add it to you American Mid-century studio pottery collection today.  This large bowl is decorated both on the outside and the inside with stylized fish in an abstract style. 

There are three fish on the inside and three on the outside. The bowl measures 9 1/2 inches across the top and stands 3 3/4 inches tall.  It is signed on the bottom with the signature of the potter, Bryant.


Add it to your Studio Pottery collection today. Go green! Save resources and purchase a piece of America's past. Sturdy, dependable, dishwasher-friendly, it is ready for your home today.  This Georges Scatchard early 8 1/2 inch tall  x 4 3/4 inch wide at the base vase is a great example of the work that Scatchard was doing in the 1970s and early 1980s before he decided to concentrate primarily on lamps. The inside of the rim shows the glaze which he used on the outside of the mug. You can see all the ridges of the hand thrown object.  The outside of the vase is done in tans and beiges and one can see both inclusions and the horizontal rings from the throwing.  The vase is signed on the unglazed bottom G. SCATCHARD . A beautiful piece. 


Currently located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960.  An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42.  According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


His current website, gslamps.com, shows his current production and gives a brief history of his work.   Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard who worked in the Burlington area, this biomorphic shaped bowl carries shape number 6 on the bottom. It measures 12 inches long at its longest point, stand 1 1/2 inches high and is 4 1/2 inches wide at its widest point. 


It is decorated in one of Ballard's favorite glazes, his mottled glazes. This one is white on brown.  


Add it to your Ballard or American Studio Pottery collection today.

Ballard #52 large blue console bowl $28.00

 

Bryant Fish decorated bowl $35.00

 

Georges Scatchard early 8. 5 inch tall va $100.00

 

Ballard #6 brown white mottled long dish $30.00

This Georges Scatchard early 4 1/4 inch tall  x 4 1/4 inch wide at the mouth planter / vase is a good example of the work that Scatchard was doing in the 1970s and early 1980s before he decided to concentrate primarily on lamps. The inside of the rim shows the glaze which he used on the outside of the mug. You can see all the ridges of the hand thrown object.  The outside of the goblet is done in tans and beiges and one can see both inclusions and the horizontal rings from the throwing.  The mug is signed on the unglazed bottom G. SCATCHARD . A beautiful piece. 


Currently located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960.  An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42.  According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


His current website, gslamps.com, shows his current production and gives a brief history of his work.   Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area,  this 3 1/4 inch high vase very irregularly shaped vase is part of a two piece set. It has a matching vase that when set side by side,  the two pieces interlock to form a wider planter. Excellent condtion.


It carries a #12 shape number and Mark #8.  Add it to your American Art Pottery collection or Stanley Ballard collection today.  Nancy Wickham signed modernist A507 numbered crystalline glaze vase with blue crystalline glaze on a tan base glaze background measuring 4 inches tall x 3 1/8 inch wide top opening.   


This vase dates to the early 1940s when she worked for Lee Rosen's firm Design Technics in New York City. It is considered to be very scarce.


Per the authoratative website vasefinder, Nancy Wickham Boyd studied at Alfred University from 1943-1945. She was later a designer for Design Technics. In 1949, she set up her studio in Woodstock, Vermont. This gorgeous vase is in excellent condition, no chips, cracks or breaks. Signed on bottom WICKHAM and A507. Add it to your Vermont Midcentury or Studio pottery collection today  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington areaa, this 5 1/8 inch square dish is a very early studio piece as it carries no shape number and was most likely hand formed.


 It has a very heavily mottled light green glaze over a chocolate brown underglaze and sloping sides. A great example of Ballard's glaze and early shape. It is in excellent condition.


Add it to your American Art Pottery or Studio Pottery or Stanley Ballard collection today.

Georges Scatchard early 4 inch tall vase $40.00

 

Ballard #12 light green puzzle vase $20.00

 

Nancy Wickham signed Midcentury Vermont $400.00

 

Ballard early studio 5 1 / 8 inch square d $15.00

Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this shape seems to be one of the early ones by Ballard which didn't make it to the later production period.


 The vase measures 5 1/2 inches high x 5 1/4 inches wide. The opening is 4 1/4 inches long x 2 3/8 inches wide. Each one I own either has no shape number or is number 21 with the early chocolate brown band around the bottom dating it from his middle period of production. This vase carries both the shape number and the Ballard signature but they are very faint. 


The chocolate underglaze can be seen at the top, the inside, and underneath the mottling on the body. This early white glaze is stunning. The glaze is a standard early shade of blue he used often. The vase is in excellent condition. 


A very interesting shape and glaze combo by Stanley Ballard. Add it to your American Art Pottery collection or Studio pottery collection today.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this 10 1/2 inch diameter bowl is the largest of the three sizes he made in this piecrust bowl form. 


It is a very early piece with the indented base. A deep mottled chocolate brown mottled glaze on it which matches the early signed 1945 vase in the collection. Excellent condition.  Made by the Muncie Pottery Company of Muncie Indiana, this #404 6 inch tall vase in the desirable matte white over rose glaze is marked with the MUNCIE incised mark as well as the IA mark which is identical to the one shown on page 33 of the 1999 Muncie Pottery book by Jon Rans and Marck Eckelman.


This lovely glaze combination highlights the lobed shape well.  It is in excellent condition. Add it to your American Art Pottery, Art Deco or Muncie Pottery collection today.  Made in  Bristol Vermont, this Moutain Kiln Pottery 4 inch square 4 rest ashtray was made by either John F. Kennedy  or Paul T. Kennedy, brothers who formed Green Mountain Wood Crafters in Charlotte Vermont in 1937 and worked there until a fire in 1942. 


Post WWII, they were located in Bristol Vermont until 1959. They moved into the former Sheffield Farms building on Route 22A in Vergennes in 1960, adding a gift shop where tourists were able to watch the wood ware being made.  From 1960-1980 they had several retail locations in Florida, New York, New Hampshire but the most successful was in downtown Burlington at the corner of College and Church street, now Sweetwater's restaurant since 1980, though the Kennedy family still owns the building. 



The earliest piece I have heard of is a pitcher dated 1947. I do not yet know when the pottery stopped operating. I now know that whichever brother was not involved with the wooden ware Vergennes operation opened a store in New Haven, VT which was operating as late as 1971 when an acquaintance's grandmother stopped and bought some pottery marked as Pittsfield Potters there.


In excellent condition, it is glazed in a multi-hued green-blue glaze. The base clay appears to be a red eartheware. It is marked with the incised initials MKP and Bristol, VT.

Ballard blue #21 ovoid top rectangular $25.00

 

Ballard early piecrust rim 10 inch glaze $75.00

 

Muncie Pottery 404 White over Rose Matte $90.00

 

Mountain Kiln Pottery Vermont 4 inch ash $20.00

Standing 4 1/4 inches tall x 3 1/2 inches wide, this Vermont contemporary deepy incised decorated covered jar was made by Patrick Kennedy of Newark Vermont as his label on the bottom clearly states.  He also has a stamped symbol which I can see now is a conjoined P and K to form his stamp.  


This is a covered jar glazed on the inside but left rough on the outside.  The deep chocolate brown layer can be seen through the cameo cuttings on the outside layer. Very interesting. I could find little on the artist. If you have any information, please pass it along.


Add it to your Vermont Art Pottery or Contemporary Pottery collection today.  This Georges Scatchard early 5 inch tall x 7 3/4" wide hanging planter is a good example of the work that Scatchard was doing in the 1970s and early 1980s before he decided to concentrate primarily on lamps. The rim has three holes for hanging. Ah, remember macramé!! There are another three drainage holes in the bottom of the planter which would carry excess water to the attached underplate. The inside rings clearly on this hand thrown piece as well as the body of the stoneware itself and where the drip glaze was place. You can see all the ridges of the hand thrown object. The outside of the goblet is done in tans and beiges and one can see both inclusions and the horizontal rings from the throwing. The overglaze on this piece is done in shades of blues and greens and has an abstract design. The plnater is signed on the unglazed bottom G. SCATCHARD. A beautiful early piece. 


Currently located in Underhill, Vermont, Georges Scatchard started from a converted horsebarn with his brother Ted in 1960. An article about the two Scatchard brothers and their ceramics was published in the 1967 Spring issue of Vermont Life on pages 38-42. According to the article, he was the only New Englander to receive a merit award for three items (all pottery) entered in the 1965-1966 New England Craft Council's exhibition for new and emerging craftsmen.


His current website, gslamps.com, shows his current production and gives a brief history of his work.  Here is a whimsical modern stoneware piece from the late David Gil at Bennington Potters in Vermont. started by David Gil in 1948. It is from the pre-1960 time period when Gil used only the words Design Cooperative, or in this case only the letters CO OP around the hand mark.


David Gil Coop Design #1202 7 inch teardrop French horn player in signature teal glaze, with the COOP Man/hand logo. rough unglazed rim. There is still a shadow that can be seen of the Raymor paper label on bottom which states: MODERN in the Tradition of Good Taste: Raymor, designed by David Gil for Cooperative Design. The label is present on a few of the other four designs in this teardrop series. Excellent condition.



I recently learned that when Gil decided to mark his works with shape numbers, he started with the number 1300. However, if an earlier design was to remain in production, they marked it with a number starting with 1200. This explains the numbering and mark on the transition pieces.


They are among the few American studio potteries that turned into production potteries in the midcentury. It evolved into a co-operative of different art potters. 


After 1960, they made their bread and butter by making gorgeous modern styled dinnerware that was distributed throughout the US and sold in fine department stores.


In their 1964 catalogue, Gil described their creations as "Art Objects in the Practical Realm" - Museum Honored, Hand-crafted, Modestly Priced,"

 Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this #1 size small ashtray is from Ballard's earliest studio period. It features the earliest blue glaze over the chocolate underglaze. It has no number but has the earliest embossed in relief Ballard 1945 signature with the long tail. Excellent condition.

Patrick Kennedy Newark Vermont covered j $50.00

 

Scatchard early studio large hanging pla $60.00

 

David Gil Coop design teardrop French Ho $75.00

 

Ballard early 1945 #1 4 rest ashtray $19.00

Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this #58 round footed planter vase stands 3 3/8 inches tall and is 3 3/4 inches wide at the top.  It is in a deeply mottled white glaze over chocolate. The signature is a very early one as it is incised and not molded.  These round shapes did not make it into Ballard's later production ware, post 1946.  It is in excellent condition. Add it to your Ballard or Midcentury American pottery collection today.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this is a Ballard #50 3 Fish decorated square top vase.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this Ballard squat bulbous mustard white vase with heavy mottling is one of Ballard's earliest examples I have found to date. I have another example of this shape which has the date 1945 on it. This vase has the recessed base and the S. Ballard in relief signature without the word Vermont which would come later. It is most likely from either 1945 or 1946. It also has a #10 in red pencil on it as well as three initials.


It stands 6 1/2 inches tall. The opening at the top is 3 1/2 inches. The glaze is the very early mustard white over the chocolate brown with very heavy mottling on the outside of the piece. The inside of the vase is glazed with the white glaze also. It is a great example of Ballard's early work. It is in excellent condition.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there under these influential teachers: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this shape seems to be one of the early ones by Ballard which didn't make it to the later production period. The vase measures 5 1/2 inches high x 5 1/4 inches wide. The opening is 4 1/4 inches long x 2 3/8 inches wide. Each one I own either has no shape number or is number 21 with the early chocolate brown band around the bottom dating it from his middle period of production. The chocolate underglaze cannot easily  be seen at the top and underneath the mottling on the body as the leopard skin overglaze extends to the bottom of the vase. This early black leopard glaze is stunning. It is heavily mottled and covers the entire vase inside and outside except the base. The vase is in excellent condition. A very interesting shape and glaze combo by Stanley Ballard. Add it to your American Art Pottery collection or Studio pottery collection today.

Ballard #58 early footed round planter v $45.00

 

Ballard #50 3 Fish decorated square top $250.00

 

Ballard bulbous studio mottled white vas $125.00

 

Ballard #21 ovoid top rectangular vase $45.00

<b>Decorative oriental multicolored bowl with gold trim designs.


This is the perfect accent bowl for small snacks such as peanuts, cashews, mixed nuts.  



Maker: Unknown

Mark: 8158  Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960), who studied at Alfred University under some influential teachers while there: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson. He graduated from the highly respected Ceramic Program  of Alfred University in 1939 and started his studio in the Burlington area in 1945.  


This #43 biomorphic low freeform bowl measures 10 inches long x 6 inches wide. It has the rooster pattern which stands 7 inches tall. Excellent condition.


This is one of three patterns in the Animal Line. Along with the rooster/hen, there is Horse and Fish. I love the whimsical depiction of this hen.  <b>


This Lekythos style vase is reminscent of ancient Greek artifacts.  


Original use:

This vase was a flask used for toilet oils, perfume, or condiments, and also appears in funerary contexts, where it was used to pour libations for the dead or was left on the grave as an offering.



Made by Napco of Bedford, Ohio.

Numbered: 2B-5516


Color: Clay


Distressed design  <b>


This Lekythos style vase is reminscent of ancient Greek artifacts. 


Original use:

This vase was a flask used for toilet oils, perfume, or condiments, and also appears in funerary contexts, where it was used to pour libations for the dead or was left on the grave as an offering.



Made by Napco of Bedford, Ohio.

Numbered: 2B-5516


Color: Dark Green


Distressed design

Small Vintage Lotus Bowl $12.95

 

Ballard #43 rooster decorated low freefo $75.00

 

1960s Handpainted Acropolis Vase by Napc $14.95

 

1960s Handpainted Acropolis Vase by Napc $14.95




<b>Design: Queen's face and neckline.


Color: Off white


Marked:  I can not make mark out, but it is numbered 8309  


<b>Design: Fruit pattern - Embossed


Beautifully designed shallow bowl with scalloped edging.  The depth is approx. 2.25 inches. 


 Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


Ballard turquoise blue or aqua  leaf shaped ashtray with the original label. The standard incised #2 number and Ballard name are on the bottom along with the original $1.75 price. Excellent condition.  Vermont Studio potter Stanley Ballard (1917-1960) graduated from Alfred University’s highly respected Ceramic Program in 1939, having studied there while these influential teachers were part of the faculty: Marion Fosdick, Charles Harder, Clarence Merritt, and C. Katherine Nelson.


 From 1937-1939 he was a classmate of Glidden Parker. He had his studio in Burlington Vermont from 1946 -1960 until his untimely tragic death in February 1960. 



 Produced by Vermont Mid-Century studio potter Stanley Ballard  who worked in the Burlington area, this Ballard #1 brown white mottled ashtray

Figural Queens Cup $6.50

 

Claire Burke Shallow Bowl $24.99

 

Ballard #2 turquoise leaf shaped ashtray $20.00

 

Ballard #1 brown white mottled ashtray $15.00




<b>Small expressive multi-colored spatterware bowl is a treat for the eyes and the hands with its vivid colors and varied textures.  


<u>Colors:</u>  

Green, Yellow, Black, Orange and White.


Maker: Unknown   

Handcrafted Impressionist Bowl - Small $4.75

  



< prev 1 next >
   About Collector Online™ | Registering | Advertise With UsTrust & Safety Program
   Announcements | Security & Privacy | Terms of Use
  
  Contact Customer Support
Copyright 1997-2018 TIAS.com. All rights reserved.